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1980-06-01
Standard
J928_198006
This SAE Standard covers general requirements and terminal interface dimensions of various sizes of pin and receptacle type terminals.
1980-06-01
Standard
J1292_198006
This document is being revised to remove the references made to Truck, Truck Tractor and Trailer per the agreement between the SAE Truck and Bus Electrical Systems Subcommittee and the SAE Electrical Distribution System Standards Committee. The Truck and Bus committee has replaced the referenced documents with newer SAE documents. The documents that supersede SAE J1292 are SAE 2174 "Heavy Duty Wiring Systems for Trailers more than 2032 MM or More in Width" and SAE J2202 "Heavy Duty Wiring Systems For On Highway Trucks".
1980-06-01
Standard
J1127_198006
This standard covers low voltage battery cable intended for use at a nominal system voltage of 60 V DC (25 V AC) or less in surface vehicle electrical systems. The tests are intended to qualify cables for normal applications with limited exposure to fluids and physical abuse.
1980-04-01
Standard
J1294_198004
This recommended practice covers distributors used on marine engines. To provide recommendations and guidelines for the evaluation, design, and testing of distributors to be used on marine engines.
1980-04-01
Standard
J1286_198004
To establish a uniform test method to measure static thrust of an electric outboard. This method covers all electric outboards.
1980-04-01
Technical Paper
800771
Dale A. Young
A new jet fuel filtration monitoring system and technique is described which provides an assessment of the current performance and signals the end of the useful life of filter/separator and clay treatment elements. The need for such a system has long been recognized by the aircraft fueling industry to indicate when surface active agent type contaminants in jet fuels are no longer efficiently removed by clay treatment and/or interfere with the water coalescence function of the filter separator. The system, which has been developed and called a Filter Sidestream Sensor, operates on a sidestream with dynamic similarity to the main filter separator or clay vessel. It has been designed to provide a cumulative history of all factors which affect filter performance. Correlations between Filter Sidestream Sensor and main filter performance are provided together with data on the effects of surfactants–both natural and additive types, and the role played by water in coalescence deactivation.
1980-04-01
Technical Paper
800691
Gene H. Miller
The integrated circuit manufacturing technology has advanced rapidly and steadily since the introduction of the first microprocessor. Ever increasing chip sizes and densities along with increasing numbers of pins per package have been the result. These advances have enabled IC manufacturers to put all of the functional electronics of a microcomputer into a single integrated circuit. This evolution and the resulting single chip microcomputers are described.
1980-04-01
Technical Paper
800682
Kim W. Wilson
Radio Control of earthmoving equipment was originally introduced to relieve bulldozer operators of the intense heat and dust which was underneath the basic oxygen furnaces at steel mills. With proper insulating and other related safeguards, the remotely controlled bulldozers can even operate under the furnaces while they are still in use. Other companies use remotely controlled loaders and/or bulldozers to excavate basements underneath existing buildings, or on treacherous terrain. Whatever the application, technology and safeguards have made this a very reliable and safe system for both the operator and the earthmoving equipment itself.
1980-04-01
Technical Paper
800734
Gilbert F. Quinby
This paper presents a review of the use of the airspace and the air traffic control system. Safety, capacity and efficiency of this use under Visual Flight Rules (VFR) are compared with the evolving constraints imposed by operations under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). The concept of Electronic Flight Rules (EFR) as developed by Topic Group III on Freedom of Airspace in the FAA’s 1978–79 E & D Initiatives Process is reviewed. The potential for conservation of air traffic control manpower and aircraft fuel is further developed. Promising areas for further technical exploration are noted. The paper concludes with some considerations for co-existence of VFR, IFR, and EFR traffic during a transition period.
1980-04-01
Technical Paper
800737
R. R. Newbery, R. W. Jones
The paper describes a closely coordinated UK research programme involving Research Establishments and Industry in hardware design, simulator tests and flight trials to investigate the interfaces and interactions between Advanced Flight Systems, the Aircrew and Air Traffic Control, Reference is made to the work of the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE) to describe developments in Air Traffic Management. Work in the UK on Flight Deck design has centred on the Advanced Flight Deck simulator at British Aerospace, Weybridge, and an example of their work is described. The flight test programme of the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) Bedford BAC 1–11 and its equipment fit are described, together with recent examples of area navigation accuracy achieved in flight using conventional ground aids. A future programme is discussed in which the integration of all these new system elements will be investigated. Some of the problems which will be addressed are discussed.
