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Viewing 1 to 30 of 509
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2402
Yoshinori Otsuki, Shigemi Tochino, Kenji Kondo, Kazuhiko Haruta
Abstract Fine particle emissions from engine exhaust have attracted attention because of concern of their higher deposition fraction in alveoli. Since it was observed that sizes of solid particles in exhaust of conventional internal combustion engine technologies are mainly distributed above 30 nm and the mainly irreproducible sensitivity to volatile particles can be reduced, the current solid particle number (PN) measurement methodology was targeted to PN emissions particles larger than 23 nm. The necessity of the measurement of particles smaller than 23 nm is now under discussion. It is also surmised that there is difference between emissions under regulatory defined test cycles and real driving conditions. Currently, implementation of further real driving emission regulations utilizing portable emissions measurement systems (PEMS) is in place for the EU and being actively discussed in other regions.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2388
Ahmad Khalfan, Gordon Andrews, Hu Li
Abstract The emissions from vehicles in real world driving are of current concern, as they are often higher than on legislated test cycles and this may explain why air quality in cities has not improved in proportion to the reduction in automotive emissions. This has led to the Real Driving Emissions (RDE) legislation in Europe. RDE involves journeys of about 90km with roughly equal proportion of urban, rural and motorway driving. However, air quality exceedances occur in cities with urban congested traffic driving as the main source of the emissions that deteriorate the air quality. Thus, the emissions measured on RDE journeys may not be relevant to air quality in cities. A Temet FTIR and Horiba exhaust flow measurement system was used for the mass emissions measurements in a Euro 4 SI vehicle. A 5km urban journey on a very congested road was undertaken 29 times at various times so that different traffic congestion was encountered.
2017-09-11
Technical Paper
2017-01-5008
Glenn W. Passavant
As part of an effort to shift focus from the emissions performance of pre-production prototypes in certification to the emissions performance of in-use vehicles, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) instituted the “CAP 2000” program. As part of that program, manufacturers are required to retrieve customer-operated in-use vehicles and test their emissions. The EPA and CARB rules contain specific sample size and mileage criteria. The program has been in place for over 15 model years. This paper examines the in-use performance results for 3115 refueling tests, 3844 hot soak+2-day diurnal evaporative emission tests covering five sets of regulatory emission standards, and evaluates several related regulatory issues such as in-use durability and the effectiveness of evaporative on-board diagnostic (OBD) systems.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0986
Mohd Azman Abas, Shaiful Fadzil Zainal Abidin, Srithar Rajoo, Ricardo Martinez-Botas, Muhammad Izzal Ismail
Abstract Engine stop/start and cylinder deactivation are increasingly in use to improve fuel consumption of internal combustion engine in passenger cars. The stop/start technology switches off the engine to whenever the vehicle is at a stand-still, typically in a highly-congested area of an urban driving. The inherent issue with the implementation of stop/start technology in Southeast Asia, with tropical climate such as Malaysia, is the constant demand for the air-conditioning system. This inevitably reduces the duration of engine switch-off when the vehicle at stop and consequently nullifying the benefit of the stop/start system. On the other hand, cylinder deactivation technology improves the fuel consumption at certain conditions during low to medium vehicle speeds, when the engine is at part load operation only.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0988
Michael Cunningham, Mi-Young Kim, Venkata Lakkireddy, William Partridge
Abstract Measuring axial exhaust species concentration distributions within a wall-flow aftertreatment device provides unique and significant insights regarding the performance of complex devices like the SCR-on-filter. In this particular study, a less complex aftertreatment configuration which includes a DOC followed by two uncoated partial flow filters (PFF) was used to demonstrate the potential and challenges. The PFF design in this study was a particulate filter with alternating open and plugged channels. A SpaciMS [1] instrument was used to measure the axial NO2 profiles within adjacent open and plugged channels of each filter element during an extended passive regeneration event using a full-scale engine and catalyst system. By estimating the mass flow through the open and plugged channels, the axial soot load profile history could be assessed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0984
Wenran Geng, Diming Lou, Ning Xu, Piqiang Tan, Zhiyuan Hu
