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Viewing 121 to 150 of 22709
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1204
Dongchang Pan, Sichuan Xu, Chunjing Lin, Guofeng Chang
Abstract As one of the most crucial components in electric vehicles, power batteries generate abundant heat during charging and discharging processes. Thermal management system (TMS), which is designed to keep the battery cells within an optimum temperature range and to maintain an even temperature distribution from cell to cell, is vital for the high efficiency, long calendar life and reliable safety of these power batteries. With the desirable features of low system complexity, light weight, high energy efficiency and good battery thermal uniformity, thermal management using composite phase change materials (PCMs) has drawn great attention in the past fifteen years. In the hope of supplying helpful guidelines for the design of the PCM-based TMSs, this work begins with the summarization of the most commonly applied heat transfer enhancement methods (i.e., the use of thermally conductive particles, metal fin, expanded graphite matrix and metal foam) for PCMs by different researchers.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1203
Zhang Qiao, Weiwen Deng, Jian Wu, Feng Ju, Jingshan Li
Abstract This paper describes a novel power management control strategy of battery and supercapacitor hybrid energy storage system to improve system efficiency and battery lifetime. In the presented research, the high and low frequency power demand in the load is separated by a Haar wavelet transform algorithm to overcome the problem of battery overload work and associated degeneration in battery lifetime resulting from an ineffective distribution between battery and supercapacitor. The purpose of frequency distribution is that the supercapacitor is used to share high frequency power components of load power demand to smooth the power demand applied to battery. However, the sole frequency control often fails to realize the optimal utilization of supercapacitor because of the uncertain variation in the driving cycle.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1202
Jihas Khan
Abstract With the advent of hybrid and electric cars battery monitoring systems and battery management systems have become bundled with more and more sophisticated algorithms and specifications. The validation of these systems are a head ache for OEMs and Tier ones considering the massive battery, high voltage and the current involved with the real loads directly or in directly connected to them. This paper is aimed at providing an intuitive explanation of these challenges and solutions which employ HILS for the component level validation of the above units. . Conventional validation for these systems produce test results much later in the embedded product development life cycle which calls for an additional over head of cost, resource, time and effort. A Proposed solution is to find the accuracy of SOC, SOH estimation algorithm in the battery monitoring sensor which usually will be clamped to the real battery itself.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1113
Thorsten Arndt, Alex Tarasow, Christian Bohn, Guido Wachsmuth, Roland Serway
Abstract Higher demands on comfort and efficiency require a continuous improvement of the shift process. During the launch and shift process the clutch control is used to get a smooth and efficient behavior. In this short time of acting the shifting behavior can be rated. Many control concepts use a clutch characteristic to calculate the actuator signal based on the clutch torque. Therefore, a high quality of this characteristic is necessary. Because of the dynamic process during clutch engagement the clutch characteristic needs further information to reach a high accuracy for the control algorithm. In this paper an existing clutch torque characteristic is extended to a characteristic map where the clutch torque becomes a function of the current actuator signal of the clutch and the clutch slip. The extension of the torque characteristic describes the slip based dependencies, e.g. the friction coefficient.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1115
Thomas Huth, Stefan Pischinger
Abstract The demand for lower CO2 emissions requires not just the optimization of every single component but the complete system. For a transmission system, it is important to optimize the transmission hardware as we well as the interaction of powertrain components. For automatic transmission with wide ratio spreads, the main losses are caused by the actuation system, which can be reduced with use of ondemand actuation systems. In this paper, a new on-demand electromechanical actuation system with validation results on a clutch test bench is presented. The electro-mechanical actuator shows an increase in the efficiency of 4.1 % compared to the conventional hydraulic actuation in a simulated NEDC (New European Driving Cycle) cycle. This increase is based on the powerless end positions of the actuator (engaged and disengaged clutch). The thermal tension and wear are compensated with a disk spring. This allows a stable control over service life.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1114
