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Magazine
1966-12-01
Standard
1966-12-01
This SAE Standard serves as a guide for testing procedures of automotive 12 V storage batteries and as a publication providing information on container holddown configuration and terminal geometry. The ratings submitted are to be based on procedures described in this document. The ratings submitted must be of a level that when any subsequent significant sample is tested in accordance with this document, that at least 90% of the batteries shall meet the ratings. The choice of 90% compliance recognizes that batteries consist of many plates and require chemical-electrical formation procedures and small variations in test conditions and procedures can affect the performance of individual batteries. Future Considerations - In order to expedite the release of this revision of the Standard, several topic areas were deferred for consideration in future revisions. These items include, but may not be limited to, the following: post dimension modifications, battery technology agnosticism, and a new, more application relevant charge acceptance test.
Magazine
1966-10-01
Standard
1966-09-01
No scope available.
Standard
1966-08-15
This recommended practice sets forth the design objectives for handling qualities applicable to transport aircraft operating in the subsonic, transonic and supersonic speed range. These objectives are not necessarily applicable to rotor or VTOL aircraft.
Magazine
1966-08-01
Standard
1966-08-01
This Aerospace Information Report, (AIR) is intended to provide the sponsors of Aerospace Standards, (AS), with standard wording, formatting, and minimum environment and design requirements for use in the preparation of their document. The individual shall use only those parts of this AIR which apply to their particular document. The individual sponsor may expand the standard wording, especially under Sections 4, 5, and 6 as required. The paragraphs of this AIR shall be used verbatim wherever possible. Unless otherwise directed by SAE, cross referenced documents shall be called out by specific revision letter, e.g. "shall be in accordance with AS XXXXB." In addition, all non-SAE documents called out shall include the document title when initially identified. However, every effort shall be made to keep cross-referencing to an absolute minimum.
Standard
1966-07-01
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the overall requirements applicable to oxygen flow indicating devices intended to operate in conjunction with an oxygen regulator and mask system. Flow indicators covered by this document are for use with pressure demand, diluter-demand and continuous flow oxygen systems.
Standard
1966-06-20
This technical report documents three surveys to determine realistic vibration requirements for skid control systems specifications and obtain updated vibration information for locations in aircraft where skid control system components are mounted.
Magazine
1966-06-01
Standard
1966-06-01
This standard establishes the essential minimum safe performance standards for exhaust gas temperature instruments primarily for use with turbine powered, subsonic aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in paragraph 3.3 et seq. The exhaust gas temperature instruments covered by this standard are of the electrical servonull balance type, actuated by varying emf output of one or more parallel connected Chromel-Alumel thermocouples.
Standard
1966-05-15
This standard covers three basic types of total-temperature-measuring instruments used as a means of determining the total temperature developed by adiabatic heating of the air due to motion of the aircraft through the air. This standard establishes essential minimum safe performance requirements for total temperature measuring instruments, primarily for use with turbine-powered subsonic transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in this report.
Standard
1966-04-01
This document covers the general recommendations for cabin lighting in order to provide satisfactory illumination for, but not limited to: a. Boarding and deplaning b. Movement about the cabin c. Reading d. Use of lavatories e. Use of work areas f. Exiting under emergency conditions g. Using stowage compartments, coat rooms, and closets h. Using interior stairways and elevators (lifts)
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
R. C. Schmidt
Since standard highway trucks rarely include cold starting provisions as standard equipment, accessories must be provided to assist the starting. The author defines cold start with respect to temperature ranges, and then details equipment requirements for starting in each range. Available equipment is described, as is the operation of the engine after starting.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
Kurt K. Stubenvoll, Frank J. Mulligan
Every truck can be a cold-weather truck. A simple 25 amp wiring arrangement, plugged into a 110 v outlet at the terminal before the truck's daily run, activates a series of immersion heating elements which will raise the engine, radiator, battery, and the fuel in the tanks to summer starting temperatures. The results will be elimination of cold-weather downtime in ambients of as low as −40 F, and assurance of normal battery life, without the addition of any maintenance items such as plumbing or hosing systems.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
P. H. Schweitzer, Carl Volz, Frank DeLuca
A feedback-type electronic control system has been developed for optimizing the performance of power producing machines. The device continuously corrects the setting (for instance, spark timing) of the machine for best power, which usually is also the point of best fuel economy. Instead of adjusting the setting from the outside, the engine is enabled to select its own best setting and to correct it continuously to always maximize the power output. The device consists of four principal components: the dither, which oscillates the setting continuously between narrow preset limits; the celsig, which senses the most minute accelerations; the control, which receives signals from the two; and a servo, which receives commands from the control and adjusts the setting.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
J. W. Brodhacker
Negative plate life has been improved by reducing the rate of sulfation of the battery. Chemistry of sulfation is briefly reviewed and factors in battery design contributing to improved sulfation-life are discussed. Emphasis is given to the “oil negative,” which not only reduces sulfation of the wet battery but has been found to prevent effectively the oxidation of dry charged negative plates.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
J. D. JENKS
Modern automobiles have a number of electrical circuits devoted to providing visual signals to the driver by means of indicator lamps. The circuits using indicator lamps found in Ford cars are reviewed, including both the indicators which are required by law, as well as those which are offered optionally. The unique characteristics of certain car models dictate variations in circuitry to accomplish a function similar to all models. In some cases, circuits and components are developed to achieve special features.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
Daniel Orlando, Thomas Oswald
