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Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Jeffrey K. Ball, Mark Kittel, Trevor Buss, Greg Weiss
Trucking fleets are increasingly installing DriveCam video event recorders in their vehicles. The DriveCam system is usually mounted near the vehicle’s rear view mirror, and consists of two cameras – one looking forward and one looking towards the driver. The DriveCam system also contains accelerometers that record lateral and longitudinal g-loading, and some may record vehicle speed (in mph) based on GPS positions. The DriveCam unit constantly monitors vehicle acceleration and speed, and also records video. However, the recorded data is only stored when a preset acceleration threshold is met. The stored data is then uploaded to the DriveCam event center, where it can be analyzed to review driver performance as well as the events before and after the triggering event. The primary use of the system is to assist fleets with driver training and education. However, the recorded data is also being used as a tool to reconstruct accidents. By integrating the accelerometer data, the vehicle speed and distance traveled during the event can be calculated.
Standard
2014-07-11
This specification covers minimum design and test requirements for aircraft tire inflation-deflation equipment for use on all types of aircraft. It shall be the responsibility of the airframe manufacturer to determine the compatibility of the requirement with the applicable aircraft and to specify requirements in excess of these minimums as necessary.
Standard
2014-06-16
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) sets forth criteria for the installation, inflation, inspection, and maintenance of aircraft tires as well as criteria for the maintenance of the operating environment so as to achieve the purpose stated in 1.1. (Definitions of terms related to aircraft tires are found in 2.2.)
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jaeseob Choi, Eugene Chang, Daejoong Yoon, Seongsook Ryu, Hogi Jung, Jaekyu Suhr
Abstract This paper proposes a parking assist system that fuses around view monitor (AVM) image, ultrasonic sensor, and in-vehicle motion sensor. The proposed system recognizes various types of parking slot markings using AVM image sequences and classifies occupancies of the detected parking slots using ultrasonic sensors. Once a desirable parking slot is selected by a driver, its position is continuously tracked by fusing AVM images and motion sensor-based odometry. Experimental results show that the proposed system can reliably detect and track various types of parking slot markings.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Zachary Sabato, Donald Margolis
Abstract This paper presents a driver assistance system designed to minimize the effect of driver reaction time on lane and speed maintenance operations. Nearly-instantaneous correcting actions are provided through a hierarchical arrangement of behaviors, by avoiding the time lag associated with deliberative or planning steps found in many control algorithms. Concepts originating in the field of robotics, including artificial potential fields and behavior-based systems, are interpreted for application to automotive control, where vehicle dynamics places considerable practical constraints on implementation. Ideas found in the study of emergent behavior in nature provide continuous, non-stepwise control signals, suitable for additive corrective inputs at highway velocities. This approach is effective for a substantial subset of road automobiles operating over a variety of speeds. A practical method for setting control parameters is found through optimization methods, corroborated with physically-driven metrics and then demonstrated.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mengxun Wu, Weiwen Deng, Sumin Zhang, Hao Sun, Bin Liu, Bingxu Shang, Shaobo Qiu
This paper proposes a novel modeling and simulation environment developed under Matlab/Simulink with friendly and intuitive graphic user interfaces, aimed to enable math-based virtual development and test of intelligent driving systems. Six typical driving maneuvers are first proposed, which are further abstracted into two atomic sub-maneuvers: lane following and lane change, as any maneuvers can be the combinations of these two. A generic trajectory planning and path tracking control algorithm are developed to deal with the generality and commonality of the lane change function with optimization among safety, comfort and efficiency in performing the lane change maneuver. Some typical simulations are conducted with results demonstrating the practical usefulness, efficiency and convenience in using this proposed tool.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
David LeBlanc, Mark Gilbert, Stephen Stachowski, Rini Sherony
Pre-collision systems (PCS) use forward-looking sensors to detect the location and motion of vehicles ahead and provide a sequence of actions to help the driver either avoid striking the rear-end of another vehicle or mitigate the severity of the crash. The actions include driver alerts, amplification of driver braking as distance decreases (dynamic brake support, DBS), and automatic braking if the driver has not acted or has not acted sufficiently (crash imminent braking, CIB). Recent efforts by various organizations have sought to define PCS objective test procedures and test equipment in support of consumer information programs and potential certification. This paper presents results and insights from conducting DBS and CIB tests on two production vehicles sold in the US. Eleven scenarios are used to assess the systems' performance. The two systems' performance shows that commercial systems can be quite different. Also demonstrated is the experience with test equipment, including a towable target that has been designed for resiliency and radar signature, a braking robot, and bumper guard.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Chi-Chun Yao, Jin-Yan Hsu, Yu-Sheng Liao, Ming Hung Li
