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Viewing 1 to 30 of 470
2017-09-23
Technical Paper
2017-01-1984
Jun Ma, Junyi Li, Zaiyan Gong, Jihong Yu
Abstract Given the wide adoption of touchscreens in vehicles, an interesting debate is taking place regarding the good screen size, length-width ratio and whether the usability of in-vehicle information system (IVIS) would be decreased by a larger screen, especially. Moreover, the lack of scientific evidence about the concrete impact of touch screen size on usability raises questions to practitioners. In this paper, we investigated the impact of in-vehicle touch screen size on users’ visual behavior and usability as measured using eye tracker and questionnaire. Two experiments were conducted on 30 participants. In the first experiment, participants were asked to seek same information on four different in-vehicle screens based on simulated driving environment, while eye movement was recorded for analyzing efficiency of visual behavior.
2017-09-19
Journal Article
2017-01-2156
Philippe Coni, Jean Luc BARDON, Xavier servantie
Abstract A new concept of Head Up Display is presented, using the windshield as a transparent screen. This breakthrough technology does not need the use of complex combiner, bulky optics and overhead projection unit. The novel system uses several holographic optical elements to perform a 3D stereoscopic display, with the ability to present floating graphical objects in a large field of view. Augmented Reality display will be possible, increasing considerably the User Experience and situational awareness, without the need of wearing a bulky and complex Head Mounted Display.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2500
Bo Huang, Wanyang Xia, Gangfeng Tan, Longjie Xiao, Zongsong Wang
Abstract Head-up Display (HUD) system can avoid drivers’ distraction on dashboard and effectively reduce collisions caused by emergency events, which is gradually being realized by researchers around the world. However, the current HUD only displays information like speed, fuel consumption, other information like acceleration and braking can’t be displayed yet. This research will use the indicator symbol‘s color and position change to remind drivers to brake or accelerate. Drivers can do driving operation timely and accurately. The system has the advantages of safety, intuition and real-time. The vehicle safe speed is calculated according to the road parameters, like adhesion coefficient and slope, and vehicle parameters, such as vehicle mass and centroid. Then, the appropriate braking operations are obtained by combining the vehicle driving state.
2017-04-11
Journal Article
2017-01-9627
André Lundkvist, Roger Johnsson, Arne Nykänen, Jakob Stridfelt
Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate if 3D auditory displays could be used to enhance parking assistance systems (PAS). Objective measurements and estimations of workload were used to assess the benefits of different 3D auditory displays. In today’s cars, PAS normally use a visual display together with simple sound signals to inform drivers of obstacles in close proximity. These systems rely heavily on the visual display, as the sound does not provide information about obstacles' location. This may cause the driver to lose focus on the surroundings and reduce situational awareness. Two user studies (during summer and winter) were conducted to compare three different systems. The baseline system corresponded to a system normally found in today’s cars. The other systems were designed with a 3D auditory display, conveying information of where obstacles were located through sound. A visual display was also available.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0075
Shinya Kitayama, Toshiyuki Kondou, Hirokazu Ohyabu, Masaaki Hirose, Haneda Narihiro, Ryuta Maeda
Abstract In the future, autonomous vehicles will be realized. It is assumed that traffic accidents will be caused by the overconfidence to the autonomous driving system and the lack of communication between the vehicle and the pedestrian. We propose that one of the solutions is a display system to give the information the state of vehicle to pedestrians. In this paper, we studied how the information influences the motion of pedestrians. The vehicle gives the information, which is displayed on road by using of color light (red, yellow and blue), of the collision risk determined by the TTC (Time to Collision). The pedestrian is ordered to cross the road in several cases of the TTC. In the presence of the TTC information, the number of the pedestrians, who did not cross the road in the case of short TTC (red light is displayed), increased from 52% to 67%. It is cleared that the pedestrians determined whether they crossed the road or not by the information effectively.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1678
Joseph Antony John Selvaraj, Sivapalan Balanayagam
Modern Instrument Panel Clusters (IPC) are equipped with thin film transistor (TFT) based displays. Contrary to conventional IPCs with hard gauges and liquid crystal diode (LCD) displays, TFT displays offer versatile usage of display area with soft gauges, reconfigurable menus, tell tales, graphics and warning messages etc., At the same time, the number of possible screen combinations, multicolor images validation and different screen arbitration become significantly complex. Thereby display validation turns out to be a complex and time consuming task in IPC validation. The task becomes even more complex when change requests are to be incorporated during final phases of development stage. This paper provides a novel solution that helps to validate any graphical and behavioral changes with minimum effort and maximum accuracy.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1375
