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Viewing 1 to 30 of 12498
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Zachary A. Collier, Steve Walters, Dan DiMase, Jeffrey M. Keisler, Igor Linkov
Counterfeit electronic components entering into critical infrastructure and applications through the global supply chain threaten the economy and national security. In response to the growing threat from counterfeits, the Society of Automotive Engineers G-19 Committee is developing AS6171. This aerospace standard is focused on testing facilities with a goal of standardizing the process of counterfeit detection. An integral part of the standard is a semi-quantitative risk assessment method. This method assigns risk scores to electronic components based on a number of relevant criteria, and places the components into one of five risk tier levels corresponding to an appropriate level of laboratory testing to ensure the authenticity of the component. In this way, the methodology aims at standardizing the risk assessment process and bases the identified risk as guidance for commensurate testing protocols. This paper outlines the risk assessment method contained within AS6171 and briefly explores other complementary efforts and research gaps within the G-19 and electronics community.
Technical Paper
2014-05-09
John O. Manyala, Todd W. Fritz
Electro-hydraulic actuated systems are widely used in industrial applications due to high torque density, higher speeds and wide bandwidth operation. However, the complexities and the parametric uncertainties of the hydraulic actuated systems pose challenges in establishing analytical mathematical models. Unlike electro-mechanical and pneumatic systems, the nonlinear dynamics due to dead band, hysteresis, nonlinear pressure flow relations, leakages and friction affects the pressure sensitivity and flow gain by altering the system's transient response, which can introduce asymmetric oscillatory behavior and a lag in the system response. The parametric uncertainties make it imperative to have condition monitoring with in-built diagnostics capability. Timely faults detection and isolation can help mitigate catastrophic failures. This paper presents a signal-based fault diagnostic scheme for a gearbox hydraulic actuator leakage detection using the wavelet transform. The novelty of the work is the development of a high fidelity leakage fault detection as low as 0.128 lit/min.
Technical Paper
2014-05-09
Nikolina Samardzic
Values of the speech intelligibility index (SII) were found to be different for the same speech intelligibility performance measured in an acoustic perception jury test with 35 human subjects and different background noise spectra. Using a novel method for in-vehicle speech intelligibility evaluation, the human subjects were tested using the hearing-in-noise-test (HINT) in a simulated driving environment. A variety of driving and listening conditions were used to obtain 50% speech intelligibility score at the sentence Speech Reception Threshold (sSRT). In previous studies, the band importance function for ‘average speech’ was used for SII calculations since the band importance function for the HINT is unavailable in the SII ANSI S3.5-1997 standard. In this study, the HINT jury test measurements from a variety of background noise spectra and listening configurations of talker and listener are used in an effort to obtain a band importance function for the HINT, to potentially correlate the calculated SII scores with the measured speech intelligibility scores.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Arturo Davila, Emilia Romero, Marina Roche, Marco Mammetti, Javier Gutierrez, Micha Lesemann
Abstract The ELVA project (Advanced Electric Vehicle Architectures) was co-funded under the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme and had the goal of developing vehicle architectures specifically designed for electric powered vehicles. The consortium was formed by the Institute for Automotive Engineering (ika) of RWTH Aachen University (coordinator), Applus+ IDIADA, Volkswagen, Renault, Centro Richerche Fiat (CRF), Continental and the Swedish Vehicle and Traffic Safety Centre (SAFER). The main objectives of the ELVA project were: To generate, investigate and analyze innovative design concepts for EVs To deliver a wide range of advanced modular architectures that enable the same level of safety as today's best known practices To minimize weight, maximize energy efficiency, optimize ergonomics and space at affordable costs with good levels of comfort and performance To deliver best practices and evidence based design rules for modular lightweight and safe architectures specifically for EVs The project, which was characterized by an intensive interaction among the partners, completed the design of three electric vehicle concepts, that were developed in parallel and doing iterative design loops.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vukica Jovanovic, Mileta Tomovic, Lisa Ncube, Ana Djuric, Petros Katsioloudis, Filip Cuckov
Abstract Many vehicle subsystems were in essence mechatronic (electro-mechanical) designs. Modern vehicles have various subsystems which provide mechanical movements which were controlled by electronic and electrical systems. At the same time, they collect and track data about system performance and environmental conditions for on board diagnostics. Advances in mechanical, electrical, and embedded systems were making vehicles more intelligent. However, these mechatronics systems face new challenges including design for compliance and ensuring that all product specifications are transferred into the company's product data management system. This is especially important for electrical and electronic subsystems since they have to comply with ongoing changes related to the management of hazardous substances. Since modern vehicles were being manufactured in a global environment through outsourcing of many different components, this poses challenges with material tracking. Environmental regulations were not only different from country to country but were also constantly changing making it essential that systems are flexible and customizable.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
