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Viewing 16441 to 16470 of 16536
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430146
H. L. KNUDSEN
THE inescapable conclusion of Mr. Knudsen is that an immersion heater is required for the starting of diesel engines at subzero temperatures. “With this method,” he says, “the danger of scoring and scuffing pistons and cylinders during the cranking period due to improper oil films is removed. The engine can be started with the lubricating oil most suitable for it at operating temperature. Cranking power requirements are no greater than in the summertime, so the batteries need not be excessively large for winter starting - even the batteries might be kept up to temperature by an immersion heater, and hence a further reduction in weight and capacity would be possible.” Mr. Knudsen resolves the problem of subzero starting into several parts: 1. The fuel oil must be able to flow freely at starting temperatures. 2. Lubricating oil must be available that permits cranking at about 100 rpm at the desired starting temperature with reasonable starting-power requirements. 3.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430055
W. P. Lear
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430052
J. W. Kelly
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420068
Kalman J. DeJuhasz
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420074
John D. Waugh
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410101
P. C. SANDRETTO
THIS paper shows that the growth of electrical demands on planes is due mainly to the problems encountered in operating the planes and, hence, electrical systems are the chief concern of the plane operators. Existing electrical systems are discussed from the standpoint of the operator, under the headings of “trouble,” “weight,” and “facilities.” A new system is described for the plane of the future, which is assumed to have a gross weight of about 100,000 lb, and a power demand of 30 kw. By means of variable-frequency systems a considerable weight saving is forecast.
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410096
NATHAN C. PRICE
COMPARISONS are drawn, in this paper, between engine supercharger and cabin supercharger flow-control problems. Some new methods of obtaining efficient flow control are discussed. Interdependent factors existing between flow control and impeller speed control must be recognized. It is pointed out that design features in the supercharger should be correlated closely with the type of control applied. Effects arising from the connection of superchargers to receivers of large volume are presented. Necessity for regulation of flow, pressure, and rate of pressure change in pressure cabins requires the solution of numerous new problems. The advantage of simultaneous design of the supercharger and controls, and the desirability of integral supercharger and control units, are stressed. It has been necessary to overcome many mechanical problems in order to produce units of a type suited for pressure cabin operation. Typical control constructions are described.
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410134
W. G. AINSLEY
THE CFR Full-Scale Engine Group was organized by engine men representing the major classifications of automotive-type diesel engines. This original group, with the cooperation of the representatives of the petroleum industry, the government agencies, and colleges, has carried on extensive series of tests on commercial diesel engines. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the influence of fuel properties such as cetane number, viscosity, volatility, and gravity on the engine performance. The following relationships are indicated: Starting and engine smoothness are dependent upon the ignition quality of the fuel. Smoke and engine deposits vary with the volatility and viscosity. Exhaust odor varies with ignition quality and cetane number. Power output and fuel consumption vary with the heat value of the fuel. At a given pump setting, viscosity may have an independent effect on the power output because of plunger leakage.
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410028
P. H. Schweitzer
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400115
L. E. Lighton, H. C. Riggs
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400102
Harry C. Doane
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400058
L. A. Blanc
ABSTRACT
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390089
Henry H. Kerr, F. C. Frank
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390108
Oscar F. Olsen
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390107
R. P. Lansing
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390073
John Geyer Williams
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390134
R. E. Johnson, W. G. Lundquist
VIBRATION characteristics and considerations of simplicity, rather than those of operating efficiency, have dictated present methods of aircraft operation, the authors contend. The bmep parameter proposed in their paper, they explain, is based upon cruising operation at or near maximum efficiency of the engine-airplane-propeller combination. They stress the importance of cruising-flight control by pointing out that cruising flight embodies 95 to 99% of all commercial flying. The authors show how the parameter is related fundamentally to the operating efficiency of the engine as defined by fuel consumption and, therefore, to the overall efficiency of the airplane-engine-propeller combination. The parameter is discussed further as related to the engine alone; as tempered by considerations of airplane and propeller efficiency; as applied to the physical problem of controlling cruising power; and as limited by engine and airplane design.
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380038
S. O. White
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380019
Carl J. Crane
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380028
G. L. Davies
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380167
R. M. Critchfield
MR. CRITCHFIELD attacks the problem of securing automotive electrical equipment that will operate satisfactorily at the lowest original as well as upkeep cost. Integral parts of the electrical supply system, the ignition system and the cranking system are discussed with notes on maintenance of each. Particular attention is given to the various items which affect the sizes and types of equipment necessary. Mr. Critchfield points out that misapplications from both the capacity and operation standpoints are often the source of the most serious maintenance problems, and he gives specific examples to illustrate. In the tables accompanying the paper the author presents application charts to serve as a rough guide in considering the purchase of new equipment.
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380093
R. P. Lansing, C. I. MacNeil
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370165
R. M. Critchfield
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370127
E. Martin, C. F. Baker
THE development work that resulted in the Hamilton standard constant-speed control is discussed briefly, and the various types of controls that were evolved during the development are described. The present control is described in detail both as to the design characteristics and the operation in conjunction with the propeller. The design requirements of the governing principle employed are discussed briefly.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370025
Sidney Oldberg, Maynard Yeasting, Max M. Roensch
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370037
Melville F. Peters, George F. Blackburn, Paul T. Hannen
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360146
R. A. Rose, G. C. Wilson, R. R. Benedict
SOLUTION of the problem of igniting and burning the fuel in the high-speed Diesel engine profoundly affects its development, according to the authors. This paper describes the photo-electric set-up selected to indicate the behavior of the fuel in the combustion-chamber because of its high speed, its intensity, its zero time lag, and its freedom from inertia effects. A magnetic-type oscillograph for recording the impulses, a cantilever-spring indicator for picking up the pressure impulse, and an amplifier between the photo-cell and the oscillograph, comprise the principal parts of this instrumentation, as applied to a single-cylinder test engine. Results of tests with a three-beam vibrator-type oscillograph are given with oscillograms for different fuels, loads, and injection angles. Other tests are described using a cathode-ray oscillograph and a high-speed camera.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360150
E. M. Dodds
THIS paper describes a number of applications of the cathode-ray tube to the solution of engine problems, such as indication of pressures in the cylinder and in Diesel fuel lines; mechanical vibration of moving parts; torsional oscillations of shafts; whip of shafts; and time of arrival and duration of flame at any point in the cylinder-head. The different technique involved when hard-vacuum cathode-ray tubes are used instead of the gas-filled variety, is also indicated. An outline is given of some of the work rendered possible by its aid. This includes observations on the nature of the octane scale in so far as its relation to combustion pressure is concerned. A contribution is made to the theory of the mechanism of Diesel knock intensity together with some information on improving the power output and cleanliness of running of a C.F.R.-Pope Diesel engine.
Viewing 16441 to 16470 of 16536