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Viewing 121 to 150 of 21600
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1426
Drew A. Jurkofsky
Photogrammetry from images captured by terrestrial cameras and manned aircraft has been used for many years to model objects, create scale diagrams and measure distances for use in traffic accident investigation and reconstruction. Due to increasing capability and availability, Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), including small UAS (SUAS), are becoming a valuable, cost effective tool for collecting overhead images for photogrammetric analysis. The metric accuracy of scale accident scene diagrams created from SUAS imagery has yet to be compared to conventional measurement methods, such as total station and laser measurement systems, which are widely used by public safety officials and private consultants. For this study, two different SUAS were used to collect overhead imagery for photogrammetric processing using PhotoModeler software.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1484
Daniel E. Toomey, Eric S. Winkel, Ram Krishnaswami
The evolution of airbag sensing system design has been rapid as electromechanical sensors used in earlier front airbag applications have been replaced by multi-point electronic sensors used to discriminate collision mechanics for potential airbag deployment in front, side and rollover accidents. In addition to multi-point electronic sensors, advanced airbag systems incorporate a variety of state sensors such as seat belt use status, seat track location, and occupant size classification that are taken into consideration by airbag system algorithms and occupant protection deployment strategies. Historically, traditional reconstruction methods and full scale vehicle crash testing were the primary means available to evaluate the field performance of passenger vehicle airbag systems. Electronic sensing systems have allowed for the advent of electronic data recorders (EDRs), which over the past decade, have provided increasingly more information related to airbag deployment events.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1435
Jeffrey Wirth, Enrique Bonugli, Mark Freund
Google Earth is a map and geographical information application created and maintained by Google Corporation. The program displays maps of the Earth using images obtained from available satellite imagery, aerial photography and geographic information systems (GIS) 3D globe. Google Earth has become a tool often used by accident reconstructionist to create scene drawings and obtain dimensional information. In some cases, a reconstructionist will not be able to inspect the scene of the crash due to various circumstances. For example, a reconstruction may commence after the roadway on which the accident occurred has been modified. In other cases, the time and expense required to physically inspect the incident site is not justifiable. In these instances, a reconstructionist may have to rely on Google Earth imagery for dimensional information about the site. The accuracy of the Google Earth is not officially documented.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0266
Dominik Juergens, Dominik Reinhardt, Rolf Schneider, Georg Hofstetter, Udo Dannebaum, Andreas Graf
Abstract The German funded project ARAMiS included work on several demonstrators one of which was a multicore approach on large scale software integration (LSSI) for the automotive domain. Here BMW and Audi intentionally implemented two different integration platforms to gain both experience and real life data on a Hypervisor based concept on one side as well as using only native AUTOSAR-based methods on the other side for later comparison. The idea was to obtain figures on the added overhead both for multicore as well as safety, based on practical work and close-to-production implementations. During implementation and evaluation on one hand there were a lot of valuable lessons learned about multicore in conjunction with safety. On the other hand valuable information was gathered to make it finally possible to set up a cost model for estimation of potential overhead generated by different integration approaches for safety related software functions.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0296
Roman Schmied, Harald Waschl, Luigi del Re
Abstract Adaptive cruise control (ACC) systems allow a safe and reliable driving by adapting the velocity of the vehicle to velocity setpoints and the distance from preceding vehicles. This substantially reduces the effort of the driver especially in heavy traffic conditions. However, standard ACC systems do not necessarily take in account comfort and fuel efficiency. Recently some work has been done of the latter aspect. This paper extends previous works for CI engines by incorporating a prediction model of the surrounding traffic and a simplified control law capable for real time use in experiments. The prediction model itself uses sinusoidal functions as the traffic measurements often show periodic behavior and is adapted in every sample instant with respect to the predecessor's velocity. Furthermore, the controlled vehicle is forced to stay within a specific inter-vehicle distance corridor to avoid collisions and ensure safe driving.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1199
Zhenli Zhang, Anthony Rick, Brian Sisk
Abstract The microhybrid electric vehicle (MHEV) has increasingly received attention since it holds promise for significant increases in fuel economy vs. traditional gasoline vehicles at a lower price point than hybrid vehicles. Passive parallel connection of the traditional 12V lead acid battery and a high power lithium ion battery has been identified as a potential architecture that will facilitate fuel economy improvements with minimal changes to the electrical network. Enabling a passive dual-battery connection requires a design match between the two batteries, including characteristics such as battery size and resistance, so that the performance can be optimized. In this work we have developed a hybrid model that couples electrochemical model of lithium ion battery (NMC-Graphite as an example) and an equivalent circuit model of lead acid battery in order to study the behavior of 12V dual-battery microhybrid architectures.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1191