David H. Myszka, Jonathan Lauden, Patrick Joyce, Andrew Murray, Christoph Gillum
Automotive starting systems require substantial amounts of mechanical energy in a short period of time. Lead-acid batteries have historically provided that energy through a starter motor. Springs have been identified as an alternative energy storage medium and are well suited to engine-starting applications due to their ability to rapidly deliver substantial mechanical power and their long service life. This paper presents the development of a conceptual, spring-based starter. The focus of the study was to determine whether a spring of acceptable size could provide the required torque and rotational speed to start an automotive engine. Engine testing was performed on a representative 600 cc, inline 4-cylinder internal combustion engine to determine the required torque and engine speed during the starting cycle. An optimization was performed to identify an appropriate spring design, minimizing its size. Results predict that the test engine could be started by a torsional steel spring with a diameter and length of approximately 150 mm, similar in size, but lower weight than an electrical starting system of the engine.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Adam Fogarty, Kevin Oswald
In order to continue the effort of converting traditional internal combustion engine (ICE)-based vehicles into hybrid-electric vehicles (HEV), it is important to consider a variety of design architectures in which hybrid-electric operation is achieved. Such architectures include power split, parallel, and series. Of the previously stated architectures, the Purdue EcoMakers of the EcoCar 2 international Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition (AVTC) have chosen a parallel-through-the-road architecture for their 2013 Chevrolet Malibu provided by General Motors. From this, the Purdue EcoMaker vehicle design will be used as a case study for the design challenges and optimization strategies that are experienced when choosing this specific architecture for a light-duty passenger vehicle. This paper will focus on the design procedure and structural analysis of the custom rear suspension cradle created by the Purdue EcoMakers. Additionally, this paper will consider the benefits and practicality of using the structure of the custom suspension cradle as a design format for future suspension cradles to be used in light-duty passenger vehicles.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael Flannagan, Mitsuhiro Uchida, John Michael Sullivan, Mary Lynn Buonarosa
This study was designed to investigate how the spectral power distribution (SPD) of LED headlamps (including correlated color temperature, CCT) affects both objective driving performance and subjective responses of drivers. The results of this study are not intended to be the only considerations used in choosing SPD, but rather to be used along with results on how SPD affects other considerations, including visibility and glare. Twenty-five subjects each drove 5 different headlamps on each of 5 experimental vehicles. Subjects included both males and females, in older (64 to 85) and younger (20 to 32) groups. The 5 headlamps included current tungsten-halogen (TH) and high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps, along with three experimental LED lamps, with CCTs of approximately 4500, 5500, and 6500 K. Driving was done at night on public roads, over a 21.5-km route that was selected to include a variety of road types. Vehicle instrumentation was used to derive the measures of objective driving performance.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
SoDuk Lee, Jeff Cherry, Byungho Lee, Joseph McDonald, Michael Safoutin
Abstract A Battery Test Facility (BTF) has been constructed at United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to test various automotive battery packs for HEV, PHEV, and EV vehicles. Battery pack tests were performed in the BTF using a battery cycler, testing controllers, battery pack cooler, and a temperature controlled chamber. For e-machine testing and HEV power pack component testing, a variety of different battery packs are needed to power these devices to simulate in-vehicle conditions. For in-house e-machine testing and development, it is cost prohibitive to purchase a variety of battery packs, and also very time-consuming to interpret the battery management systems, CAN signals, and other interfaces for different vehicle manufacturers. Therefore, there is a need to accurately emulate battery pack voltage, power, current, State of Charge (SOC), etc. for testing e-machines as well as performing real-time HIL (Hardware-In-Loop) vehicle simulations by having the ability to instantly select a cell chemistry along with battery pack configuration such as cell capacity, number of cells in series/parallel, coolant type, etc.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Takao Suenaga, Takahiro Jo
Abstract The automotive industry is placing high importance on technologies that can reduce CO2, even in a highly fuel-efficient compact car. One major technology is Stop & Start(S&S) System, with a combined energy regeneration system. A key component of the system is a power supply storage device that has high-charge acceptance, light weight, and compact size. We believe a Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery completely meets these requirements. For the battery, there are three key points: 1 Battery cell specification2 State Of Charge (SOC) detection method3 Temperature management for Li-ion battery. We have already proposed the battery cell and the SOC detection during SAE 2013, and now we are going to introduce “Temperature Management”. If the temperature of a Li-ion battery operates over 60 degrees Celsius, the battery could be severely damaged. Therefore, temperature management of the battery is very important. Conventionally, the temperature is managed by several thermistors and a cooling fan.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tae-Kyung Lee, Ghamdan Kaid, John Blankenship, Dyche Anderson