Louis Tijerina, Danielle Warren, Sang-Hwan Kim, Francine Dolins
Abstract This study investigated the effects of three navigation system human-machine interfaces (HMIs) on driver eye-glance behavior, navigational errors, and subjective assessments. Thirty-six drivers drove an unfamiliar 3-segment route in downtown Detroit. HMIs were 2D or 3D (level-of-detail) electronic map display + standard voice prompts, or 3D map-display augmented by photorealistic images + landmark-enhanced voice prompts. Participants drove the same three route segments in order but were assigned a different HMI condition/segment in a 3-period/3-treatment crossover experimental design. Results indicate that drivers’ visual attention using the advanced navigation systems HMIs were within US Department of Transportation recommended visual distraction limits. More turns missed in the first route segment, regardless of HMI, were attributable to greater route complexity and a late-onset voice prompt.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1978
Philippe Coni, Sylvain Hourlier, Xavier Servantie, Laurent Laluque, Aude Gueguen
Abstract A 3D Stereoscopic Head-Up Display (HUD) using direct projection on a transparent screen is presented. Symbol incrustation in conformity with the landscape is performed through the use of simulated collimation offering a large eye-box, in excess of conventional HUD. The use of spectral glasses for our transparent screen was decided as most commonly used polarizing or active glasses were not adapted. Furthermore it gave ususeful green laser attack protection.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1416
Rambabu Radakrishnan, Ganesh Dharmar, Mohanraj Balakrishnan, Sarath Padattil
Abstract Infotainment screens have become critical interface between occupant and Vehicle. Historical development of In-vehicle infotainment (IVI) has shown us the growth of interface size and usability is tremendously increased. The basic small segmented displays of past decades have transformed into large touch screen interface [1]. Earlier small screen interfaces had minimal information and less driver assist functions. It was mainly entertainment based information, which does not require much attention from driver. But recently it has changed from glancing the screen to seeing the screen, due to increased driver assist functions like GPS navigation etc. The amount of information displayed is also increased tremendously [2]. This scenario demands that the infotainment screen positioning inside the vehicle should be free from any visual obscuration, reflection and direct illumination on the infotainment screen due to ambient lighting.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1417
Toshinao Fukui, Kazuhiko Nakamoto, Hiroyuki Satake
Abstract The use of a head-up display (HUD) system has become popular recently, as it can provide feedback information at a position easily seen by the driver. However, the outline of the HUD bezel often reflects on the windshield of a HUD equipped vehicle. This phenomenon occurs when the sun is at a high position and reflects off the top of the instrument panel and the front view is dark. For this reason, it can occur when driving on asphalt paved roads, causing annoyance to the driver. Under fixed environmental conditions, the vehicle based factors that influence the annoyance caused by reflected boundary lines are the position of the reflection, line thickness, and the contrast of the reflected boundary line. These can be represented by the conspicuity of a striped pattern (contrast sensitivity function). In previous research in 1991, M. S. Banks et al. studied a contrast sensitivity function that included the factors stated above.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1443
Nazan Aksan, Lauren Sager, Sarah Hacker, Benjamin Lester, Jeffrey Dawson, Matthew Rizzo
Abstract We examined relative effectiveness of heads-up visual displays for lane departure warning (LDW) 39 younger to middle aged drivers (25-50, mean = 35 years) and 37 older drivers (66-87, mean = 77 years). The LDW included yellow “advisory” visuals in the center screen when the driver started drifting toward the adjacent lane. The visuals turned into red “imminent” when the tires overlapped with the lane markers. The LDW was turned off if the driver activated the turn signal. The visuals could be easily segregated from the background scene, making them salient but not disruptive to the driver’s forward field of view. The visuals were placed adjacent to the left and right lane markers in the lower half of the center screen.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0080
Hiroyuki Miyake
Abstract This paper explains a performance enhancement of the lane guidance function in car navigation systems. In order to achieve intuitive lane guidance, a function is considered that displays lane guidance on an image of the front scene that matches what drivers actually see outside the vehicle. Therefore, two developed items were lane accurate positioning based on image recognition and augmented reality visualization that renders lane guidance images overlaid on the scenery of the road ahead. The eye glance time to the navigation screen has been reduced in a comparison test with a conventional lane guidance method. It is confirmed that this lane guidance function is more intuitive than the conventional method.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0084
Paul Weindorf, James Krier, Carl Evans