Abstract Recently Hybrid Electric Buses (HEBs) have been widely used in China for energy saving and emission reduction. In order to study the real road emission performance of HEBs, the emission tests of an in-use diesel-electric hybrid bus (DHEB) are evaluated both on chassis dynamometer over China City Bus Cycles (CCBC) and on-road using Portable Emissions Measurement Systems (PEMS). The DHEB is powered by electric motor alone at speed of 0~20km/h. When the speed exceeds 20km/h, engine gets engaged rapidly and then works corporately with the electric motor to drive the bus. For chassis dynamometer test over CCBC, emissions of NOx, particulate number, particulate mass, and THC of the DHEB are 7.68g/km, 5.88E+11#/km, 0.412mg/km, and 0.062g/km, respectively. They have all decreased greatly compared to those of the diesel bus. But the CO emission which is 3.48g/km has increased significantly.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0992
Dereck Dasrath, Richard Frazee, Jeffrey Hwang, William Northrop
Abstract Partially premixed low temperature combustion (LTC) in diesel engines is a strategy for reducing soot and NOX formation, though it is accompanied by higher unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions compared to conventional mixing-controlled diesel combustion. In this work, two independent methods of quantifying light UHC species from a diesel engine operating in early LTC (ELTC) modes were compared: Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). A sampling system was designed to capture and transfer exhaust samples for off-line GC-MS analysis, while the FT-IR sampled and quantified engine exhaust in real time. Three different ELTC modes with varying levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) were implemented on a modern light-duty diesel engine. GC-MS and FT-IR concentrations were within 10 % for C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, and C2H4O. While C3H8 was identified and quantified by the FT-IR, it was not detected by the GCMS.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0991
Sunil Kumar Pathak, Yograj Singh, Vineet sood, Salim Abbasbhai Channiwala
Abstract Vehicles are tested in controlled and relatively narrow laboratory conditions to determine their type approval emission values and reference fuel consumption. Some studies have shown that real world driving emissions are much higher as compared to laboratory measurements. The difference was caused by two important factors, i.e. ambient conditions (temperature and altitude) and actual real-world driving cycles. For this reason, the European Commission had constituted a working group which developed a complementary Real-Driving Emissions (RDE) test procedure using the Portable Emissions Measurement Systems (PEMS). RDE test will verify gaseous pollutant and particle number emissions during a wide range of normal operating conditions on the road. In RDE test specific boundary conditions of the temperatures, classified as moderate (0 ≤Tamb < 30), Extended (low): -7 ≤Tamb < 0 and Extended (high): 30
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0998
Kurtis James Irwin, Jonathan Stewart, Roy Douglas, Andrew Woods, Richard O’Shaughnessy, Andrew Pedlow, Rose Mary Stalker
Abstract Accelerated aging of automotive catalysts has become a routine process for the development of new catalytic formulations and for homologation of vehicle emissions. In the standard approach, catalyst samples are subjected to temperatures in excess of 800°C on a predefined test cycle and aged for precise timescales representative of certain vehicle mileage. The high temperature feed gas is traditionally provided by a large gasoline engine but, increasingly, alternative bench-aging techniques are being applied as these offer more precise control and considerable cost savings, as well as offering more development possibilities. In the past few years, emissions control of light duty vehicles has become increasingly prominent as more stringent emissions legislations require more complex after-treatment systems. Aging of the catalysts are not fully understood as they are subjected to many varying environments, including temperature and gas concentrations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1004
Jan Czerwinski, Pierre Comte, Norbert Heeb, Andreas Mayer, Volker Hensel
Abstract In the present paper some results of investigations of nanoparticles from five DI gasoline cars are represented. The measurements were performed at vehicle tailpipe and in CVS-tunnel. Moreover, five variants of “vehicle - GPF” were investigated. These results originate from the project GasOMeP (Gasoline Organic & Metal Particulates), which focused on metal-nanoparticles (including sub 20nm) from gasoline cars with different engine technologies. The PN-emission level of the investigated GDI cars in WLTC without GPF is in the same range of magnitude very near to the actual limit value of 6.0 × 1012 #/km. With the GPF’s with better filtration quality, it is possible to lower the emissions below the future limit value of 6.0 × 1011 #/km. There is no visible nuclei mode and the ultrafine particle concentrations below 10mm are insignificant. Some of the vehicles show at constant speed operation a periodical fluctuation of the NP-emissions, as an effect of the electronic control.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1000