Abstract Aggressive battery usage profiles in electrified vehicle applications require extensive efforts in developing battery management strategy and system design determination to guarantee safe operation under every real-world driving conditions. Experiment based approaches have been widely used for battery system development, but higher costs and longer testing time restrain the number of test cases in the product development process. Battery experiments tend to be conservative to avoid inherent risks of battery failure modes under aggressive battery operation close to the capability limits. Battery Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) is an alternative way to overcome the limitations of experiment-based approaches. Battery models in the HIL should provide real-time computation capability and high (at least acceptable) prediction accuracy. Equivalent circuit model (ECM) based HILs have been used owing to its relatively good balance between computational time and prediction accuracy. However, there are difficulties in constructing compact ECM structures to capture reliable battery responses over wide ranges of State of Charge (SOC), current, and temperature.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jiangong Zhu, Zechang Sun, Xuezhe Wei, Haifeng Dai, Hongzhang Cen
Abstract This paper presents a three-dimensional electrochemical electrode plate pair model to study the effect of the electrode tabs configuration. Understanding the distribution of current density, potential and heat generation rate is critical for designing li-ion batteries and conducting effective design optimization studies. We developed several electrode plate pair models which were different in position and size of tabs. Results showed the influence and comparison of different configuration on the distribution of current density, potential density and heat generation rate at different discharge process. The distribution was predicted as a function of tabs. It can provide a theoretical basis for improving battery thermal performance and cooling system design.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Joydeep Banerjee, John McPhee, Paul Goossens, Thanh-Son Dao
Abstract The analysis of nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery performance is very important for automotive researchers and manufacturers. The performance of a battery can be described as a direct consequence of various chemical and physical phenomena taking place inside the container. In this paper, a physics-based model of a Ni-MH battery will be presented. To analyze its performance, the efficiency of the battery is chosen as the performance measure, which is defined as the ratio of the energy output from the battery and the energy input to the battery while charging. Parametric sensitivity analysis will be used to generate sensitivity information for the state variables of the model. The generated information will be used to showcase how sensitivity information can be used to identify unique model behavior and how it can be used to optimize the capacity of the battery. The results will be validated using a finite difference formulation.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Matthew Klein, Shijie Tong, Jae Wan Park
Abstract Optimizing the hardware design and control strategies of thermal management systems (TMS) in battery packs using large format pouch cells is a difficult but important problem due to the limited understanding of how internal temperature distributions impact the performance and lifetime of the pack. Understanding these impacts is difficult due to the greatly varying length and time scales between the coupled phenomena, causing the need for complex and computationally expensive models. Here, an experimental investigation is performed in which a set of fixed one-dimensional temperature distributions are applied across the face of a Nickel-Cobalt-Manganese (NCM) cathode lithium ion pouch cell in order to study the performance impacts. Effects on the open circuit voltage (OCV), Ohmic resistance, bulk discharge and charge resistance and instantaneous power are investigated. It is observed that temperature gradients have a negative impact on the bulk performance by lowering the OCV and also increasing the bulk discharge resistance.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Li Sun, Mohamed Awadallah, Lianhua Chi, Nong Zhang
Abstract This paper presents a smart electric scooter system consisting of a microprocessor based vehicle controller (integrating an embedded regenerative braking controller), a 300W Permanent Magnet (PM) DC motor, two low-power DC-DC converters to form a higher power DC-DC converter pack, a motor controller, a supercapacitor bank and a capacitor cell balancing sub-system. During acceleration or forward motoring mode, the vehicle controller sets the DC motor into motoring mode to further utilizing motor controller regulate wheel speed and acceleration torque, whereas during deceleration or forward braking mode, sets the DC motor into braking mode and further utilizing regenerative braking controller regulate wheel speed and braking torque, as well as functions as a constant current (whose reference value is adjustable via a potentiometer) generator to charge the supercapacitor bank in a controllable fashion, hence not only successfully replacing frictional braking to certain degree, but also increasing the total energy efficiency dramatically owing to the low internal resistance and larger capacitance of the supercapacitor compared with other conventional regenerative braking systems via batteries.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Chao Chen, Martin Mohr, Franz Diwoky
