Criteria

Text:
Content:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 29390
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Giovanni Vichi, Luca Romani, Giovanni Ferrara, Luca Carmignani, Francesco Maiani
In the last years, the engineering in the automotive industry has been revolutionized by the continuous research in the reduction of consumption and pollutant emissions. On this topic there is the maximum attention both by the legislative bodies and by the costumers. The more and more severe limitations in pollutant and CO2 emissions imposed by international standards on the engine manufacturers and the increasing price of the fuel force the automotive research to more efficient and ecological engines. The standard approach for the definition of the engine parameters at the beginning of the design process is based on wide open throttle condition although, both in homologation cycles and in the real utilization, engines work mainly in partial load where the efficiency dramatically decreases. This aspect has recently become strongly relevant also for two-wheels vehicles especially for urban purpose. Within this context the authors developed an integrated numerical model, in MatLab Simulink ambient, in order to couple the engine simulation, performed by means of a 1D computer-aided engineering code, with the whole vehicle dynamic behaviour.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Rama Subbu, Baskar Anthony Samy, Piyush Mani Sharma, Prasanna Mahendiran
Ride comfort, driving stability and drivability are vital factors in terms of vehicle performance and the customer satisfaction. Crankshaft balancing is the source for the vibration that reduces the vehicle performance and it need to be controlled to some extent such that the vehicle performance will be improved. The IC engine is made up of reciprocating and rotating parts and they produce unbalanced forces during their operation and produce the vibratory output at the vehicle supporting members. The vibration reduction will be possible by minimizing unbalanced forces and by optimizing the crankshaft at the two wheeled vehicle engine design. Many researches were made to find the causes for the vibration and to reduce the vibrations at the engine supports. But still there is a research gap on the testing and simulation of engine components (crankshaft, connecting rod and piston assembly) and the correlation between the testing and simulation. In this work, an attempt is made to represent the engine vibrations and its isolations and to provide a gate way for the future work on it.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Jonathan Tenenbaum, Michael Shapiro, Leonid Tartakovsky
Two-phase jets are found in a variety of applications, including ink-jet printers, spray cooling, etc. Fuel sprays in internal combustion engines is an application of particular interest because of its direct influence on engine performance, energy efficiency and pollutants formation. Many phenomenological models have been proposed to quantify the temporal behavior of spray properties such as spray penetration with time, spray dispersion angle and cross-sectional averaged fuel concentration. However, most of the existing models have the limitation of providing a one-dimensional description and are thus unable to adequately describe the spatial point-wise spray distribution, in particular the local fuel concentration and mixture velocity. The aim of this study is to develop a more elaborate spray model which allows for calculation of spatial local fuel concentration and mixture velocity. The model is based on the single-phase steady-state laminar axisymmetric jet flow field solution by Schlichting, which is applied for a two-phase jet in the limit of dilute fuel concentration.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Mohamed El Morsy, Gabriela Achtenova
Through PULSE platform for vibration analysis, which is developed as an advanced solution for vibration measurements was developed the robust diagnostic concept (RDC). The PULSE setup is designed to help in fault diagnosis of vehicle gearbox -the main part of vehicle powertrain-. Time Domain, Continuous Wavelet Transformation Technique (CWT), FFT and Order analysis measurements are used for detection of an artificial pitting defect in gear by tracking the gearbox response at accelerated speed and different load. The test stand is equipped with three dynamometers; the input dynamometer serves as internal combustion engine, the output dynamometers introduce the load on the flanges of output joint shafts. The pitting defect is manufactured on the tooth side of gear of the fifth speed on the intermediate shaft. Temperature effect on the vibration measurements has been also investigated to study its effect on the fault diagnosis. The presented concept has an important application in the field of mechanical fault diagnosis.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Yoshihiro Nakagawa, Shinya Takahashi, Mikihito Masaki, Ranju Imao
