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CURRENT
2017-09-07
Standard
J1498_201709
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines.
2017-08-01
WIP Standard
J1297
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
CURRENT
2017-06-07
Standard
J313_201706
Automotive and railroad diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil over a range between 163 and 371 °C (325 to 700 °F). Their makeup can represent various combinations of volatility, ignition quality, viscosity, sulfur level, gravity, and other characteristics. Additives may be used to impart special properties to the finished diesel fuel.
CURRENT
2015-11-24
Standard
J2265_201511
This SAE Standard specifies: a test method for assessing the lubricating property of diesel fuels including those which may contain a lubricity enhancing additive, and the performance criteria necessary to ensure reliable operation of diesel fuel injection equipment with respect to fuel lubrication of such equipment. It applies to fuel used in diesel engines.
HISTORICAL
2011-12-20
Standard
J1498_201112
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines. The changes to SAE J1498 include: SAE Publications - Added SAE Paper 2010-01-1517 Other Publications and Sections 5, 9, and 10 - Updated ASTM alphanumeric designations and titles. Section 10 - Added discussion of a method to calculate net heating value for gasoline-ethanol blends using ASTM D3338.
CURRENT
2011-10-27
Standard
J1422_201110
This SAE Information Report establishes performance requirements for devices used to warm diesel fuel before entering the fuel filter(s).
CURRENT
2011-09-06
Standard
J1515_201109
The guidelines in this SAE Information Report are directed at laboratory engine dynamometer test procedures with alternative fuels, and they are applicable to four-stroke and two-stroke cycle spark ignition (SI) and diesel (CI) engines (naturally aspirated or pressure charged, with or without charge air cooling). A brief overview of investigations with some alternative fuels can be found in SAE J1297. Other SAE documents covering vehicle, engine, or component testing may be affected by use of alternative fuels. Some of the documents that may be affected can be found in Appendix A. Guidelines are provided for the engine power test code (SAE J1349) in Appendix D. The principles of these guidelines may apply to other procedures and codes, but the effects have not been investigated. The report is organized into four technical sections, each dealing with an important aspect of testing or reporting of results when using alternative fuels.
CURRENT
2007-07-09
Standard
J1297_200707
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
HISTORICAL
2005-12-19
Standard
J1498_200512
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines.
HISTORICAL
2004-07-28
Standard
J313_200407
Automotive and railroad diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil over a range between 163 and 371 °C (325 to 700 °F). Their makeup can represent various combinations of volatility, ignition quality, viscosity, sulfur level, gravity, and other characteristics. Additives may be used to impart special properties to the finished diesel fuel.
HISTORICAL
2002-10-31
Standard
J313_200210
Automotive and railroad diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil over a range between 163 and 371 °C (325 to 700 °F). Their makeup can represent various combinations of volatility, ignition quality, viscosity, sulfur level, gravity, and other characteristics. Additives may be used to impart special properties to the finished diesel fuel.
HISTORICAL
2002-09-13
Standard
J1297_200209
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
HISTORICAL
2000-10-01
Standard
J1297_200010
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
HISTORICAL
1998-03-01
Standard
J313_199803
Automotive and railroad diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil over a range between 163 and 371 °C (325 to 700 °F). Their makeup can represent various combinations of volatility, ignition quality, viscosity, sulfur level, gravity, and other characteristics. Additives may be used to impart special properties to the finished diesel fuel.
HISTORICAL
1998-02-01
Standard
J1498_199802
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines.
HISTORICAL
1996-11-01
Standard
J1422_199611
This SAE Information Report establishes performance requirements for devices used to warm diesel fuel before entering the fuel filter(s). This document applies to all off-road, self-propelled, diesel-powered work machines described in SAE J1116. This document may be applied to other diesel equipment.
HISTORICAL
1995-06-01
Standard
J2265_199506
This SAE Standard specifies: a test method for assessing the lubricating property of diesel fuels including those which may contain a lubricity enhancing additive, and the performance criteria necessary to ensure reliable operation of diesel fuel injection equipment with respect to fuel lubrication of such equipment. It applies to fuel used in diesel engines.
HISTORICAL
1995-06-01
Standard
J1515_199506
The guidelines in this SAE Information Report are directed at laboratory engine dynamometer test procedures with alternative fuels, and they are applicable to four-stroke cycle spark ignition (SI) and diesel (CI) engines (naturally aspirated or pressure charged, with or without charge air cooling). A brief overview of investigations with some alternative fuels can be found in SAE J1297. Other SAE documents covering vehicle, engine, or component testing may be affected by use of alternative fuels. Some of the documents that may be affected can be found in Appendix A. Guidelines are provided for the engine power test code (SAE J1349) in Appendix D. The principles of these guidelines may apply to other procedures and codes, but the effects have not been investigated. The report is organized into four technical sections, each dealing with an important aspect of testing or reporting of results when using alternative fuels.