Abstract An optical configuration has been developed which offers a seamless appearance where the display aperture is less visible in the “off” condition and is minimized in the “on” condition.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1482
Paul Montalbano, Daniel Melcher, Rachel Keller, Thomas Rush, Jay Przybyla
Abstract A number of methods have been presented previously in the literature for determination of the impact speed of a motorcycle or scooter at its point of contact with another, typically larger and heavier, vehicle or object. However, all introduced methods to date have known limitations, especially as there are often significant challenges in gathering the needed data after a collision. Unlike passenger vehicles and commercial vehicles, most motorcycles and scooters carry no onboard electronic data recorders to provide insight into the impact phase of the collision. Recent research into automobile speedometers has shown that certain types of modern stepper motor based speedometers and tachometers can provide useful data for a collision reconstruction analysis if the instrument cluster loses electrical power during the impact, resulting in a “frozen” needle indication.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1474
Edward C. Fatzinger, Tyler L. Shaw, Jon B. Landerville
Abstract Six electronic needle-display speedometers from five different manufacturers were tested in order to determine the behavior of the gauges following a power interruption and impact. Subject motorcycles were accelerated to pre-determined speeds, at which point the speedometer wiring harness was disconnected. The observed results were that the dial indicator would move slightly up, down, or remain in place depending on the model of the speedometer. The observed change of indicated speed was within +/- 10 mph upon power loss. Additionally, the speedometers were subjected to impact testing to further analyze needle movement due to collision forces. Speedometers were attached to a linear drop rail apparatus instrumented with an accelerometer. A minimum acceleration due to impact which could cause needle movement was measured for each speedometer assembly.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1402
Lora L. Spangler, Jeffrey Hurlbut, Daniel Cashen, Emily Robb, Jim Eckhart
Abstract Head-up display (HUD) technology creates inherent driver safety advantages by displaying critical information directly in the driver’s line of sight, reducing eyes off road and accommodation time. This is accomplished using a system of relay optics and windshield reflection to generate a virtual image that appears to hover over the hood near the bumper. The windshield is an integral optical component of the HUD system, but unfortunately the windshield-air interface causes a double image ghost effect as a result of refractive index change, reducing HUD image clarity. Current technology uses a constant angle wedged PVB windshield interlayer to eliminate double image at a single driver height. However, the HUD double image persists for all other viewing locations. Eastman Chemical Company has developed a new interlayer technology which eliminates the double image at all driver locations by tuning the wedge angle as a function of driver occupant seated height.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2838
Dharmar Ganesh, Riyaz Mohammed, Hareesh Krishnan, Radakrishnan Rambabu
Abstract In-vehicle displays such as an instrument cluster in a vehicle provide vital information to the user. The information in terms of displays and tell-tales needs to be perceived by the user with minimal glance during driving. Drivers must recognize the condition of the vehicle and the state of its surroundings through primarily visual means. Drivers then process this in the brain, draw on their memory to identify problem situations, decide on a plan of action and execute it in order to avoid an accident. There are visual hindrances seen in real world scenario such as obscuration, reflection and glare on the instrument cluster which prevents the vital information flow from vehicle to the driver. In order to ensure safety while driving, the instrument cluster or driver displays should be placed in an optimized location.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1705
Miguel Hurtado, Amine Taleb-Bendiab, Julien Moizard, Patrice M. Reilhac, Heinz Mattern
Abstract Current market trend indicates an increased interest in replacing mirrors by camera monitor systems (CMS) to reduce CO2 emissions and to improve visibility of surrounding environment to the driver. A CMS is an advanced system composed of an electronic imager, a display, and an intelligent electronic control unit intended to provide at least the same level of functionality of legally prescribed mirrors. A CMS must also take into consideration several factors in the designed system to satisfy an overall system magnification and system resolution. Some factors pertain to the camera, and display inside the cockpit, but some other are related to the physical constraints of the human operator, i.e. visual acuity, height, etc. In this paper, we demonstrate that there exists a fundamental nonlinear equation for a given CMS encompassing factors that influence the performance of the system.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0147
Matthew J. Pitts, Elvir Hasedžić, Lee Skrypchuk, Alex Attridge, Mark Williams
