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Viewing 16411 to 16440 of 16558
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490192
W. H. FOLAND
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490191
J. H. Bolles
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490026
JAMES M. WICKHAM
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490031
PHILIP J. COSTA
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490068
A. W. WUERKER
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480181
HAROLD O. WENDT
A SET of feeler elevators or “feelevators” added to regular spring-tab elevators can lessen the effect of airspeed on the ratio of stick force to airplane normal acceleration. The author develops an equation for computing the stick force per g of normal acceleration with a spring-tab and feelevator arrangement, and applies the equation to a large, high-speed fighter. Plotted results show that, with the feelevator, the stick force required at high speeds to move the elevator is great enough so that the pilot will not accidentally set the elevators for dangerously large accelerations. Yet at low speeds, a reasonably small stick force is enough to control the elevators.
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480192
G. A. Philbrick, W. T. Stark, W. C. Schaffer
DESIGN of stable turboprop control systems is greatly speeded up by the WAC electronic analog. This computing device simulates the physical relationship between the five prime variables involved: speed, torque, temperature, fuel flow, and propeller blade angle. Although as many as 25 design characteristics may be involved in a control system, the analog can determine the optimum values for them in the course of one day. The analog computing technique might be equally valuable in a number of other uses.
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480045
R. R. HIGGINBOTHAM
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480040
P. HALPERT
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480109
WALTER C. HADLEY, J. R. HUDNALL, A. E. TRAVER
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480015
CARL F. BAKER
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480038
M. M. NEWMAN
Summary The modern all-metal transport airplane is in general inherently well protected from lightning damage. The metal surface of the airplane forms an inherent safe path for lightning currents around occupants and equipment in the interior. Certain external elements such as movable control surfaces, plastic sections, and outside antennas require protection against lightning. Therefore a thorough knowledge of the character of the lightning discharge and its various effects is of importance. This paper gives an introductory brief discussion of the nature of the lightning discharge phenomena and possible effects on aircraft.
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480036
KARL MARTINEZ
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470254
H. C. WELCH, J. V. McNULTY
WITH this portable electronic ignition analyzer, malfunctioning of the ignition system can be detected by observing primary-voltage wave forms shown on the screen. Some of the conditions which can be detected and identified are a short in the high-tension circuit, insufficient voltage to break down the spark-plug gap, an open-circuit primary due to insulated contact points or a broken primary connection, and excessive arcing at the breaker points. The instrument's dependability and utility have been proved for aircraft engines. With modifications it could be used with other types.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470245
J. H. GOFFE, J. W. WHEELER
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470232
CLARENCE S. BRUCE, JESSE T. DUCK
AN instrument for the accurate measurement of cylinder wear is described by the authors. The instrument consists of a diamond indenting tool, an indentation locator, and a microscope. To determine wear, the length of an indentation is observed with the microscope before and after periods of operation. Wear, which is reflected by changes in the depth of the indentation, is calculated from changes in the length of the indentation. Using this instrument in their experiments, the authors found that most cylinder wear is due to corrosion and occurs during warmup, when cylinder temperatures are low. It appears that corrosive gases condense on cool cylinder walls and attack the surface. Then the corroded film and lubricating oil are wiped away by the piston, leaving the walls ready for further corrosion.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470155
W. A. REICHEL
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470167
HUGO SCHUCK, GORDON VOLKENANT
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470151
J. B. HIDAY
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470131
WILLIAM LITTLEWOOD
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470082
C. F. MEYER
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470058
Frank C. White
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470030
ARTHUR BEIER
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460009
J H MANSFIELD
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460153
G. W. NEWTON, W. K. KLOSE
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460151
MARSDEN H. PEAIRS
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460111
HARRY H. HOWELL
Viewing 16411 to 16440 of 16558