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Viewing 16441 to 16470 of 16574
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470254
H. C. WELCH, J. V. McNULTY
WITH this portable electronic ignition analyzer, malfunctioning of the ignition system can be detected by observing primary-voltage wave forms shown on the screen. Some of the conditions which can be detected and identified are a short in the high-tension circuit, insufficient voltage to break down the spark-plug gap, an open-circuit primary due to insulated contact points or a broken primary connection, and excessive arcing at the breaker points. The instrument's dependability and utility have been proved for aircraft engines. With modifications it could be used with other types.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470245
J. H. GOFFE, J. W. WHEELER
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470232
CLARENCE S. BRUCE, JESSE T. DUCK
AN instrument for the accurate measurement of cylinder wear is described by the authors. The instrument consists of a diamond indenting tool, an indentation locator, and a microscope. To determine wear, the length of an indentation is observed with the microscope before and after periods of operation. Wear, which is reflected by changes in the depth of the indentation, is calculated from changes in the length of the indentation. Using this instrument in their experiments, the authors found that most cylinder wear is due to corrosion and occurs during warmup, when cylinder temperatures are low. It appears that corrosive gases condense on cool cylinder walls and attack the surface. Then the corroded film and lubricating oil are wiped away by the piston, leaving the walls ready for further corrosion.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470167
HUGO SCHUCK, GORDON VOLKENANT
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470151
J. B. HIDAY
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470131
WILLIAM LITTLEWOOD
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470082
C. F. MEYER
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470030
ARTHUR BEIER
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470058
Frank C. White
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470155
W. A. REICHEL
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460009
J H MANSFIELD
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460097
Alfred J. Poole
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460013
J. B. Hiday
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460111
HARRY H. HOWELL
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460151
MARSDEN H. PEAIRS
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460153
G. W. NEWTON, W. K. KLOSE
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450071
E. J. McLaughlin
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450026
H. E. Gulbransen
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450041
Harold W. Adams, Fred Foulon
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450022
R. J. Colin
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450044
Austin F. Trumbull
Synopsis An actual detailed aircraft electrical load analysis is a chore for an ‘IBM’ machine, and is indicative only of a specific airplane under controlled conditions. This paper concerns itself with the problem qualitatively, and attempts to show the trend and the advantages of a single Auxiliary Power System for Aircraft, that single system being the electrical system, and into what magnitude of electrical loads such thinking may lead us.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450003
M. F. Vanik
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450079
R. J. Lusk
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450165
E. G. RILEY
THE need for power boost controls, as evidenced by the practical limitations experienced with mechanical types of manual-assist control methods, is briefly summarized. This is followed by an analysis of power boost control in general in so far as location of major elements is concerned. Also included is an analysis of the conditions under which power boost is required and a list of basic characteristics which are essential as a design nucleus. Each characteristic is presented in detail and reasons for its inclusion are explained. A complete description of the principles of operation of the Vickers hydraulic boost control as used on the Martin Mars is presented with a schematic diagram of a typical control system incorporating the boost unit. Selection of power source and all related hydraulic and mechanical equipment necessary for satisfactory operation of the Vickers unit is described.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450203
Duncan B. Gardiner
AIRPLANE hydraulic braking systems must be designed to have the highest standard of performance without sacrificing reliability. By the use of a multielement oscillograph the various characteristics of the braking system can be recorded simultaneously so that the value of design changes can easily be determined. Oscillograms for a typical aircraft braking system show that relatively minor changes result in a wide differential in performance and emphasize the conclusion that design changes in a hydraulic brake system should be evaluated with the oscillograph.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440206
C. E. GRINSTEAD, R. N. FRAWLEY, F. W. CHAPMAN, H. F. SCHULTZ
THE principle of operation and the mechanical design of an improved indicator for measuring static and dynamic pressures are discussed in this paper. The condenser type of indicator was selected by the authors for engine work because it lends itself to an exceptionally compact and sturdy construction, it is easily serviced, it has a high natural frequency, and it is relatively insensitive to shock and vibration. This type of indicator also does not require mechanical linkage between the pressure diaphragm and the electrically sensitive element.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440054
R. L. Ellinger
Viewing 16441 to 16470 of 16574