Abstract This work presents a physical model that calculates the efficiency maps of the inverter-fed Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine (PMSM) drive. The corresponding electrical machine and its controller are implemented based on the two-phase (d-q) equivalent circuits that take into account the copper loss as well as the iron loss of the PMSM. A control strategy that optimizes the machine efficiency is applied in the controller to maximize the possible output torque. In addition, the model applies an analytical method to predict the losses of the voltage source inverter. Consequently, the efficiency maps within the entire operating region of the PMSM drive can be derived from the simulation results, and they are used to represent electric drives in the system simulation model of electric vehicles (EVs).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Oguz H. Dagci, Ram Chandrasekaran
Abstract This paper outlines the characterization of a Li-Ion Iron Phosphate battery pack with nominal voltage of 700V as well as the modeling of this pack as an equivalent electrical circuit (EEC) for the purpose of vehicle simulations. For a higher level of fidelity and accuracy, the equivalent circuit is initially modeled as an R-2RC circuit which consists of a voltage source with one resistor (R) and two resistor-capacitor (RC) branches. In this modeling effort, first, several open circuit voltage (OCV) determination methods in the literature are benchmarked and state-of-charge (SOC) dependent OCV curve which is used in the voltage source of the EEC model is derived. Then, two methods of parameter estimation of the EEC are developed for both step current and dynamic current profiles. The first estimation method is applicable to discharge or charge step currents and relies mostly on the relaxation portion of the battery response and involves some manual calibration. The second estimation method utilizes online parameter estimation techniques and learns the EEC parameters automatically by processing the battery response to some special designed dynamic current profiles.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vijay Somandepalli, Hubert Biteau
The emergence of Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) as a viable means of transportation has been coincident with the development of lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery technology and electronics. These developments have enabled the storage and use of large amounts of energy that were previously only possible with internal combustion engines. However, the safety aspects of using these large energy storage battery packs are a significant challenge to address. In addition, the rapid advances in electrode and electrolyte materials for Li-Ion batteries have made comparisons and ranking of safety parameters difficult because of the substantial variations in cell designs. In this work, we outline a method for quantifying the thermal safety aspects of Li-ion battery technologies using a Cone Calorimeter. The Cone Calorimeter is a suitable tool to measure and quantify critical information such as the heat release rate and total energy released from the combustion of organic material.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Brian Sisk, Zhenli Zhang
Design of batteries for automotive applications requires a careful balance between vehicle requirements - as driven by automakers - and cost. Typically, for batteries, the goal is to meet the most stringent requirement at a competitive cost. The real challenge in doing so is understanding how the battery-level requirements vary with changes in the vehicle, powertrain, and drive cycle. In this work, we consider the relationship between vehicle-level and battery-level requirements of microhybrid vehicles and their linkage with battery design. These vehicle platforms demand high-power pulses for impractical durations - over 60 seconds on some drive cycles. We demonstrate a method for optimizing the battery design for fuel economy against any specific drive cycle, whether regulatory, consumer, or otherwise. This method allows for a high degree of customization against manufacturer or consumer value. Electrochemical modeling and vehicle modeling, coupled with experimental validation, is used to investigate the effects of key battery design parameters - such as particle size and coating thickness - on the energy and power capability of lithium ion batteries.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yinyin Zhao, Song-Yul Choe
Abstract Models for lithium ion batteries based on electrochemical thermal principles approximate electrodes with spheres. Ion concentration in the spheres is described using Fick's second law with partial differential equations (PDE), which can be solved numerically. The model calculation time, especially the electrode ion concentration part, should be reduced as less as possible for real time control purposes. Several mathematical methods have been proposed to reduce the complexity of PDE in electrode particles which include polynomial approximation, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), Padé approximation, Galerkin reformulation and etc. These methods are compared to each other with different input current density. Then, selected method is further integrated into a reduced order model (ROM) for a complete battery that considers Li ion concentration, potentials in electrode and electrolyte. Evaluation of simulation results reveal that the 3rd order Padé approximation serves as a better computationally efficient replacement for the diffusion equation in lithium ion battery model.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Saeed Asgari, Xiao Hu, Michael Tsuk, Shailendra Kaushik