In brake squeal analysis using FE models, minimizing differences in natural frequency between the measurement and the simulation in each component are a key issue for improvement in reproducibility of brake squeal. In the evaluations of model-measurement correlations in the study of brake discs, if amounts of shifts in natural frequencies and their deviation orientations, between the measured and simulated, have the same tendency in each vibration mode, the gaps between the measurements and simulations are relatively easy to be corrected to match to each other by adjusting parameters of densities and/or Young’s moduli. However, these tendencies in natural frequency differences vary depending on the situations and the opposite tendencies may appear in some cases. In such cases, the model-measurement gaps in natural frequency cannot be adequately reduced by adjusting densities and/or Young’s moduli. The potential cause of this model-measurement gap was assumed to be the residual stresses, which were imposed during the inductive hardening process of the brake disc to increase the hardness of the sliding surfaces.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Tatsuhiko Sato, Hirotaka Kurita, Akemi Ito, Hideyuki Iwasaki
The frictional force generated between an actual monolithic aluminum cylinder block and a piston / a piston-ring in a firing mode was measured with using a newly developed floating liner device for the first case in the world. The improvement of fuel consumption is the most important issue for engine manufactures from the viewpoint of energy and environment conservation. The piston-cylinder system plays quite important role for the reduction of the engine friction. For the improvement of the frictional behavior of the piston-cylinder system, it is beneficial to observe and analyze the frictional waveforms during an engine operation. In order to meet the above-mentioned demand, the renewed floating liner device was developed. In the newly developed floating liner device, the actual cylinder block itself was used as a test specimen, whereas a thin-walled cylindrical sleeve should be used as the test specimen in the conventional floating liner device. The measured single cylinder was an aluminum monolithic type made of hypereutectic Al-17Si alloy using a high pressure die casting process.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Tomokazu Nomura, Koichiro Matsushita, Yoshihiko Fujii, Hirofumi Fujiwara
To meet growing demands on the fuel economy, various studies have been made to improve thermal efficiency of engines. In spite of such efforts, approximately 30% of fuel energy is still dissipated to the atmosphere finally as cooling loss, through engine parts, coolant and oil. Therefore, if the heat dissipation from the engine is insufficient, the temperature of engine parts rises. An excessively higher engine temperature causes a degradation of engine performance and a deterioration of material strength. Especially in air-cooled engines, there are contradicting demands between the heat dissipation capacity and the light weighted compactness. Therefore, to realize the optimized design for a light and compact engine, a method of a precise temperature prediction is required in the early stage of the development. A number of studies have been made on the cooling performance and the temperature prediction of engines. In many of such studies, temperature of an engine cannot be directly estimated but heat transfer from the engine to the atmosphere and to the coolant are evaluated on the basis of heat transfer coefficients calculated by 3D-CFD.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Akira Ishibashi, Muneaki Nakamura, Hitoshi Muramatsu
Fuel economy improvement has become the most important issue in automobile engine developments nowadays. For the purpose of improving fuel economy due to the higher thermal efficiency, the enhancement of compression ratio and the reduction of thermal loss through cooling have been conducted widely. Those efforts exerted in the ongoing developments to improve thermal efficiency increase the thermal load on pistons. Considering the reliability of the pistons and anti-knocking capacity of engines, it is necessary to make a better understanding of piston temperature distributions through accurate measurement under various engine operating conditions. Thus, direct and indirect measurement methods have been developed to estimate the actual piston temperature. The direct method, such as linkage-type is not typically available under higher engine speed due to the durability of linkages. The indirect method, such as material hardness-type can neither measure real-time piston temperature nor measure temperature of piston skirts which are thin-walled.    
