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Viewing 16411 to 16440 of 16574
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530231
L.E. Wells
THE scope of extensive research devoted to storage battery improvements during recent years is emphasized in this paper, together with a comprehensive review of results achieved to date. In an effort to produce an optimum battery, research has been directed to the qualitative factors, leading to improved performance during the life of the battery, and to quantitative characteristics which would lengthen its life. The author points out that manufacturers have concentrated on building more and more cranking capacity into their product, accomplishing this by decreasing plate thickness, increasing separator efficiency, and by the use of improved active material. He reviews the factors which limit life under cycling and overcharge conditions, and surveys the research which has led to the use of corrosion-resistant alloys to correct electrolysis.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530081
ROBERT R. BAYUK
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530163
DOYLE C. WELLS
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520171
H.L. HARTZELL
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520122
C. S. CONSTANTINO
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520200
H. J. Sands
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520088
M. M. NEWMAN
FOREWORD The majority of thunderstorm electrical discharges involving aircraft are in the “Upper-reaches” of a lightning discharge channel where currents tend to be lower than for the lightning we know near the ground: Therefore, the term “Static-discharge”, which many pilots use when the discharge does not seem violent enough to warrant the term “Lightning” may logically be used as a more general term covering all thunderstorm electrical discharges. In using the term “static-discharge” it is important to avoid confusion with precipitation charging and the associated minute currents normally discharged through “wick-dischargers” to prevent radio interference. It must be emphasized that discharges in the case of precipitation-static involve currents of fractional amperage insufficient to produce any of pitting or burning effects for which protection might be needed.
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510012
WILLIAM D. DOWNS
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500021
GEORGE P. KNAPP
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500056
CLARK R. LUPTON
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500122
R. C. TRESEDER, D. D. BOWE
Abstract The procedure followed in the design of a turbo propeller for a given type of installation is outlined. Aerodynamic, physical and control aspects are covered. The resulting design is discussed, and its physical and operational characteristics are briefly described. Test experience is reviewed to indicate how the theoretical design was substantiated.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500080
E. C. TAILOR, R. E. SMALL
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490162
E. S. GALLAGHER
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490197
L. C. WOLCOTT
ALTHOUGH the wiring systems of trucks are relatively simple and rather accessible for repair and replacement, the author explains that the amount of wire used on buses is much larger and, furthermore, the wires have to run all over the vehicle, thus becoming an inseparable component of the bus. Wires could be readily replaced if conduits and junction boxes were used but, the author says, their cost would be prohibitive. Rather, he looks to the use of insulating materials having longer life, which would give trouble-free wiring systems at a reasonable cost.
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490192
W. H. FOLAND
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490191
J. H. Bolles
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490026
JAMES M. WICKHAM
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490031
PHILIP J. COSTA
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490068
A. W. WUERKER
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480045
R. R. HIGGINBOTHAM
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480040
P. HALPERT
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480109
WALTER C. HADLEY, J. R. HUDNALL, A. E. TRAVER
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480015
CARL F. BAKER
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480036
KARL MARTINEZ
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480192
G. A. Philbrick, W. T. Stark, W. C. Schaffer
DESIGN of stable turboprop control systems is greatly speeded up by the WAC electronic analog. This computing device simulates the physical relationship between the five prime variables involved: speed, torque, temperature, fuel flow, and propeller blade angle. Although as many as 25 design characteristics may be involved in a control system, the analog can determine the optimum values for them in the course of one day. The analog computing technique might be equally valuable in a number of other uses.
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480038
M. M. NEWMAN
Summary The modern all-metal transport airplane is in general inherently well protected from lightning damage. The metal surface of the airplane forms an inherent safe path for lightning currents around occupants and equipment in the interior. Certain external elements such as movable control surfaces, plastic sections, and outside antennas require protection against lightning. Therefore a thorough knowledge of the character of the lightning discharge and its various effects is of importance. This paper gives an introductory brief discussion of the nature of the lightning discharge phenomena and possible effects on aircraft.
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480181
HAROLD O. WENDT
A SET of feeler elevators or “feelevators” added to regular spring-tab elevators can lessen the effect of airspeed on the ratio of stick force to airplane normal acceleration. The author develops an equation for computing the stick force per g of normal acceleration with a spring-tab and feelevator arrangement, and applies the equation to a large, high-speed fighter. Plotted results show that, with the feelevator, the stick force required at high speeds to move the elevator is great enough so that the pilot will not accidentally set the elevators for dangerously large accelerations. Yet at low speeds, a reasonably small stick force is enough to control the elevators.
Viewing 16411 to 16440 of 16574