Jinsung Kim
Abstract A dry clutch induces judder phenomenon which is caused by variations in the vehicle load condition and frictional material properties. Such a problem may lead to the stick-slip limit cycle that results in undesired longitudinal vibrations of vehicles. To solve this problem, a vibration suppression control is proposed. The amplitude of vibrations is detected by the signal conditioning from the measurements with the transmission input shaft speed and the wheel speed sensors. Based upon this, a perturbation torque is applied additionally on the nominal launch controller to make the drive shaft oscillation vanish. It can be achieved by the control design without any extra hardware cost. Finally, experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1319
Kimitoshi Tsuji, Katsuhiko Yamamoto
Abstract It is important for vehicle concept planning to estimate fuel economy and the influence of vehicle vibration using virtual engine specifications and a virtual vehicle frame. In our former study, we showed the 1D physical power plant model with electrical starter, battery that can predict combustion transient torque, combustion heat energy and fuel efficiency. The simulation result agreed with measured data. For idling stop system, the noise and vibration during start up is important factor for salability of the vehicle. In this paper, as an application of the 1D physical power plant model (engine model), we will show the result of analysis that is starter shaft resonance and the effect on the engine mount vibration of restarting from idle stop. First, an engine model for 3.5L 6cyl NA engine was developed by energy-based model using VHDL-AMS. Here, VHDL-AMS is modeling language registered in IEC international standard (IEC61691-6) to realize multi physics on 1D simulation.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1322
Tonghang Zhao, Xining Liu, Yuntao Cao, Chao Li, Hangsheng Hou
Abstract A hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) will start the engine which drives its motor to charge the battery even at idle whenever the battery power is detected to be insufficient. The activation of idle battery charging could lead to serious NVH problems if powertrain parameters are not designed or calibrated properly. This work is focused on a noise issue encountered during idle charging for a specific prototype vehicle, and investigates control strategies to contain the noise level. Based on basic principles of automobile vibration and noise control along with the specific characteristics of the hybrid vehicle architecture, this work analyzes and elucidates methods of the engine idle charging noise control from the perspectives of powertrain modal alignment, idle speed optimization, and electric motor control algorithm.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0827
J. Felipe Rodriguez, Wai K. Cheng
Abstract This work examines the effect of valve timing during cold crank-start and cold fast-idle (1200 rpm, 2 bar NIMEP) on the emissions of hydrocarbons (HC) and particulate mass and number (PM/PN). Four different cam-phaser configurations are studied in detail: 1. Baseline stock valve timing. 2. Late intake opening/closing. 3. Early exhaust opening/closing. 4. Late intake phasing combined with early exhaust phasing. Delaying the intake valve opening improves the mixture formation process and results in more than 25% reduction of the HC and of the PM/PN emissions during cold crank-start. Early exhaust valve phasing results in a deterioration of the HC and PM/PN emissions performance during cold crank-start. Nevertheless, early exhaust valve phasing slightly improves the HC emissions and substantially reduces the particulate emissions at cold fast-idle.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0826
Arumugam Sakunthalai Ramadhas, Hongming Xu
Abstract Ambient temperature has significant impact on engine start ability and cold start emissions from diesel engines. These cold start emissions are accounted for substantial amount of the overall regulatory driving cycle emissions like NEDC or FTP. It is likely to implement the low temperature emissions tests for diesel vehicles, which is currently applicable only for gasoline vehicles. This paper investigates the potential of the intake heating strategy on reducing the driving cycle emissions from the latest generation of turbocharged common rail direct injection diesel engines at low ambient temperature conditions. For this investigation an air heater was installed upstream of the intake manifold and New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) tests were conducted at -7°C ambient temperature conditions for the different intake air temperatures. Intake air heating reduced the cranking time and improved the fuel economy at low ambient temperatures.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0825
William Fedor, Joseph Kazour, James Haller, Kenneth Dauer, Daniel Kabasin