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Francesco Maiani, Alessio Sisi, Walther Leardini
In recent years the 2-wheelers engines companies are focused on increasing the overall engine efficiency, that can be gained through engine down-speeding, engine down-sizing and by reducing the frictions; however, to maintain or improve vehicle performance, it is necessary to provide a corresponding increase in specific power. In accordance with these trends, the studied approaches and methodologies have been exploited, during the development of the new Piaggio small scooter engine. In this work a multi-target analysis has been applied to the valvetrain system design, in order to optimize engine performance in terms of friction reduction, power curve and dynamic response of the timing system. Along with this optimization methodology, a robust design has been studied and applied to make the peak cranking compression pressure insensitive to engine starting device working. These calculation methodologies was achieved using commercial software as GT–SUITE for engine performance and valvetrain simulation and modeFRONTIER for multiobjective optimization analysis.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Toshio Watanabe, Hiroki Sakamoto
It is well known that for high-speed planing craft with outboard motor, cavitation occurs around the lower unit(gear case) and propeller blades. There are several kinds of cavitation; (1)Tip vortex cavitation (2)Hub vortex cavitation (3)Sheet cavitation (4)Cloud cavitation (5)Root cavitation Among them ,Cloud cavitation and root cavitation lead to erosion damage on the surface of lower unit and propeller. To prevent from poor appearance or performance deterioration of outboard motor by erosion damage, It is important to simulate the occurrence of erosion in advance at the design stage. In this paper, we propose the new method of predicting the area that erosion occurs using CFD (computational fluid dynamics). In order to simulate cavitation phenomena, basically, we have implemented the CFD analysis using the barotropic model. But the area that cavitation occurs does not correspond to the position of erosion damage. Therefore, we focus on the bubble nucleus which is due to cavitation. First, we predict cavitation phenomena on the basis of single-bubble motion with Rayleigh plesset model.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Mohd Farid Muhamad Said, Azhar Bin Abdul Aziz, Zulkanain Abdul Latiff, Amin Mahmoudzadeh Andwari, Shahril Nizam Mohamed Soid
Many efforts have been invested to improve the fuel efficiency of vehicles mainly for the local consumers. The production of a downsized turbocharged engine in the last quarter of 2011 proves that Malaysian is racing towards producing high efficiency engines along with other manufacturers. The effort does not only end there, several research activities on other alternative technology including cylinder deactivation (CDA) has begun. In this paper, the main research area is focus on the investigation of cylinder deactivation (CDA) technology on common engine part load conditions within Malaysian city driving operation. CDA mostly being applied on multi cylinders engines. It has the advantage in improving fuel consumption by reducing pumping losses at part load engine conditions. Here, the application of CDA on 1.6 liter four cylinders gasoline engine is studied. One-dimensional (1-D) engine modeling is performed to investigate the effect of intake and exhaust valve strategy on engine performance with CDA.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Bo Hu, Chris Brace, Sam Akehurst, Colin Copeland, J.W.G. Turner
One of the major limits for two-stage-regulated turbocharged SI engines is its large backpressure and the corresponding degraded combustion efficiency. Divided exhaust period (DEP) concept is an approach which has been proved to significantly reduce the backpressure while still maintaining the same engine performance. The standard layout of the DEP system only comprises of a single turbocharger. Two exhaust valves are separately functioned with one valve feeding the blow-down pulse to the turbine whilst the other valve targeting the scavenging by bypassing the turbine. This method can provide large BSFC improvement due to improved breathing characteristics and better combustion phasing. The DEP concept has only been applied to single turbocharged engines so far. However, it in its basic form is in no way restricted to one-stage system. This paper, for the first time, applied DEP concept to a two-stage-regulated downsized SI engine. By controlling the timing of the exhaust valves separately to feed the exhaust to the high-pressure-turbine or low-pressure turbine or the exhaust pipe, it is anticipated that such system could achieve even better breathing characteristics than the standard one-stage turbocharged engine.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Tao Yin, Tie Li, Longhua Chen, Bin Zheng, Fei Zhao
