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Viewing 211 to 240 of 22709
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0100
Sushant Kishor Hingane
High-end vehicles with latest technology and autonomous driving experience have to bear the cost of increasing number of sensors on-board. It would be beneficial to reduce some of the sensors in the vehicle and make use of other available resources, retaining the same functionality. This paper discusses a novel technique of estimating the weight of seat occupant from an already existing DC motor without using additional pressure sensors. Passenger weight information is important for seat-belt reminder system as well as supplemental restraint system that will decide the air-bag deployment. The mathematical model for a series-type DC motor is analyzed and simulated using MATLAB. Further, results of the experiment performed on a lower capacity motor are shared and compared with the simulation results. Formulating a linear relation gives a possibility to develop a device for occupant weight measurement inside the high-end vehicles.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0103
Ludwig Brabetz, Mohamed Ayeb, Oliver Baumgarten
Abstract The topology of an EDS, defined by the routing paths and by the location of the distribution boxes and the inline connectors, has a strong impact on weight and required amount of material, especially of copper, as well as on the manufacturing- and assembly time. Although a good part of the routing and packaging is fixed due to technical reasons and carry-over situations, in general there are enough optional paths and locations to allow up to several thousand alternative topologies. For these reasons, an optimization is possible as well as important. For such an optimization, in this paper a method is presented to concurrently minimize predefined criteria, e.g. the required copper, length of the wires, and the overall length of the wire bundles. It is based on designated algorithms for the variation of the topology, the routing, and the calculation of the optimization criteria as mentioned above.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0114
Chris Schwarz, Timothy Brown, John Lee, John Gaspar, Julie Kang
Abstract Distracted driving remains a serious risk to motorists in the US and worldwide. Over 3,000 people were killed in 2013 in the US because of distracted driving; and over 420,000 people were injured. A system that can accurately detect distracted driving would potentially be able to alert drivers, bringing their attention back to the primary driving task and potentially saving lives. This paper documents an effort to develop an algorithm that can detect visual distraction using vehicle-based sensor signals such as steering wheel inputs and lane position. Additionally, the vehicle-based algorithm is compared with a version that includes driving-based signals in the form of head tracking data. The algorithms were developed using machine learning techniques and combine a Random Forest model for instantaneous detection with a Hidden Markov model for time series predictions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0115
Dev S. Kochhar, Hong Zhao, Paul Watta, Yi Murphey
Abstract Lane change events can be a source of traffic accidents; drivers can make improper lane changes for many reasons. In this paper we present a comprehensive study of a passive method of predicting lane changes based on three physiological signals: electrocardiogram (ECG), respiration signals, and galvanic skin response (GSR). Specifically, we discuss methods for feature selection, feature reduction, classification, and post processing techniques for reliable lane change prediction. Data were recorded for on-road driving for several drivers. Results show that the average accuracy of a single driver test was approx. 70%. It was greater than the accuracy for each cross-driver test. Also, prediction for younger drivers was better.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0112
Dariusz Borkowski, Rafal Tomasz Dlugosz, Michał Szulc, Pawel Skruch, Pawel Markiewicz, Dominik Sasin, Marta Kolasa, Tomasz Talaska
Abstract In the presented paper we deal with an important problem in active safety systems, which is the multi-rate processing of different signals. Automotive systems are usually very complex, involving multiple subsystems, in which typically it is very difficult to obtain equal sampling rates. In many cases, this problem is ignored, which means that the signals samples stored in different time moments are silently assumed to be to sampled in the same time. Looking from the point of view of signal processing, this incorrect assumption often causes large harmonic distortions artifacts of processed signals. These distortions, in turn, generate harmonics of different frequencies. As a result, if processed signals are used to calculate the trajectories of objects seen by systems associated with the vehicle, may differ from the real world trajectories. This may cause occurrence of false positives or no reaction of the vehicle in case of emergency situation.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0113
William Buller, Rini Sherony, Brian Wilson, Michelle Wienert
Abstract Based on RADAR and LiDAR measurements of deer with RADAR and LiDAR in the Spring and Fall of 2014 [1], we report the best fit statistical models. The statistical models are each based on time-constrained measurement windows, termed test-points. Details of the collection method were presented at the SAE World Congress in 2015. Evaluation of the fitness of various statistical models to the measured data show that the LiDAR intensity of reflections from deer are best estimated by the extreme value distribution, while the RCS is best estimated by the log-normal distribution. The value of the normalized intensity of the LiDAR ranges from 0.3 to 1.0, with an expected value near 0.7. The radar cross-section (RCS) varies from -40 to +10 dBsm, with an expected value near -14 dBsm.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0110
