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2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0199
Stefan Fuchs, Hans-Peter Schmidt
Abstract Real time data transfer over Ethernet, with an inhomogeneous physical layer is studied. Within the Ethernet network 100Base-TX and BroadR Reach© physical layers are used. Synchronization of devices via Ethernet is investigated and synchronized transfer of video streams is shown. Purpose-built Ethernet-Physical Layer Adapters (E-PLAs) are applied. It is demonstrated that an Ethernet network with different physical layers may be used for real time data transfer with just a little trade-off in synchronization and transfer delay.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0216
Ping-Min Hsu, Ming Hung Li, Kuo-Ching Chang
Abstract This paper discusses noise filtering in an autonomous emergency braking (AEB) system with a sensor fusion between a millimeter wave (MMW) radar and a camera. Three kinds of noise, namely twice harmonic noise, ground noise, and specular reflection noise, are then filtered. The former is caused by the reflection of a radar wave between a target object and the MMW radar; therefore, one of the sensing distances would be twice as longer as one of others. An object featuring this characteristic is treated as the noise and filtered. Next, detecting a ground metal as the target object generates the second noise with a focus of car-like objects. That is, an object-with the sensing distance from the MMW radar being smaller than that from the camera by a threshold value-is taken as the ground metal noise and ignored. Moreover, the third noise happens when there is a radar wave reflection between an object and its surroundings.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0292
Pascal Herve
Abstract Transportation systems use wireless technology to link vehicles and mobile devices to each other, and to the transportation infrastructure. This paper presents an advanced approach supporting and establishing a future testing and certification framework for vehicles and applications that can leverage wireless communications for the transportation environment. Assessing such integrated communication systems performance will realize the full potential of connected vehicles, travelers and infrastructure. To reach this potential, connected vehicle equipment and applications must meet minimum performance requirements, conform to common technical standards, and interoperate with one another. Over-The-Air Testing and Certification method provides formal means of verifying that a vehicle integrating specific communication technology fulfills the End-User's expectations and complies with Standards and Regulations.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0290
Amin Tahmasbi-Sarvestani, Hadi Kazemi, Yaser P. Fallah, Mohammad Naserian, Allan Lewis
Abstract Pedestrians account for a significant ratio of traffic fatalities; as a result, research on methods of reducing vehicle-pedestrian crashes is of importance. In this paper, we describe a system architecture that allows the use of vehicle-to-pedestrian (V2P) communication as a means of generating situational awareness and eventually predicting hazards and warning drivers and pedestrians. In contrast, vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication for safety applications, V2P has not received much attention. One major reason for this lack of attention had been the unavailability of communication mechanisms between pedestrians and vehicles. Recent advances in enabling Wi-Fi and dedicated short range communication (DSRC) based communication using smart-phones is changing this picture. As a result, V2P communication can be considered as a possible solution.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0300
Sven Bohn, Michael Agsten, Anamika Dubey, Surya Santoso
Abstract Supported by generous federal incentives and customer acceptance, the number of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) is increasing worldwide. A PEV can be charged both at a residential or a commercial facility by connecting it to the power grid using a charging equipment. The power demand for a single PEV charging may exceed the peak power demand of an ordinary household. Hence, an increasing number of PEVs can potentially impact the power grid massively. This paper aims to quantify the impacts of an increasing number of PEVs on power distribution circuits. A comparative analysis of the PEV impacts on the North American and European distribution circuits are presented. The study also identifies the indicators representative for quantifying the grid impacts of PEV charging. The paper further intents to clarify the interface between OEMs and utilities in achieving the common goal of a successful PEV charging and therefore a faster customer acceptance.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0301
Takayuki Shimizu, Akihisa Yokoyama, Kazuma Sato, Kunihiko Kumita
Abstract In this paper, we present an implementation of smart charging systems for plug-in electric vehicles based on off-the-shelf communication protocols for smart grids including SAE J2836/2847/J2931 standards and SEP 2.0. In this system, the charging schedule is optimized so that it supplies sufficient electricity for the next trip and also minimizes the charging cost under given time-of-use rate structures while it follows demand response events requested by a utility. Also, users can control charging schedule and check the current status of charging through application software of tablet computers. To validate the effectiveness of the developed smart charging system, we conducted experimental demonstration in which a total of 10 customers of Duke Energy regularly used our developed system for approximately one year with simulated time-of-use rate structures and demand response events.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0745
Petter Dahlander, Stina Hemdal