Worldwide demands for better fuel economy and less pollutant emissions of automobiles are driving vehicle manufactures to seek further technical improvements in reciprocating engines. Spark ignited (SI) engines have a significant optimization potential by techniques such as supercharging, variable valve timing, downsizing, exhaust gas recirculation or direct injection. Each method distinctively influences the engine performance in variable operating conditions, which makes it complex to apply these techniques in a synergy pattern. Therefore, optimization of engine parameters is expected to make full use of the positive coupling techniques.This paper studies the effect of cooled EGR on fuel consumption and anti-knock performance of a boosted port fuel injection (PFI) SI engine. Experimental results show that the cooled EGR increases the thermal efficiency by 2%~18% depending on the operation conditions. Compared to low load operations, more improvements of the thermal efficiency are obtained at higher loads, primarily owing to the enhanced anti-knock performance, advanced combustion phasing, elimination of fuel-rich operations as well as reduced heat transfer loss with cooled EGR.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Fabio Bozza, Vincenzo De Bellis, Daniela Siano
Control of knock phenomenon is becoming more and more important in modern SI engine, due to the tendency to develop high boosted turbocharged engines (downsizing). To this aim, improved modeling and experimental techniques are required to precisely define the maximum allowable spark advance. On the experimental side, the knock limit is identified based on some indices derived by the analysis of the in-cylinder pressure traces or of the cylinder block vibrations. The threshold levels of the knock indices are usually defined following an heuristic approach. On the modeling side, in the 1D codes, the knock is usually described by simple correlation of the auto-ignition time of the unburned gas zone within the cylinders. In addition, the latter methodology commonly refers to ensemble-averaged pressure cycles and, for this reason, does not take into account the cycle-by-cycle variations. In this work, an experimental activity is carried out to characterize the effects of cyclic dispersion on knock phenomena for different engine speeds, at full load operations and referring to a spark advance of borderline knock.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Pawel Magryta, Miroslaw Wendeker, Adam Majczak, Michal Bialy, Ksenia Siadkowska
Nowadays more sophisticated ways are search for alternative supply of combustion engines. One of the commonly used alternative fuels is hydrogen. On the market there are quite a number of passenger cars, which are powered by hydrogen fuel. The development of this technology is primarily connected with the introduction of hydrogen refueling stations, and hydrogen storage and distribution systems. We can predict that much faster popularization trend of hydrogen fuel would bring the possibility of modifying the existing fuel supply systems of internal combustion engines for use this environmentally friendly fuel. Adaptation of existing vehicles equipped with spark-ignition engines in the ability to support combustion by dosing additional dose of hydrogen would enable the introduction of this alternative fuel on a larger scale than at present. In order to verify the assumptions of the additive supplying hydrogen, simulation test model of a spark ignition engine, developed in the AVL BOOST software was presented in the article.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Christopher Bannister
When evaluating the performance of new boosting hardware, it is a challenge to isolate the heat transfer effects inherent within measured turbine and compressor efficiencies. This work documents the construction of a lumped mass turbocharger model in the MatLab Simulink environment capable of predicting turbine and compressor metal and gas outlet temperatures based on measured or simulated inlet conditions. A production turbocharger from a representative 2.2L common rail diesel engine was instrumented to enable accurate gas and wall temperature measurements to be recorded under a variety of engine operating conditions. Initially steady-state testing was undertaken across the engine speed and load range in order that empirical Reynolds-Nusselt heat transfer relationships could be derived and incorporated into the model. Steady state model predictions were validated against further experimental data and an assessment made of the transient performance of the model during tip-in’s and tip-outs.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Jacek Andrzej Czarnigowski
The search for environmentally friendly fuels and ways of reducing carbon dioxide emissions is the main cause of a growing interest in gaseous fuels and corresponding fuel systems for internal combustion engines. To assure the expected environmental advantages with no detriment to the engine performance, these fuel systems need to be equipped with precise actuators – the gas injectors. The key input required in the process of designing and calibrating such fuel systems are precise characteristics of the injectors and understanding what affects these characteristics. The paper presents the results of experiments on the effects of supply pressure and supply voltage on the pulse gas injector opening time. Two characteristics have been investigated into: the opening lag time and the opening time. The opening lag was defined as the time between the occurence of a control signal and the moment of the valve’s starting to move. The lag determines the minimal duration of the control signal that can be executed by the injector, and thus the injector’s applicability.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Yongqiang Han, Jianjian Kang, Xianfeng Wang, Yang Chen, Zhichao Hu