Mohammad Huq, Douglas McConnell
Abstract Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) runs with a set of parameters that determine how the ACC performs. Some of these parameters are tunable to some degree through HMI and the rest are pre-determined. The proposed Behavior Trainable ACC (BTACC) is able to learn all these parameters from driving behavior of the driver. To develop BTACC adapted to the driver’s driving behavior, the ACC keeps collecting driving data such as set speed, acceleration, deceleration, headway settings, etc., of the vehicle over time and keeps updating the related parameters. After training is over, the driver is able to drive the vehicle in BTACC mode, when the vehicle would drive itself according to driving behavior of the driver, young or elderly, and thus, provide the drivers with a higher level of safety and comfort. BTACC can be embedded with an existing ACC module so that the drivers may choose either ACC or BTACC.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0111
Hiroaki Tanaka, Daisuke Takemori, Tomohiro Miyachi
Abstract Establishing drivers’ trust in the automated driving system is critical to the success of automated vehicle. The focus of this paper is how to make drivers drive automated vehicles with confidence during braking events. In this study, 10 participants drove a test vehicle and experienced 24 different deceleration settings each. Prior to each drive, we indicated to each participant the expected brake starting and stopping position. During each drive, participants would first maintain a set speed, and then stop the vehicle when they see a signal to apply the brakes. After each drive, we asked the participants’ perceived safety about the deceleration setting he/she just experienced. The results revealed that ‘jerk’ have significant influence on drivers’ perceived safety.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0108
Jihas Khan
Abstract Advanced driver assistance features like Advanced Emergency Brake Assist, Adaptive Cruise Control, Blind Spot Monitoring, Stop and Go, Pedestrian Detection, Obstacle Detection and Collision Detection are becoming mandatory in many countries. This is because of the promising results received in reducing 75% of fatalities related to road accidents. All these features use RADAR in detecting the range, speed and even direction of multiple targets using complex signal processing algorithm. Testing such ECUs is becoming too difficult considering the fact that the RADAR is integrated in the PCB of ECU. Hence the simulation of RADAR sensor for emulation of various real world scenarios is not a preferred solution for OEMs. Furthermore, Tier ones are not interested in a testing solution where the real RADAR sensor is bypassed. This paper discusses such issues which include the validation of the most modern Electronic Scanning RADARs.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0109
Dariusz Cieslar, Krzysztof Kogut, Maciej Różewicz, Mateusz Orlowski
Abstract Enhanced perception algorithms are the key requirement for the introduction of more sophisticated active safety functionalities to urban areas. In order to realize the principles of test-driven development for such systems, either a set of representative and comprehensive test-drive logs needs to be available up front or a sufficiently universal simulation environment for virtual maneuvers should be employed. In this article a case study of developing a radar-based estimator for target heading is considered. This relatively standard problem serves as an illustrative example to assess the merits of an inherently simplified stimulus generated from virtual maneuvers and its limitation in comparison to real measurements. It is argued that a convenient modelling approach for a virtual scene simulation applied from an early development stage can further improve the quality and integrity of active safety projects, especially when they involve multiple sensor types.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0122
Tatsuya Yoshikawa, Aoyagi Takahiko, Hiroshi Ishiguro
Abstract In a system with which acceleration and braking by the driver are automated, a gap against the system can be felt when the timing of acceleration or deceleration is different from that intended by the driver or the extent of acceleration or deceleration exceeds an acceptable limit. For an automated system, it is important to realize a control that provides comfort and a sense of security for the driver. This paper is related to the technology that secures the ride comfort felt by the driver (comfort and a sense of security) within an appropriate range and presents a discussion of the technological means to improve the ride comfort from a viewpoint particularly related to longitudinal direction.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0123
Mostafa Anwar Taie, Mohamed ElHelw
Abstract The evaluation of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS including driver assistance and active safety) has increasing interest from authorities, industry and academia. AsPeCSS active safety project concludes that good results in a laboratory test for active safety system design does not necessarily equate to an effective system in real traffic conditions. Moreover, many ADAS assessment projects and standards require physical testing on test tracks (dummy vehicles, pedestrian mannequins…), which are expensive and limit testing capabilities. This research presents a conceptual framework for on-board evaluation (OBE) of ADAS, which can be used as a cost effective evaluation in real-life traffic conditions. OBE shall monitor, record, analyze and report both internal behavior and external environment (external objects list and video stream) of ADAS under evaluation (ADASUE).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0120