Abstract LEV-3 regulation changes require 100% SULEV30 fleet average by 2025. While present applications meeting SULEV30 are predominately small displacement 4-cylinder engines, LEV-3 standards will require larger displacement engines to also meet SULEV30. One concept previously investigated to reduce the cold start engine-out HC emissions was to heat the fuel injected during the cold start and initial engine idle period. Improved atomization and increased vaporization of heated fuel decreased wall wetting and unburned fuel. This resulted in more fuel available to take part in combustion, thus reducing the required injected fuel mass and HC emissions. Single cylinder engine testing with experimental heated Gasoline Direct Injection (GDi) injectors was conducted at 40°C engine coolant and oil temperature conditions. The operating mode simulated cold start idle operating conditions, with split injection for improved Catalyst Light-Off (CATLO) times.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0824
J. Felipe Rodriguez, Wai K. Cheng
Abstract The first 3 cycles in the cold crank-start process at 20°C are studied in a GDI engine. The focus is on the dependence of the HC and PM/PN emissions of each cycle on the injection strategy and combustion phasing of the current and previous cycles. The PM/PN emissions per cycle decrease by more than an order of magnitude as the crank-start progresses from the 1st to the 3rd cycle, while the HC emissions stay relatively constant. The wall heat transfer, as controlled by the combustion phasing, during the previous cycles has a more significant influence on the mixture formation process for the current cycle than the amount of residual fuel. The results show that the rise in HC emissions caused by the injection spray interacting with the intake valves and piston crown is reduced as the cranking process progresses. Combustion phasing retard significantly reduces the PM emission. The HC emissions, however, are relatively not sensitive to combustion phasing in the range of interest.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0823
Jason Miwa, Darius Mehta, Chad Koci
Abstract Increasingly stringent emissions regulations require that modern diesel aftertreatment systems must warm up and begin controlling emissions shortly after startup. While several new aftertreatment technologies have been introduced that focus on lowering the aftertreatment activation temperature, the engine system still needs to provide thermal energy to the exhaust for cold start. A study was conducted to evaluate several engine technologies that focus on improving the thermal energy that the engine system provides to the aftertreatment system while minimizing the impact on fuel economy and emissions. Studies were conducted on a modern common rail 3L diesel engine with a custom dual loop EGR system. The engine was calibrated for low engine-out NOx using various combustion strategies depending on the speed/load operating condition.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0841
Russel Lockett, Zeeshan Fatmi, Olawole Kuti, Richard Price
Abstract Most modern high-pressure common rail diesel fuel injection systems employ an internal pressure equalization system in order to support needle lift, enabling precise control of the injected fuel mass. This results in the return of a fraction of the high-pressure diesel back to the fuel tank. The diesel fuel flow occurring in the injector spill passages is expected to be a cavitating flow, which is known to promote fuel ageing. The cavitation of diesel promotes nano-particle formation through induced pyrolysis and oxidation, which may result in deposits in the vehicle fuel system. A purpose-built high-pressure cavitation flow rig has been employed to investigate the stability of unadditised crude-oil derived diesel and paraffin-blend model diesel, which were subjected to continuous hydrodynamic cavitation flow across a single-hole research diesel nozzle.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0842
Joshua Lacey, Farzad Poursadegh, Michael Brear, Phred Petersen, Charles Lakey, Steve Ryan, Brendan Butcher
Abstract The focus of internal combustion (IC) engine research is the improvement of fuel economy and the reduction of the tailpipe emissions of CO2 and other regulated pollutants. Promising solutions to this challenge include the use of both direct-injection (DI) and alternative fuels such as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). This study uses Mie-scattering and schlieren imaging to resolve the liquid and vapor phases of propane and iso-octane, which serve as surrogates for LPG and gasoline respectively. These fuels are imaged in a constant volume chamber at conditions that are relevant to both naturally aspirated and boosted, gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. It is observed that propane and iso-octane have different spray behaviors across these conditions. Iso-octane is subject to conventional spray breakup and evaporation in nearly all cases, while propane is heavily flash-boiling throughout the GDI operating map.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0903
Ram Vijayagopal, Kevin Gallagher, Daeheung Lee, Aymeric Rousseau