Energy saving and environment protection has been two major subjects in the development of automobile industry. In the internal combustion engine, about 40% of fuel energy is released into the atmosphere through waste gas. The recovery and utilization of the heat from waste gas can realize the goals of energy saving and cost reducing. In fieldof waste heat recovery, the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) has good prospects and has been widely used.Turbo has been selected firstly as the expander in traditional ORC. However, turbo has disadvantages of high manufacturing cost and narrow applicable range. In this paper, a new organic Rankinecycle coupling free piston (ORC-FP) system used in theinternal combustion engine (ICE) exhaust heatrecovery is proposed and its working principle is introduced in detail.In this system, the free piston with constant force outputfunctions as expander in ORC and operates reciprocally to output workunder the driven of working fluid R245ca,which absorbs heat from waste gas and provides vapor power.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Lyes Tarabet, Mohand Said Lounici, Khaled Loubar, Mohand Tazerout
The use of computer engine cycle simulations, based on zero-dimensional (single zone or multi-zone) or multi-dimensional models, to aid engine systems design process has been largely applied and has become a popular tool because of combination of accurate results and reduced costs. In these models, the combustion sub-model plays a critical role in the overall engine simulation as it provides the heat release rate (HRR), which represents the combustion process for a given engine geometry and set of operating conditions. The determination of the experimental HRR is obtained solving the first law of Thermodynamics in the cylinder closed cycle with the aid of measured in-cylinder pressure. The widely used model in modern reciprocating Diesel engine applications to predict the HRR is the approximation by means of a correlation based on the combination of at least two Wiebe functions. This correlation has a characteristic S-shaped curve, which grows from zero indicating the start of combustion and tends exponentially to one indicating the end of combustion.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Mohamadamin Shamsderakhshan, Shahaboddin Kharazmi
Diesel engines have widely used in past hundred years. During this time costly and extensive researches have been done to improve engine performance, which is going on. Important issues of these engines are higher specific power and efficiency and lower specific fuel consumption and pollutions formation. One of the best methods for engine performance improvement is matching a convenient turbocharger on engine. A turbocharger increases the engine air mass flow rate by increasing the inlet pressure and density, which causes fuel mass flow rate and power increase. The aim of this paper is to choose the convenient turbocharger for the OM355 naturally aspirated diesel engine and turn it to a turbocharged one. For this, 1D computer simulation code is used and simulation results are validated with experimental results. Finally, by selecting proper turbocharger, engine power increases about 50% and specific fuel consumption decreases about 4%. Moreover, effects of exhaust manifold geometry and ambient condition on performance parameters of the turbocharged diesel engine are investigated.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Qiyou Deng, Richard Burke
As the requirements of vehicle pollutant emissions and fuel consumption are getting stricter, engine downsizing through turbocharging to improve the efficiency of vehicles is becoming more popular. However, for now, the turbocharger models are based on characteristic maps derived from experimental measurements taken under steady conditions on dedicated gas stand facility. Under these conditions heat transfer is ignored and consequently the predictive performance of the model is compromised, particularly under the part load and dynamic operating conditions that are representative of real powertrain operation. Although some physics based models have been proposed to account for the thermal behaviour of the device, these require considerable experimental effort to determine the model parameters that is not practical for industrial applications. A more accurate model that is easily parameterised would benefit turbocharger-engine matching and engine controller design. This paper proposes to apply a dynamic mathematical model that uses a polynomial structure, the Volterra Series, for the modelling of the turbocharger system.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Shui-chang Liu, Zheng-qi Gu, Li-fu Li, Yong Zhang, Wan-dong ZHAO