Jiangong Zhu, Zechang Sun, Xuezhe Wei, Haifeng Dai
Abstract An electrochemical impedance spectroscopy battery model based on the porous electrode theory is used in the paper, which can comprehensively depict the internal state of the battery. The effect of battery key parameters (the radius of particle, electrochemical reaction rate constant, solid/electrolyte diffusion coefficient, conductivity) to the simulated impedance spectroscopy are discussed. Based on the EIS analysis, a lithium-ion battery optimized equivalent circuit model is built. The parameters in the equivalent circuit model have more clear physical meaning. The reliability of the optimized equivalent circuit model is verified by compared the model and experiments. The relationship between the external condition and internal resistance could be studied according to the optimized equivalent circuit model. Thus the internal process of the power battery is better understood.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1183
Padmanaban Dheenadhayalan, Anush Nair, Mithun Manalikandy, Anurag Reghu, Jacob John, V S Rani
Abstract Hybrid and electric vehicles are becoming increasingly popular these days owing to concerns over exhaustion of conventional fuel sources, pollution from combustion, as well as high carbon foot print of these fuels. Lithium-ion batteries are widely preferred as the source of power for hybrid and electric vehicles because of their high monomer voltage and high energy density. Accurate estimation of the State of Charge (SoC) of battery is crucial in the electric vehicle. It provides the information on the range of operation of the vehicle. It also ensures the safety and reliability of the battery unit. Accurate State of Charge estimation also enables more optimized battery pack design for the electric vehicle. Conventional methods for State of Charge estimation such as Coulomb counting and Open Circuit Voltage (OCV) measurement suffer from inaccuracies and is affected by noise during the vehicle operation.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1169
Akira Yamashita, Masaaki Kondo, Sogo Goto, Nobuyuki Ogami
Abstract The new Toyota FCV “Mirai” has reduced the weight, size, and cost of the high-pressure hydrogen storage system while improving fueling performance. The four 70 MPa tanks used on the 2008 Toyota FCHV-adv were reduced to two new larger diameter tanks. The laminated structure of the tanks was optimized to reduce weight, and a high-strength low-cost carbon fiber material was newly developed and adopted. The size of the high-pressure valve was reduced by improving its structure and a high-pressure sensor from a conventional vehicle was modified for use in a high-pressure hydrogen atmosphere. These innovations helped to improve the weight of the whole storage system by approximately 15% in comparison with Toyota FCHV-adv, while reducing the number of component parts by half and substantially reducing cost. The time required to fuel the FCV was greatly reduced by chilling the filling gas temperature at the hydrogen filling station to −40°C (as per SAE J2601).
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1197
Chao Chen, Franz Diwoky, Zoran Pavlovic, Johann Wurzenberger
This paper presents a system-level thermal model of a fluid-cooled Li-Ion battery module. The model is a reduced order model (ROM) identified by results from finite element analysis (FEA)/computational fluid dynamic (CFD) coupling simulation using the linear and time-invariant (LTI) method. The ROM consists of two LTI sub-systems: one of which describes the battery temperature response to a transient battery current, and the other of which takes into account of the battery temperature variation due to a heat flux induced by a varied inlet temperature of the battery cooling circuit. The thermal LTI model can be coupled to an electrical model to build a complete system-level battery ROM. Test examples show that the ROM is able to provide as accurate results as those from FEA/CFD coupling simulations.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1155
Robert Steffan, Peter Hofmann, Bernhard Geringer
Abstract This paper focuses on the potentials of a Belt-Starter-Generator (BSG) in the context of an ultra-light vehicle prototype with a target curb weight of only 600 kg. Therefore, two hybrid approaches with a voltage level below 60 V are described and their potentials regarding electrical driving and CO2 reduction are analysed in detail. Introducing the ‘Cars Ultra-Light Technology’ (CULT) project, the holistic lightweight approach is described as a main requirement for the further hybrid investigations. In addition, a P2-hybrid structure with a 12 V BSG on the transmission input shaft enabled unique features despite the low voltage level and limited electrical power resources. The CO2 reduction for this powertrain combination is described and compared to a conventional stop start configuration. The validation process on a dynamic test rig is presented as well.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1638
Dejan Kihas, Michael R. Uchanski
Recently, numerous researchers and Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) have developed diesel engine-out nitrogen oxides (NOx) estimation algorithms that are capable of running in real-time on production Electronic Control Units (ECUs). These are generally referred to as virtual sensors or inferential sensors. NOx estimators are typically installed to improve On-Board Diagnostics (OBD) monitors or to lower bill of material costs by replacing physical NOx sensors. This paper reviews the literature of on-ECU NOx models in order to document the state of the art and identify directions for future work. The discussion includes applications of NOx estimators, accuracy of NOx estimators, required sensor inputs, sources of error, calibration effort, and ECU resource consumption.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0269