Abstract The energy density and power density comparison of conventional fuels and batteries is often mentioned as an advantage of conventional vehicles over electric vehicles. Such an analysis often shows that the batteries are at least an order of magnitude behind fuels like gasoline. However this incomplete analysis ignores the impact of powertrain efficiency and mass of the powertrain itself. When we compare the potential of battery electric vehicles (BEVs) as an alternative for conventional vehicles, it is important to include the energy in the fuel and their storage as well as the eventual conversion to mechanical energy. For instance, useful work expected out of a conventional vehicle as well as a BEV is the same (to drive 300 miles with a payload of about 300 lb). However, the test weight of a Conventional vehicle and BEV will differ on the basis of what is needed to convert their respective stored energy to mechanical energy.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0918
Alexander Sappok, Paul Ragaller, Leslie Bromberg, Vitaly Prikhodko, John Storey, James Parks
Abstract Radio frequency (RF)-based sensors provide a direct measure of the particulate filter loading state. In contrast to particulate matter (PM) sensors, which monitor the concentration of PM in the exhaust gas stream for on-board diagnostics purposes, RF sensors have historically been applied to monitor and control the particulate filter regeneration process. This work developed an RF-based particulate filter control system utilizing both conventional and fast response RF sensors, and evaluated the feasibility of applying fast-response RF sensors to provide a real-time measurement of engine-out PM emissions. Testing with a light-duty diesel engine equipped with fast response RF sensors investigated the potential to utilize the particulate filter itself as an engine-out soot sensor.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0911
Makoto Nagata, Takashi Yamada, Ryuji Ando, Insu Kim, Toshihisa Tomie
Abstract Commercial three way catalysts (TWC) are designed to eliminate HC, CO and NOx pollutants emitted from gasoline powered internal combustion engines. TWC have been optimized over many years to meet ever more stringent emission regulations. It has long been speculated that surface electrical conductivity may be a key parameter in controlling catalytic activity, however until now it has not been possible to reliably measure this physical parameter on a catalytic surface. In this study, the surface electrical conductivity of catalyst powders, such as Rh/ CeO1-x-ZrxO2, Rh/ZrO2 and Rh/Al2O3, were measured by EUPS (Extreme Ultraviolet excited Photoelectron Spectroscopy). Then the measured electrical conductivity was compared with catalyst performance from CO-NO and water gas shift reactions which are important for controlling automobile exhaust emissions from gasoline vehicles.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0893
Bogdan R. Kucinschi, Teng-Hua Shieh
Abstract The adequate lubrication of engine parts is critical for the engine durability, and insufficient oil supply to various friction areas might result in catastrophic engine failure. However, when the environment temperatures are very low, the presence of oil between friction surfaces may be significantly delayed, especially during the engine start-up after a longer period of time when the vehicle was not driven. The capability of the oil pump to transport oil within the engine depends on the low-temperature rheological properties of oil, as well as the geometry of the passages. There are testing methods that estimate the ability of an oil to provide lubrication at low temperatures by measuring the yield stress and viscosity in controlled conditions (ASTM D4684, D5293, D5133), but they provide limited data generally used as a guideline for the selection of an appropriate oil.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0894
Kenji Matsumoto, Hironori Harada, Yuki Ono, Yuji Mihara
Abstract A simple method is frequently used to calculate a reciprocating engine’s bearing load from the measured cylinder pressure. However, it has become apparent that engine downsizing and weight reduction cannot be achieved easily if an engine is designed based on the simple method. Because of this, an actual load on a bearing was measured, and the measured load values were compared with a bearing load distribution calculated from cylinder pressure. As a result, it was found that some of actual loads were about half of the calculated ones at certain crank angles. The connecting rod’s elastic deformation was focused on as a factor behind such differences, and the rod’s deformation due to the engine’s explosion load was studied. As a result, it was found that the rod part of the engine’s connecting rod was bent by 0.2 mm and became doglegged. Additional investigation regarding these findings would allow further engine downsizing.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0985
Christian Gruenzweig, David Mannes, Florian Schmid, Rob Rule
