Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 21011
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0071
Christian Schweikert, David Witt, Dirk Schweitzer, Marco Nicolo, Liu Chen
Abstract The market potential for products such as scooters and small motorcycles is already self-sustaining. However, other applications for small engines can be more fragmented with a wide variety of requirements for the engine control unit. Consequently, the engine control unit can be designed to accommodate more features than are necessary for a given application to cover a broader market. The flip side of this approach is to design the engine control unit for a limited application reducing the market size. Neither approach creates a cost efficient product for the producer. It either supplies the market with an electronic control unit that has features not being utilized (wasted costs) or a unit that has limited capabilities reducing the economies of scale (higher costs). When these designs are developed using discrete components these inefficiencies are exacerbated. Integration of these functions at the semiconductor level can mitigate these costs, improve the thermal performance and expand the functional capabilities to include additional vehicular control aspects in the electronic control unit.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0007
Joseph K. Ausserer, Alexander K. Rowton, Keith D. Grinstead, Paul J. Litke, Marc D. Polanka
Abstract In this work, in-cylinder pressure was measured in a 55 cc single cylinder, 4.4 kW, two stroke, spark ignition engine. In cylinder pressure measurements were taken using two different pressure transducers to determine if the performance differences between the two transducers are discernible in a small, spark ignition engine. A Kistler brand measuring spark plug was compared to a Kistler brand flush mount high temperature pressure sensor. Both sensors employ piezo-electric pressure sensing elements and were designed to measure indicated mean effective pressure as well as to detect knock at high temperature engine conditions. The pressure sensors were installed and adjusted to ensure cylinder volume after sensor installation matched the engine's original configuration within reasonable manufacturing tolerances. A series of tests at four throttle settings ensued to determine if either device altered the combustion volume or the engine's performance. Performance measurements were obtained over a range of engine speeds from 4000 rpm to 6000 rpm.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0069
Ken Fosaaen
Abstract Global concerns over pollution have led to increasingly strict emissions legislation targeting small engines, which currently pollute at a much greater level than modern multi-cylinder automotive engines. Closed-loop control may be required to meet many future legislation requirements; however, such systems can be impractical due to high added component costs. A necessary component for closed-loop engine control is an oxygen sensor. Existing automotive oxygen sensors are too large, require too much power, and are far too expensive to be suitable for the vast majority of the global small engine applications; therefore, some manufacturers have developed smaller and/or unheated versions based on their existing sensors to meet this emerging need. The ability to miniaturize resistive based sensors well below that of traditional Nernst (zirconia based) oxygen sensors affords the opportunity to meet future emissions standards with less of an impact on cost. The performance of a novel low-cost, low-power, narrow-band resistive-based oxygen sensor was compared with the stock oxygen sensor and several other commercially available oxygen sensors on a 2014 Honda Grom 125E motorcycle.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0027
T Manikandan, S Sarmadh Ameer, A Sivakumar, Samaraj Dhinagar
Abstract The proposed paper is on electrical energy conservation in a two wheeler. Electrical energy generation adds a 12% load torque on an engine and hence saving electrical energy would ultimately reduce the consumption of fuel. Load Control Module (LCM) is a single intelligent device which is placed in between electrical energy generation and consumption. The module controls and distributes energy to the corresponding loads depending on parameters like battery voltage, engine RPM, overhead light illumination levels and load usage time. The module prioritizes battery charging for prolonging the life of the battery. The Module has a microcontroller and load drivers and it is programmed with a novel algorithm for prioritization and energy distribution with respect to input conditions. A vehicle fitted with the Load Control Module was tested in city driving cycle (CDC) condition as per ARAI (Automotive Research Association of India) standard and it was found that the electrical loading decreased to about 30% when compared to vehicle with uncontrolled loading.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0137
Ken Fosaaen
Abstract Global concerns over pollution have led to increasingly strict emissions legislation targeting small engines, which currently pollute at a much greater level than modern multi-cylinder automotive engines. Closed-loop control may be required to meet many future legislation requirements; however, such systems can be impractical due to high added component costs. A necessary component for closed-loop engine control is an oxygen sensor. Existing automotive oxygen sensors are too large, require too much power, and are far too expensive to be suitable for the vast majority of the global small engine applications; therefore, some manufacturers have developed smaller and/or unheated versions based on their existing sensors to meet this emerging need. The ability to miniaturize resistive based sensors well below that of traditional Nernst (zirconia based) oxygen sensors affords the opportunity to meet future emissions standards with less of an impact on cost. In this study, a sub-miniature resistance-based narrow-band oxygen sensor was developed and its response to various exhaust lambda values was characterized at various temperatures.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0107
Takahiro Masuda, Kouji Sakai, Yuki Yamaguchi, Jun-ichi Kaku, Hirobumi Nagasaka