Andreas Kiep, Marco Puerschel, Chris Spielman
Abstract This paper will describe different types of short circuit conditions, how they affect power semiconductor devices, and how to detect and safely mitigate the event.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0298
Wontaek Lim, Junsoo Kim, Kichun Jo, Yongwoo Jo, Myoungho Sunwoo
Abstract Parking path planning is an essential technology for intelligent vehicles. Under a confined area, a parking path has to guide a vehicle into a parking space without collision. To realize this technology, circle-based planning algorithms have been studied. The main components of these algorithms are circles and straight lines; subsequently, the parking path of the algorithm is designed by the combination of these geometric lines. However, the circle-based algorithm was developed in an open space within an unlimited parking lot width, so a feasible path cannot always be guaranteed in a narrow parking lot. Therefore, we present a parking planning algorithm based on Turning Standard Line (TSL) that is a straight line segment. The algorithm uses the TSL lines to guide sequential quadratic Béizer curves. A set of these curves from parking start to goal position creates a continuous parking path.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0299
Saurav Talukdar
Abstract Control of vehicular platoons has been a problem of interest in the controls domain for the past 40 years. This problem gained a lot of popularity when the California PATH (Partners for Advanced Transportation Technology) program was operational. String stability is an important design criterion in this problem and it has been shown that lead vehicle information is essential to achieve it. This work builds upon the existing framework and presents a controller form for each follower in the string where the lead vehicle information is used explicitly to analytically demonstrate string stability. The discussion is focused on using information from immediate neighbors to achieve string stability. Recent developments in distributed control are an attractive framework for control design where each agent has access to states of the neighbors and not all agents in the network. In this work, the aim is to design sparse H2 controllers and then perform a check on string stability.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0309
Mayurika Chatterjee, Atchyuta Rao, Chaitanya Rajguru
Abstract Parking assist systems have become very common in current vehicles. The purpose of such a system is to assist the driver to park the vehicle without collision. The sensors serve as eyes of the driver during parking maneuver by sensing any obstacle in the path. The parking sensors, typically ultrasonic sensors, are mounted on front and rear of vehicle to assist the driver to park the vehicle. Thus, such a system can cover only the front and rear portion of the vehicle and is unable to cover the side portions of the vehicle. This paper proposes a novel method to monitor the perimeter of a vehicle while parking using minimum sensors placed at strategic locations. A local map of the parking area is generated using data from sensors which helps in identifying static obstacles. The map is constantly updated in real time during parking. The algorithm ascertains that the entire perimeter of the vehicle is protected from impending collisions in real time.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0307
Hongfeng Wang, Lei He, Qianfei Liu, Changfu Zong
Abstract Nowadays active collision avoidance has become a major focus of research, and a variety of detection and tracking methods of obstacles in front of host vehicle have been applied to it. In this paper, laser radars are chosen as sensors to obtain relevant information, after which an algorithm used to detect and track vehicles in front is provided. The algorithm determines radar's ROI (Region of Interest), then uses a laser radar to scan the 2D space so as to obtain the information of the position and the distance of the targets which could be determined as obstacles. The information obtained will be filtered and then be transformed into cartesian coordinates, after that the coordinate point will be clustered so that the profile of the targets can be determined. A threshold will be set to judge whether the targets are obstacles or not. Last Kalman filter will be used for target tracking. To verify the presented algorithm, related experiments have been designed and carried out.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0310
R Danymol, Krishnan Kutty
Abstract Camera sensors that are made of silicon photodiodes and used in ordinary digital cameras are sensitive to visible as well as Near-Infrared (NIR) wavelength. However, since the human vision is sensitive only in the visible region, a hot mirror/infrared blocking filter is used in cameras. Certain complimentary attributes of NIR data are, therefore, lost in this process of image acquisition. However, RGB and NIR images are captured entirely in two different spectra/wavelengths; thus they retain different information. Since NIR and RGB images compromise complimentary information, we believe that this can be exploited for extracting better features, localization of objects of interest and in multi-modal fusion. In this paper, an attempt is made to estimate the NIR image from a given optical image. Using a normal optical camera and based on the compressed sensing framework, the NIR data estimation is formulated as an image recovery problem.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0311
Reecha Yadav, Vinuchackravarthy Senthamilarasu, Krishnan Kutty, Vinay Vaidya, Sunita Ugale