1980-04-01
Technical Paper
800736
Harry A. Verstynen
Many different roles have been postulated for the cockpit traffic display during the more than 30 years since its first proposal. Many years of research have shown that the concept may have significant potential for improving safety, capacity, and efficiency in the ATC system, but also may have potential for creating new problems in the process of resolving others. This paper reviews the dimensions of the CDTI problem and discusses some of the possible benefits and liabilities associated with various roles such a concept might serve in the evolutionary development of the future air traffic control system.
1980-04-01
Technical Paper
800624
Richard Lukso
The business jet industry is in the midst of a prolific avionics revolution which, if not properly integrated, will soon result in a semi-crisis of having used up all the panel space, all black box space, lowered reliability, and increased weight. It can be alleviated if our industry joins together to plan for its advent.
1980-04-01
Technical Paper
800627
Paul Rauschelbach
Future developments in business jet autopilots will build on present day configurations using technological advancements such as microprocessors, memory systems, solid state sensors, and electronic displays. The architecture of future autopilots will be further integrated with peripheral systems, dual redundant in configuration, and interconnected on a digital bus, and will utilize solid state displays. Operational features including new modes, improved reliability, self monitoring and maintenance tests will also be found in future business jet autopilots.
1980-04-01
Technical Paper
800626
Gregory W. Tomsic
Flight Management Systems promise to be of considerable use in the aircraft cockpit of the 1980’s. By providing to the pilot and aircraft operator a consolidated system to simplify the flight management task while optimizing aircraft operating time and saving fuel, these systems will and should be considered a necessary ingredient in the 1980’s avionics shipset. Perhaps their greatest asset will be their ability to reduce the time that the pilot spends on tasks that take his attention away from his primary objective -- safe aircraft flight.
1980-04-01
Standard
J107_198004
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to two- and three-wheeled motorcycles intended for highway use. Vehicles commonly known as mpoeds and mini-bikes are included in this vehicle category if they are intended for highway use. This document is intended to provide guides toward standard location and operation of motorcycle controls and standard identification of displays to reduce the possibility of operator confusion.
1980-04-01
Standard
J297_198004
This SAE Standard is intended to improve operator efficiency and convenience by providing guidelines for the uniformity of location and direction of motion of operator controls used on industrial wheeled equipment. The controls covered are those centrally located at the operator's normal position. General These guidelines are based on the principle that a given direction of movement of any control produces a consistent and expected effect. Where confusion may result from the motion of the control, the effect from movement of the control shall be clearly and permanently identified.
1980-03-01
Standard
J819_198003
This SAE Standard applies to all self-propelled construction and industrial machines using liquid-cooled internal combustion engines. The purpose of this code is to provide a procedure to determine the cooling system reserve capacity under the conditions existing when tested.
1980-02-01
Technical Paper
800056
Kenji Ikeura, Akio Hosaka, Tsuneomi Yano
A microcomputer control system for managing the automotive engine’s air-fuel ratio, spark ignition timing, exhaust gas recirculation and idle speed has been developed and is marketed in Japan under the name of ECCS. By installing this system in a 1,500 kg vehicle’s 6 cylinder 2.8 liter engine, the four factors listed above have been controlled so precisely that their optimum relative calibration has been realized. As a result, fuel economy has been improved by 10% while good drivability has been maintained. This paper outlines ECCS and describes how control factors in a “steady state” are determined. It also discusses the control sequence in transient conditions, such as “cold” starts, “hot” restarts, clutch engagement, acceleration, deceleration, gearshifts and the “warm-up” process.
1980-02-01
Technical Paper
800062
E. Frank Echolds
New electronically commutated traction motors for electric vehicles may offer improved efficiency over a wider load range, lower weight, and potentially lower cost than conventional brush type machines. Two new electronically commutated traction motors are described along with predicted and measured performance data. The motors are being developed for NASA as part of the Department of Energy electric and hybrid vehicle program.
