Display:

Results

Viewing 211 to 240 of 21010
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2175
Jay Wilhelm, Joseph Close, Wade Huebsch
A Hybrid Projectile (HP) is a ballistically launched round that transforms into an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) at a designated point during flight. Aerodynamic control surfaces and associated control laws were sought that would extend the projectile's range using body lift and include guidance for a selected point of impact. Several challenges were encountered during the modification of an existing projectile, in this case a 40mm round, to achieve range extension and controllability. The control surfaces must be designed to allow for de-spin, controllability, and natural static stability. Also, a control system with laws and guidance relationships between heading, pitch or glide rate, and the associated aerodynamic surface movements needed to be developed. The designed aerodynamic surfaces, external ballistics, and control methods developed were modeled in a projectile flight simulator built in MATLAB. The base model was an M781 practice round and the aerodynamic coefficients and mass data were found in literature.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2132
Prashant Vadgaonkar, Ullas Janardhan, Adishesha Sivaramasastry
Abstract Performance of Avionics systems is dictated by the timely availability and usage of critical health parameters. Various sensors are extensively used to acquire and communicate the desired parameters. In today's scenario, sensors are hardwired. The number of sensors is growing due to automation which increases the accuracy of intended Aircraft functions. Sensors are distributed all over the Aircraft and they are connected through wired network for signal processing and communication. LRUs (Line Replaceable Unit) which are integrating various sensors also use a wired approach for communication. The use of a wired network approach poses challenges in terms of cable routing, stray capacitances, noise, mechanical structure and added weight to the structure. The weight of cables contributes significantly to the overall weight of the aircraft. As the weight of Aircraft increases, the required fuel quantity also increases. The Key driver for Airline operational cost is fuel. Fuel quantity is a direct function of weight.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2129
Vincent Metzger, Douglas Parker, Alain Philippe, Sebastien Claudot
Abstract Fiber optic physical contact connection technology has been used with multimode fiber in civilian aircraft for over 30 years with very good proven reliable performance. The extensive use of singlemode fiber (SMF) in FTTx Telecom market rollouts speeds up the development of passive optical components which significantly decreases the cost, expands capability and increases the reliability level of singlemode components. SMF transmission seems mandatory for future applications even in mil-aero and other harsh environment applications due to increased data rate requirements and new sensors applications. In harsh environment applications, is it realistic to use SMF with cores that are 30 times smaller in area compared to multimode fiber (MMF) when highly exposed to contamination? The present paper presents a technology of beam expansion interconnection that mixes a physical contact (PC) with an expanded optical surface. The optical connector brings together benefits of both technologies resulting in a reliable connection requiring low maintenance for SMF fiber optic applications.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2127
Karl Strauss
Abstract “Today's electronic components rely on principles of physics and science with no manufacturing precedence and little data on long term stability and reliability.” [1] Yet many are counting on their reliable performance years if not decades into the future, sometimes after being literally abandoned in barns or stored neatly in tightly sealed bags. What makes sense? To toss everything away, or use it as is and hope for the best? Surely there must be a middle ground! With an unprecedented number of missions in its future and an ever-tightening budget, NASA faces the daunting task of doing more with less. One proven way for a project to save money is to use already screened and qualified devices from the spares of its predecessors. But what is the risk in doing so? How can a project reliably count on the value of spare devices if the risk of using them is not, in itself, defined? With hundreds of thousands of devices left over from previous missions, the parts bins of NASA hold a wealth of electronic components, (possibly) ready for use many years after their production.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2125
Janice Meraglia, Mitchell Miller