Abstract In view of the continuous efforts by the automotive fraternity, for achieving traffic safety, detecting pedestrians from image/video has become an extensively researched topic in recent times. The task of detecting pedestrians in the urban traffic scene is complicated by the considerations involving pedestrian figure size, articulation, fast dynamics, background clutter, etc. A number of methods using different sensor technologies have been proposed in the past for the problem of pedestrian detection. To limit the scope, this paper reviews the techniques involved in day-time detection of pedestrians, with emphasis on the methods making use of a monocular visible-spectrum sensor. The paper achieves its objective by discussing the basic framework involved in detecting a pedestrian, while elaborating the requisites and the existing methodologies for implementing each stage of the basic framework.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0312
Jiji Gangadharan, Shanmugaraj Mani, Krishnan Kutty
Abstract Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) in combination with other active safety features like air bags etc. is gaining popularity. Vision based ADAS systems perform well under ideal lighting, illumination and environmental conditions. However, with change in illumination and other lighting related factors, the effectiveness of vision based ADAS systems tend to deteriorate. Under conditions of low light, it is therefore important to develop techniques that would offset the effects of low illumination and generate an image that appears as if it were taken under ideal lighting conditions. To accomplish this, we have developed a method, that uses local color statistics from the host image with low illumination, and enhance the same using an adaptive color transfer mechanism.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1009
Cameron W. Tanner, Kenneth Twiggs, Tinghong Tao, David Bronfenbrenner, Yoshiaki Matsuzono, Shinichiro Otsuka, Yukio Suehiro, Hiroshi Koyama
Abstract Regulations that limit emissions of pollutants from gasoline-powered cars and trucks continue to tighten. More than 75% of emissions through an FTP-75 regulatory test are released in the first few seconds after cold-start. A factor that controls the time to catalytic light-off is the heat capacity of the catalytic converter substrate. Historically, substrates with thinner walls and lower heat capacity have been developed to improve cold-start performance. Another approach is to increase porosity of the substrate. A new material and process technology has been developed to significantly raise the porosity of thin wall substrates (2-3 mil) from 27-35% to 55% while maintaining strength. The heat capacity of the material is 30-38% lower than existing substrates. The reduction in substrate heat capacity enables faster thermal response and lower tailpipe emissions. The reliance on costly precious metals in the washcoat is demonstrated to be lessened.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1158
Justin Wilbanks, Fabrizio Favaretto, Franco Cimatti, Michael Leamy
Abstract This paper presents a detailed design study and associated considerations supporting the development of high-performance plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Due to increasingly strict governmental regulations and increased consumer demand, automotive manufacturers have been tasked with the reduction of fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. PHEV powertrains can provide a needed balance in terms of fuel economy and vehicle performance by exploiting regenerative braking, pure electric vehicle operation, engine load-point shifting, and power-enhancing hybrid traction modes. Thus, properly designed PHEV powertrains can reduce fuel consumption while increasing vehicle utility and performance.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1181
Zhihong Jin, Zhenli Zhang, Timur Aliyev, Anthony Rick, Brian Sisk
Abstract Power limit estimation of a lithium-ion battery pack can be employed by a battery management system (BMS) to balance a variety of operational considerations, including optimization of pulse capability while avoiding damage and minimizing aging. Consideration of cell-to-cell performance variability of lithium-ion batteries is critical to correct estimation of the battery pack power limit as well as proper sizing of the individual cells in the battery. Further, understanding of cell variability is necessary to protect the cell and other system components (e.g., fuse and contactor, from over-current damage). In this work, we present the use of an equivalent circuit model for estimation of the power limit of lithium-ion battery packs by considering the individual cell variability under current or voltage constraints. We compare the power limit estimation by using individual cell characteristics compared to the estimate found using only max/min values of cell characteristics.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1180
Letao Zhu, Zechang Sun, Haifeng Dai, Xuezhe Wei
Abstract This paper aims at accurately modeling the nonlinear hysteretic relationship between open circuit voltage (OCV) and state of charge (SOC) for LiFePO4 batteries. The OCV-SOC hysteresis model is based on the discrete Preisach approach which divides the Preisach triangle into finite squares. To determine the weight of each square, a linear function system is constructed including a series of linear equations formulated at every sample time. This function system can be solved by computer offline. When applying this approach online, the calculated square weight vector is pre-stored in advance. Then through multiple operations with hysteresis state vector of squares updated online at every sampling time, the SOC considering the influence of OCV-SOC hysteresis is predicted.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1179
Christopher J. Brooks, Eric Kreidler