Abstract Neutron imaging (NI) is an alternative non-destructive inspection technique compared to the well-known X-ray method. Although neutron imaging data look at a first glance similar to X-ray images it must be underlined that the interaction mechanism of the sample material with neutrons differs fundamentally. X-ray interaction with matter occurs with the electrons in the atomic shells whereas neutrons interact only with the atomic nuclei. Hence, both methods have a different and to great extent complementary contrast origin. Neutron imaging allows for a higher penetration through heavier elements (e.g. metals) whereas a high contrast is given for light elements (e.g. hydrogen). By the use of neutrons instead of X-rays exhaust after-treatment systems can be successfully examined non-destructively for their soot, ash, urea and coating distributions.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0957
Patrick Schrangl, Roman Schmied, Stephan Stadlbauer, Harald Waschl, Luigi del Re, Bernhard Ramsebner, Christoph Reiter
Abstract Abatement and control of emissions from passenger car combustion engines have been in the focus for a long time. Nevertheless, to address upcoming real-world driving emission targets, knowledge of current engine emissions is crucial. Still, adequate sensors for transient emissions are seldom available in production engines. One way to target this issue is by applying virtual sensors which utilize available sensor information in an engine control unit (ECU) and provide estimates of the not measured emissions. For real-world application it is important that the virtual sensor has low complexity and works under varying conditions. Naturally, the choice of suitable inputs from all available candidates will have a strong impact on these factors. In this work a method to set up virtual sensors by means of design of experiments (DOE) and iterative identification of polynomial models is augmented with a novel input candidate selection strategy.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0960
Arifumi Matsumoto, Kenji Furui, Makoto Ogiso, Toru Kidokoro
Abstract Urea selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems are a promising technology for helping to lower NOx emissions from diesel engines. These systems also require on-board diagnostic (OBD) systems to detect malfunctioning catalysts. Conventional OBD methodology for a SCR catalyst involves the measurement of NOx concentration downstream of the catalyst. However, considering future OBD regulations, erroneous diagnostics may occur due to variations in the actual environment. Therefore, to enhance OBD accuracy, a new methodology was examined that utilizes NH3 slip as a new diagnostic parameter in addition to NOx. NH3 slip increases as the NOx reduction performance degrades, because both phenomena are based on deterioration in the capability of the SCR catalyst to adsorb NH3. Furthermore, NH3 can be measured by existing NOx sensors because NH3 is oxidized to NO internally. To make use of NH3 slip, an estimation model was developed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0943
Paul Ragaller, Alexander Sappok, Leslie Bromberg, Natarajan Gunasekaran, Jason Warkins, Ryan Wilhelm
Abstract Efficient aftertreatment management requires accurate sensing of both particulate filter soot and ash levels for optimized feedback control. Currently a combination of pressure drop measurements and predictive models are used to indirectly estimate the loading state of the filter. Accurate determination of filter soot loading levels is challenging under certain operating conditions, particularly following partial regeneration events and at low flow rate (idle) conditions. This work applied radio frequency (RF)-based sensors to provide a direct measure of the particulate filter soot levels in situ. Direct measurements of the filter loading state enable advanced feedback controls to optimize the combined engine and aftertreatment system for improved DPF management. This study instrumented several cordierite and aluminum titanate diesel particulate filters with RF sensors.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0012
Sebastian Voss, Johannes Eder, Bernhard Schaetz
Abstract The growing complexity of functionalities in automotive vehicles and their safety-criticality, including timing requirements, demands sound and scalable approaches to deal with the increasing design space. Most often, such complex automotive systems are composed of a set of functions that are characterized by multi-period timing behaviors, e.g., due to environment constraints limiting sensing/acting frequencies, or various worst case execution times of software components. As safety-critical systems must perform the desired behavior within guaranteed time bounds, a valid system configuration is needed including a time-correct schedule that fulfills all timing requirements. This contribution proposes a systematic and correct schedule synthesis of complex multi-rate automotive software systems that ensures precise timing behavior of software components.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0013
Sujit S. Phatak, Heming Chen, Yuan Xiao, Can Wang, Donald McCune, Simon Schliecker, Maurice Sebastian, Victor Reyes, David Balland
