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CURRENT
2011-08-10
Standard
AIR746C
This document supplements ARP85, to extend its use in the design of ECS for supersonic transports. The ECS provides an environment controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals, and equipment. These limits include pressure, temperature, humidity, conditioned air velocity, ventilation rate, thermal radiation, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.) of the environment. The ECS is comprised of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply and distribute conditioned air to the occupied compartments. This system is defined within the ATA 100 specification, Chapter 21. It interfaces with the pneumatic system (Chapter 36 of ATA 100), at the inlet of the air conditioning system shutoff valves.
CURRENT
2011-08-10
Standard
ARP86C
These recommendations are written to cover the subject of engine exhaust gas to air type heat exchangers under the following classifications:
2011-08-04
WIP Standard
ARP6420
The turbine-engine inlet flow distortion descriptors summarized in this document apply to the effects of inlet total-pressure, planar wave, total-temperature, and swirl distortion. Guidelines on stability margin, destabilizing phenomena, types and purposes of inlet data, AIP definition, and data acquisition and handling are summarized.
2011-08-01
WIP Standard
AIR6465
This document addresses many of the issues and challenges related to obtaining high quality measurements at the designated Aerodynamic Interface Plane (AIP) necessary to characterize the flow field. The intent is to consolidate information needed to understand the requirements, and techniques for obtaining quality measurements, and provide lessons learned from previous test programs. This document applies to Ground (wind tunnel and engine test) and Flight testing for inlet recovery and distortion for air vehicles.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/2A
Heat transfer is the transport of thermal energy from one point to another. Heat is transferred only under the influence of a temperature gradient or temperature difference. The direction of heat transfer is always from the point at the higher temperature to the point at the lower temperature, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The fundamental modes of heat transfer are conduction, convection, and radiation. Conduction is the net transfer of energy within a fluid or solid occurring by the collisions of molecules, atoms, or electrons. Convection is the transfer of energy resulting from fluid motion. Convection involves the processes of conduction, fluid motion, and mass transfer. Radiation is the transfer of energy from one point to another in the absence of a transporting medium. In practical applications several modes of heat transfer occur simultaneously.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/6A
This section relates the engineering fundamentals and thermophysical property material of the previous sections to the airborne equipment for which thermodynamic considerations apply. For each generic classification of equipment, information is presented for the types of equipment included in these categories, and the thermodynamic design considerations with respect to performance, sizing, and selection of this equipment.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/9A
This AIR is arranged in the following four sections: 2A - Properties of the Natural Environment 2B - Properties of Gases 2C - Properties of Liquids 2D - Properties of Solids A summary of each section is given below.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/8A
The purpose of this section is to provide methods and a set of convenient working charts to estimate penalty values in terms of take-off fuel weight for any given airplane mission. The curves are for a range of specific fuel consumption (SFC) and lift/drag ratio (L/D) compatible with the jet engines and supersonic aircraft currently being developed. A typical example showing use of the charts for an air conditioning system is given. Evaluation of the penalty imposed on aircraft performance characteristics by the installation of an air conditioning system is important for two reasons: It provides a common denominator for comparing systems in the preliminary design stage, thus aiding in the choice of system to be used. It aids in pinpointing portions of existing systems where design improvements can be most readily achieved.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/12A
In the design of spacecraft, heat transfer becomes a criterion of operation to maintain structural and equipment integrity over long periods of time. The spacecraft thermal balance between cold space and solar, planetary, and equipment heat sources is the means by which the desired range of equipment and structural temperatures are obtained. With the total spacecraft balance set, subsystem and component temperatures can be analyzed for their corresponding thermal requirements. This section provides the means by which first-cut approximations of spacecraft surface, structure, and equipment temperatures may be made, using the curves of planetary and solar heat flux in conjunction with the desired coating radiative properties. Once the coating properties have been determined, the material to provide these requirements may be selected from the extensive thermal radiative properties tables and curves.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/11A
The prediction of vehicle temperatures during ascent through the earth’s atmosphere requires an accurate knowledge of the aerodynamic heating rates occurring at the vehicle surface. Flight parameters required in heating calculations include the local airstream velocity, pressure, and temperature at the boundary layer edge for the vehicle location in question. In addition, thermodynamic and transport air properties are required at these conditions. Both laminar and turbulent boundary layers occur during the boost trajectory. Experience has shown that laminar and turbulent heating are of equivalent importance. Laminar heating predominates in importance in the stagnation areas, but the large afterbody surfaces are most strongly affected by turbulent heating. Once the local flow conditions and corresponding air properties have been obtained, the convective heating rate may be calculated for a particular wall temperature.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/13A
This part of the manual presents methods for arriving at a solution to the problem of spacecraft inflight equipment environmental control. The temperature aspect of this problem may be defined as the maintenance of a proper balance and integration of the following thermal loads: equipment-generated, personnel-generated, and transmission through external boundary. Achievement of such a thermal energy balance involves the investigation of three specific areas: Establishment of design requirements. Evaluation of properties of materials. Development of analytical approach. The solution to the problem of vehicle and/or equipment pressurization, which is the second half of major environmental control functions, is also treated in this section. Pressurization in this case may be defined as the task associated with the storage and control of a pressurizing fluid, leakage control, and repressurization.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/5A
Like the technologies to which it contributes, the science of instrumentation seems to be expanding to unlimited proportions. In considering instrumentation techniques, primary emphasis was given in this section to the fundamentals of pressure, temperature, and flow measurement. Accent was placed on common measurement methods, such as manometers, thermocouples, and head meters, rather than on difficult and specialized techniques. Icing, humidity, velocity, and other special measurements were touched on briefly. Many of the references cited were survey articles or texts containing excellent bibliographies to assist a more detailed study where required.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/7A
The pressurization system design considerations presented in this AIR deal with human physiological requirements, characteristics of pressurization air sources, methods of controlling cabin pressure, cabin leakage control, leakage calculation methods, and methods of emergency cabin pressure release.
