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Viewing 151 to 180 of 33411
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0030
Vesselin Krassimirov Krastev, Luca Silvestri, Giacomo Falcucci, Gino Bella
Abstract A two-equation Zonal-DES (ZDES) approach has been recently proposed by the authors as a suitable hybrid URANS/LES turbulence modeling alternative for Internal Combustion Engine flows. This approach is conceptually simple, as it is all based on a single URANS-like framework and the user is only required to explicitly mark which parts of the domain will be simulated in URANS, DES or LES mode. The ZDES rationale was initially developed for external aerodynamics applications, where the flow is statistically steady and the transition between zones of different types usually happens in the URANS-to-DES or URANS-to-LES direction. The same “one-way” transition process has been found to be fairly efficient also in steady-state internal flows with engine-like characteristics, such as abrupt expansions or intake ports with fixed valve position.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0029
Tommaso Lucchini, Gianluca D'Errico, Tarcisio Cerri, Angelo Onorati, Gilles Hardy
Abstract Computational fluid dynamics represents a useful tool to support the design and development of Heavy Duty Engines, making possible to test the effects of injection strategies and combustion chamber design for a wide range of operating conditions. Predictive models are required to ensure accurate estimations of heat release and the main pollutant emissions within a limited amount of time. For this reason, both detailed chemistry and turbulence chemistry interaction need to be included. In this work, the authors intend to apply combustion models based on tabulated kinetics for the prediction of Diesel combustion in Heavy Duty Engines. Four different approaches were considered: well-mixed model, presumed PDF, representative interactive flamelets and flamelet progress variable. Tabulated kinetics was also used for the estimation of NOx emissions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0036
S Krishna Addepalli, Om Prakash Saw, J M Mallikarjuna
Abstract Mixture distribution in the combustion chamber of gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines significantly affects combustion, performance and emission characteristics. The mixture distribution in the engine cylinder, in turn, depends on many parameters viz., fuel injector hole diameter and orientation, fuel injection pressure, the start of fuel injection, in-cylinder fluid dynamics etc. In these engines, the mixture distribution is broadly classified as homogeneous and stratified. However, with currently available engine parameters, it is difficult to objectively classify the type of mixture distribution. In this study, an attempt is made to objectively classify the mixture distribution in GDI engines using a parameter called the “stratification index”. The analysis is carried out on a four-stroke wall-guided GDI engine using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0035
Giulio Cazzoli, Claudio Forte, Gian Marco Bianchi, Stefania Falfari, Sergio Negro
Abstract The laminar burning speed is an important intrinsic property of an air-fuel mixture determining key combustion characteristics such as turbulent flame propagation. It is a function of the mixture composition (mixture fraction and residual gas mass fraction) and of the thermodynamic conditions. Experimental measurements of Laminar Flame Speeds (LFS) are common in literature, but initial pressure and temperature are limited to low values due to the test conditions: typical pressure values for LFS detection are lower than 25 bar, and temperature rarely exceeds 550 K. Actual trends in spark ignition engines are to increase specific power output by downsizing and supercharging, thus the flame front involves even more higher pressure and temperature since the beginning of combustion.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0034
Michele Battistoni, Carlo N. Grimaldi, Valentino Cruccolini, Gabriele Discepoli, Matteo De Cesare
Abstract Water injection in highly boosted gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines has become an attractive area over the last few years as a way of increasing efficiency, enhancing performance and reducing emissions. The technology and its effects are not new, but current gasoline engine trends for passenger vehicles have several motivations for adopting this technology today. Water injection enables higher compression ratios, optimal spark timing and elimination of fuel enrichment at high load, and possibly replacement of EGR. Physically, water reduces charge temperature by evaporation, dilutes combustion, and varies the specific heat ratio of the working fluid, with complex effects. Several of these mutually intertwined aspects are investigated in this paper through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, focusing on a turbo-charged GDI engine with port water injection (PWI). Different strategies for water injection timing, pressure and spray targeting are investigated.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0024
Andrea Piano, Federico Millo, Davide Di Nunno, Alessandro Gallone
Abstract The need for achieving a fast warm up of the exhaust system has raised in the recent years a growing interest in the adoption of Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) technology for automotive diesel engines. As a matter of fact, different measures can be adopted through VVA to accelerate the warm up of the exhaust system, such as using hot internal Exhaust Gas Recirculation (iEGR) to heat the intake charge, especially at part load, or adopting early Exhaust Valve Opening (eEVO) timing during the expansion stroke, so to increase the exhaust gas temperature during blowdown. In this paper a simulation study is presented evaluating the impact of VVA on the exhaust temperature of a modern light duty 4-cylinder diesel engine, 1.6 liters, equipped with a Variable Geometry Turbine (VGT).