Libo Huang, Huanlei Chen, Zhuoping Yu, Jie Bai
Abstract Automotive radar is the most important component in the autonomous driving system, which detects the obstacles, vehicles and pedestrians around with acceptable cost. The target tracking is one of the key functions in the automotive radar which estimates the position and speed of the targets having regarding to the measurement inaccuracy and interferences. Modern automotive radar requires a multi-target tracking algorithm, as in the radar field of view hundreds of targets can present. In practice, the automotive radar faces very complicated and fast-changing road conditions, for example tunnels and curved roads. The targets’ unpredictable movements and the reflections of the electromagnetic wave from the tunnel walls and the roads will make the multi-target tracking a difficult task. Such situation may last several seconds so that the continuous tracks of the targets cannot be maintained and the tracks are dropped mistakenly.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0121
Ulrich Vögele, Christian Endisch
Abstract Predictive velocity control can be used to enable efficient driving regarding fuel efficiency and driving time. Commonly, velocity optimization algorithms only take static information, like road slope and curvature, into account and neglect dynamic information, like traffic lights and other traffic participants, although the information is available through sensors or could be made available by vehicle-tovehicle or vehicle-to-infrastructure communication. Thus, static optimization algorithms do not provide optimal solutions in dynamic environments, caused by driver or assistance systems intervention. Because the incorporation of dynamic information increases the complexity of the problem to find an optimal control policy, its use in real-time applications is often prohibited. An algorithm is presented which allows a fast computation of all optimal speed profiles with regard to time and fuel consumption.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0118
Shinji Niwa, Mori Yuki, Tetsushi Noro, Shunsuke Shioya, Kazutaka Inoue
Abstract This paper presents detection technology for a driver monitoring system using JINS MEME, an eyewear-type wearable device. Serious accidents caused by human error such as dozing while driving or inattentive driving have been increasing recently in Japan. JINS MEME is expected to contribute to reducing the number of traffic deaths by constantly monitoring the driver with an ocular potential sensor. This paper also explains how a driver’s drowsiness level can be estimated from information on their blink rate, which can be calculated from the ocular potential.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0119
Preeti J. Pillai, Veeraganesh Yalla, Kentaro Oguchi
Abstract This paper is an extension of our previous work on the CHASE (Classification by Holistic Analysis of Scene Environment) algorithm, that automatically classifies the driving complexity of a road scene image during day-time conditions and assigns it an ‘Ease of Driving’ (EoD) score. At night, apart from traffic variations and road type conditions, illumination changes are a major predominant factor that affect the road visibility and the driving easiness. In order to resolve the problem of analyzing the driving complexity of roads at night, a brightness detection module is incorporated in our end-to-end nighttime EoD system, which computes the ‘brightness factor’ (bright or dark) for that given night-time road scene. The brightness factor along with a multi-level machine learning classifier is then used to classify the EoD score for a night-time road scene.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0116
Takayuki Tanaka, Shunsuke Nakajima, Takahiro Urabe, Hideyuki Tanaka
Abstract Mitsubishi Electric has been developing a lane keeping assist system (LKAS). This system consists of our products such as an electric power steering (EPS), a camera, and an electronic control unit (ECU) for ADAS. In this system, the camera detects a lane marker, the ECU estimates reference path and vehicle position, and calculates reference steering wheel angle, and the EPS controls a steering wheel angle based on reference steering wheel angle. In this paper, we explain the calculation method of reference steering wheel angle for path tracking control. We derive a formula of reference steering wheel angle calculation that converges lateral position deviation in desired time by using lateral position deviation change rate control on forward gaze point as path tracking control algorithm. Since the formula is obtained from the vehicle model, we can easily design a controller depending on the vehicle type, by using known vehicle specifications.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0117
Bi-Cheng Luan, I-Hsuan Lee, Han-Shue Tan, Kang Li, Ding Yuan, Fang-Chieh Chou
Abstract This paper presents the design and implementation of a new steering control method for lane following control (LFC) using a camera. With the road information provided by the image sensor, the LFC system calculates the steering command based on the Target and Control (T&C) driver steering model. The T&C driver model employs a look-ahead control structure to capture the drivers’ core steering mechanism. Based on the models of the steering actuator and the vehicle dynamics, optimal control gains can be determined for any given look-ahead distance (normalized by the vehicle speed). With these simple gains, the vehicle can track very well along the center of the lane. This LFC system was first simulated under the Model-in-the-Loop (MiL) test using the CarSim simulation. The simulations show that the resultant lateral offsets are smaller than those from typical driver models.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0130
Satoshi Otsuka, Kohei Sakurai