Jong Lee, Yu Zhang, Tom Tzanetakis, Michael Traver, Melanie Moses-DeBusk, John Storey, William Partridge, Michael Lance
Abstract Greenhouse gas regulations and global economic growth are expected to drive a future demand shift towards diesel fuel in the transportation sector. This may create a market opportunity for cost-effective fuels in the light distillate range if they can be burned as efficiently and cleanly as diesel fuel. In this study, the emission performance of a low cetane number, low research octane number naphtha (CN 34, RON 56) was examined on a production 6-cylinder heavy-duty on-highway truck engine and aftertreatment system. Using only production hardware, both the engine-out and tailpipe emissions were examined during the heavy-duty emission testing cycles using naphtha and ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuels. Without any modifications to the hardware and software, the tailpipe emissions were comparable when using either naphtha or ULSD on the heavy duty test cycles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0997
Roberto Aliandro Varella, Gonçalo Duarte, Patricia Baptista, Luis Sousa, Pablo Mendoza Villafuerte
Abstract The gap between regulated emissions from vehicle certification procedures and real-world driving has become increasingly wider, particularly for nitrogen oxides (NOx). Even though stricter emission regulations have been implemented, NOx emissions are dependent on specific, short-duration driving events which are difficult to control, therefore high concentrations of these pollutants are still being measured in European cities. Under certification procedures, vehicle emissions compliance is evaluated through standards, recurring to driving cycles performed on chassis dynamometer under controlled laboratory conditions. Different countries use different standard cycles, with the US basing their certification cycle on FTP-75 and Europe using NEDC (Euro 5/6c)/WLTP (Euro 6d).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0999
Yuanzhou Xi, Nathan Ottinger, Z. Gerald Liu
Abstract Natural gas powered vehicles are attractive in certain applications due to their lower emissions in general than conventional diesel engines and the low cost of natural gas. For stoichiometric natural gas engines, the aftertreatment system typically consists only of a three-way catalyst (TWC). However, increasingly stringent NOx and methane regulations challenge current TWC technologies. In this work, a catalyst reactor system with variable lean/rich switching capability was developed for evaluating TWCs for stoichiometric natural gas engines. The effect of varying frequency and duty-cycle during lean/rich gas switching experiments was measured with a hot-wire anemometer (HWA) due to its high sensitivity to gas thermal properties. A theoretical reactor gas dispersion model was then developed and validated with the HWA measurements. The model is capable of predicting the actual lean/rich gas exposure to the TWC under different testing conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0700
Valentin Soloiu, Aliyah Knowles, Jose Moncada, Emerald Simons, Martin Muinos, Thomas Beyerl
Abstract The Cottonseed biodiesel combustion, sound and vibrations have been evaluated in a medium duty single cylinder DI engine (1.1L/cyl) by comparison with s ULSD#2 reference values. The engine was supercharged and had 20% EGR and all tests were conducted at 1400 rpm and at 4 bar BMEP load. Cylinder pressure was determined using a Kistler piezoelectric transducer. Combustion pressures peaked at 76 bar for both fuels. Ignition delay for CS100 decreased by 0.16 ms when compared to the ULSD#2 baseline. This would lead to a 23% lower peak heat release rate when operating CS100. The pressure rise rate for CS100 was 20% lower than ULSD#2, which related to the reduced ringing intensity for the biodiesel. The sound and vibrations were measured using a B&K condenser type multi-field microphone, and a tri-axial, piezoelectric accelerometer. All noise & vibration signals were analyzed with CPB and FFT Analysis, and Crank Angle Domain Analysis with B&K Pulse Platform software.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0983
Masaaki Ito, Frank Katsube, Yasuhiko Hamada, Hiroaki Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi Asako
Abstract Particle Number (PN) regulation was firstly introduced for European light-duty diesel vehicles back in 2011[1]. Since then, PN regulation has been and is being expanded to heavy-duty diesel vehicles and non-road diesel machineries. PN regulation will also be expanded to China and India around 2020 or later. Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) is significant factor for the above-mentioned PN regulation. This filter technology is to be continuously evolved for the near future tighter PN regulation. Generally, PN filtration performance test for filter technology development is carried out with chassis dynamometer, engine dynamometer or simulator [2]. This paper describes a simplified and relatively quicker alternative PN filtration performance test method for accelerating filter technology development compared to the current test method.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1001