Abstract To contribute to knowledge required to meet new emission requirements, relationships between multiple injection parameters, degrees of fuel stratification, combustion events, work output and flame luminosity (indicative of particulate abundance) were experimentally investigated using a single-cylinder optical GDI engine. A tested hypothesis was that advancing portions of the mass injected would enhance the fuel-air mixing and thus reduce flame luminescence. An outward-opening piezo actuated fuel injector capable of multiple injections was used to inject the fuel using different triple injection strategies, with various combinations of late and earlier injections leading to various degrees of fuel stratification. Sprays and combustion events were captured using two high-speed cameras and cylinder pressure measurements.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0306
Satoru Shinzaki, Hakaru Sadano, Yutaka Maruyama, Willett Kempton
Abstract In order to reduce emissions and enhance energy security, renewable power sources are being introduced proactively. As the fraction of these sources on a power grid grows, it will become more difficult to maintain balance between renewable power supply and coincident demand, because renewable power generation changes frequently and significantly, depending on weather conditions. As a means of resolving this imbalance between supply and demand, vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology is being discussed, because it enables vehicles to contribute to stabilizing the power grid by utilizing on-board batteries as a distributed energy resource as well as an energy storage for propulsion. The authors have built a plug-in vehicle with a capability of backfeeding to the power grid, by integrating a bi-directional on-board AC/DC and DC/AC converter (on-board charger) and a digital communication device into the vehicle.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1603
Ahmed A. Abdel-Rehim, Ahmed A. Hamouda
Abstract As the world is going through an evolutionary development in most of the science fields, there is an essential and exceptional demand for higher efficiency power generators to recover the thermal losses. Recently thermoelectric materials have attracted extensive attention for this purpose. The recent advancement in nanotechnology has a remarkable impact on thermoelectric materials development. This resulted in nano structured materials whose thermoelectric properties exhibit a great challenge to its bulk form, such as Silicon nanowires (SiNWs). Silicon nanowires are promising thermoelectric materials as they offer large reductions in thermal conductivity over bulk Si without significant decrease in the electrical conductivity. In the present work silicon nanowires have been implemented in fabricating a thermoelectric device which can be employed in different applications, such as engines, to recover part of the energy lost in these applications.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0157
M Abu Anas Shuvom, M Zahurul Haq
Abstract As combustion can vary widely between engine cycles if left uncontrolled, strict and robust control is required to meet optimum performance at different operating conditions. In this research, intelligent control techniques implemented on a Gasoline Direct Compression Injection (GDCI/GDI) engine. A research four cylinder 2.0 L GDI engine modeled with optimal control hardware that is frequently called as the conceptual Cybernetic intelligent GDI or ‘iGDI’ engine. The engine features Free Valve Actuation (FVA) hardware and precision fuel injector connected directly to the engine cylinder that found assistive for control flexibility by technical assessments. Then a mechatronic neural control approach is proposed and discussed with adaptive control techniques. Adaptive and predictive neural network control architectures developed for two distinct plant operation modes.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0166
Christian Drabek, Annette Paulic, Gereon Weiss
Abstract Car infotainment systems feature an increasing number of functions to keep pace with consumer needs. The GENIVI Alliance aims to facilitate this evolution of infotainment systems by developing a common baseline where services of different suppliers can easily be integrated on a single hardware platform. Since the huge number of services creates more dependencies and interactions, more effort is required to ensure the same level of quality. We present a novel approach and effective tooling to reduce the effort for the interface verification of in-vehicle software components. Our models create different views of the system. Consistency checks and automated transformations between the views reduce the modeling effort and ensure compatible interactions of distributed software components. Layered reference models separate the description of the structure and the behavior of the services' communication.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0260
Ashlie B. Hocking, John C. Knight, M. Anthony Aiello, Shin'ichi Shiraishi
Abstract Software verification is a critical component of software development. Software verification techniques include different forms of testing, inspection, static analysis, and formal verification. Formal verification offers the advantage that it corresponds, at least informally, to testing all possible paths through the software. There are two primary approaches to using formal verification to establish properties of software: (a) proving properties of a formal specification, and (b) proving an implementation is a refinement of its specification. The first approach allows inference of the proven properties of the implementation provided the implementation is correct. The second approach allows inference of the correctness of the implementation. Proving properties of a specification provides a means for detecting critical design flaws early in the development process.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0261
Shuai Li, Cheng Chang, Huichao Zhao