The thermal behavior of a fluid-cooled battery can be modeled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Depending on the size and complexity of the battery module and the available computing hardware, the simulation can take days or weeks to run. This work introduces a reduced-order model that combines proper orthogonal decomposition, capturing the variation of the temperature field in the spatial domain, and linear time-invariant system techniques exploiting the linear relationship between the resulting proper orthogonal decomposition coefficients and the uniform heat source considered here as the input to the system. After completing an initial CFD run to establish the reduction, the reduced-order model runs much faster than the CFD model. This work will focus on thermal modeling of a single prismatic battery cell with one adjacent cooling channel. The extension to the multiple input multiple output case such as a battery module will be discussed in another paper.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xiao Hu, Scott Stanton
Abstract Due to growing interest in hybrid and electric vehicles, li-ion battery modeling is receiving a lot of attention from designers and researchers. This paper presents a complete model for a li-ion battery pack. It starts from the Newman electrochemistry model to create the battery performance curves. Such information is then used for cell level battery equivalent circuit model (ECM) parameter identification. 28 cell ECMs are connected to create the module ECM. Four module ECMs are connected through a busbar model to create the pack ECM. The busbar model is a reduced order model (ROM) extracted from electromagnetic finite element analysis (FEA) results, taking into account the parasitic effects. Battery thermal performance is simulated first by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Then, a thermal linear and time-invariant (LTI) ROM is created out of CFD solution. The thermal LTI ROM is then two-way coupled with the battery pack ECM to form a complete battery pack model. Thanks to the ROM technology, such a battery pack model can finish a complete charge discharge cycle within seconds of simulation time.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lijun Zhang, Hongzheng Cheng, Kun Diao, Cheng Ruan
To accurately and efficiently predict the temperature fields inside a lithium-ion battery is key technology for the enhancement of battery thermal management and the improvement of battery performances. The dimensional analysis method is applied to derive similarity criterions and the similarity coefficients of battery interior temperature fields, based on the governing partial differential equations describing the three dimensional transient temperature field. To verify the correctness of similarity criterions and the similarity coefficients, 3D finite element models of battery temperature field are established with a prototype and scale model, on the assumption that the battery cell has single-layer structure and multi-layers structure separately. The simulation results show that the similarity criterions and the similarity coefficients are correct. The calculation efficiency is checked to be much more efficient compared with FEM model based on the original cell structure in aspect of amount of resources occupied.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ehsan Samadani, Leo Gimenez, William Scott, Siamak Farhad, Michael Fowler, Roydon Fraser
Abstract In electrified vehicle applications, the heat generated of lithium-ion (Li-ion) cells may significantly affect the vehicle range and state of health (SOH) of the pack. Therefore, a major design task is creation of a battery thermal management system with suitable control and cooling strategies. To this end, the thermal behavior of Li-ion cells at various temperatures and operating conditions should be quantified. In this paper, two different commercial pouch cells for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are studied through comprehensive thermal performance tests. This study employs a fractional factorial design of experiments to reduce the number of tests required to characterize the behavior of fresh cells while minimizing the effects of ageing. At each test point, the effects of ambient temperature and charge/discharge rate on several types of cell efficiencies and surface heat generation is evaluated. A statistical thermal ramp rate model is suggested which enables fast and accurate determination of cell surface temperature and heat generation where the vehicle is started from cold or warm environments at a range of constant currents over the entire state of charge (SOC) range.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mohammed Farag, Matthias Fleckenstein, Saeid R. Habibi
Abstract Due to their high energy density, power density, and durability, lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are rapidly becoming the most popular energy storage method for electric vehicles. Difficulty arises in accurately estimating the amount of left capacity in the battery during operation time, commonly known as battery state of charge (SOC). This paper presents a comparative study between six different Equivalent Circuit Li-ion battery models and two different state of charge (SOC) estimation strategies. The Battery models cover the state-of-the-art of Equivalent Circuit models discussed in literature. The Li-ion battery SOC is estimated using non-linear estimation strategies i.e. Extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the Smooth Variable Structure Filter (SVSF). The models and the state of charge estimation strategies are compared against simulation data obtained from AVL CRUISE software. The effectiveness of the models and estimation strategies is then compared through a comprehensive evaluation for model complexity, model accuracy, and root mean squared error in state of charge estimation.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ehsan Samadani, Siamak Farhad, Satyam Panchal, Roydon Fraser, Michael Fowler