Abstract Highly automated driving systems have a responsibility to keep a vehicle safe even in abnormal conditions such as random or systematic failures. However, creating redundancy in a system to respond to failures increases the cost of the system, and simple redundancy cannot detect systematic failures because some systematic failures occur in each system at the same time. Systematic failures in automated driving systems cannot be verified sufficiently during the development phase due to numerous patterns of parameters input from outside the system. A safety concept based on a “safety sustainer” for highly automated driving systems is proposed. The safety sustainer is designed for keeping a vehicle in a safe state for several seconds if a failure occurs in the system and notifying the driver that the system is in failure mode and requesting the driver to take over control of the vehicle.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0129
Ashlie B. Hocking, M. Anthony Aiello, John C. Knight, Shinichi Shiraishi, Masahiro Yamaura, Nikos Arechiga
Abstract For many crucial applications, establishing important properties of Simulink models by testing is either extremely resource intensive or impossible, and proof of the properties is highly desirable. Many Simulink models rely upon discrete-valued functions for which the function values are defined as a lookup table of correspondences between values in the domain and range, with linear interpolation used to evaluate intermediate values in the domain. Such discrete-valued functions arise in applications for which no known closed-form algebraic definition exists. In general, the proof of a property for a model that includes a discrete-valued function has to be by case analysis. For a single function and with mechanical support, case analysis is manageable. However, for models that include multiple discrete-valued functions, the number of cases can be the product of the cardinalities of the domains of the individual functions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0126
Philip Daian, Shinichi Shiraishi, Akihito Iwai, Bhargava Manja, Grigore Rosu
The Runtime Verification ECU (RV-ECU) is a new development platform for checking and enforcing the safety of automotive bus communications and software systems. RV-ECU uses runtime verification, a formal analysis subfield geared at validating and verifying systems as they run, to ensure that all manufacturer and third-party safety specifications are complied with during the operation of the vehicle. By compiling formal safety properties into code using a certifying compiler, the RV-ECU executes only provably correct code that checks for safety violations as the system runs. RV-ECU can also recover from violations of these properties, either by itself in simple cases or together with safe message-sending libraries implementable on third-party control units on the bus. RV-ECU can be updated with new specifications after a vehicle is released, enhancing the safety of vehicles that have already been sold and deployed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0125
Michael Kaessmeyer, Michael Soden
Abstract Automotive engineering processes are dynamic, iterative and driven by changes. Reasons for changes on development artifacts are manifold, but the result is a new evolution step which may influence all, some, or just a single development artifact. Consequently, research on impact analysis put forth approaches to assess the adverse effects of changes. However, understanding and implementing functional changes and its consequences in the safety domain is often aggravated by dependencies between different types of development artifacts, scattered in various (tool) formats. Safety properties may change depending on the type of a modification. Thereby, connected analyses like fault trees, Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), and safety concepts cannot be reused easily if the artifacts on which they are based on are affected by changes.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0124
Andrew Scott Alden, Brian Mayer, Patrick Mcgowen, Rini Sherony, Hiroyuki Takahashi
Abstract Animal-vehicle collision (AVC) is a significant safety issue on American roads. Each year approximately 1.5 million AVCs occur in the U.S., the majority of them involving deer. The increasing use of cameras and radar on vehicles provides opportunities for prevention or mitigation of AVCs, particularly those involving deer or other large animals. Developers of such AVC avoidance/mitigation systems require information on the behavior of encountered animals, setting characteristics, and driver response in order to design effective countermeasures. As part of a larger study, naturalistic driving data were collected in high AVC incidence areas using 48 participant-owned vehicles equipped with data acquisition systems (DAS). Continuous driving data including forward video, location information, and vehicle kinematics were recorded. The respective 11TB dataset contains 35k trips covering 360K driving miles.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0139
Andreas Himmler, Klaus Lamberg, Tino Schulze, Jann-Eve Stavesand
Abstract Increasing productivity along the development and verification process of safety-related projects is an important aspect in today’s technological developments, which need to be ever more efficient. The increase of productivity can be achieved by improving the usability of software tools and decreasing the effort of qualifying the software tool for a safety-related project. For safety-critical systems, the output of software tools has to be verified in order to ensure the tools’ suitability for safety-relevant applications. Verification is particularly important for test automation tools that are used to run hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) tests of safety-related software automatically 24/7. This qualification of software tools requires advanced knowledge and effort. This problem can be solved if a tool is suitable for developing safety-related software. This paper explains how this can be achieved for a COTS test automation tool.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0138