Seyoung Kim, Kenji Kondo, Yoshinori Otsuki, Kazuhiko Haruta
Abstract An on-board solid particle number (PN) analyzer (OBS-ONE-PN) has been developed to measure PN concentrations in engine exhaust under real-driving conditions. Specification of OBS-ONE-PN is based on the recommendation in PEMS-PN draft. OBS-ONE-PN consists of primary diluter, heated transfer tube, heated catalytic stripper (CS), secondary dilutor and particle detector. Volatile fractions which is emitted from the automobile engine are removed by CS, and then only solid particles are counted by a condensation particle counter (CPC). Finally, the system provides results in number concentration. The detailed specifications relating to the OBS-ONE-PN performance such as dilution factor accuracy, volatile particle removal efficiency, overall detection efficiency and durability test results are described in this paper The OBS-ONE-PN is used to characterize PN emission from a gasoline vehicle.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0747
John Storey, Samuel Lewis, Melanie Moses-DeBusk, Raynella Connatser, Jong Lee, Tom Tzanetakis, Kukwon Cho, Matthew Lorey, Mark Sellnau
Abstract Low temperature combustion engine technologies are being investigated for high efficiency and low emissions. However, such engine technologies often produce higher engine-out hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, and their operating range is limited by the fuel properties. In this study, two different fuels, a US market gasoline containing 10% ethanol (RON 92 E10) and a higher reactivity gasoline (RON 80 E0), were compared on Delphi’s second generation Gasoline Direct-Injection Compression Ignition (Gen 2.0 GDCI) multi-cylinder engine. The engine was evaluated at three operating points ranging from a light load condition (800 rpm/2 bar IMEPg) to medium load conditions (1500 rpm/6 bar and 2000 rpm/10 bar IMEPg). The engine was equipped with two oxidation catalysts, between which was located the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) inlet. Samples were taken at engine-out, between the catalysts, and at tailpipe locations.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0743
Kukwon Cho, Eric Latimer, Matthew Lorey, David J. Cleary, Mark Sellnau
Abstract Fuel efficiency and emission performance sensitivity to fuel reactivity was examined using Delphi’s second-generation Gasoline Direct-Injection Compression Ignition (Gen 2.0 GDCI) multi-cylinder engine. The study was designed to compare a US market gasoline (RON 92 E10) to a higher reactivity gasoline (RON 80) at four operating conditions ranging from light load of 800 rpm / 2.0 bar gross indicated-mean-effective pressure (IMEPg) to medium load of 2000 rpm / 10.0 bar IMEPg. The experimental assessment indicated that both gasolines could achieve good performance and Tier 3 emission targets at each of the four operating conditions. Relative to the RON 92 E10 gasoline, better fuel consumption and engine-out emissions performance was achieved when using RON 80 gasoline; consistent with our previously reported single-cylinder engine research [1].
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0796
J. Felipe Rodriguez, Wai K. Cheng
Abstract The NOx emissions during the crank-start and cold fast-idle phases of a GDI engine are analyzed in detail. The NOx emissions of the first 3 firing cycles are studied under a wide set of parameters including the mass of fuel injected, start of injection, and ignition timing. The results show a strong dependence of the NOx emissions with injection timing; they are significantly reduced as the mixture is stratified. The impact of different valve timings on crank-start NOx emissions was analyzed. Late intake and early exhaust timings show similar potential for NOx reduction; 26-30% lower than the baseline. The combined strategy, resulting in a large symmetric negative valve overlap, shows the greatest reduction; 59% lower than the baseline. The cold fast-idle NOx emissions were studied under different equivalence ratios, injection strategies, combustion phasing, and valve timings. Slightly lean air-fuel mixtures result in a significant reduction of NOx.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0795
Changhoon Oh, Wai K. Cheng
Abstract The gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine particulate emission sources are assessed under cold start conditions: the fast idle and speed/load combinations representative of the 1st acceleration in the US FTP. The focus is on the accumulation mode particle number (PN) emission. The sources are non-fuel, combustion of the premixed charge, and liquid fuel film. The non-fuel emissions are measured by operating the engine with premixed methane/air or hydrogen/air. Then the PN level is substantially lower than what is obtained with normal GDI operation; thus non-fuel contribution to PN is small. When operating with stoichiometric premixed gasoline/air, the PN level is comparable to the non-fuel level; thus premixed-stoichiometric mixture combustion does not significantly generate particulates. For fuel rich premixed gasoline/air, PN increases dramatically when lambda is less than 0.7 to 0.8.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0989