Abstract In this paper, initial results of Li-ion battery performance characterization through field tests are presented. A fully electrified Ford Escape that is equipped by three Li-ion battery packs (LiFeMnPO4) including an overall 20 modules in series is employed. The vehicle is in daily operation and data of driving including the powertrain and drive cycles as well as the charging data are being transferred through CAN bus to a data logger installed in the vehicle. A model of the vehicle is developed in the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) software based on the available technical specification of the vehicle components. In this model, a simple resistive element in series with a voltage source represents the battery. Battery open circuit voltage (OCV) and internal resistance in charge and discharge mode are estimated as a function of the state of charge (SOC) from the collected test data. It is shown that although the OCV should be measured under no-load condition, still it can be estimated with an acceptable accuracy (∼5%) from the driving data.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ienkaran Arasaratnam, Jimi Tjong, Saeid Habibi
Abstract No two battery cells can be identical. Charging/discharging a battery pack without monitoring cell voltages or SoC (State-of-Charge) will cause cell voltages to deviate over time and the packs useable capacity to decrease quickly. To redistribute charge uniformly among cells, various cell balancing methods have been proposed in the literature. In this paper, a cell balancing method based on a single switched-capacitor is presented from a brand new perspective. Unlike the traditional balancing methods that rely on the voltage divergence criterion, this paper uses the SoC divergence criterion to shuttle charge from a highly charged cell to a poorly charged cell. Moreover, an equivalent resistance of the single-switched capacitor topology is derived in steady state. For fast cell balancing, design guidelines are provided for selecting a proper switching-time period and the capacitor parameters. Ultracapacitors are recommended to achieve this goal. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, numerous simulations are performed on a string of five series connected Lithium-ion cells that have different initial SoCs and electrochemical parameters.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vijay Somandepalli, Kevin Marr, Quinn Horn
As lithium-ion cells and systems become larger and more ubiquitous in automotive applications, fire and explosion hazards that are rare or non-existent in smaller systems may exist in these larger systems. One potential hazard can occur when flammable gases emitted from a lithium-ion cell failure accumulate in or around automobiles and are ignited by electrical activity or by the cells themselves and result in a fire or explosion. In some instances, the safety aspects related to fires and explosions protection of electric vehicles and hybrid vehicles using these large energy storage battery packs are a significant challenge to address. This paper describes and characterizes the combustion and explosion hazards that can occur when a lithium ion battery pack fails and goes into thermal runaway in an enclosed space. Metrics such as gas composition, maximum overpressure, rate of pressure rise, and flammability limits are described. This information can be helpful to battery and pack designers, vehicle designers, first responders and emergency personnel in developing strategies to mitigate and prevent explosion hazards from the use of battery packs in automobiles and other fields where large battery packs are used.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ehsan Samadani, Roydon Fraser, Michael Fowler
Abstract Despite significant progress toward application of Li-ion batteries in electric vehicles, there are still major concerns about the range of electric vehicles and battery life. Depending on the climate of the region where the vehicle is in use, auxiliary loads could also play a significant role on the battery performance and durability. In this paper, the effect of air conditioning (AC) load on the electric range and Li-ion battery life is evaluated. For this purpose, a thermodynamic model for the vehicle cabin is developed and integrated to a battery model. The thermodynamic model takes the ambient conditions, solar load, and the vehicle drive cycle as inputs and calculates the instantaneous cabin temperature and humidity. The battery model, which represents a Li-on battery pack installed on a fully electrified Ford Escape 2009, consists of a voltage source in series with a lump resistance, a thermal sub-model, and a degradation sub-model to predict the battery capacity fade. At an initial cabin temperature and a desired set point, the model is capable of predicting the required cooling load and its corresponding required battery power as well as reductions in the vehicle range and battery state of health (SOH).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Adam Ing, Ramin Masoudi, John McPhee, Thanh-Son Dao
Abstract Due to rising fuel prices and environmental concerns, Electric Vehicles (EVs) and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) have been gaining market share as fuel-efficient, environmentally friendly alternatives. Lithium-ion batteries are commonly used in EV and HEV applications because of their high power and energy densities. During controls development of HEVs and EVs, hardware-in-the-loop simulations involving real-time battery models are commonly used to simulate a battery response in place of a real battery. One physics-based model which solves in real-time is the reduced-order battery model developed by Dao et al. [1], which is based on the isothermal model by Newman [2] incorporating concentrated solution theory and porous electrode theory [3]. The battery models must be accurate for effective control; however, if the battery parameters are unknown or change due to degradation, a method for estimating the battery parameters to update the model is required. A set of manufacturer recommended battery parameters were evaluated using a numerical sensitivity analysis to evaluate their identifiability.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 12498