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Viewing 151 to 180 of 3061
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0029
Chuanliangzi Liu, Bo Chen, Ming Cheng, Anthony Champagne, Keyur Patel
Abstract The Electronic Control Unit (ECU) of an Electric Power Steering (EPS) system is a core device to decide how much assistance an electric motor applies on a steering wheel. The EPS ECU plays an important role in EPS systems. The effectiveness of an ECU needs to be thoroughly tested before mass production. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation provides an efficient way for the development and testing of embedded controllers. This paper focuses on the development of a HiL system for testing EPS controllers. The hardware of the HiL system employs a dSPACE HiL simulator. The EPS plant model is an integrated model consisting of a Vehicle Dynamics model of the dSPACE Automotive Simulation Model (ASM) and the Nexteer Steering model. The paper presents the design of an EPS HiL system, the simulation of sensors and actuators, the functions of the ASM Vehicle Dynamics model, and the integration method of the ASM Vehicle Dynamics model with a Steering model.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0028
Ali Shahrokni, Peter Gergely, Jan Söderberg, Patrizio Pelliccione
Abstract In areas such as Active Safety, new technologies, designs (e.g. AUTOSAR) and methods are introduced at a rapid pace. To address the new demands, and also requirements on Functional Safety imposed by ISO 26262, the support for engineering methods, including tools and data management, needs to evolve as well. Generic and file-based data management tools, like spreadsheet tools, are popular in the industry due to their flexibility and legacy in the industry but provide poor control and traceability, while rigid and special-purpose tools provide structure and control of data but with limited evolvability. As organizations become agile, the need for flexible data management increases. Since products become more complex and developed in larger and distributed teams, the need for more unified, controlled, and consistent data increases.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0031
Wenxu Niu, Ke Song, Yucheng He, Tong Zhang
Abstract X-in-the-loop (XiL) framework is a new validation concept for vehicle product development, which integrates different virtual and physical components to improve the development efficiency. With XiL platform the requirements of reproducible test, optimization and validation, in which hardware, equipment and test objects are located in different places, could be realized. In the view of different location and communication form of hardware, equipment and test objects, time delay problem exists in the XiL platform, which could have a negative impact on development and validation process. In this paper, a simulation system of time delay prediction and compensation is founded with the help of BP neural network and RBF neural network. With this simulation system the effect of time delay in a vehicle dynamic model as well as tests of geographically distributed vehicle powertrain system is improved during the validation process.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0030
Jungkyum Yu, Geesu Lee, Hyunsung Lee, Jaepoong Lee, Kwangil Kim, Youngsuk Kim, Sangkyong Lee, Sangwoo Jeon, Kyongsu Yi
Abstract As an effective approach for the design, implementation and test of control systems, hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) test has been used in many research areas. This paper describes a real-time HIL simulation test for an automotive electronic control system. The HIL system proposed in this paper consists of three parts: real-time target hardware, electronic control unit (ECU) of the automotive electronic control systems and a signal-conditioning unit which regulates the voltage levels between real-time target and ECU. The HIL simulation evaluates mechanical and electronic behaviors in real time using off-line simulation models by interfacing real-target with electrical control units via interface box. The model has been developed by MATLAB/Simulink. The model is composed of mechanical part which predicts dynamic behaviors and electronic part to calculate the motor speeds, current and electronic loads under the various conditions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0034
Shunsuke Kobuna, Tomoyuki Kaga, Tomoya Yamaguchi
Abstract As vehicle control software becomes larger and more complex, it is increasingly important to improve the efficiency of the software development process. This study developed search-based testing technology to increase the efficiency of the validation process. Search-based testing can generate dynamic test data automatically, but it tends to overlook the generation of correct test data to detect problems when the software has many branches and paths. To resolve this problem, a method was devised that combines search-based testing [1] and formal methods such as model checking. This paper describes this method and shows application examples of engine control.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0032
Siddartha Khastgir, Gunwant Dhadyalla, Paul Jennings