Abstract Counterfeit items can be viewed as the by-product of a supply chain which has been compromised. While many industries are impacted, certain types of products can mean the difference between life and death. Electronics are of special interest, however, mechanical parts can also have dire consequences. The point is that the counterfeiting community is very diverse. The business model is fluid and unrestricted. Electronics today…hardware tomorrow. All of this leads to the need for an authentication platform that is agnostic to product. Most supply chains would benefit from a technical way to have assurance of authenticity - a benefit that could be shared by all. A comprehensive marking program, such as SigNature DNA, offers value to all supply chain participants as outlined below: Manufacturers will have the ability to effectively monitor their legacy components Authorized distributors will have an absolute way to verify and accept returns Defense contractors and agencies will have forensically authentic and traceable inventory at their disposal End users will have the power to authenticate stock to the component level
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2117
Michael L. Zierolf, Thomas Brinson, Andrew Fleming
Abstract Recent emphasis on optimization of engine technologies with ancillary subsystems such as power and thermal management has created a need for integrated system modeling. These systems are coupled such that federated design methods may not lead to the most synergetic solution. Obtaining an optimal design is often contingent on developing an integrated model. Integrated models, however, can involve combining complex simulation platforms into a single system of systems, which can present many challenges. Model organization and configuration control become increasingly important when orchestrating various models into a single simulation. Additionally, it is important to understand such details as the interface between models and signal routing to ensure the integrated behavior is not contaminated or biased. This paper will present some key learnings for model integration to help alleviate some of the challenges with system-based modeling.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2150
Martin Bradish, Obed Sands, Ted Wright, Casey Bakula, Daniel Oldham, William Ivancic, Michael Lewis, Joseph Klebau, Nicholas Tollis, Andrew Jalics
Abstract This paper summarizes the Power, Avionics and Software (PAS) 1.0 subsystem integration testing and test results that occurred in August and September of 2013. This paper covers the capabilities of each PAS assembly to meet integration test objectives for non-safety critical, non-flight, non-human-rated hardware and software development. This test report is the outcome of the first integration of the PAS subsystem and is meant to provide data for subsequent designs, development and testing of the future PAS subsystems. The two main objectives were to assess the ability of the PAS assemblies' to exchange messages and to perform audio tests of both inbound and outbound channels. This paper describes each test performed, defines the test, the data, and provides conclusions and recommendations.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2148
Jon Hagar
Abstract System testing can, in part, be defined as the application of concepts as an attempt to demonstrate that the implementation does not meet its intended use. Unfortunately, some industry verification test efforts only show that a system meets requirements which while necessary, are not sufficient to fully address a product's system-software testing. Managers, engineers, and testers may not be familiar with the wide variety of test concepts, approaches, and standards available for system-software testing-many of which can save projects money and effort in the long run. Newer software test standards and advanced techniques can offer a wealth of knowledge and improvement opportunities for software products. This paper offers a review of emerging software test concepts and standards in which teams will find potential value toward their improvement efforts including: Math-based techniques which apply combinatorial, statistical, Design of Experiments (DOE), or domain-based concepts Attack-based testing which focuses on common industry error taxonomies Independent model-based testing using tools and standards New standards-driven testing to address verification and validation (V&V), testing, and documentation.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2146
Rudolf Neydorf, Sergey Novikov, Nikita Kudinov
Abstract Airship designers research application versions of systems with several ballonets for adjustment of airship roll and/or pitch as a whole. This requires effective automatic status management of each separate ballonet. But multi-ballonet system control issue encounters the absence of industrially measurable variables of each separate ballonet status. Thus status control issue of the system becomes uncertain. The fact requires the issue studying and shaping new scientific and technical solutions. This publication represents research results implying that fairly simple implementation and effective result can be achieved by application of fuzzy control concept. Its application is built on generating the representative quantity of fuzzy production rules. They are based on present set evaluation of known parameters and measured variables. This results in fuzzy but meaningful image of ballonet system status and airship as a whole. Thus achieving fairly good control over multi-ballonet system.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2139
Serhiy Bozhko, Seang Shen Yeoh, Fei Gao, Tao Yang, Christopher Hill