HISTORICAL
1992-03-01
Standard
J313_199203
Automotive and railroad diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil over a range between 163 and 371 °C (325 to 700 °F). Their makeup can represent various combinations of volatility, ignition quality, viscosity, sulfur level, gravity, and other characteristics. Additives may be used to impart special properties to the finished diesel fuel.
HISTORICAL
1990-06-01
Standard
J1297_199006
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
HISTORICAL
1990-05-01
Standard
J1498_199005
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines.
HISTORICAL
1989-11-01
Standard
J1422_198911
This SAE Information Report establishes performance requirements for devices used to warm diesel fuel before entering the fuel filter(s). This document applies to all off-road, self-propelled, diesel-powered work machines described in SAE J1116. This document may be applied to other diesel equipment.
HISTORICAL
1989-06-01
Standard
J1297_198906
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
HISTORICAL
1989-06-01
Standard
J313_198906
Automotive and railroad diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil over a range between 163 and 371 °C (325 to 700 °F). Their makeup can represent various combinations of volatility, ignition quality, viscosity, sulfur level, gravity, and other characteristics. Additives may be used to impart special properties to the finished diesel fuel.
HISTORICAL
1988-10-01
Standard
J1498_198810
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines. The changes to SAE J1498 include: SAE Publications - Added SAE Paper 2010-01-1517 Other Publications and Sections 5, 9, and 10 - Updated ASTM alphanumeric designations and titles. Section 10 - Added discussion of a method to calculate net heating value for gasoline-ethanol blends using ASTM D3338.
HISTORICAL
1988-03-01
Standard
J1515_198803
The guidelines in this SAE Information Report are directed at laboratory engine dynamometer test procedures with alternative fuels, and they are applicable to four-stroke cycle spark ignition (SI) and diesel (CI) engines (naturally aspirated or pressure charged, with or without charge air cooling). A brief overview of investigations with some alternative fuels can be found in SAE J1297. Other SAE documents covering vehicle, engine, or component testing may be affected by use of alternative fuels. Some of the documents that may be affected can be found in Appendix A. Guidelines are provided for the engine power test code (SAE J1349) in Appendix D. The principles of these guidelines may apply to other procedures and codes, but the effects have not been investigated. The report is organized into four technical sections, each dealing with an important aspect of testing or reporting of results when using alternative fuels.
HISTORICAL
1987-06-01
Standard
J313_198706
Automotive and railroad diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil over a range between 163 and 371 °C (325 to 700 °F). Their makeup can represent various combinations of volatility, ignition quality, viscosity, sulfur level, gravity, and other characteristics. Additives may be used to impart special properties to the finished diesel fuel.
HISTORICAL
1987-05-01
Standard
J1297_198705
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
HISTORICAL
1987-05-01
Standard
J1498_198705
The heating value or heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from the fuel. The fraction or percentage of the heat of combustion that is converted to useful work is a measure of the thermal efficiency of an engine. Thus, a knowledge of the heat of combustion of the fuel is basic to the engineering of automotive engines. This SAE Information Report provides information on the standardized procedures for determining the heat of combustion of fuels that may be used for automotive engines. The changes to SAE J1498 include: SAE Publications - Added SAE Paper 2010-01-1517 Other Publications and Sections 5, 9, and 10 - Updated ASTM alphanumeric designations and titles. Section 10 - Added discussion of a method to calculate net heating value for gasoline-ethanol blends using ASTM D3338.
HISTORICAL
1986-06-01
Standard
J313_198606
Automotive and railroad diesel fuels, in general, are derived from petroleum refinery products which are commonly referred to as middle distillates. Middle distillates represent products which have a higher boiling range than gasoline and are obtained from fractional distillation of the crude oil or from streams from other refining processes. Finished diesel fuels represent blends of middle distillates. The properties of commercial distillate diesel fuels depend on the refinery practices employed and the nature of the crude oils from which they are derived. Thus, they may differ both with and within the region in which they are manufactured. Such fuels generally boil over a range between 163 and 371 °C (325 to 700 °F). Their makeup can represent various combinations of volatility, ignition quality, viscosity, sulfur level, gravity, and other characteristics. Additives may be used to impart special properties to the finished diesel fuel.
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