Abstract The introduction of ISO 26262 concepts has brought important changes in the software development process for automotive software. While making the process more robust by introducing various additional methods of verification and validation, there has been a substantial increase in the development time. Thus, test automation and front loading approaches have become important to meet product timelines and quality. This paper proposes automated testing methods using formal analysis tools like Simulink Design Verifier™ (SLDV) for boundary value testing and interface testing to address the demands of ISO 26262 concepts at unit and component level. In addition, the method of automated boundary value testing proposed differs from the traditional methods and the authors offer an argument as to why the traditional boundary value testing is not required at unit (function) level.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0037
Hariharan Venkitachalam, Dirk von Wissel, Johannes Richenhagen
Abstract Powertrain software development for series production faces multifaceted challenges related to high functional complexity, high quality standards, reduced time to market and high development costs. Software architecture tackles the above mentioned challenges by breaking down the complexity of application software into modular components. Hence, design errors introduced during that phase cause significant cost and time deviations. Early and repeated analysis of new and modified architecture artifacts is required to detect design errors and the impact of the subsequent changes in the software architecture. Engine management software has a high degree of functional complexity and large number of system variants depending upon market requirements. This paper deals with the methods to perform automated evaluation of Renault’s EMS 2012 Engine Management Software in a Continuous Integration Framework.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0035
Amey Zare, Advaita Datar, R Venkatesh, Miwako Hasegawa
Abstract Finite State Machines (FSMs) are used at various stages of software development, from the initial concept of software system to the lowest level implementation. These FSMs communicate non-deterministically with the other FSMs and the environment of the underlying system. Any inappropriate handling of the communication across multiple FSMs or environment may lead to unexpected behavior of the underlying system. Manual detection of the root cause of such unexpected behavior is effort intensive. Moreover, state of art techniques focus mainly on design level review of communicating FSMs (Comm-FSMs), and no technique is available for systematic review of Comm-FSMs at implementation level. In this paper we present a review technique for detecting inconsistencies in the implementation of Comm-FSMs.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0040
Ming Meng, Wilson Khoo
The modern vehicle development is highly dependent on software. The software development plays an extremely important role in vehicle safety and security. In order to ensure software high quality and safety standards, we have investigated the secure software development process and analyzed the works in this area. Based on our analysis, we have identified the similarities and differences between the secure software development process and the existing vehicle development process. We then made suggestions on how to adopt the secure software development process in the overall vehicle development process.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0041
Florin Maticu, Paul Pop, Christian Axbrink, Mafijul Islam
Abstract The automotive electronic architectures have moved from federated architectures, where one function is implemented in one ECU (Electronic Control Unit), to distributed architectures, where several functions may share resources on an ECU. In addition, multicore ECUs are being adopted because of better performance, cost, size, fault-tolerance and power consumption. In this paper we present an approach for the automatic software functionality assignment to multicore distributed architectures. We consider that the systems use the AUTomotive Open System ARchitecture (AUTOSAR). The functionality is modeled as a set of software components composed of subtasks, called runnables, in AUTOSAR terminology.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0039
Karsten Schmidt, Andreas Schulze, Kai R. Richter
Abstract New technologies such as multi-core and Ethernet provide vastly improved computing and communications capabilities. This sets the foundation for the implementation of new digital megatrends in almost all areas: driver assistance, vehicle dynamics, electrification, safety, connectivity, autonomous driving. The new challenge: We must share these computing and communication capacities among all vehicle functions and their software. For this step, we need a good resource planning to minimize the probability of late resource bottlenecks (e.g. overload, lack of real-time capability, quality loss). In this article, we summarize the status quo in the field of resource management and provide an outlook on the challenges ahead.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0038
Priti Ranadive, Somnath Sengupta, Narendra Kumar, Naveen Boggarapu, Vinay Vaidya
Abstract Automobiles are getting more and more sophisticated with increased demand for more comfort and safety by customers. Due to this, the automotive Electronic Control Units (ECU) and the software applications running on these ECUs have become more complex and computationally more intensive. This has resulted in Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) migrating to multicore platforms. Optimal usage of multicore platform necessitates the design of new scheduling algorithms. In the past decade, different approaches to implement hard real time scheduling in automotive domain have been proposed for single core as well as multicore architectures. We explore different scheduling techniques proposed so far which are relevant to automotive domain and also, provide a taxonomy of these scheduling algorithms, which will help the automotive design engineer to make an informed decision.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0046