Abstract The EMDS (E-motor Drive System), as the core powertrain system of the EV/HEVs, which safety is becoming more and more critical. Meanwhile, the newly released ISO26262 standard rules the functional safety for E/E systems in vehicles, and provides a framework for developing automotive products that are safe from E/E system malfunctions in passenger vehicles. This paper mainly presents the functional safety concept development of the EMDS for a state-of-the-art P2 hybrid powertrain architecture according to the ISO26262 standard, including system architectures and item definition, hazard analysis and risk assessment, functional safety concept and technical safety concept. In the development of functional safety concept, the ASIL decomposition is also applied between requirements regarding main functionality and monitoring process, and obtains functional safety requirements based on a preliminary architecture.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0265
Martin Krammer, Philip Stirgwolt, Helmut Martin
Abstract The standard ISO 26262 stipulates a “top-down” approach based on the process “V” model, by conducting a hazard analysis and risk assessment to determine the safety goals, and subsequently derives the safety requirements down to the appropriate element level. The specification of safety goals is targeted towards identified hazardous events, whereas the classification of safety requirements does not always turn out non-ambiguous. While requirement formalization turns out to be advantageous, the translation from natural language to semi-formal requirements, especially in context of ISO 26262, poses a problem. In this publication, a new approach for the formalization of safety requirements is introduced, targeting the demands of safety standard ISO 26262. Its part 8, clause 6 (“Specification and management of safety requirements”) has no dedicated work product to accomplish this challenging task.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0268
Pablo Oliveira Antonino, Mario Trapp, Ashwin Venugopal
Abstract Evidence has shown that the lack of traceability between safety requirements and both architecture and failure propagation models is a key reason for the incompleteness and inconsistency of safety requirements, and, consequently, a root cause of safety incidents. In this regard, this paper presents checks for the automatic detection of incompleteness and inconsistency of safety requirements with respect to failure propagation models and architecture. First, the notion of safety requirements completeness and consistency was decomposed into small manageable pieces called Safety Requirement Completeness and Consistency Criteria. Breaking the complex notions of completeness and consistency into finer grains was important to allow systematic and precise elaboration of the completeness and consistency checks.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0267
Ryoichi Inada, Teppei Hirotsu, Yasushi Morita, Takahiro Hata
Abstract The ISO 26262 is a functional safety standard for road vehicles. The standard requires manufacturers to conduct quantitative assessment of the diagnostic coverage (DC) of products. The DC is defined as the percentage of failure probability covered by safety mechanisms. However, DC evaluation methods for drift faults, in which the change in element values is not constant, have not been discussed. In this paper, we propose a DC evaluation method for analog circuits with drift faults. With this method, we first parameterize the effect of drift faults onto a bounded region then split the region into safe fault, hazardous detectable fault, and hazardous undetectable fault regions. We evaluate the classification rate distribution by the area ratios of these regions.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0273
Helmut Martin, Martin Krammer, Bernhard Winkler, Christian Schwarzl
Abstract Although the ISO 26262 provides requirements and recommendations for an automotive functional safety lifecycle, practical guidance on how to handle these safety activities and safety artifacts is still lacking. This paper provides an overview of a semi-formal safety engineering approach based on SysML for specifying the relevant safety artifacts in the concept phase. Using specific diagram types, different views of the available data can be provided that reflects the specific needs of the stakeholders involved. One objective of this work is to improve the common understanding of the relevant safety aspects during the system design. The approach, which is demonstrated here from the perspective of a Tier1 supplier for an automotive battery system, covers different breakdown levels of a vehicle. The safety workflow presented here supports engineers' efforts to meet the safety standard ISO 26262 in a systematic way.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0272
Ludovic Pintard, Michel Leeman, Abdelillah Ymlahi-Ouazzani, Jean-Charles Fabre, Karama Kanoun, Matthieu Roy
Abstract The complexity and the criticality of automotive electronic embedded systems are steadily increasing today, and that is particularly the case for software development. The new ISO 26262 standard for functional safety is one of the answers to these challenges. The ISO 26262 defines requirements on the development process in order to ensure the safety. Among these requirements, fault injection (FI) is introduced as a dedicated technique to assess the effectiveness of safety mechanisms and demonstrate the correct implementation of the safety requirements. Our work aims at developing an approach that will help integrate FI in the whole development process in a continuous way, from system requirements to the verification and validation phase.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0277
Seth Placke, John Thomas, Dajiang Suo