CURRENT
2011-06-29
Standard
AIR4951
Thrust measurement systems come in many sizes and shapes, with varying degrees of complexity, accuracy and cost . For the purposes of this information report, the discussions of thrust measurement will be limited to axial thrust in single-axis test systems.
CURRENT
2011-06-13
Standard
J244_201106
This procedure establishes recommendations on the measurement of diesel engine intake air flow under steady-state test conditions. The measurement methods discussed have been limited to metering systems and associated equipment found in common usage in the industry, specifically, nozzles, laminar flow devices, and vortex shedding. The procedure establishes accuracy goals as well as explains proper usage of equipment. The recommendations concerning diesel engine exhaust mass flow measurements are minimal in scope.
CURRENT
2011-06-09
Standard
J826/1_201106
This document describes the CAD model data available from SAE for the HPM-1 three-dimensional H-point machine. The elements of the CAD model include the outer surfaces of the cushion and back pans, datum points and lines, and calibration references. The intended purpose for this information is to provide a CAD reference for design and benchmarking as well as a calibration reference for the physical HPM-1 audits. The content and format of the data files that are available are also described. The actual CAD model files are included with this product and are provided in the following formats: CATIA v4 (without parametrics), CATIA v5 (without parametrics), IGES, and STEP.
HISTORICAL
2011-06-07
Standard
J1113/13_201106
This SAE Standard specifies the test methods and procedures necessary to evaluate electrical components intended for automotive use to the threat of Electrostatic Discharges (ESDs). It describes test procedures for evaluating electrical components on the bench in the powered mode and for the packaging and handling non-powered mode. A procedure for calibrating the simulator that is used for electrostatic discharges is given in Appendix A. An example of how to calculate the RC Time Constant is given in Appendix B Functional Performance Status Classifications for immunity to ESD and Sensitivity classifications for ESD sensitive devices are given in Appendix C.
2011-05-25
WIP Standard
ARP6201
This ARP would define and standardize the basic tools necessary in order to determine the adequacy of the Cabin Simulator Devices for the conduct of crewmember training and qualification.
CURRENT
2011-05-25
Standard
AIR1823B
The Engineering Analysis System (EASY) computer program is summarized in this report. It provides techniques for analysis of steady-state and dynamic (transient) environmental control system (ECS) performance, control system stability, and for synthesis of optimal ECS. General uses of a transient analysis computer program for ECS design and development, and general features of EASY relative to these uses, are presented. This report summarizes the nine analysis options of EASY, EASY program organization for analyzing ECS, data input to the program and resulting data output, and a discussion of EASY limitations. A generalized computer program for determining transient thermodynamic performance of aircraft ECS, and methods for dynamic analysis of aircraft ECS are discussed in this report.
HISTORICAL
2011-05-23
Standard
ARP4868A
The SAE Aerospace Standard document AS681 is the parent document of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP). AS681 applies to Engine programs written to conform to this document. This ARP specifies a set of functions and their expected behaviors that constitute a function based Application Program Interface (API) for gas turbine engine customer programs. The functions specified in this API are delivered by the Supplier as part of the Engine model. This document defines generic language independent functions and specific appendices for implementations in C and Fortran. The function based API specified in this ARP represents an alternative to the Fortran COMMON block structure, as specified in AS4191, historically used to communicate with an engine program. The customer may request emulation of the AS4191 interface if desired.