Markus Ernst, Mario Hirz, Jurgen Fabian
Abstract A steady increasing share and complexity of automotive software is a huge challenge for quality management during software development and in-use phases. In cases of faults occurring in customer’s use, warranty leads to product recalls which are typically associated with high costs. To avoid software faults efficiently, quality management and enhanced development processes have to be realized by the introduction of specific analysis methods and Key Process/Performance Indicators (KPIs) to enable objective quality evaluations as soon as possible during product development process. The paper introduces an application of specific analysis methods by using KPIs and discusses their potential for automotive software quality improvement. Target is to support quality evaluation and risk-analysis for the release process of automotive software.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0047
Umesh Patel, Sreenivasa Parnasala, Chamaraj Melinmath, KM Khalid, Chandrakantha Ursu
RACam [1] is an Active Safety product designed and manufactured at Delphi and is part of their ADAS portfolio. It combines two sensors - Electronically Scanned RADAR and Camera in a single package. RADAR and Vision fusion data is used to realize safety critical systems such as Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC), Autonomous Emergency Braking (AEB), Lane Departure Warning (LDW), Lane Keep Assist (LKA), Traffic Sign Recognition (TSR) and Automatic Headlight Control (AHL). Figure 1 RACam Front View. With an increase in Active Safety features in the automotive market there is also a corresponding increase in the complexity of the hardware which supports these safety features. Delphi’s hardware design for Active Safety has evolved over the years. In Delphi’s RACam product there are a number of critical components required in order to realize RADAR and Vision in a single package. RACam is also equipped with a fan and heater to improve the operating temperature range.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0045
Takanori Uno, Akahori Ichiro, Yoichiro Hara
Abstract In this paper, consideration is made to create a simulation model of the BCI test method, which is one of the EMC evaluation methods for in-vehicle electronic devices, and an intrinsic model of a BCI probe is provided. Using this model, it is demonstrated that when the impedance of the BCI probe is sufficiently high, the BCI probe serves as a transformer with a winding ratio of 1:1, and the admittance of a line or a load connected to each wire becomes proportional to the magnitude of current flowing in each wire. This model can also be applied when the leakage inductance inside the BCI probe is taken into consideration. The validity of this model is verified by experiment using a jig which can clamp multiple wires. In addition, by using this model, it is demonstrated that the S-parameters for dozens of wires clamped in the BCI probe can be generated using the S-parameter measurement results from when one wire is in the BCI probe.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0048
Sundaravadivelu Kandavelu, Anil Kumar Velagapudi, Raghavendra Nese, Satish Thimmalapura
Abstract The effort involved in automotive software test/calibration at road level is very high and cost involved is also commendable because of the involved proto level samples. Further the on-road test/calibration process is sensitive to external factors like drive pattern and environmental conditions. It is always a challenge for any OEM, to come up with an efficient process, which optimizes development cost, time and reliability of the product. The model based test/calibration process is always a dream for any engineer to work on, as it has big advantage of cost, reproducibility and repeatability of test cases [1]. But the challenge lies in achieving the closeness to reality with limited availability of crucial data for model parameterization. Activity at test bed level bridges the gap between the on-road and model based test/calibration achieving high maturity level at optimal cost/time. Current vehicle has many systems, which work in synergy to create an impact on end customer.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0049
Jinwei Zhou, Roman Schmied, Alexander Sandalek, Helmut Kokal, Luigi del Re
Abstract Virtual testing of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) using a simulation environment provides great potential in reducing real world testing and therefore currently much effort is spent on the development of such tools. This work proposes a simulation and hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) framework, which helps to create a virtual test environment for ADAS based on real world test drive. The idea is to reproduce environmental conditions obtained on a test drive within a simulation environment. For this purpose, a production standard BMW 320d is equipped with a radar sensor to capture surrounding traffic objects and used as vehicle for test drives. Post processing of recorded GPS raw data from the navigation system using an open source map service and the radar data allows an exact reproduction of the driven road including other traffic participants.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0055
Mark Steffka, Cyrous Rostamzadeh