Abstract Vehicle Rollover Prevention/Warning Systems have recently been an important topic in Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) of automotive electronics field. This paper will propose a rollover-prevention system implementation with vehicle dynamic model, video-detection technique and rollover index to help the driver avoid accidents as driving into a curve. Due to the reason that vehicle rollover motion analysis needs complicated computation and accurate parameters of vehicle stability in real time, in the first stage a vehicle dynamic model based on Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) algorithm is built, which can estimate vehicle roll/yaw motion in the curve by vehicle sensors. And then the image-based technique will be employed in detecting the front road curvature, and combined in the system to predict vehicle steering status. The final stage is to apply the vehicle rollover index with estimated vehicle motion to predict the dangerous level to drivers for warning. In the system validation, a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) with Microcontroller Unit (MCU) hardware structure is equipped and implemented in our vehicle experimental platform.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Cheng-Lung Lee, Hongyi Zhang, Hong Nguyen, Yu-Ting Wu, Christopher Smalley, Utayba Mohammad, Mark J. Paulik
Abstract A novel multi-modal scene segmentation algorithm for obstacle identification and masking is presented in this work. A co-registered data set is generated from monocular camera and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) sensors. This calibrated data enables 3D scene information to be mapped to time-synchronized 2D camera images, where discontinuities in the ranging data indicate the increased likelihood of obstacle edges. Applications include Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) which address lane-departure, pedestrian protection and collision avoidance and require both high-quality image segmentation and computational efficiency. Simulated and experimental results that demonstrate system performance are presented.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Daniel Schugk, Anton Kummert, Christian Nunn
Abstract The mean shift tracking algorithm has become a standard in the field of visual object tracking, caused by its real time capability and robustness to object changes in pose, size, or illumination. The standard mean shift tracking approach is an iterative procedure that is based on kernel weighted color histograms for object modelling and the Bhattacharyyan coefficient as a similarity measure between target and candidate histogram model. The benefits of the approach could not been transferred to monochrome vision systems yet, because the loss of information from color to grey-scale histogram object models is too high and the system performance drops seriously. We propose a new framework that solves this problem by using histograms of HoG-features as object model and the SOAMST approach by Ning et al. for track estimation. Mean shift tracking requires a histogram for object modelling. In the proposed framework a set of high dimensional HoG-features is clustered via K-means and features inside the object area are matched to the cluster-centers via a nearest neighbor search.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Marco Steger, Michael Karner, Werner Rom, Daniel Watzenig
Abstract Within this work we demonstrate the implementation and evaluation of a vehicle-to-vehicle based intersection assistance system, relying only on communication between the vehicles and not requiring any communication with infrastructural components as it is the case with typical complex intersection assistance systems. It also requires no additional information like right-of-way or maps and works out-of-the-box for nearly all types of intersections. The intersection assistance system utilizes GPS, yaw rate, vehicle acceleration, speed and heading as indicators for a 3D path prediction. While the x-y layer aids in the detection of possible collisions, the z axis is used for detecting bridges and overpasses. By applying several sophisticated filter levels and algorithms, the amount of false positives can massively be reduced while the true positives can be maintained. Finally, the developed simple intersection assistance system is compared to a sophisticated intersection assistance system.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Edgar Yoshio Morales Teraoka, Shin Tanaka, Tsutomu Mochida
Abstract We develop a simulation tool which reproduces lane departure crashes for the purpose of estimating potential benefits of Lane Departure Warning (LDW) systems in the American traffic environment. Tools that allow a fast evaluation of active safety systems are useful to make better systems, more effective in the real world; however accuracy of the results is always an issue. Our proposed approach is based on developing a simulation tool that reproduces lane departure crashes, then adding the effect of the LDW to compare the cases with and without the safety system, and finally comparing the results of different settings of the safety system. Here, the accurate reproduction of the relevant crashes determines the reliability of the results. In this paper, we present the reproduction of the lane departure crashes occurred in American roads in one year, by using data distributions obtained from retrospective crash databases. We analyze data from NASS/GES1 and NASS/CDS2 to obtain the characteristics of lane departure accidents in the USA.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ying Wang, Fei Han, Yue Kong, Weiwen Deng