Modern storage batteries must provide greater starting power to meet the demands of today's engines. An effective method of increasing starting power is to reduce the resistance of the cell connectors. Cell connectors formed by resistance welding through the partition prove to be reliable and efficient connections, meeting all requirements for storage battery use. Batteries made with this type of cell connector provide considerably more starting power, particularly at low temperatures. This construction has been applied to all types of automotive batteries.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
Rine Kruger, J. W. Barrick
Abstract Battery ratings set forth by the S.A.E. Standard are used to specify minimum charge and discharge characteristics and minimum life standards. Some deficiencies with present ratings are discussed as well as the requirements for a good battery rating. Factors such as temperature, current, state of charge, electrolyte concentration, and battery age must be considered in any rating. The development of performance equations as a new rating method is suggested to widen the scope of present measures of performance.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
Raymond E. Zirkle
Pulsed ruby laser optical radars were used to examine the feasibility of turbulence detection in laboratory test chambers and afield. Many returns obtained showed evidence of particle concentration variations, but none were identified as interactions with either turbulence or correlates of rough flying. Calculations and recently reported experimental evidence show that c-w laser doppler optars might eventually measure wind velocity components and gust spectra.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
Joel Greene, Salvatore Roberto, Marcus Lewinstein
This paper deals with techniques of photometric measurements of starlight variations which propagate along a line of sight coincident with the flight profile of a jet aircraft. Thus, a CAT “volume” intersecting this flight path may be detected at some prior point in time and compared to non-turbulent measurements. A star tracker will produce information which by statistical processing will establish a threshold for advanced warning of CAT. Recommendations are presented for night time feasibility tests to be made with operational hardware under controlled conditions. Daytime tests requiring the measurement of weak bodies in high ambient conditions poses severe problems.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
R. C. Breece, D. L. Fried, J. B. Seidman
A concept for detection of clear air turbulence utilizing the Doppler frequency shift in laser light backscattered from atmospheric aerosol is described. The concept employs detection of beat frequencies in the output current of a photodetector resulting from photo mixing the backscattered light from two laser pulses illuminating separated volumes of air. Analysis of the spectral and coherence properties of scattered light is given which proves that the basic phenomena exists. The realizability of a practical system depends upon sufficient aerosol densities and higher performance lasers to achieve adequate S/N at useful distances.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
Lloyd G. Cross
A scanning optical radar system for meterological studies is briefly described. The techniques of obtaining efficient, high pulse repetition rates from a ruby laser, scanning the transmitter and receiver beams, and the operation of the B scope area display are discussed.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
P. A. Franken, J. A. Jenney, D. M. Rank
Conclusions based on the airborne experiments with laser radars are summarized in this paper. Details of the equipment and the flight procedures will be displayed during the oral presentation at the conference.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
Eric M. Wormser
Air temperature gradients are frequently associated with Clear Air Turbulence. Radiation measuring instruments have already been used for the remote sensing of air temperature. A suitably-designed instrument should give adequate warning of turbulence regions ahead and provide an opportunity for their avoidance. A spectral scanning infrared radiometer has been designed for this purpose and is described in this paper. Extensive ground tests have been conducted, including making atmospheric temperature analyses in horizontal and vertical directions. Mountaintop tests are being planned and airborne tests will follow. Detection ranges of 25 miles are anticipated.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
David Atlas, Kenneth R. Hardy, Keikichi Naito
An analysis is made of the spectrum of refractivity fluctuations in regions of CAT and of its radar reflectivity as a function of wavelength. The results are compared to the minimum detectable reflectivity of airborne radars having optimum state of the art characteristics at each wavelength. It is shown that the best radars now feasible can barely detect the most reflective CAT at 10 na. mi. (i.e. 1 minute warning). A 20 db improvement in sensitivity is required for detection of most CAT, which appears to be just attainable by pre-detection integration. The optimum wavelength to implement is 5 - 6 cm. The best radar at this wavelength will also detect cirrus clouds reliably. Whether detecting clouds, chaff, or direct CAT echoes, a measure of the echo fluctuation (or Doppler) spectrum is required to identify the intensity of CAT. It is also demonstrated that a ground-based forward-scatter link holds great promise for reliable CAT detection.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
Joseph E. Nanevicz, Edward F. Vance, Sidney M. Serebreny
The results of a cooperative effort by Stanford Research Institute, United Air Lines, and Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories to determine the correlation between regions of clear air turbulence (CAT) and aircraft electrical activity are described. Corona discharges from precipitation static dischargers on DC-8 aircraft were monitored and correlated with CAT encounters. A significant correlation was found to exist between CAT encounters and periods of electrical discharge. It is suggested that these electrical discharges may be caused by electric fields in the region of clear-air turbulence, particulate matter in the region that charges the aircraft, or a combination of both. The results of a meteorological analysis of the regions where turbulence associated with electrical activity was observed indicated that the CAT incidents were of typical kinds that are associated with jet streams.
Technical Paper
1966-02-01
H. W. TenBroek, C. R. Seashore
The results of an investigation of the low frequency electrostatic field characteristics of clear air turbulence are presented. Brief descriptions are included of the general theory and practical aspects of the field sensing antennas used during the program and the electronic instrumentation used in data-gathering flights and subsequent data reduction. The data from a ridgeline turbulence encounter is analyzed with respect to frequency content in the decade bandwidths from 0.1 cps to 2000 cps. The results reveal turbulence-generated signals in the 0.1-10.0 cps region which differ from pre- and post- encounter norms, presenting the possibility of anticipating the encounter. The direction of future effort is described.
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