Abstract The paper reports the control design for an aircraft electric starter-generator system based-on high-speed permanent magnet machine operated in a flux-weakening mode and controlled by an active front-end rectifier. The proposed system utilizes advances of modern power electronics allowing the use of novel machine types and the introduction of controlled power electronics into the main path of energy flow. The paper focuses on control design for such system and includes development of flux weakening control of high-speed permanent magnet machine and droop control of the system output dc-link current. The achieved analytical design results and the expected system performance are confirmed by time-domain simulations.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2113
Fei Gao, Serhiy Bozhko, Greg Asher
Abstract Stability is a great concern for the Electrical Power System (EPS) in the More Electric Aircraft (MEA). It is known that tightly controlled power electronic converters and motor drives may behave as constant power loads (CPLs) which may produce oscillations and cause instability. The paper investigates the stability boundaries for dc multi-source EPS under different power sharing strategies. For each possible strategy the corresponding reduced-order models are derived. The impedance criterion is then applied to study the EPS stability margins and investigates how these margins are influenced by different parameters, such as main bus capacitance, generator/converter control dynamics, cabling arrangements etc. These results are also illustrated by the root contours of reduced-order EPS models. Theoretical results achieved in the paper are confirmed by the time-domain simulations.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2115
Brian C. Raczkowski, Benjamin Loop, Jason Wells, Eric Walters, Oleg Wasynczuk, Sean Field, Jason Gousy
Abstract Future more electric aircraft (MEA) architectures that improve electrical power system's (EPS's) source and load utilization will require advance stability analysis capabilities. Systems are becoming more complex with bidirectional flows from power regeneration, multiple sources per channel and higher peak to average power ratios. Unknown load profiles with large transients complicate common stability analysis techniques. Advancements in analysis are critical for providing useful feedback to the system integrator and designers of multi-source, multi-load power systems. Overall, a framework for evaluating stability with large displacement events has been developed. Within this framework, voltage transient bounds are obtained by identifying the worst case load profile. The results can be used by system designers or integrators to provide specifications or limits to suppliers. Subsystem suppliers can test and evaluate their design prior to integration and hardware development. By identifying concerns during the design phase, a more streamlined approach to hardware development can save on rework, integration delays and cost.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2111
Shweta Sanjeev, Goutham Selvaraj, Patrick Franks, Kaushik Rajashekara
Abstract The transition towards More Electric Aircraft (MEA) architectures has challenges relating to integration of power electronics with the starter generator system for on-engine application. To efficiently operate the power electronics in the hostile engine environment at high switching frequency and for better thermal management, use of silicon carbide (SiC) power devices for a bi-directional power converter is examined. In this paper, development of a 50 kVA bi-directional converter operating at an ambient temperature of about 2000C is presented. The design and operation of the converter with details of control algorithm implementation and cooling chamber design are also discussed.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2101
Joseph Dygert, Melissa Morris, Patrick Browning
Abstract The high demand for traditional air traffic as well as increased use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) has resulted in researchers examining alternative technologies which would result in safer, more reliable, and better performing aircraft. Active methods of aerodynamic flow control may be the most promising approach to this problem. Research in the area of aerodynamic control is transitioning from traditional mechanical flow control devices to, among other methods, plasma actuators. Plasma actuators offer an inexpensive and energy efficient method of flow control. Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD), one of the most widely studied forms of plasma actuation, employs an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) device which uses dominant electric fields for actuation. Unlike traditional flow control methods, a DBD device operates without moving components or mass injection methods. Publications discussing the optimization of DBD flow control versus a single variable such as gap width, voltage, dielectric constant, etc., have been widely published, and instigated a 2003 paper published by the IEEE-DEIS-EHD Technical Committee titled “Recommended International Standard for Dimensionless Parameters Used in Electrohydrodynamics.”