Abstract The advent of 3D displays offers Human-Machine Interface (HMI) designers and engineers new opportunities to shape the user's experience of information within the vehicle. However, the application of 3D displays to the in-vehicle environment introduces a number of new parameters that must be carefully considered in order to optimise the user experience. In addition, there is potential for 3D displays to increase driver inattention, either through diverting the driver's attention away from the road or by increasing the time taken to assimilate information. Manufacturers must therefore take great care in establishing the ‘do’s and ‘don’t's of 3D interface design for the automotive context, providing a sound basis upon which HMI designers can innovate. This paper describes the approach and findings of a three-part investigation into the use of 3D displays in the instrument cluster of a road car, the overall aim of which was to define the boundaries of the 3D HMI design space.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0169
Kazuyuki Nakata, Maya Seki, Ryoichi Nishikawa, Soju Matsumoto, Shinichiro Murakami, Yukio Yoshino
Abstract Instrument clusters that display all information on a TFT-LCD screen, also known as reconfigurable instrument clusters, have become the new trend in automotive interiors. DENSO mass-produced the world's first reconfigurable instrument cluster in 2008. To satisfy customer requirements, large quantities of resources were required. Coupled with an iterative process due to requirement changes, development costs became very high. Reducing development costs was vital in order to expand the reconfigurable instrument cluster product line. A new artist-centric HMI (human machine interface) software development workflow is proposed to reduce the development effort by introducing a data converter and real-time 3D rendering engine in our earlier paper. Our goal is to realize an environment with little programming during development by utilizing a tool chain to automate the majority of the programmer's tasks.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0028
T Manikandan, S Sarmadh Ameer, A Sivakumar, Davinder Kumar, R Venkatesan, VenkataKalyana Kumar
Abstract The Instant Mileage Assistance (IMA), as the name indicates, is a system to guide the vehicle users to realize maximum fuel economy (mileage). This system is targeted to provide users with instantaneous mileage indication depending on the current driving pattern, correct gear operating zone (in case of a geared vehicle) through gear up/down shift assist indication and the accurate distance the vehicle can travel before the fuel tank is empty, thereby assisting the user in harnessing maximum fuel economy the vehicle can deliver and also safely reach the next refilling station. The instantaneous mileage is calculated by mapping the distance travelled by the vehicle and the respective amount of fuel consumed, during a particular period of time, and is displayed using an instrument cluster.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-0266
Jason Lisseman, Lisa Diwischek, Stefanie Essers, David Andrews
The last years have seen an increasing amount of innovations in the functionality of car electronics (e.g. advanced driver assistant systems (ADAS) and in-vehicle infotainment systems (IVIS)). These electrical systems are not reserved for premium cars anymore, but additionally reach mid-size, compact, and subcompact cars. The growing number of functionalities in these cars entails increasing amount of interfaces, which may confuse, overload, or annoy the driver. Accompanying this, there is a trend towards the integration of capacitive touchscreens as user interfaces. These touchscreens were implemented first in consumer electronics and had a substantial impact on the way in which users interact with technology. This in turn has led to an increased user driven demand for the technology to be implemented in other domains, even in safety-critical ones like the automotive area.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0451
Kathleen Ku, Michael Tschirhart
Abstract Displays that support complex graphics in driver information (DI) systems allow for the presentation of detailed visual data by employing a range of static (fixed image) and/or dynamic (moving image) design approaches. Such displays are gaining market share across a wide range of mainstream vehicles as the availability and cost of such technologies improves. Although a range of 2D, rendered 3D, and 3D imaging (or stereoscopic) information displays have been demonstrated throughout the automotive industry in recent years, there is limited empirical research examining consumer preference of the respective approaches or their influence on driving related tasks. The vehicle environment is known to be a demanding context for efficiently displaying information to the driver.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0443
Michael Tschirhart, Kathleen Ku
Abstract The vehicle environment is known to be a demanding context for efficiently displaying information to the driver. Research in typography reveals some factors that influence reading performance measures, but there is limited research on the influence of typographic design elements in a driver-vehicle interface on user performance with a simulated driver task. Participants in these studies completed a set of vehicle infotainment tasks that involved a text-based item search in a custom-designed interface that employed a family of Helvetica Neue fonts, in a static environment and a driving simulator environment. Analysis of the data from the two studies reveals a modest but statistically significant effect of font on certain driving-related task performance measures. In both studies, fonts with intermediate values of character width and line thickness were associated with the best performance on a simulated driving task.