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0023
Karim Gharaibeh, Aaron W. Costall
Abstract Internal combustion engines are routinely developed using 1D engine simulation tools. A well-known limitation is the accuracy of the turbocharger compressor and turbine sub-models, which rely on hot gas bench-measured maps to characterize performance. Such discrete map data is inherently too sparse to be used directly in simulation, and so a preprocessing algorithm interpolates and extrapolates the data to generate a wider, more densely populated map. Methods used for compressor map interpolation vary. They may be mathematical or physical in nature, but there is no unified approach, except that they typically operate on input map data in SAE format. For decades it has been common practice for turbocharger suppliers to share performance data with engine OEMs in this form. This paper describes a compressor map interpolation technique based on the nondimensional compressor flow and loading coefficients, instead of SAE-format data.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0022
Alessio Dulbecco, Gregory Font
Abstract Diesel engine pollutant emissions legislation is becoming more and more stringent. New driving cycles, including increasingly severe transient engine operating conditions and low ambient-temperature conditions, extend considerably the engine operating domain to be optimized to attain the expected engine performance. Technological innovations, such as high pressure injection systems, Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) loops and intake pressure boosting systems allow significant improvement of engine performance. Nevertheless, because of the high number of calibration parameters, combustion optimization becomes expensive in terms of resources. System simulation is a promising tool to perform virtual experiments and consequently to reduce costs, however models must account for relevant in-cylinder physics to be sensitive to the impact of technology on combustion and pollutant formation.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0027
Nearchos Stylianidis, Ulugbek Azimov, Nobuyuki Kawahara, Eiji Tomita
Abstract A chemical kinetics and computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to evaluate the combustion of syngas derived from biomass and coke-oven solid feedstock in a micro-pilot ignited supercharged dual-fuel engine under lean conditions. For this analysis, a reduced syngas chemical kinetics mechanism was constructed and validated by comparing the ignition delay and laminar flame speed data with those obtained from experiments and other detail chemical kinetics mechanisms available in the literature. The reaction sensitivity analysis was conducted for ignition delay at elevated pressures in order to identify important chemical reactions that govern the combustion process. We have confirmed the statements of other authors that HO2+OH=H2O+O2, H2O2+M=OH+OH+M and H2O2+H=H2+HO2 reactions showed very high sensitivity during high-pressure ignition delay times and had considerable uncertainty.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0028
Adèle Poubeau, Stephane Jay, Anthony Robert, Edouard Nicoud, Christian Angelberger
Abstract This study presents a preliminary application of Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of a speed transient performed on a motored single-cylinder engine. The numerical setup follows a methodology which has been validated and optimized for stabilized operating points in previous work, and adapted to run a speed transient of 31 cycles, from 1000 to 1800 rpm. Analysis of the results contributes to characterize the impact of the transient on the engine charge, tumble motion and velocity distribution. These simulations, which have never been performed in the past (to the best of our knowledge), represent a decisive step towards modeling and understanding transient in GDI engines, and particularly their impact on soot particle emissions in real driving conditions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0026
Davide Paredi, Tommaso Lucchini, Gianluca D'Errico, Angelo Onorati, Stefano Golini, Nicola Rapetto
Abstract The scope of the work presented in this paper was to apply the latest open source CFD achievements to design a state of the art, direct-injection (DI), heavy-duty, natural gas-fueled engine. Within this context, an initial steady-state analysis of the in-cylinder flow was performed by simulating three different intake ducts geometries, each one with seven different valve lift values, chosen according to an estabilished methodology proposed by AVL. The discharge coefficient (Cd) and the Tumble Ratio (TR) were calculated in each case, and an optimal intake ports geometry configuration was assessed in terms of a compromise between the desired intensity of tumble in the chamber and the satisfaction of an adequate value of Cd. Subsequently, full-cycle, cold-flow simulations were performed for three different engine operating points, in order to evaluate the in-cylinder development of TR and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) under transient conditions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0025
Francesco Sapio, Andrea Piano, Federico Millo, Francesco Concetto Pesce