Abstract Automobiles are becoming ever more complex as advanced safety features are integrated into the vehicle platform. As the pace of integration and complexity of new features rises, it is becoming increasingly difficult for system engineers to assess the impact of new additions on vehicle safety and performance. In response to this challenge, a new approach for analyzing multiple control systems as an extension to the Systems Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) framework has been developed. The new approach meets the growing need of system engineers to analyze integrated control systems, that may or may not have been developed in a coordinated manner, and assess them for safety and performance. The new approach identifies unsafe combinations of control actions, from one or more control systems, that could lead to an accident. For example, independent controllers for Auto Hold, Engine Idle Stop, and Adaptive Cruise Control may interfere with each other in certain situations.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0278
Ingo Stürmer, Heiko Doerr, Thomas End
Managing ISO 26262 software development projects is a challenging task. This paper discusses major challenges in managing safety-critical projects from a high-level perspective, i.e. from a manager’s point of view. We address managers (directors) with full project responsibility including software and hardware teams. Rather than discussing how to fulfill (technical) requirements stated by the ISO standard, we highlight major challenges and tough decisions a manager has to face on her way from project start up to delivery of the safety case. We discuss important project management topics and best practices such as negotiation issues with the contractor (OEM), selection of the appropriate functional safety manager, general ISO 262626-related project management matters, as well as contractual issues with supplier such as development interface agreement. We discuss the topics on the basis of real-life experience we collected during several ISO 26262 management projects.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0274
John Thomas, John Sgueglia, Dajiang Suo, Nancy Leveson, Mark Vernacchia, Padma Sundaram
Abstract The introduction of new safety critical features using software-intensive systems presents a growing challenge to hazard analysis and requirements development. These systems are rich in feature content and can interact with other vehicle systems in complex ways, making the early development of proper requirements critical. Catching potential problems as early as possible is essential because the cost increases exponentially the longer problems remain undetected. However, in practice these problems are often subtle and can remain undetected until integration, testing, production, or even later, when the cost of fixing them is the highest. In this paper, a new technique is demonstrated to perform a hazard analysis in parallel with system and requirements development. The proposed model-based technique begins during early development when design uncertainty is highest and is refined iteratively as development progresses to drive the requirements and necessary design features.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0275
Gokul Krithivasan, William Taylor, Jody Nelson
Abstract In ISO 26262, the top-level safety goals are derived using the Hazard Analysis and Risk Assessment. Functional safety requirements (FSRs) are then derived from these safety goals in the concept phase (ISO 26262-3:2011). The standard does not call out a specific method to develop these FSRs from safety goals. However, ISO 26262-8:2011, Clause 6, does establish requirements to ensure consistent management and correct specification of safety requirements with respect to their attributes and characteristics throughout the safety lifecycle. Hence, there are expectations on the part of system engineers to bridge this gap. The method proposed in this paper utilizes concepts from process modeling to ensure the completeness of these requirements, eliminate any external inconsistencies between them and improve verifiability.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0279
Fumio Narisawa, Masahiro Matsubara, Masataka Nishi, Tomohito Ebina
Abstract Functions and sizes of electronic control and software systems in automotives are being increased to achieve better controllability and reduce fuel consumption. A higher safety level is also demanded, so functional-safety standards are increasingly being introduced to in-vehicle systems. In safety critical systems, failure must be diagnosed and a system transited to a safe state when hardware failure occurs. Therefore, the failure diagnosis part of the basic software that takes charge of signal inputs and outputs processing must be verified for high accountability and explanations to a third party. To diagnose failure, the hardware and software that originally operate independently need to cooperate in principle. Hardware and software cooperating systems are not straight-forward to verify, because the combinations of conditions are too numerous for testing.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0762
Mitsuru Kowada, Isao Azumagakito, Tetsuya Nagai, Nobuyuki Iwai, Ryoji Hiraoka
Abstract Attempts were made to measure knocking phenomenon by an optical method, which is free from influences of mechanical noises and is allowing an easy installation to an engine. Using a newly developed high durability optical probe, the light intensity of hydroxyl radical component, which is diffracted from the emitted light from combustion, was measured. The intensity of this emission component was measured at each crank angle and the maximum intensity in a cycle was identified. After that, the angular range in which the measured intensity exceeded 85% of this maximum intensity was defined as “CA85”. When a knocking was purposely induced by changing the conditions of the engine operation, there appeared the engine cycles that included CA85 less than a crank angle of 4 degrees. The frequency of occurrence of CA85 equal to or less than 4 degrees within a predetermined number of engine cycles, which can be interpreted as a knocking occurrence ratio, was denoted as “CA85-4”.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0754
Simona Silvia Merola, Adrian Irimescu, Luca Marchitto, Cinzia Tornatore, Gerardo Valentino