Jennifer H. Zhu, Christopher Nones, Yan Li, Daniel Milligan, Barry Prince, Mark Polster, Mark Dearth
Abstract Vehicle interior air quality (VIAQ) measurements are currently conducted using the offline techniques GC/MS and HPLC. To improve throughput, speed of analysis, and enable online measurement, specialized instruments are being developed. These instruments promise to reduce testing cost and provide shortened analysis times at comparable accuracy to the current state of the art offline instruments and methods. This work compares GCMS/HPLC to the Voice200ultra, a specialized real-time instrument utilizing the technique selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS). The Voice200ultra is a real-time mass spectrometer that measures volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air down to the parts-per-trillion level by volume (pptv). It provides instantaneous, quantifiable results with high selectivity and sensitivity using soft chemical ionization.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0987
Nathan Ottinger, Niklas Schmidt, Z. Gerald Liu
Abstract Nitrous oxide (N2O), with a global warming potential (GWP) of 297 and an average atmospheric residence time of over 100 years, is an important greenhouse gas (GHG). In recognition of this, N2O emissions from on-highway medium- and heavy-duty diesel engines were recently regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) GHG Emission Standards. Unlike NO and NO2, collectively referred to as NOx, N2O is not a major byproduct of diesel combustion. However, N2O can be formed as a result of unselective catalytic reactions in diesel aftertreatment systems, and the mitigation of this unintended N2O formation is a topic of active research. In this study, a nonroad Tier 4 Final/Stage IV engine was equipped with a vanadium-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) aftertreatment system. Experiments were conducted over nonroad steady and both cold and hot transient cycles (NRSC and NRTC, respectively).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0994
Tim Nevius, Dario Rauker, Masanobu Akita, Yoshinori Otsuki, Scott Porter, Michael Akard
Abstract Direct measurement of dilution air volume in a Constant Volume emission sampling system may be used to calculate tailpipe exhaust volume, and the total dilution ratio in the CVS. A Remote Mixing Tee (RMT) often includes a subsonic venturi (SSV) flowmeter in series with the dilution air duct. The venturi meter results in a flow restriction and significant pressure drop in the dilution air pipe. An ultrasonic flow meter for a similar dilution air volume offers little flow restriction and negligible pressure drop in the air duct. In this investigation, an ultrasonic flow meter (UFM) replaces the subsonic venturi in a Remote Mixing Tee. The measurement uncertainty and accuracy of the UFM is determined by comparing the real time flow rates and integrated total dilution air volume from the UFM and the dilution air SSV in the RMT. Vehicle tests include FTP and NEDC test cycles with a 3.8L V6 reference vehicle.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0990
Carl Paulina, Dan McBryde, Mike Matthews
Abstract Track Road Load Derivations (RLDs) and subsequent load matching on test cell dynamometers has traditionally been conducted using vehicle coastdowns (CDs). Vehicle speed changes during these coastdowns are used to calculate the vehicle mechanical drag forces slowing vehicles when on the road. Track drag force, exerted on a vehicle, can also be quantified by holding a vehicle at a specific steady state speed and measuring the forces required to maintain that speed. This paper focuses on two methods to quantify speed dependent forces which a vehicle must work against when motoring. One method is the traditional coastdown method. The second reference method measures vehicle steady state speed forces necessary to propel the vehicle using both electric vehicle propulsion power flows and dynamometer measured forces. Track CDs require the vehicle to be placed in neutral.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0982
Dhruvang Rathod, Mark A. Hoffman, Simona Onori
Abstract The duration over which a three way catalyst (TWC) maintains proper functionality during lambda excursions is critically impacted by aging, which affects its oxygen storage capacity (OSC). As such, emissions control strategies, which strive to maintain post TWC air-to-fuel ratios at the stoichiometric value, will benefit from an accurate estimation of TWC age. To this end, this investigation examines a method of TWC age estimation suitable for real-world transient operation. Experimental results are harvested from an instrumented test vehicle equipped with a two-brick TWC during operation on a chassis dynamometer. Four differently aged TWCs are instrumented with wideband and switch-type Lambda sensors upstream (Pre TWC location), and downstream (Mid location) of first catalyst brick.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1008
Antti Rostedt, Leonidas D. Ntziachristos, Pauli Simonen, Topi Rönkkö, Zissis C. Samaras, Risto Hillamo, Kauko Janka, Jorma Keskinen