1980-02-01
Technical Paper
800126
Leonard P. Gau
Pneumatic pulsation resulting from vortex precession is the advantageous feature being utilized in the adaptation of a precision instrumentational quality flowmeter to vehicular power plant fuel control.
1980-02-01
Technical Paper
800117
Robin G. Adams
The auto industry is facing significantly tighter supply conditions and greater market instability for copper, lead and zinc in the Eighties. Lack of past investment in new mines, increased political intervention in the mining industry, the growing import dependence of the United States and greater reliance on terminal commodity markets will further compound the difficult purchasing environment.
1980-02-01
Technical Paper
800124
J. David Marks, Michael J. Sinko
The Wiegand Effect has been applied as an ignition trigger in several configurations of automotive distributors. Recent advances in the design of magnetic excitation systems for the Wiegand Effect have made possible considerable improvement in such distributors. The improved magnetic circuit has made possible the development of a crankshaft position sensor for deriving the top-dead-center and speed signals. The design lends itself to actuation by suitable notched discs, or directly from the teeth of the flywheel ring gear.
1980-02-01
Technical Paper
800112
Robert Kaiser, Charles Graver
The mobility of the existing personal-vehicle fleet is provided by a refueling infrastructure consisting of petroleum refiners, distributors, and service stations. This paper identifies the equivalent infrastructure that would be required to support a fleet of electric vehicles (EV), and analyzes the current status in the United States of its major components. The components include the electric utility companies, the types of dwellings at which it would be practical to recharge electric vehicles overnight, and methods for providing range extension, i.e., additional vehicle range without overnight recharging. Many of these elements are already in place. The US utility industry has sufficient capacity to support at least 13 million EVs, if they are recharged at night. There are at least 20 million single-family homes where it would be possible to recharge an EV by adding a branch circuit and outlet with a rating of 230 volts at 50 amperes.
1980-02-01
Technical Paper
800351
N. Sato, T. Miyazaki, J. Suehiro
Recently developed analog fluorescent indicator panels (FIPs) of linear and circular bar graph types are introduced. This paper discusses the technical problems and improvement methods made in the development of analog FIPs. Particularly fine pattern technologies on substrates and improvements of grid edge effects with dynamic drive conditions (including driving methods) are described.
1980-02-01
Technical Paper
800340
Paul H. Greenlee, Robert W. Crum
Downsizing of todays automobile has created component packaging problems for the automotive engineer. One solution has been the application of electroluminescent (E. L.) lighting in place of incandescent lighting. In addition to superior packaging and flexibility, this lighting provides softer, more uniform appearance with minimal weight and power consumption. The purpose of this paper is to explain E. L. and its application to the automotive industry.
1980-02-01
Technical Paper
800357
Bernard Miller
A new five volt instrumentation voltage regulator has been designed for automotive electronic systems. Very low quiescent current and low dropout voltage promises applications in standby systems, such as microprocessor memory supplies, while reverse battery protection and transient protection shields the regulator and load from the hazards of the automotive electrical environment.
1980-02-01
Technical Paper
800355
Roy Richards
Engineering relationships between high technology semiconductor manufacturers and automotive manufacturers are becoming increasingly important as the amount of electronics on an automobile increases dramatically in the 1980’s. Understanding of the economic, technological, chronological and production relationships is outlined as it effects design of automotive electronic systems. The most used semiconductor technologies are reviewed with data on technical and economical guidelines. Methods of estimating circuit cost using defect density and chip complexity are illustrated. Partitioning and development timing are important aspects of system design and along with product engineering issues require close communication.
1980-02-01
Technical Paper
800356
Mitchell Gooze
The single-chip microcomputer is coming into its own as the state-of-the-art is MOS integrated circuit design advances. LSI technology made possible the original single-chip microcomputers and VLSI technology is bringing about a revolution in single-chip microcomputer capability. This paper discusses the world of single-chip microcomputers from low-end four bit architectures to high performance 16-bit architectures and describes some of the tradeoffs involved in each product area.
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