Abstract Significant research has been underway for many years to develop technologies to electrochemically power vehicles with limited success. Unfortunately, most technologies fail to achieve theoretical performance and/or are prohibitively too expensive for mass marketed vehicles. Most of the issues with electrochemical technologies can ultimately be attributed to materials issues, whether it is cost, durability, or activity. A broad examination of potential electrochemical technologies is provided identifying key materials issues with each. Included are the results of recent research involving lithium-oxygen batteries. The observations from this research have identified the electrochemical product, lithium peroxide, and its properties to be the most pressing material issue for lithium-oxygen battery. A future research vision is proposed counter to the current research trend of electrocatalyst/electrolyte development.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1188
Seongjun Yun, SungJin Park, Daekwang Kim, Junyong Lee, Sejun Kim, Kwang-yeon Kim
Abstract The fuel economy of a vehicle can be improved by recuperating the kinetic energy when the vehicle is decelerated. However, if there is no electrical traction component, the recuperated energy can be used only by the other electrical systems of the vehicle. Thus, the fuel economy improvement can be maximized by balancing the recuperated energy and the consumed energy. Also, suitable alternator and battery management is required to maximize the fuel economy. This paper describes a design optimization process of the alternator and battery system equipped with recuperation control algorithms for a mid-sized sedan based on the fuel economy and system cost. A vehicle model using AVL Cruise is developed for cycle simulations and validated with experimental data. The validated model is used for the parametric study and design optimization of the alternator and battery systems with single and dual energy storage.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1185
Brian Sisk, Timur Aliyev, Zhenli Zhang, Zhihong Jin, Negin Salami, Kem Obasih, Anthony Rick
Abstract Competitive engineering of battery packs for vehicle applications requires a careful alignment of function against vehicle manufacturer requirements. Traditional battery engineering practices focus on flow down of requirements from the top-level system requirements through to low-level components, meeting or exceeding each requirement at every level. This process can easily produce an over-engineered, cost-uncompetitive product. By integrating the key limiting factors of battery performance, we can directly compare battery capability to requirements. Here, we consider a power-oriented microhybrid battery system using coupled thermal and electrochemical modeling. We demonstrate that using dynamic resistance acquired from drive cycle characteristics can reduce the total size of the pack compared to typical static, fixed-duration resistance values.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1182
Mehrdad Mastali Majdabadi Kohneh, Ehsan Samadani, Siamak Farhad, Roydon Fraser, Michael Fowler
Abstract Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are one of the best candidates as energy storage systems for automobile applications due to their high power and energy densities. However, durability in comparison to other battery chemistries continues to be key factor in prevention of wide scale adoption by the automotive industry. In order to design more-durable, longer-life, batteries, reliable and predictive battery models are required. In this paper, an effective model for simulating full-size LIBs is employed that can predict the operating voltage of the cell and the distribution of variables such as electrochemical current generation and battery state of charge (SOC). This predictive ability is used to examine the effect of parameters such as current collector thickness and tab location for the purpose of reducing non-uniform voltage and current distribution in the cell. It is identified that reducing the non-uniformities can reduce the ageing effects and increase the battery durability.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1195
Kiyotaka Maeda, Masashi Takahashi
Abstract To verify the appropriateness of the vibration test conditions of ISO 12405, we performed tailoring to derive power spectrum densities and test durations as vibration test conditions. Vehicles used for tailoring included two electric vehicles and one plug-in hybrid electric vehicle. Those vehicles were equipped with accelerometers and were run on seven different road types at different speeds while data on the acceleration of the battery packs were recorded. The power spectrum densities for three axes that were derived from the obtained acceleration data were similar in form to the power spectrum densities of ISO 12405, and almost the same root mean square accelerations were obtained, confirming that they are appropriate. However, both experiments and theory suggest that the test duration for the Z-axis exceeds those of the X- and Y-axes.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1196
Jeremy S. Neubauer, Eric Wood
Abstract Fast charging is attractive to battery electric vehicle (BEV) drivers for its ability to enable long-distance travel and to quickly recharge depleted batteries on short notice. However, such aggressive charging and the sustained vehicle operation that results could lead to excessive battery temperatures and degradation. Properly assessing the consequences of fast charging requires accounting for disparate cycling, heating, and aging of individual cells in large BEV packs when subjected to realistic travel patterns, usage of fast chargers, and climates over long durations (i.e., years). The U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office has supported the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's development of BLAST-V-the Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool for Vehicles-to create a tool capable of accounting for all of these factors. We present on the findings of applying this tool to realistic fast charge scenarios.
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