Abstract Development trends in modern Common Rail Fuel Injection System (FIS) show dramatically increasing capabilities in terms of optimization of the fuel injection pattern through a constantly increasing number of injection events per engine cycle along with a modulation and shaping of the injection rate. In order to fully exploit the potential of the abovementioned fuel injection pattern optimization, numerical simulation can play a fundamental role by allowing the creation of a kind of a virtual injection rate generator for the assessment of the corresponding engine outputs in terms of combustion characteristics such as burn rate, emission formation and combustion noise (CN). This paper is focused on the analysis of the effects of digitalization of pilot events in the injection pattern on Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC), CN and emissions for a EURO 6 passenger car 4-cylinder diesel engine.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0053
Silvio A. Pinamonti, Domenico Brancale, Gerhard Meister, Pablo Mendoza
Abstract The use of state of the art simulation tools for effective front-loading of the calibration process is essential to support the additional efforts required by the new Real Driving Emission (RDE) legislation. The process needs a critical model validation where the correlation in dynamic conditions is used as a preliminary insight into the bounds of the representation domain of engine mean values. This paper focuses on the methodologies for correlating dynamic simulations with emissions data measured during dynamic vehicle operation (fundamental engine parameters and gaseous emissions) obtained using dedicated instrumentation on a diesel vehicle, with a particular attention for oxides of nitrogen NOx specie. This correlation is performed using simulated tests run within AVL’s mean value engine and engine aftertreatment (EAS) model MoBEO (Model Based Engine Optimization).
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0054
Francesco de Nola, Giovanni Giardiello, Alfredo Gimelli, Andrea Molteni, Massimiliano Muccillo, Roberto Picariello
Abstract In the last few years, the automotive industry had to face three main challenges: compliance with more severe pollutant emission limits, better engine performance in terms of torque and drivability and simultaneous demand for a significant reduction in fuel consumption. These conflicting goals have driven the evolution of automotive engines. In particular, the achievement of these mandatory aims, together with the increasingly stringent requirements for carbon dioxide reduction, led to the development of highly complex engine architectures needed to perform advanced operating strategies. Therefore, Variable Valve Actuation (VVA), Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR), Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI), turbocharging, powertrain hybridization and other solutions have gradually and widely been introduced into modern internal combustion engines, enhancing the possibilities of achieving the required goals.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0040
Insuk Ko, Kyoungdoug Min, Federico Rulli, Alessandro D'Adamo, Fabio Berni, Stefano Fontanesi
Abstract The increasing interest in the application of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to Internal Combustion Engines (hereafter ICEs) flows is motivated by its capability to capture spatial and temporal evolution of turbulent flow structures. Furthermore, LES is universally recognized as capable of simulating highly unsteady and random phenomena driving cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV) and cycle-resolved events such as knock and misfire. Several quality criteria were proposed in the recent past to estimate LES uncertainty: however, definitive conclusions on LES quality criteria for ICEs are still far to be found. This paper describes the application of LES quality criteria to the TCC-III single-cylinder optical engine from University of Michigan and GM Global R&D; the analyses are carried out under motored condition.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0038
Golnoush Ghiasi, Irufan Ahmed, Yuri M. Wright, Jann Koch, Nedunchezhian Swaminathan
Abstract Engines with reduced emissions and improved efficiency are of high interest for road transport. However, achieving these two goals is challenging and various concepts such as PFI/DI/HCCI/PCCI are explored by engine manufacturers. The computational fluid dynamics is becoming an integral part of modern engine development programme because this method provides access to in-cylinder flow and thermo-chemical processes to develop a closer understanding to tailor tumble and swirling motions to construct green engines. The combustion modelling, its accuracy and robustness play a vital role in this. Out of many modelling methods proposed in the past flamelet based methods are quite attractive for SI engine application. In this study, FlaRe (Flamelets revised for physical consistencies) approach is used to simulate premixed combustion inside a gasoline PFI single-cylinder, four-stroke SI engine.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0064
En-Zhe Song, Shi-Chao Chu, Li-Ping Yang, Zhen-Ting Liu