Bernard Dion
Abstract Automotive manufacturers and their suppliers increasingly need to follow the objectives of ISO 26262 as it is now state-of-the art and as it is the case that an ever increasing number of active and passive safety systems are developed within cars. This has increased the need to define a safe system development process. This paper proposes a model-based approach including automatic and certified code generation to efficiently implement the embedded software that controls these systems while meeting the needed safety requirements and obeying the rules of ISO 26262.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0137
Heiko Doerr, Ingo Stuermer
Abstract A key component of developing a safety-critical automotive system in compliance with ISO 26262 is developing what is known as the safety case. This delivery justifies that the system is free from unreasonable risk and that the safety requirements are complete and satisfied according to evidence from ISO 26262 work products. However, the standard provides neither practical guidance on how the safety case should be developed, nor how the safety argument should be evaluated in the functional safety assessment process. This paper discusses quality and product readiness of the system under development in the context of safety case generation. We will focus on the software level and ISO 26262-6 requirements that relate to this. We will look at the software lifecycle of the system and how to measure and deliver key data throughout this lifecycle.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0136
Deepak Gangadharan, Oleg Sokolsky, Insup Lee, BaekGyu Kim, Chung-Wei Lin, Shinichi Shiraishi
Abstract Optional software-based features (for example, to provide active safety, infotainment, etc.) are increasingly becoming a significant cost driver in automotive systems. In state-of-the-art production techniques, these optional features are built into the vehicle during assembly. This does not give the customer the flexibility to choose the specific set of features as per their requirement. They either have to buy a pre-bundled option that may or may not satisfy their preferences or are unable to find an exact combination of features from the inventory provided by a dealership. Alternatively, they have to pre-order a car from the manufacturer, which could result in a substantial delay. Therefore, it is important to improve the flexibility of delivering the optional features to customers. Towards this objective, the vehicle could be configured with the desired options at the dealership, when the customer requires them.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0134
Sagar Behere, Xinhai Zhang, Viacheslav Izosimov, Martin Törngren
Abstract Heavy commercial vehicles constitute the dominant form of inland freight transport. There is a strong interest in making such vehicles autonomous (self-driving), in order to improve safety and the economics of fleet operation. Autonomy concerns affect a number of key systems within the vehicle. One such key system is brakes, which need to remain continuously available throughout vehicle operation. This paper presents a fail-operational functional brake architecture for autonomous heavy commercial vehicles. The architecture is based on a reconfiguration of the existing brake systems in a typical vehicle, in order to attain dynamic, diversified redundancy along with desired brake performance. Specifically, the parking brake is modified to act as a secondary brake with capabilities for monitoring and intervention of the primary brake system.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0133
Masahiro Matsubara, Fumio Narisawa, Atsuhiro Ohno, Toshiaki Aoki, Yuki Chiba
Abstract Safety concepts are essential to conform to functional safety standard ISO 26262 for automotive products. Safety requirements, which are a part of safety concepts, shall be satisfied by products to avoid hazards by vehicles to maintain their safety. Incompleteness of safety requirements must be avoided in deriving parent requirements to its children. However, measure for checking is only reviewing when the safety requirements are described in a natural language. This measure for checking is not objective or stringent. We developed a specification technique written in formal notation that addresses some of the shortcomings of capturing safety requirements for verification purposes. Safety requirements in this notation are expressed in goal tree models, which originate from goal-oriented requirement engineering Knowledge Acquisition in autOmated Specification (KAOS). Each requirement is written with propositional logic as the node of a tree.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0132
Haizhen Liu, Weiwen Deng, Rui He, Jian Wu, Bing Zhu
Abstract Brake-by-wire (BBW) system has drawn a great attention in recent years as driven by rapidly increasing demands on both active brake controls for intelligent vehicles and regenerative braking controls for electric vehicles. However, unlike conversional brake systems, the reliability of the brake-by-wire systems remains to be challenging due to its lack of physical connection in case of system failure. There are various causes for the failure of a BBW system, such as failure of brake controller, loss of sensor signals, failure of communication or even power supply, to name a few. This paper presents a fault-tolerant control under novel control architecture. The proposed control architecture includes a driver command interpreter module, a command integration module, a control allocation module, a fault diagnosis module and state observers. The fault-tolerant control is designed based on a quadratic optimal control method with consideration of actuator constraints.
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