In vehicle cooling system, the essential components—radiators often interact with each other air-side flow field thereby the thermal performance. To calculate the radiators’ performance more accurately at lower time cost against the background of today’s highly competitive marketplace, based on the CFD tools, a radiator group performance prediction method of a engineering vehicle cooling system is presented in this study. During CFD simulation, the RNG k–ε turbulence model is applied and the adopted numerical methods is SIMPLE, the first upwind discrete method is used firstly to get steady flow field and the second upwind is used to reach convergence at last. Air-side flow field simulations of the radiators unit model are carried out firstly to obtain the radiators resistance and heat transfer characteristics, during which three near-wall treatments are applied respectively, and simulations result present that flow field obtained from simulation with enhanced wall treatment has the least separated flow and backflow, also pressure drop; then, the air flow and heat transfer in the whole air channel containing the radiator group are simulated to get the inlet and outlet water temperatures of radiator group, during which radiators’ are processed as porous media with heat resource distribution near to the actual condition; at last, the water temperatures obtained from simulations are compared with the test values and the temperatures according to the enhanced wall treatment has lowest relative error 6.3%, which can meet the accuracy requirement in engineering computation, so the performance calculated method proposed in this paper is effective.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Yufeng Li
Swirl ratio in the cylinder of a diesel engine is an important parameter for air/fuel mixing and combustion process. Swirling flow in the cylinder is formed when the intake air flows thought a helical or tangential port and inlet valve seats and then recognized by the wall of the cylinder. The swirling angular speed generated by the intake ports can be determined on a steady flow rig. The swirl ratio at the end of intake stroke in an operating engine is then estimated by equations which have already been established by Ricardo and AVL. However, the swirl ratio estimated by these existing equations is not the real value in the cylinder of an operating engine as the equations were deducted from three basic assumptions: a) volumetric efficiency of an engine is 100%; b) the pressure drop between the intake ports is constant during the engine operation; c) no burned gas residual is trapped in the cylinder. They are not true definitely. On the other hand, an accurate swirl ratio in the cylinder is essential during the engine development.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Ossi Kaario, Teemu Sarjovaara, Olli Ranta, Tuomo Hulkkonen, Karri Keskinen, Martti Larmi, Sauli Halonen, Arno Amberla
In the present study, we analyze urea solution spray mixing and evaporation in a novel selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. In typical SCR systems, low urea solution injection pressures are used. This may result in low evaporation rates implying that some additional methods need to be used to obtain feasible mixing and evaporation rates in the system. However, the aim in the present study is to use very high injection pressure for the solution in order to enhance droplet breakup, mixing, and evaporation and thus remove the need to use additional mixing enhancement techniques. We measure the spray characteristics of the urea solution, namely the spray penetration, opening angle, and droplet sizes from several distances from the nozzle and with various nozzle hole sizes and injection pressures. We focus our experiments on low gas density setting which is typically the SCR system operating environment. This kind of experimental data (low gas density, high injection pressure) is scarce in literature.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Mohammad Reza Hamedi, Athanasios Tsolakis, Jose Martin Herreros
Recent developments in diesel engines lead to increased fuel efficiency and reduced exhaust gas temperature. Therefore more energy efficient aftertreatment systems are required to comply with tight emission regulations. In this study, a computational fluid dynamics package was used to investigate the thermal behaviour of diesel aftertreatment system. A parametric study was carried out to identify the most influential piping material and insulation characteristics in terms of thermal performance. In case of aftertreatment piping and canning material effect, an array of different potential materials was selected and their effects on the emission conversion efficiency of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) were numerically investigated over a driving cycle. Results indicate that although the piping material volumetric heat capacity was decreased by a factor of four, the total emission reduction was only considerable during the cold start. Since the piping system heat up and cool down periods were accelerated by reducing the system thermal inertia.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
R. Pradeepak, Mihir Bhambri