Abstract Automotive vehicles today consist of very complex network of electronic control units (ECU) connected with each other using different network implementations such as Controller Area Network (CAN), FlexRay, etc. There are several ECUs inside a vehicle targeting specific applications such as engine, transmission, body, steering, brakes, infotainment/navigation, etc. comprising on an average more than 50 ECUs executing more than 50 million lines of software code. It is expected to increase exponentially in the next few years. Such complex electric/electronic (E/E) architecture and software calls for a comprehensive, flexible and systematic development and validation environment especially for a system level or vehicle level development. To achieve this goal, we have built a virtual multi-ECU high fidelity cyber-physical multi-rate cosimulation that closely resembles a realistic hardware based automotive embedded system.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0015
Eldad Palachi, Fariz Saracevic, Amit Fisher
Abstract Connected vehicles provide suppliers and OEMs new opportunities to improve their customer experience and offer new services. Yet, in this new era of Internet of Things (IoT), OEMs and suppliers are expected to expand their engineering efforts beyond the vehicle itself. We present a new Rapid Application Development (RAD) service offered by IBM, called IBM Internet of Things Workbench. This is a visual tool, offered as an IBM Bluemix service that allows engineers to design and simulate the overall architecture and interactions between the various IoT entities such as devices, cloud applications and services, mobile clients and asset management systems. IoT Workbench abstracts the messaging details and generates code skeletons for the cloud applications as well as for simulating devices. It also provides the device simulation to allow for the application testing before the actual devices are available and the requirements for the various devices are validated.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0016
Jörg Schäuffele
Abstract The functions provided by the E/E system of modern vehicles can be assigned to the classical domains of powertrain, chassis, body and multimedia. Upcoming functions are forming new domains for advanced driver assistance and cloud integration. Therefore networking of functions is not limited to the vehicle but includes also the cloud. These trends imply major changes like the introduction of Ethernet as onboard networking technology or increasing safety and security needs. To design the best E/E architecture three groups of optimization targets are most relevant: Global vehicle targets, E/E targets derived from the implemented vehicle functions and product line targets for an E/E architecture. The PREEvision approach for E/E architecture design and optimization is a model based approach - inspired by the relevant and widely accepted automotive standards. Import and export filters allow the easy integration with PREEvision and complementation of existing tool chains.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0018
Rupesh Sonu Kakade, Sushovan Basu
Abstract Development of the software using fixed-point arithmetic is known to be tedious and error-prone. Difficulty of selecting the correct data type can outwear software developers. The common retreats often sought after include manual calculation of the approximate ranges, exhaustive simulations with extreme input values and conservative development approach by using excessive word length. The first two retreats - manual calculation and exhaustive simulations - increase the software development time, and the third retreat - conservative development - leads to the excessive memory (RAM and ROM) utilization by the software. The model-based development environment such as the Simulink has graphical nature to the software with flow of data defined by connecting signal lines. The model-based software therefore gives an opportunity to trace signal flow in the software.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0020
Eric Woestman, Jeremias Sauceda
Abstract Over the last decade, the automotive industry has embraced model-based development for control systems. Many of these companies have chosen Simulink from MathWorks to design and simulate these models. However, a remaining issue is the fact that many control systems were initially written in C and are still being used. Some companies have attempted to manually convert these C systems to Simulink models but have found this method to be too costly, error-prone, and time consuming. EnSoft decided to tackle this problem by providing a semi-automated conversion using our Atlas for C tool. Atlas is a tool that maps software and creates a relation map for all parts of the program. It then offers the developer tools to query and visualize this graph. We have developed Modelify, a tool built on this framework that performs the necessary queries on a C project and creates equivalent Simulink models and subsystems.
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