Abstract This paper proposes a novel engine starter system composed of a small-power electric motor and a simple mechanical valve train. The system makes it possible to design more efficient starters than conventional systems, and it is especially effective to restart engines equipped with idling stop systems. Recently, several idling stop systems, having intelligent start-up functions and highly-efficient generate capabilities have been proposed for motorcycles. One of challenges of the idling stop systems is the downsizing of electric motors for starting-up. However, there are many limitations to downsize the electric motors in the conventional idling stop systems, since the systems utilize the forward-rotational torque of the electric motors to compress the air-fuel mixture gas in the cylinders. Our studies exceeded the limitations of downsizing the electric motors by mainly using the engine combustion energy instead of the electric energy to go over the first compression top dead center.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0143
Ken Fosaaen
Abstract Global concerns over pollution have led to increasingly strict emissions legislation targeting small engines, which currently pollute at a much greater level than modern multi-cylinder automotive engines. Closed-loop control may be required to meet many future legislation requirements; however, such systems can be impractical due to high added component costs. A necessary component for closed-loop engine control is an oxygen sensor. Existing automotive oxygen sensors are too large, require too much power, and are far too expensive to be suitable for the vast majority of the global small engine applications; therefore, some manufacturers have developed smaller and/or unheated versions based on their existing sensors to meet this emerging need. The ability to miniaturize resistive based sensors well below that of traditional Nernst (zirconia based) oxygen sensors affords the opportunity to meet future emissions standards with less of an impact on cost. The performance of a novel low-cost, low-power narrow-band oxygen sensor was compared with several automotive as well as newer oxygen sensors developed for the small engine market.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0073
Horizon Walker Gitano, Ray Chim, Jian Loh
Abstract Recent concern over air quality has lead to increasingly stringent emissions regulations on ever smaller displacement engines, resulting in the application of Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI) to the 100cc-200cc class 2-wheelers in many countries. In the pursuit of ever smaller and less expensive EFI systems a number of unique technologies are being explored, including resistive type oxygen sensors. In this paper we investigate the application of a prototype resistive oxygen sensor to a small motorcycle EFI system. Measurements of the exhaust system temperatures, and Air/Fuel Ratio (AFR) and resistive sensor response are carried out, and compared to the standard zirconia oxygen sensor to create an estimate of the sensor's in-use performance. Motorcycle performance data are compared using both a standard zirconia switching type oxygen sensor, and the new resistive type oxygen sensor to control the air/fuel ratio. Results indicate that the resistive type oxygen sensor is capable of allowing the EFI controller to successfully control the vehicle's AFR in all operating modes with a significantly faster “light off” time, and lower overall current draw when compared to the standard heated zirconia sensor.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0075
Kazuyoshi Shimatani
Abstract Various sensors including throttle position sensors (TPS), manifold pressure sensors (MPS), crank angle sensors, engine temperature sensors, and oxygen sensors are mounted in electronically controlled fuel injection (FI) systems to accurately regulate the air-fuel ratio according to the operating state and operating environment. Among these vehicle-mounted sensors, TPS has functions for detecting a fully-closed throttle and estimating intake air volume by the amount of throttle opening. Currently, we have conducted a study on transferring TPS functions into the MPS (manifold pressure sensor) in order to eliminate the TPS. Here we report on detecting a fully-closed throttle for achieving fuel cut control (FCC) and idle speed control (ISC) in fuel injection systems. We contrived a means for fully-closed throttle detection during ISC and controlling changes in the bypass opening during FCC in order to accurately judge each fully-closed throttle state via the manifold pressure. A factor in causing fluctuations in manifold pressure in a fully-closed throttle state are changes in the engine RPM (also referred to as engine speed) and changes in the degree of opening of the bypass (hereafter simply bypass opening).
2014-11-07
Book
Ian K. Jennions
Integrated Vehicle Health Management: Implementation and Lessons Learned is the fourth title in the IVHM series published by SAE International. This new book introduces a variety of case studies, lessons learned, and insights on what it really means to develop, implement, or manage an integrated system of systems. Integrated Vehicle Health Management: Implementation and Lessons Learned brings to the reader a wide set of hands-on stories, made possible by the contribution of twenty-three authors, who agreed to share their experience and wisdom on how new technologies are developed and put to work. This effort was again coordinated by Dr. Ian K. Jennions, Director of the IVHM Centre at Cranfield University (UK), and editor of the previous books in the series. Integrated Vehicle Health Management: Implementation and Lessons Learned, with seventeen, fully illustrated chapters, covers diverse areas of expertise such as the impact of trust, human factors, and evidential integrity in system development.
2014-11-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-9079
Yongming Bao, Qing Nian Chan, Sanghoon Kook, Evatt Hawkes
Abstract The spray development of ethanol, gasoline and iso-octane has been studied in an optically accessible, spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engine. The focus is on how fuel properties impact temporal and spatial evolution of sprays at realistic ambient conditions. Two optical facilities were used: (1) a constant-flow spray chamber simulating cold-start conditions and (2) a single-cylinder SIDI engine running at normal, warmed-up operating conditions. In these optical facilities, high-speed Mie-scattering imaging is performed to measure penetrations of spray plumes at various injection pressures of 4, 7, 11 and 15 MPa. The results show that the effect of fuel type on the tip penetration length of the sprays depends on the injection conditions and the level of fuel jet atomisation and droplet breakup. It is observed that at 4 MPa injection pressure, the tip penetration length of ethanol sprays is shorter than that of gasoline sprays, likely due to lower injection velocity and increased nozzle loss associated with higher density and increased viscosity of ethanol, respectively.