Motor scooters are popular in most parts of the world, especially in countries with local manufacturers. Parking, storage, and traffic issues in crowded cities, along with the easy driving position makes them a popular mode of transportation. Motor scooters are the segment of 2 wheelers which is driven by the entire family with ease unlike motorcycles which is a male dominated segment. Due to the importance that the scooters hold in the present time, it has become very important to manufacture stable, light weight yet robust scooters. For the best product in the market, testing is given a great importance in automotive manufacturing companies. Virtual testing has been the latest development in terms of testing a vehicle during the design stage itself. Multi Body Dynamics approach is used to study - 1) the articulation of various sub-assemblies and 2) the static & dynamic loads generated at various attachment points of the scooter. Integration of sub-assemblies into a final product creates a minimal scope of modification of the location of different components.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Lukasz Grabowski, Zbigniew Czyz, Krzysztof Kruszczynski
The research on the project to develop a new type of gyroplane required a special gyroplane powertrain to be developed. To meet special research requirements, the correct cooling of a drive unit is particularly important so this paper puts a focus just on the issues of gyroplane powertrain cooling. The Rotax 912S engine was selected as a drive unit following a detailed analysis. A one-dimensional model, simulated with the AVL Boost software, was applied to determine the heat balance for this engine and heat flux penetrating through each engine surface. The geometrical quantities defined in the model were obtained by measuring a three-dimensional geometry provided by an authorized Rotax engine supplier company. It has been shown that 6 kW is absorbed by a direct cooling cylinder, 28 kW by indirect cooling heads and the rest of heat is absorbed by engine oil, the heat due to friction in connecting rod bearing and camshaft bearing and the friction between piston rings and a cylinder surface.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Chris D. Monaco, Chris Golecki, Benjamin Sattler, Daniel C. Haworth, Jeffrey S. Mayer, Gary Neal
As one of the fifteen universities in North America taking part in the EcoCAR 2: Plugging into the Future competition, The Pennsylvania State University Advanced Vehicle Team (PSUAVT) designed and implemented a series plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) that reduces fuel consumption and emissions while maintaining high consumer acceptability and safety standards. This architecture allows the vehicle to operate as a pure electric vehicle until the Energy Storage System (ESS) State of Charge (SOC) is depleted. The Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) then supplements the battery to extend range beyond that of a purely electric vehicle. General Motors (GM) donated a 2013 Chevrolet Malibu for PSUAVT to use as the platform to implement the PSUAVT-selected series PHEV design. A 90 kW electric traction motor, a 16.2 kW-hr high capacity lithium-ion battery pack, and Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) are now integrated into the vehicle. The APU is a 750cc, two-cylinder engine running on an 85% ethanol/15% gasoline (E85) mixture coupled to an electric generator.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Thomas Bradley, Benjamin Geller, Jake Bucher, Shawn Salisbury
EcoCAR 2 is the premiere North American collegiate automotive competition that challenges 15 North American universities to redesign a 2013 Chevrolet Malibu to decrease the environmental impact of the Malibu while maintaining its performance, safety, and consumer appeal. The EcoCAR 2 project is a three year competition headline sponsored by General Motors and U.S. Department of Energy. In Year 1 of the competition, extensive modeling guided the Colorado State University (CSU) Vehicle Innovation Team (VIT) to choose an all-electric vehicle powertrain architecture with range extending hydrogen fuel cells, to be called the Malibu H2eV. During this year, the CSU VIT followed the EcoCAR 2 Vehicle Design Process (VDP) to develop the H2eV’s electric and hydrogen powertrain, energy storage system (ESS), control systems, and auxiliary systems. From the design developed in Year 1 of the EcoCAR 2 competition, a Malibu donated by General Motors was converted into a concept validating prototype during Year 2.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Di Zhu, Ewan Pritchard
EcoCAR 2: Plugging in to the Future is a three-year collegiate engineering competition established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and General Motors (GM). North Carolina State University is designing a Series Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) on a 2013 Chevrolet Malibu vehicle platform. The designed vehicle has a pure electric range of 55 miles and an overall range of 235 miles with a range extension system. The vehicle is designed to reduce fuel consumption and gas emission while maintaining consumer acceptability in the areas of performance, utility, and safety. This reports details the vehicle development process with an emphasis on control system development and refinement. Advanced manufacturing, modeling, and simulation have been used to ensure a safe and functional vehicle at the upcoming year 3 final competition.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 29390