Abstract In this article we present a design of a new miniaturized sensor with the capacity to measure exhaust particle concentrations on board vehicles and engines. The sensor is characterized by ultra-fast response time, high sensitivity, and a wide dynamic range. In addition, the physical dimensions of the sensor enable its placement along the exhaust line. The concentration response and temporal performance of a prototype sensor are discussed and characterized with aerosol laboratory test measurements. The sensor performance was also tested with actual engine exhaust in both chassis and engine dynamometer measurements. These measurements demonstrate that the sensor has the potential to meet and even exceed any requirements around the world in terms of on-board diagnostic (OBD) sensitivity and frequency of monitoring.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0995
Olle Berg, Lars-Gunnar Simonson
Abstract The Constant Volume Sampler (CVS) is often used to dilute automotive exhaust with ambient air for measurement of emissions from light duty vehicles. A CVS is traditionally equipped with Critical Flow Venturi (CFV) to control and measure total flow. If the CVS is equipped with a Smooth Approach Orifice (SAO) to measure dilution air flow, the exhaust flow of the vehicle can be calculated as the difference between dilution and total flow. Calibration of the CVS and SAO is routinely done using ambient air, but carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor in diluted exhaust have an influence on the flow through the CFV. In current US emission legislation the provisions to include water vapor is added. However, if this is done then the effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) in exhaust has not been considered. Further on, when using the CVS to measure exhaust flow, only the CFV will be affected by the diluted exhaust gas composition.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0996
Sebastian Gramstat, André Cserhati, Matthias Schroeder, Dmytro Lugovyy
Abstract Brake Particle Emission (BPE) is gaining considerable importance for the friction brake and automotive industry. So far no common approach or legislation for BPE characterization exists although many activities in this field have been started during the last years. Taking this into account, the authors carried out a joint measurement campaign to investigate a new approach regarding the sampling location using a brake dynamometer. During preliminary investigations the influence of the cooling air quality has been examined and a sampling point position validation has been carried out. At first the stabilization behavior for repeated test cycles and variations of volumetric air flow rates are analyzed. As a next step the role of volatile particle emissions is determined. Subsequently, the influence of load history and friction power is studied. Finally results in terms of the role of high temperature applications are presented.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0107
Monanshi Gupta, Yasser Rafat, M. Saad Alam
Abstract Electric vehicles (EVs) are considered as zero emission vehicles because of no exhaust emissions (tailpipe emission). But electric power generation contributes in the well to wheel emissions. Hence, Electric vehicle cannot be regarded as completely pollution free. In Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) based vehicles, the pollution is from both the tailpipe (exhaust pipe) and from the well to wheel (extraction of the gasoline in this case). Tailpipe emissions are taken in compliance with Bharat stage emission standards. Standard emissions of CO2, NOx, PM and CH from refineries, during extraction of fuel (gasoline/diesel), are considered for well to wheel emissions. In this work a comparative study of tailpipe and well to wheel emissions from EVs and ICE vehicles is carried out. Three vehicle categories namely; Heavy Duty Vehicles, Passenger cars and 2 wheelers and four major pollutants, namely; CO2, NOx, PM and CH (hydrocarbons) are taken into consideration.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0063
Parashuram R Chitragar, K V Shivaprasad, G N Kumar
Abstract Hydrogen’s combustion properties made it as a gifted fuel and energy carrier to combat the current scenario of depletion of the fossil fuels and crisis of environmental pollution problems. Its superior thermo physical properties and least toxic emissions are favorable to use it in an internal combustion (IC) engine as an alternative fuel. This paper describes an experimental analysis of performance and emission parameters for a four cylinder, four stroke SI engine by supplementing hydrogen fraction with gasoline. Tests were carried out by using hydrogen fraction from 0-10% in step of 2% by volume. Study revealed an improvement in brake power, efficiency and brake specific energy consumption up to 8% hydrogen fractions in comparison with gasoline operation while volumetric efficiency decreased for all hydrogen fractions. Carbon monoxide (CO), Hydrocarbons (HC) emissions were reduced and Nitrogen oxides (NOx) was slightly increased for all hydrogen fractions than gasoline.
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