Abstract Automotive systems can generate un-intentional radio frequency energy. The levels of these emissions must be below maximum values set by the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) for customer satisfaction and/or in order to meet governmental requirements. Due to the complexity of electromagnetic coupling mechanisms that can occur on a vehicle, many times it is difficult to measure and identify the noise source(s) without the use of an electromagnetic interference (EMI) receiver or spectrum analyzer (SA). An efficient and effective diagnostic solution can be to use a low-cost portable, battery powered RF detector with wide dynamic range as an alternative for automotive electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and design engineers to identify, locate, and resolve radio frequency (RF) noise problems. A practical circuit described here can be implemented easily with little RF design knowledge, or experience.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0052
Jihas Khan
Abstract HILS is a proven and essential part of the embedded product development life cycle which strives to reduce effort, time and cost spent on automotive validation activities. An efficient HILS system allows to create a precise simulation environment for the ECU which is made to believe that it is sitting inside a real vehicle and there by the intended functionalities implemented in the same could be tested even before the vehicle prototypes or other ECUs or sensors and actuators are available. An inefficient and faulty HILS system provides erroneous test results which could lead to wrong inferences. This paper is proposing a standardized process flow aided by specific documentation and design concepts which validates that the test system designed is robust and caters to the actual requirement. The Design stage starts by a requirement gathering phase where the analysis of the device under test is executed in detail.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0053
Abhishek Sharma
Abstract Today open source software is widely used in different domains like Desktop systems, Consumer electronics (smart phones, TV, washing machines, camera, printers, smart watches), Automotive, Automation etc. With the increased involvement of the open source software in the different domains including the safety critical ones, there has been a requirement of the well-defined test strategy to test and verify such systems. Currently there are multiple open source tools and frameworks to choose from. The paper describes the various open source test strategies and tools available to qualify such systems, their features, maintenance, community support, advantages and disadvantages. Target audience would be the software engineers, program managers, using an open source stack for the product development.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0060
Holger Zeltwanger
Abstract The CAN FD protocol internationally standardized in ISO 11898-1:2015 just describes how to implement it into silicon. The ISO 11898-2:2016 standard specifies the physical media attachment (PMA) sub-layer of the CAN (FD) physical layer. The design of CAN FD networks is not in the scope of these standards. In general, the physical layer design of CAN FD networks requires more attention compared with Classical CAN networks. First recommendations have been developed. Different standardization bodies have already specified or are in the process of specifying higher-layer protocols, for example ISO for on-board diagnostic, ASAM for calibration, etc.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0059
Christopher Quigley, Paul Faithfull, Simon Saunders, Neil Yates
The paper discusses the development and implementation of a form of in-vehicle communications for the body control in an Ariel Atom niche sports car. A Local Interconnect Network (LIN) bus has been developed that runs the LIN signals over the power lines of the vehicle wiring harness. The LIN system has one master and up to 15 slave ECUs. LIN is normally run at a maximum bit rate of 20 Kbit/s, however this system has been implemented at 57.6 Kbit/s by modulating over the power lines. Benefits of this approach include weight reduction, reduction in the number wires, ease in retro-fitting to existing vehicle architectures as only requires a connection to power lines and the ability to monitor the signals via the battery pins of the OBD connector of the vehicle. The approach has resulted in a reduction in weight due to wiring and electronic control unit reduction.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0058
Jihas Khan
Abstract Network Management protocols are implemented in ECUs to provide a start-up of the network, node monitoring and to ensure that they go to a proper sleep mode when they don’t need the network, coordination among ECUs, support of diagnosis, reading and setting of network specific parameters and proper wake up of the network. OSEK/VDX based network management protocol is the most widely used among OEMs and its validation has proved to be of utmost importance these days. This paper is proposing a scalable validation framework using the model based architecture and relevant hardware to test the conformance of ECUs to the specifications of OSEK/VDX NM. OSEK/VDX works mainly via the exchange of network management CAN messages between the ECUs.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0057
Eiji Taki, Yoshiro Hirata, Yoshifumi Ohmori, Naoji Kaneko, Hiroya Andou