Abstract Vision-based Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (Vi-ADAS) has achieved rapid growth in recent years. Since vehicle field testing under various driving scenarios can be costly, tedious, unrepeatable, and often dangerous, simulation has thus become an effective means that reduces or partially replaces the conventional field testing in the early development stage. This paper proposes a quantitative assessment framework for model quality evaluation of 3D scene under simulation platform. An imaging model is first built. The problem of solving the imaging model is then transformed into the problem of intrinsic image decomposition. Based on Retinex theory and Non-local texture analyses, a superior intrinsic image decomposition method is adopted to evaluate the fidelity of the 3D scene model through the degree of deviation to the Reflectance and Shading intrinsic maps respectively. Some preliminary testing results demonstrate that the proposed assessment framework can produce quantitative evaluation on 3D scene models.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Fei Han, Weiwen Deng, Sumin Zhang, Jian Wu, Yu Wang, Bin Liu, Bingxu Shang, Shaobo Qiu
Abstract This paper presents a novel real-time virtual simulation environment for advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS). The proposed environment mainly includes a 3D high-fidelity virtual driving environment developed with computer graphics technologies, a virtual camera model and a real-time hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) system with a driver simulator. Some preliminary simulation and experiment have been conducted to verify that the proposed virtual environment along with the image generated by a virtual camera model is valid with sufficient fidelity, and the real-time HIL development system with driver in the loop is effective in the early design, test and verification of ADAS systems.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Maki Kawakoshi, Takanobu Kaneko, Toru Nameki
Abstract Controllability (C) is the parameter that determines the Automotive Safety Integrity Level (ASIL) of each hazardous event based on an international standard of electrical and/or electronic systems within road vehicles (ISO 26262). C is classified qualitatively in ISO 26262. However, no specific method for classifying C is described. It is useful for C classification to define a specific classification based on objective data. This study assumed that C was classified using the percentage of drivers who could reduce Severity (S) in one or more classes compared with the S class in which the driver did not react to a hazardous event. An experiment simulated a situation with increased risk of collision with a leading vehicle due to insufficient brake force because of brake-assist failure when the experiment vehicle decelerated from 50 km/h on a straight road. First, the relationship between the S class and the difference of speed at the moment of collision obtained in the experiment was classified according to ISO/DIS 26262 Part 3 Annex B.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Fei Han, Weiwen Deng, Sumin Zhang, Bei Ren, Ying Wang, Jie Bai
This paper presents a novel approach of developing a vision-based forward collision warning system (FCW) under a virtual and real-time driving environment. The proposed environment mainly includes a 3D high-fidelity virtual driving environment developed with computer graphics technologies, a virtual camera model and a real-time hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) system with a driver simulator. Some preliminary simulation has been conducted to verify that the proposed virtual environment along with the image generated by a virtual camera model is valid with sufficient fidelity, and the real-time HIL development system with driver in the loop is effective in the early design, test and verification of the FCW and other similar ADAS systems.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Toshiya Hirose, Masato Gokan, Nobuyo Kasuga, Toichi Sawada
Collision avoidance systems for rear-end collisions have been researched and developed. It is necessary to activate collision warnings and automatic braking systems with appropriate timing determined by a monitoring system of a driver's braking action. Although there are various systems to monitor driving behavior, this study aims to create a monitoring system using a driver model. This study was intended to construct a model of a driver's braking action with the Time Delay Neural Network (TDNN). An experimental scenario focuses on rear-end collisions on a highway, such as the driver of a host vehicle controlling the brake to avoid a collision into a leading vehicle in a stationary condition caused by a traffic jam. In order to examine the accuracy of the TDNN model, this study used four parameters: the number of learning, the number of neurons in the hidden layer, the sampling time with 0.01 second as a minimum value, and the number of the delay time. In addition, this study made a comparative review of the TDNN model and the Neural Network (NN) model to examine the accuracy of the TDNN model.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Stanley Chien, Qiang Yi, David Good, Ali Gholamjafari, Yaobin Chen, Rini Sherony