2013-11-27
Technical Paper
2013-01-2820
Manali Brahme, Vivek S. Joshi
Automotive exterior lighting systems has several regulatory requirements & most of the manufactures have defined internal standards to achieve desired expectations based on vehicle category. Unavailability of such requirements for interior light illuminating systems has motivated the authors to generate test specifications & measurement methodology. There has been growing interest in automotive vehicle interior lighting for both functional and aesthetic requirements. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the Interior light illuminating devices in terms of “Light harmony”. The lighting harmony is “Maintain the color combination and light intensity level within users comfort zone”. In this study the lighting harmony is measured by means of two methods; one is Subjective evaluation & other is Objective evaluation.
2013-09-17
Journal Article
2013-01-2300
Sarah Barber, Dean Schwab, Ken Zimmerman
Following the introduction of Head-Up Displays (HUD) into commercial airplanes over 30 years ago, many aircraft manufacturers are now installing HUDs as baseline or as a selectable option on their latest designs. Most pilots that have used the HUD in difficult flying conditions prefer it to classic flight deck configurations with head-down displays only. This paper describes the features and benefits of the HUD that allow the pilot to remain head-up and eyes-out throughout the flight, especially in the crowded skies around an airport. This is achievable because the HUD provides all the primary flight information needed to fly the airplane. Some of the information is conformal to the outside world and the whole image is focused at optical infinity, eliminating the need for the pilot to refocus between the HUD symbology and real world features viewed through the HUD.
2013-03-25
Technical Paper
2013-01-0036
Yong Lee, Jongyong Nam, Eui-seung Jung, Youngjae Lim, Sung wook Jung, David Chung
In order to utilize in-vehicle systems efficiently, many vehicles are becoming equipped with integrated controls near the center fascia or the control box. However, the placement of these control systems can cause safety issues and risks due to visual distractions. In this study, we proposed a new integrated touch screen on the steering wheel. For this experiment, a control system was placed on the steering wheel or the center fascia. 15 participants were required to drive while utilizing vent and navigation control tasks regarding four different locations. Three of these locations were based on the steering wheel (center, upper right, lower right) and one location on the center fascia. Afterwards, the task completion time and visual distraction rate of the different locations were measured and compared. The results showed that a touch screen placed on the upper right section of the steering wheel had better performance and lower user discomfort.
2013-03-25
Technical Paper
2013-01-0061
Narasimhan Rajagopal
Display devices play a vital role as the man-machine interface in most embedded domains including the automotive industry. Display systems provide information regarding the health of various safety critical subsystems and the general status of the machine. Accuracy and precision of the information displayed is a key factor in proper machine operation. Hence display systems need to be tested meticulously before they are delivered to the customer. Current Scenario The present generation display ECM's (Electronic Control Module) function is not restricted to displaying parameters like fuel level or speed; it also acts as the virtual master of the vehicle. Most display ECMs in off-highway vehicles present at least half a dozen screens to the operator, who selects the one he wants to view based on the need. Hence testing the display ECM becomes as complex as its design.
2013-03-25
Technical Paper
2013-01-0002
Jeong Il Yu, Youngjae Lim, David Chung
There have been many current studies regarding touch display locations. However, these studies revolve specifically around the Y and Z axes which disregard certain elements of an touch display in terms of usability factors. The compact car has limited space for the layouts of touch display locations. In addition, the users of compact cars have smaller body types which could be problematic for the usage frequency of touch displays without proper consideration of its location. This study focused on the touch display locations that are placed in compact cars. The conditions of this experiment focused on women drivers who drove working vehicles during actual traffic and driving scenarios. The 3-dimensional axes(X, Y, Z) determines the location of the touch display and were analyzed throughout the experiment. The experiment is divided into two experiments. During the first experiment discomfort score of menu touch task while driving are measured according to 24 location alternatives.
2012-10-08
Technical Paper
2012-01-9022
Silviu Pala
New sensing and fast processing technologies will create an electronic driver in every car by 2025. All people in the vehicle will be passengers! The vehicle will drive by itself from A to B. In this case what will be need for HUD? Below is an investigation of the key issues and some possible solutions.
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