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2267
George Nicholas Bullen
Abstract Rapid advances in cloud-based computing, robotics and smart sensors, multi-modal modeling and simulation, and advanced production are transforming modern manufacturing. The shift toward smaller runs on custom-designed products favors agile and adaptable workplaces that can compete in the global economy. This paper and presentation will describe the advances in Digital Manufacturing that provides the backbone to tighten integration and interoperability of design methods interlinked with advanced manufacturing technologies and agile business practices. The digital tapestry that seamlessly connects computer design tools, modeling and simulation, intelligent machines and sensors, additive manufacturing, manufacturing methods, and post-delivery services to shorten the time and cost between idea generation and first successful product-in-hand will be illustrated.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2201
Fan Frank Wang
Abstract This article is about the issues associated with the published thermal data from commercial off the shelf (COTS) component manufacturers. Some of the published electrical component thermal data can be confusing and/or misleading. This article discusses the possibility of wrong design decisions that can be made using published COTS thermal data. There are two major issues of the published thermal data associated with the use of COTS components. One is the published ambient temperature rating. Another is the published thermal resistance. This paper will discuss these two major issues in details and provide mitigation suggestions.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2104
Jon Zumberge, John Mersch
Cost and performance requirements are driving military and commercial systems to highly integrated, optimized systems which require more sophisticated, highly complex controls. To realize benefits and make confident decisions, the validation of both plant and control models becomes critical. To quickly develop controls for these systems, it is beneficial to develop models and determine the uncertainty of those models so as to predict performance and stability. A process of model validation for a boost circuit based on acceptance sampling is presented here. The validation process described in this paper includes the steps of defining requirements, performing a screening and exploration of the system, completing a system and parameter identification, and finally executing a validation test. To minimize the cost of experimentation and simulation, design of experiments is used extensively to limit the amount of data taken without losing information. One key contribution in this paper is the use of tolerance intervals as an estimation of model accuracy.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2128
Ephraim Suhir, Alain Bensoussan
Abstract The attributes of and challenges in the recently suggested probabilistic design for reliability (PDfR) concept, and the role of its major constituents - failure oriented accelerated testing (FOAT) and physically meaningful predictive modeling (PM) - are addressed, advanced and discussed. The emphasis is on the application of the powerful and flexible Boltzmann-Arrhenius-Zhurkov (BAZ) model, and particularly on its multi-parametric aspect. The model can be effectively used to analyze and design optoelectronic (OE) devices and systems with the predicted, quantified, assured, and, if appropriate and cost-effective, even maintained probability of failure in the field. The numerical example is carried out for an OE system subjected to the combined action of the ionizing radiation and elevated voltage as the major stimuli (stressors). The measured leakage current is used as a suitable characteristic of the degree of degradation. It is concluded that the suggested methodology can be accepted as an effective means for the evaluation of the operational reliability of the aerospace electronics and OE systems and that the next generation of qualification testing (QT) specifications and best practices for such systems could be viewed and conducted as a “quasi-FOAT,” a sort of an “initial stage of FOAT” that adequately replicates the initial non-destructive segment of the previously conducted comprehensive “full-scale” FOAT.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2122
Fidele Moupfouma, Amadou Ndoye, Mohsen Jalali, William Tse
Abstract Advanced commercial aircraft increasingly use more composite or hybrid (metal and composite) materials in structural elements and, despite technological challenges to be overcome, composites remain the future of the aviation industry. Composite and hybrid aircraft today are equipped with digital systems such as fly by wire for reliable operations no matter what the flying environment is. These systems are however very sensitive to electromagnetic energy. During flight, aircraft can face High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF), static electricity, or lightning. The coupling of any of these threats with airframe structure induces electromagnetic energy that can impair the operation of avionics and navigation systems. This paper focuses on systems susceptibility in composite aircraft and concludes that the same electromagnetic rules dedicated to all metal aircraft for systems and wiring integration cannot be applied directly as such for composite aircraft.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2123
Andre Hessling
Abstract Advanced technologies in LED's have the potential to reduce maintenance and improve aircraft safety. Aircrafts need adequate illumination for night time landing. New technology such as high-power LEDs allow for better suited light distributions, more whitish light compatible for mesopic lighting conditions and reduced glare in adverse weather conditions. LEDs and the associated electronics are more susceptible to harsh environmental conditions and this needs to be accounted for in the design of the equipment. Highly conductive metal core PCBs (MCPCB) allow for adequate cooling in a mirror telescopic optical arrangement when coupled with robust active cooling. Closed loop optical feedback of output flux ensures constant performance over the lifetime of the light unit and allows for indication of remaining useful life to the operator to plan maintenance activities. Parylene coating inhibits premature degradation of the LEDs induced by water vapor and corrosive gases.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2120