Abstract While the number of traffic fatalities as a whole continues to decline steadily over time, the number of pedestrian fatalities continues to rise (up 8% since 2009) and comprises a larger fraction of these fatalities. In 2011 there were 4,432 pedestrians killed and an estimated 69,000 pedestrian injuries [1]. A new generation of Pedestrian Pre-Collision Systems (PCS) is being introduced by car manufactures to mitigate pedestrian injuries and fatalities. In order to evaluate the performance of pedestrian PCS, The Transportation Active Safety Institute (TASI) at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is developing a set of test scenarios and procedures for evaluating the performance of pedestrian PCS with the support of the Collaborative Safety Research Center of Toyota. Pedestrian crashes are complex in that there are many aspects about location, driver behavior, and pedestrian behaviors that may have implications for the performance of the PCS. This complexity will generate far more scenarios than can be reasonably tested.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kristofer D. Kusano, H. Gabler, Thomas I. Gorman
Forward Collision Warning (FCW) and Lane Departure Warning (LDW) systems are two active safety systems that have recently been added to the U.S. New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) evaluation. Vehicles that pass confirmation tests may advertise the presence of FCW and LDW alongside the vehicle's star safety rating derived from crash tests. This paper predicts the number of crashes and injured drivers that could be prevented if all vehicles in the U.S. fleet were equipped with production FCW and/or LDW systems. Models of each system were developed using the test track data collected for 16 FCW and 10 LDW systems by the NCAP confirmation tests. These models were used in existing fleetwide benefits models developed for FCW and LDW. The 16 FCW systems evaluated could have potentially prevented between 9% and 53% of all rear-end collisions and prevented between 19% and 60% of injured (MAIS2+) drivers. Earlier warning times prevented more warnings and injuries. The lower operating speed thresholds of some systems also greatly affected benefits estimates.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Masayuki Takemura, Masato Imai, Masahiro Kiyohara, Kota Irie, Masao Sakata, Shoji Muramatsu
Abstract Driver safety continues to be improved by advances in active safety technologies. One important example is Lane Departure Warning (LDW). European regulators soon will require LDW in big cars to reduce traffic accidents and New Car Assessment Programs in various countries will include LDW in a few years. Our focus is on rear cameras as sensing devices to recognize lane markers. Rear cameras are the most prevalent cameras for outside monitoring, and new Kids and Cars legislation will make them obligatory in the United States from 2014. As an affordable sensing system, we envision a rear camera which will function both as a rear-view monitoring device for drivers and as an LDW sensing device. However, there is a great difficulty involved in using the rear camera: water-droplets and dirt are directly attached to the lens surface, creating bad lens condition. The purpose of this study is to improve the durability of lane recognition systems when water-droplets and dirt are deposited on the lens surface.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jakub Zebala, Wojciech Wach
Abstract The objective of the paper is to present the results of an investigation of the effect of reduced tire pressure on car lateral dynamics in lane change maneuver. The intended aim was attained by performing bench and road tests. The aim of the bench tests was parameterization of the mathematical model of the tested car. The road tests covered the vehicle motion with reduced and no tire pressure on a curvilinear track adequate for bypassing an unexpected appearing obstacle. Next, simulations in PC-Crash were performed, and the results were compared with those obtained in experiments.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Amardeep Sathyanarayana, Seyed Omid Sadjadi, John H. L. Hansen
Towards developing of advanced driver specific active/passive safety systems it is important to be able to continuously evaluate driving performance variations. These variations are best captured when evaluated against similar driving patterns or maneuvers. Hence, accurate maneuver recognition in the preliminary stage is vital for the evaluation of driving performance. Rather than using simulated or fixed test track data, it is important to collect and analyze on-road real-traffic naturalistic driving data to account for all possible driving variations in different maneuvers. Towards this, massive free style naturalistic driving data corpora are being collected. Human transcription of these massive corpora is not only a tedious task, but also subjective and hence prone to errors/inconsistencies which can be due to multiple transcribers as well as lack of enough training/instructions. These human transcription errors can potentially hinder the development of algorithms for advanced safety systems, and lead to performance degradations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jason Lisseman, Lisa Diwischek, Stefanie Essers, David Andrews
The last years have seen an increasing amount of innovations in the functionality of car electronics (e.g. advanced driver assistant systems (ADAS) and in-vehicle infotainment systems (IVIS)). These electrical systems are not reserved for premium cars anymore, but additionally reach mid-size, compact, and subcompact cars. The growing number of functionalities in these cars entails increasing amount of interfaces, which may confuse, overload, or annoy the driver. Accompanying this, there is a trend towards the integration of capacitive touchscreens as user interfaces. These touchscreens were implemented first in consumer electronics and had a substantial impact on the way in which users interact with technology. This in turn has led to an increased user driven demand for the technology to be implemented in other domains, even in safety-critical ones like the automotive area. Capacitive touchscreens have certain drawbacks in their distraction potential and their usability, leading to safety-critical situations and negative user feedback.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shifeng Geng, Jian Wu, Weiwen Deng, Yang Zhao