Abstract The growing functionality and complexity of recent vehicle electronic systems have made inter-device communication (on-board LAN) technology vital to vehicle design. By field of application, the LAN (Local Area Network) systems currently in use are LIN (Local Interconnect Network) used for body systems, CAN (Controller Area Network) used for control systems, and MOST (Media Oriented Systems Transport ) used for multimedia and camera systems, and work to standardize the next-generation communication technology for each of those fields is underway. This paper provides a technical overview of the CXPI (Clock Extension Peripheral Interface) communication protocol, which satisfies the body system requirements (rapid response, system extensibility, high reliability, and low cost). It also presents the progress made on standardization at SAE and other organizations.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0064
Sandhya Lingadahalli, Sudhakaran Maydiga, Matthew Darin
The need for improved vehicle energy efficiency has increased greatly in recent years along with regulatory fuel economy standards. One key aspect of energy efficiency for both conventional and alternative propulsion vehicles is the energy efficiency of the electrical architecture. In the design of electrical architectures there are several techniques available to increase the energy efficiency. One technique is to manage CAN serial data communication by using Partial Networks. This paper describes a model based approach for simulating the vehicle network behavior when CAN Partial Networking is used as the strategy for need based ECU activation. The simulation results will in turn provide ECU power consumption data to support various electrical architecture design decisions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0063
Karsten Schmidt, Harald Zweck, Udo Dannebaum
Abstract/Short Version Introduction The introduction of Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet [2] as the main invehicle network infrastructure is the technical foundation for different new functionalities such as piloted driving, minimizing the CO2- footprint and others. The high data rate of such systems influences also the used microcontrollers due the fact that a big amount of data has to be transferred, encrypted, etc.Figure 1 Motivation - Vehicles will become connected to uncontrolled networks The usage of Ethernet as the in-vehicle-network enables the possibility that future road vehicles are going to be connected with other vehicles and information systems to improve system functionality. These previously closed automotive systems will be opened up for external access (see Figure 1). This can be Car2X connectivity or connection to personal devices.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0062
Anders Kallerdahl, Sherif Ali
Abstract Communication between electronic control units (ECUs) and vehicle gateways can span LIN, CAN, FlexRay, and Ethernet. Designing an in-vehicle network supporting multiple car platform variants, with respect to selecting the appropriate technology to connect ECUs and gateway networks, and making timing based analysis and synthesis is extremely challenging. This paper discusses how to handle a variety of communication protocols on an individual network level and how multiple networks relate to the overall communication design of a vehicle platform ensuring consistent variants.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0061
Anders Kallerdahl, Mohammad Salah
Abstract Increasingly, Ethernet is being used in automotive as a vehicle network backbone. It is ideal for service-oriented communications; streamed communications, such as Audio/Video Bridging (AVB) [1]; and Diagnostics over Internet Protocol (DoIP) [2] communications - areas in which high-bandwidth and reliable performance are essential. Designers are accustomed to network communication systems CAN, LIN, and FlexRay, but how will the timing performance be verified in an Ethernet network? This paper looks at network-wide timing analysis challenges where a mixture of CAN, FlexRay, and Ethernetbased busses co-exist. It is also worth noting that the AUTOSAR standard [3] supports timing definition for all elements in a mixed topology network, but again, accounting for the many different timing paths is a non-trivial process. Figure 1 The Ethernet backbone serving different domains.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0068
Yoshihiro Ujiie, Takeshi Kishikawa, Tomoyuki Haga, Hideki Matsushima, Tohru Wakabayashi, Masato Tanabe, Yoshihiko Kitamura, Jun Anzai
Abstract Controller area network (CAN) technology is widely adopted in vehicles, but attention has been drawn recently to its lack of security mechanisms. Numerous countermeasures have been proposed, but none can be regarded as a generic solution, in part because all the proposed countermeasures require extensive modifications to existing in-vehicle systems. To arrive at a solution to this problem, we propose a new method of protecting CAN without the need to modify existing systems. In this paper, we explain the principle of our proposed method and the architecture of the electronic control unit (ECU) that implements it. We report the result of our experiments and show its efficacy against typical security threats faced by CAN.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0067
Ryan Wilson, Wayne Music, Brian Anderson
Modern vehicular systems rely on millions of lines of code that must occasionally be updated to add new functions or to patch flaws to ensure safe and secure operation. Updates accomplished through a compromised cellular base station could lead to an update process that may be vulnerable to attack. We have been investigating techniques for determining whether an LTE base station (known as an eNodeB) appears to be suspicious, so that an update could be paused or terminated until a trusted eNodeB is available. We describe a detector we developed as part of our research that scans LTE signals for anomalies and provides an alert when an anomaly is found.
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