2014-10-30
Standard
AS90387C
Scope is unavailable.
2014-10-29
WIP Standard
ARP6307
This document is for establishing and addressing anomalies on appearance of new and newly retreaded tires.
2014-10-28
Article
Flying cars got short shrift. Panelists at SAE 2014 Convergence event instead predicted that vehicles of model year 2054 will be extremely connected and will largely drive themselves. Dealing with urban gridlock was also a key concern during the Wednesday session.
2014-10-27
Standard
AS24000A
Scope is unavailable.
2014-10-27
Standard
AS22759C
AS22759 specification covers fluoropolymer-insulated single conductor electrical wires made with tin-coated, silver-coated, or nickel-coated conductors of copper or copper alloy as specified in the applicable detail specification. The fluoropolymer insulation may be polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVF2), ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene copolymer (ETFE), or other Fluoropolymer resin. The fluoropolymer may be used alone or in combination with other insulation materials. These abbreviations shall be used herein. When a wire is referenced herein, it means an insulated conductor (see 7.7).
2014-10-24
Article
Connectivity brings many benefits for vehicle owners, but it creates many challenges for engineers. Security is perhaps the most difficult since stopping hackers is an ongoing task.
2014-10-24
Article
Though hardware and software were front and center at SAE 2014 Convergence, panels also explored broader issues facing the auto industry. A Wednesday panel focused on ways to better utilize overloaded engineers as well as offering techniques for attracting new talent.
2014-10-24
Article
Six autonomous vehicles, each about the length of a shoebox, navigate a curve-filled track on the show floor at SAE 2014 Convergence.
2014-10-24
WIP Standard
J2032
This SAE Standard specifies the general requirements and test methods for nonshielded high-tension ignition cable assemblies.
2014-10-24
Standard
J3021_201410
This SAE RP provides a set of test methods and practices for the characterization of the properties of Li-battery cathode active material. It is not within the scope of this document to establish criteria for the test results, as these are usually established between the vendor and customer. It is not within the scope of this document to examine the rheological properties of the cathode material in slurry since such properties are influenced by the conductive additive and the solid loading, which are determined through discussion between the manufacturer and user. It is not within the scope of this document to examine the electrochemical properties of cathode materials since these are influenced by electrode design. The committee considers that it is impossible to establish an electrode design that would be appropriate for all cathode active materials.
2014-10-23
WIP Standard
ARP1199C
This Aerospace Recommended Practice provides technical and application information needed by the designers of aircraft electric systems and support equipment for the selection of overcurrent protective devices. It provides definitions to permit comparisons of various electric circuit protective devices. Included also are recommended procedures for periodic inspection.
2014-10-23
WIP Standard
J973
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to provide any technical person or group interested in ignition system design and/or evaluation with the specific equipment, conditions, and methods which will produce test results definitive and reproducible for his own work and yet sufficiently standardized to be acceptable to other groups working on battery ignition systems for automotive engines.
2014-10-22
Article
Meeting diverse customer demands is a vexing challenge that will require heavy amounts of engineering work. Development teams will have to give drivers more personal options while they also determine how to ensure that autonomous driving platforms mimic the ways humans sometimes break traffic laws.
2014-10-22
Article
The company unveiled reconfigurable clusters and wireless device charging technologies as part of its second-generation “Tech Truck” at the recent IAA Commercial Vehicles event in Hannover, Germany.
2014-10-22
WIP Standard
AS22520/34
Hand crimp tool used to crimp M39029/83-450 thru 453, 507, and -508 connector contacts
2014-10-22
WIP Standard
J2698
1.1 This SAE Recommended Practice covers the design and application of primary on-board wiring distribution system harnessing for surface vehicles. This document is intended for single phase nominal 120 VAC circuits that provide power to truck sleeper cab hotel loads so that they may operate with the main propulsion engine turned off. The power supply comes from alternative sources such as land-based grid power, DC-AC inverters and auxiliary power generators. The circuits may also provide power to improve vehicle performance through charging batteries or operating cold-weather starting aids. 1.2 This document is not intended to provide guidance for electric or hybrid electric vehicle wiring circuits. Refer to SAE J1673 for high voltage automotive wiring assembly design. 1.3 Engine block heaters are 120 VAC devices that are used on a multitude of vehicle platforms in addition to trucks with sleeper cabs. Generally, the engine block heater circuit is wired independent of hotel loads. SAE J2698 does not apply to independently wired engine block heater circuits.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 21011

Filter

  • Article
    2395
  • Book
    170
  • Collection
    45
  • Magazine
    934
  • Technical Paper
    12613
  • Standard
    4854