The trajectory variation of preceding objects with changing road curvature and uncertain driving behaviors of both host and preceding cars make it difficult for conventional radar-based Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) system to effectively select its valid target object, which is mainly caused by the deficient judgment about the preceding curves and the behaviors of preceding cars. Through analysis of the trajectories that host and preceding objects generate, the new proposed method can differentiate the operating conditions of each car, either in straight lane, on curve or in lane-change, thus front path prediction and host vehicle's future lane estimation can be precisely fulfilled. From radar and host car's information a coordinate that changes under several criteria can be established, and based on this coordinate the trajectories of preceding and host car can be recorded and analyzed, some mathematics methods are adopted to reach the qualitative conclusion. The new method can find the valid target for ACC system and enable the system to conquer some typical drawbacks of conventional ACC, such as the confusion between lane-change and curve-enter of a preceding car, and also the speed of a preceding object can be modified as soon as it enters a curve.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yinghao Huang, Wenduo Wang, Chen Fang, Yi Murphey, Dev S. Kochhar
A transportable instrumentation package to collect driver, vehicle and environmental data is described. This system is an improvement on an earlier system and is called TIP-II [13]. Two new modules were designed and added to the original system: a new and improved physiological signal module (PH-M) replaced the original physiological signals module in TIP, and a new hand pressure on steering wheel module (HP-M) was added. This paper reports on exploratory tests with TIP-II. Driving data were collected from ten driver participants. Correlations between On-Board-Diagnostics (OBD), video data, physiological data and specific driver behavior such as lane departure and car following were investigated. Initial analysis suggested that hand pressure, skin conductance level, and respiration rate were key indicators of lane departure lateral displacement and velocity, immediately preceding lane departure; heart rate and inter-beat interval were affected during lane changes. Correlation analyses of car-following data are ongoing.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mengmeng Yu, Guanglin Ma
In this paper, we present a real-time 360 degree surround system with parking aid feature, which is a very convenient parking and blind spot aid system. In the proposed system, there are four fisheye cameras mounted around a vehicle to cover the whole surrounding area. After correcting the distortion of four fisheye images and registering all images on a planar surface, a flexible stitching method was developed to smooth the seam of adjacent images away to generate a high-quality result. In the post-process step, a unique brightness balance algorithm was proposed to compensate the exposure difference as the images are not captured with the same exposure condition. In addition, a unique parking guidance feature is applied on the surround view scene by utilizing steering wheel angle information as well as vehicle speed information.
Collection
2014-04-01
Active Safety & Advanced Driver Assistance Systems help prevent accidents or mitigate accident severity. Some of these safety systems provide alerts to the driver in critical situations, while others respond to threats by automatically braking and steering the vehicle to avoid crashes. This technical paper collection covers the latest technologies in active safety and driver assistance systems.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shotaro Odate, Naotoshi Takemura, William Seaman
Abstract Currently, a number of automobile OEMs have been equipped motorized seatbelt systems with volume-production vehicles. Since the current systems are generally initiated by the activation of the automatic collision brakes, or the brake assist systems; the benefit of those systems is limited solely in pre-crash phase. To enhance the effectiveness of the system, we attempted to develop a motorized seatbelt system which enables to control retracing force according to various situations during driving. The present system enables to accomplish both the occupants' comfort and protection performance throughout their driving from when it is buckled to when unbuckled and stored, or during both routine and sport driving, as well as pre-crash phase. Moreover, it was confirmed that lateral occupants' excursion during driving was reduced by up to 50% with the present system.
Standard
2013-12-16
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines a procedure for demonstrating service overload capability for new, main and nose landing gear, radial or bias tires fitted on multiple wheel landing gear of Part 25 certified aircraft.
Standard
2013-12-16
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) identifies current nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods used to ensure product integrity and maximize "in service" life of the major structural components of aircraft wheel and brake assemblies.
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