Jennifer C. Shaw, Patrick Norman, Stuart Galloway, Graeme Burt
Abstract Radical new electrically propelled aircraft are being considered to meet strict future performance goals. One concept design proposed is a Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion (TeDP) aircraft that utilises a number of electrically driven propulsors. Such concepts place a new and significant reliance on an aircraft's electrical system for safe and efficient flight. Accordingly, in addition to providing certainty that supply reliability targets are being met, a contingency analysis, evaluating the probability of component failure within the electrical network and the impact of that failure upon the available thrust must also be undertaken for architecture designs. Solutions that meet specified thrust requirements at a minimum associated weight are desired as these will likely achieve the greatest performance against the proposed emissions targets. This paper presents a Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) based design approach for the electrical system and thrust reliability analysis of TeDP aircraft architectures.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2119
Steven David Angus Fletcher, Patrick Norman, Stuart Galloway, Graeme Burt
Abstract The development of the More-Electric Engine (MEE) concept will see an expansion in the power levels, functionality and criticality of electrical systems within engines. However, to date, these more critical electrical systems have not been accounted for in existing engine certification standards. To begin to address this gap, this paper conducts a review of current engine certification standards in order to determine how these standards will impact on the design requirements of More-Electric Engine (MEE) electrical system architectures. The paper focuses on determining two key architectural requirements: the number of individual failures an architecture can accommodate and still remain functional and the rate at which these failures are allowed to occur. The paper concludes by discussing how the derived failure rates begin to define a set of design requirements for MEE electrical architectures, considering various operating strategies, and demonstrates their application to example MEE electrical system architecture designs.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2217
Javier Gazzarri, Nishant Shrivastava, Robyn Jackey, Craig Borghesani
Abstract Battery Management System (BMS) design is a complex task requiring sophisticated models that mimic the electrochemical behavior of the battery cell under a variety of operating conditions. Equivalent circuits are well-suited for this task because they offer a balance between fidelity and simulation speed, their parameters reflect direct experimental observations, and they are scalable. Scalability is particularly important at the real time simulation stage, where a model of the battery pack runs on a real-time simulator that is physically connected to the peripheral hardware in charge of monitoring and control. With modern battery systems comprising hundreds of cells, it is important to employ a modeling and simulation approach that is capable of handling numerous simultaneous instances of the basic unit cell while maintaining real time performance. In previous publications we presented a technique for the creation of a battery cell model that contains the electrochemical fingerprints of a battery cell based on equivalent circuit model fitting to experimental data.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2204
Gregory J. Moore, Frank Puglia, Lawrence Myron, Stephen Lasher, Bob Doane, Joe Gnanaraj, Seth Cohen, Arthur Dobley, Ryan Lawrence, Rong Yan
Abstract For 70 years Yardney has been a leader in specialty battery and energy systems for military, space, avionics, weapon systems and undersea vehicles. In addition to battery systems, Yardney also delivers hybrid systems for ground, space, undersea and avionic applications. The beauty of hybrid systems, combining energy sources such as batteries, capacitors, fuel cells and solar, is that they can be used to optimize energy and power density, and with proper design, the systems can also lead to longevity of components and an overall cost savings. For ground applications, utilization of hybrid systems can assist in conservation of fuel by making vehicle applications more efficient. For space applications, satisfying pulses can be improved by a capacitor and battery hybrid energy storage system. To optimize aircraft performance and decrease operating costs, avionics are beginning to move towards more electric aircrafts (MEA). This embraces the concept of utilizing electrical power for driving aircraft subsystems currently powered by mechanical means.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2170
Michelle Bash, Michael Boyd, Chad Miller
Abstract This paper presents the details of an engine emulation system utilized within a Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) test environment for aircraft power systems. The paper focuses on the software and hardware interfaces that enable the coupling of the engine model and the generator hardware. In particular, the rotor dynamics model that provides the critical link between the modeled dynamics of the engine and the measured dynamics of the generator is described in detail. Careful consideration for the measured torque is included since the measurement contains inertial effects as well as torsional resonances. In addition, the rotor model is equipped with the ability to apply power and speed scaling between the engine and generator. This scaling approach provides significant flexibility that can be useful when hardware resources are limited such that a direct engine-generator match is not possible or when one wants to evaluate turboshaft engine dynamics for a variety of applications and power levels.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2144