Abstract Crank angle resolved imaging in the UV-visible spectral range was used to investigate flame front characteristics during normal combustion, surface ignition and light knock conditions. ‘Line of sight’ measurements provided information on local wrinkling: the evaluation was based on a statistical approach, with multiple frames taken at the same crank angle during consecutive cycles. This allowed the results during normal combustion to be representative for the specific operational conditions and to a good degree independent from the effects of cyclic variation. Abnormal combustion on the other hand, was investigated on a cycle-to-cycle basis, given the stochastic nature of such phenomena. The experimental trials were performed at fixed engine speed on an optically accessible direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engine equipped with the cylinder head of a four cylinder 16-valves commercial power unit.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0759
Tetsuya Nagai, Ryoji Hiraoka, Nobuyuki Iwai, Mitsuru Kowada, Isao Azumagakito
Abstract In the real site of engine development, new means are required for optical measurements under a wide variety of conditions including high-loaded operation. We have accordingly developed the new optical probe having less restriction when installing onto the engine as well as having high durability. The shape of connector end of newly developed optical probe that fits to the engine is interchangeable with the M5 sensor used for in-cylinder pressure measurement. The optical module of the optical probe can also be installed in the M10 spark plug or the M8 glow plug. The durability of the newly developed optical probe is; heat up to 400°C, pressure up to 25 MPa, and vibration up to 50 G. The durability of the optical probe was assessed using the engines of commercially available motorcycles. The 110 cm3 engine was used for the time-wise assessment. The 150 cm3 engine was used for the environment-wise assessment. Either one is a single cylinder engine.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0304
Samveg Saxena, Jason MacDonald, Doug Black, Sila Kiliccote
Abstract Electric vehicles (EVs) enable improved vehicle efficiency and zero emissions in population centers, however the large loads from EV charging can stress grid systems during periods of peak demand. We apply detailed physics-based models of EVs with data on how drivers use their cars to quantify the ability for EVs to reduce their charging during periods of peak demand, i.e. as in a demand response program. A managed charging controller is developed and applied within the vehicle-to-grid simulator (V2G-Sim) which charges vehicles during demand response (DR) events only if charging is required to satisfy anticipated mobility needs for a given driver over the next 24 hours. We find that up to 95% of EV charging loads can be removed during DR events without compromising the mobility needs of individual drivers. This value is found by comparing the charging loads of EVs using the managed charging controller against an uncontrolled charging case.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0370
Modar Horani, Osamah Rawashdeh
Abstract Traditional Heat Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) control systems are reactive by design and largely dependent on the on-board sensory data available on a Controller Area Network (CAN) bus. The increasingly common Internet connectivity offered in today's vehicles, through infotainment and telematic systems, makes data available that may be used to improve current HVAC systems. This includes real-time outside relative humidity, ambient temperature, precipitation (i.e., rain, snow, etc.), and weather forecasts. This data, combined with position and route information of the vehicle, may be used to provide a more comfortable experience to vehicle occupants in addition to improving driver visibility through more intelligent humidity, and defrost control. While the possibility of improving HVAC control utilizing internet connectivity seems obvious, it is still currently unclear as to what extent.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0464
Christian-Andreas Schumann, Eric Forkel, Thomas Klein, Dieter Gerlach, Egon Mueller
Abstract Total quality is becoming increasingly important for competitiveness. In order to achieve high quality, the requirements must be continuously compared with the results achieved in the process. This is done by means of measurement parameters and comparative values. The acquisition of the data requires appropriate measurement methods. The measurement methods and procedures have to be constantly developed in order to measure more precisely and to generate an even higher quality. Thus, the achieved product quality can be determined absolutely and relatively. If deviations from the planned quality parameters occur, the operator will be able to intervene immediately. The presented procedure is one of the noncontact (optical) measurement methods using CMMs, 3D scanners and 3D cameras. It is a combination of stereo photography and photogrammetry.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0463
Kasiraja Thangapandian, Immanuel Rajkumar
Abstract In recent years the automotive industry is facing unprecedented influx of new technology advancements and ever-increasing consumer demands for media, entertainment and connectivity applications. This drives the automotive industry to deliver the products at a faster pace, thereby reducing time to market which results in issues from end users and dealers. Automotive industries are striving hard to keep pace with these radical changes with increase in software and electronics which in turn necessitates a systematic and effective software engineering approach to deliver high quality product from the core embedded software industry. This paper details how embedded software projects are developed globally and customer issues are collected and analyzed. It also discuss about the method used for performing effective Root cause analysis for identifying the systemic issues and formulating the systemic improvement actions.
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