CURRENT
2011-05-17
Standard
J1490_201105
There are two ways to assess the characteristics of ride vibrations of a vehicle during its operation. Subjective evaluation and objective measurement. Subjective assessments of the ride vibrations experienced by drivers during ride evaluations are generally performed by a panel of drivers and/or passengers who are instructed to operate or ride a group of vehicles in a predetermined manner in order to subjectively assess the levels and characteristics of ride vibrations. Figures 6A through 6C show examples of subjective evaluation forms presently in use. The disadvantages of the subjective method include need for careful experimental design, need for statistically unbiased samples, complexity of human perceptions of vibrations, and difficulty in comparing qualitative data of vehicles evaluated at different times and/or by different groups of people. Often ride characterization is not an easy task using only qualitative or descriptive terms.
CURRENT
2011-05-17
Standard
J2180_201105
The test procedure applies to roll coupled units such as straight trucks, tractor semitrailers, full trailers, B-trains, etc. The test is aimed at evaluating the level of lateral acceleration required to rollover a vehicle or a roll-coupled unit of a vehicle in a steady turning situation. Transient, vibratory, or dynamic rollover situations are not simulated by this test. Furthermore, the accuracy of the test decreases as the tilt angle increases, although this is a small effect at the levels of tilt angle used in testing heavy trucks. The test accuracy is accepted for vehicles that will rollover at lateral acceleration levels below 0.5 g corresponding to a tilt table angle of less than approximately 27 degrees. Even so, the results for heavy trucks with rollover thresholds greater than 0.5 g could be used for comparing their relative static roll stability.
CURRENT
2011-04-26
Standard
AS5379A
This specification covers the general requirements for cabin air safety valves for use in pressurized cabins of aircraft to prevent excess positive and negative pressures in the cabin and to provide a means of cabin pressure release in case of emergency.
2011-03-21
WIP Standard
AIR6183
This standard should provide accurate fuel consumption prediction methods throughout the flight regime. The standard should apply to any fixed-wing, turbofan or turbojet-powered airplane.
CURRENT
2011-02-24
Standard
J2189_201102
This SAE Information Report prescribes dummies, procedures, and configurations that can be used for investigating the interactions that might occur between a deploying airbag and a child restrained by a child restraint system (CRS). During the inflation process, airbags generate a considerable amount of kinetic energy which can result in substantial forces being applied to a child who is restrained in a CRS in the front seat of a vehicle. Field data collected by the special crash investigation team of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) indicate that fatal forces can be developed. In response to these field data, NHTSA added a series of airbag/child interaction tests and limits to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR 571.208) that deal with occupant protection, commonly known as Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS 208).
HISTORICAL
2011-02-10
Standard
AIR1706
This document has been declared “CANCELLED” as of January 2010. By this action, this document will remain listed in the Numerical Section of the Aerospace Standards Index.
HISTORICAL
2011-02-04
Standard
J3001_201102
This procedure is applicable to modes between 1500 and 15 000 Hz. The parameters measured with this procedure are defined as the damping factor, ξ for first three bending modes of the beam. The procedure will focus on bending modes only.
CURRENT
2011-02-04
Standard
J2772_201102
This Standard is restricted to refrigeration circuits that provide air-conditioning for the passenger compartments of passenger and commercial vehicles. This Standard includes analytical and physical test procedures to evaluate concentration inside the passenger compartment. In the early phases of vehicle evaluation, usage of the analytical approach may be sufficient without performing physical tests. The physical test procedure involves releasing refrigerant from an external source to a location adjacent to the evaporator core (inside the HVAC-Module). An apparatus is used to provide a repeatable, calibrated leak rate. If the system has multiple evaporators, leakage could be simulated at any of the evaporator locations. This standard gives detail information on the techniques for measuring R-744 [CO2] and R-1234yf [HFO-1234yf], but the general techniques described here can be used for other refrigerants as well.
CURRENT
2010-10-25
Standard
AIR5686
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) addresses the subject of aircraft inlet-swirl distortion. A structured methodology for characterizing steady-state swirl distortion in terms of swirl descriptors and for correlating the swirl descriptors with loss in stability pressure ratio is presented. The methodology is to be considered in conjunction with other SAE inlet distortion methodologies. In particular, the combined effects of swirl and total-pressure distortion on stability margin are considered. However, dynamic swirl, i.e., time-variant swirl, is not considered. The implementation of the swirl assessment methodology is shown through both computational and experimental examples. Different types of swirl distortion encountered in various engine installations and operations are described, and case studies which highlight the impact of swirl on engine stability are provided. Supplemental material is included in the appendices.
2010-10-04
WIP Standard
J1699/1
This SAE Recommended Practice recommends test methods, test procedures, and specific test parameters to help verify that vehicles and test tools can communicate using the SAE J1850. This document only verifies the portion of SAE J1850 that is used for OBD-II communications. The term "test tool" is synonymous with OBD-II Scan tool.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 616