Marco Amrhein, Jason Wells, Eric Walters, Seana McNeal, Brett Jordan, Peter Lamm
Abstract Transient operating conditions in electrical systems not only have significant impact on the operating behavior of individual components but indirectly affect system and component reliability and life. Specifically, transient loads can cause additional loss in the electrical conduction path consisting of windings, power electronic devices, distribution wires, etc., particularly when loads introduce high peak vs. average power ratios. The additional loss increases the operating temperatures and thermal cycling in the components, which is known to reduce their life and reliability. Further, mechanical stress caused by dynamic loading, which includes load torque cycling and high peak torque loading, increases material fatigue and thus reduces expected service life, particularly on rotating components (shaft, bearings). This article investigates the aforementioned stress mechanisms and provides analysis techniques and metrics to quantify the impact of transient operating conditions onto system and component reliability and life.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2163
Mario Luca Fravolini, Matthew Rhudy, Srikanth Gururajan, Silvia Cascianelli, Marcello Napolitano
Abstract A measurement device that is extremely important for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) guidance and control purposes is the airspeed sensor. As the parameters of feedback control laws are conventionally scheduled as a function of airspeed, an incorrect reading (e.g. due to a sensor fault) of the Pitot-static tube could induce an incorrect feedback control action, potentially leading to the loss of control of the UAV. The objective of this study is to establish the accuracy and reliability of the two airspeed estimation techniques for eventual use as the basis for real-time fault detection of anomalies occurring on the Pitot-static tube sensor. The first approach is based on an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and the second approach is based on Least Squares (LS) modeling. The EKF technique utilizes nonlinear kinematic relations between GPS, Inertial Measurement Unit and Air Data System signals and has the advantage of independence from knowledge of the aircraft model. The LS method is based on explicit knowledge of the aircraft model and has the advantage of on-line computation of the airspeed estimate, with minimal computational effort.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2143
Ralf D. Pechstedt
Abstract Recently, there has been an increasing interest in Fiber Optic Sensors (FOS) for aircraft applications. Many of the FOS are based on different transducer mechanisms and hence, employ sensor-specific readout systems. However, for ease of maintenance and cost saving purposes, a ‘universal interrogator’ that can be used with at least a large sub-group of sensors is the preferred option for deployment in aircraft. Oxsensis has been developing sensors for harsh environments with focus on land based gas-turbine monitoring and combustion control and more recently is also looking at applying its technology to other areas such as Aerospace and Oil & Gas. In this paper we report on recent progress on the development of a number of FOS and how these could find application in aircraft with a ‘universal interrogator’ concept in mind.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2227
Thierry Cornilleau, Pierre Linard, Paul Moxon, Christopher Nicholas
Abstract ECOA is an active software architecture research programme conducted by the French Republic and United Kingdom. It is one product of the recent Defence and Security Co-operation Treaty signed between the two nations. This paper provides an overview of the programme goals and progress as well as an introduction to the technology being developed and comparison to related initiatives. The goal of the ECOA programme is to define an open software architecture that enables collaborative development of mission system software. The ECOA programme is needed to reduce development and lifecycle costs of future military air programmes. For this reason the programme has a specific focus on combat-air mission systems but the underlying technology is general purpose, applying to multiple military and civil domains. At present, the programme has defined a concept, delivered a set of initial technical standards and produced a joint demonstrator to validate the technology developed.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2110
David Gras, Christophe Pautrel, Amir Fanaei, Gregory Thepaut, Maxime Chabert, Fabien Laplace, Gonzalo Picun
Abstract In this paper we present a set of integrated circuits specifically designed for high temperature power applications such as isolated power transistor drivers and high efficiency power supplies. The XTR26010 is the key circuit for the isolated power gate drive application. The XTR26010 circuit has been designed with a high focus in offering a robust, reliable and efficient solution for driving a large variety of high-temperature, high-voltage, and high-efficiency power transistors (SiC, GaN, Si) existing in the market. The XTR40010 is used for isolated data communication between a microcontroller or a PWM controller and the power driver (XTR26010). The isolated power transistor driver features a dual turn-on channel, a turn-off channel and a Miller Clamp channel with more than 3A peak current drive strength for each channel. The dV/dt immunity between XTR26010 and XTR40010 exceeds 50kV/μs. To demonstrate the performance and reliability at system level, a half-bridge driver test-board has been developed for driving SiC MOSFETs.
Viewing 211 to 240 of 21010

Filter

  • Article
    2394
  • Book
    172
  • Collection
    45
  • Magazine
    934
  • Technical Paper
    12610
  • Standard
    4855