Abstract A CFD model of natural gas engine was established, and working process from intake stroke to combustion stroke was simulated in this paper. Based on the validation of CFD model through experimental method, the combustion characteristics of lean-burn natural gas engine are studied under different ignition timings and different ignition energies. Results indicate that, the in-cylinder indicated mean effective pressure increases with the ignition timing advancing from 22°CA BTDC to 32°CA BTDC at the same load level. Meanwhile, the heat release rate is increased by 23.18J/°CA and its peak phase is advanced by 9°CA. The peak pressure is also increased by 45.95% and its phase is advanced by 4.5°CA. On the other hand, when the ignition energy decreases from 91.97mJ to 33.1mJ at the same load level, the in-cylinder indicated mean effective pressure decreases.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0063
Sebastiano Breda, Alessandro D'Adamo, Stefano Fontanesi, Marco Del Pecchia, Simona Merola, Adrian Irimescu
Abstract The recent interest in alternative non-fossil fuels has led researchers to evaluate several alcohol-based formulations. However, one of the main requirements for innovative fuels is to be compatible with existing units’ hardware, so that full replacement or smart flexible-fuel strategies can be smoothly adopted. n-Butanol is considered as a promising candidate to replace commercial gasoline, given its ease of production from bio-mass and its main physical and chemical properties similar to those of Gasoline. The compared behavior of n-butanol and gasoline was analyzed in an optically-accessible DISI engine in a previous paper [1]. CFD simulations explained the main outcomes of the experimental campaign in terms of combustion behavior for two operating conditions. In particular, the first-order role of the slower evaporation rate of n-butanol compared to gasoline was highlighted when the two fuels were operated under the same injection phasing.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0071
Fadila Maroteaux, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Abstract Ignition delay time is key to any hydrocarbon combustion process. In that sense, this parameter has to be known accurately, and especially for internal combustion engine applications. Combustion timing is one of the most important factors influencing overall engine performances like power output, combustion efficiency, emissions, in-cylinder peak pressure, etc. In the case of low temperature combustion (LTC) mode (e.g. HCCI mode), this parameter is controlled by chemical kinetics. In this paper, an ignition delay time model including 7 direct reactions and 13 species coupled with a temperature criterion is described. This mechanism has been obtained from the previous 26-step n-heptane reduced mechanism, focusing on the low temperature region which is the most important phase during the two stage combustion process. The complete model works with 7 reactions until the critical temperature is reached, leading to the detection of the ignition delay time value.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0090
Robert E. Morgan, Morgan Heikal, Emily Pike-Wilson
Abstract Traffic related NOx and particle emission remain a significant concern particularly in the urban environment. Electrification offers a medium to long term solution, but there remains a need to significantly reduce internal combustion engine emissions in the short and medium term, and potentially in the long term for long range inter city transportation. Late injection low temperature combustion (LTC) has the potential to achieve ultra-low emissions levels in a compression ignition engine by increasing the lean pre-mixed burn fraction. However, significant quantities of diluent are normally required to achieve the required delay in ignition and pre-mixing to achieve LTC. This results in high boost requirements, increased pumping work and the complexity of the air handling system and potentially adversely impacting fuel economy.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0084
Giacomo Belgiorno, Nikolaos Dimitrakopoulos, Gabriele Di Blasio, Carlo Beatrice, Martin Tuner, Per Tunestal
Abstract In this paper, a parametric analysis on the main engine calibration parameters applied on gasoline Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) is performed. Theoretically, the PPC concept permits to improve both the engine efficiencies and the NOx-soot trade-off simultaneously compared to the conventional diesel combustion. This work is based on the design of experiments (DoE), statistical approach, and investigates on the engine calibration parameters that might affect the efficiencies and the emissions of a gasoline PPC. The full factorial DoE analysis based on three levels and three factors (33 factorial design) is performed at three engine operating conditions of the Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Cycles (WLTC). The pilot quantity (Qpil), the crank angle position when 50% of the total heat is released (CA50), and the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) factors are considered. The goal is to identify an engine calibration with high efficiency and low emissions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0105
Stefania Falfari, Gian Marco Bianchi, Giulio Cazzoli, Claudio Forte PhD, Sergio Negro
Abstract The primary target of the internal combustion engines design is to lower the fuel consumption and to enhance the combustion process quality, in order to reduce the raw emission levels without performances penalty. In this scenario the direct injection system plays a key role for both diesel and gasoline engines. The spray dynamic behaviour is crucial in defining the global and the local air index of the mixture, which in turns affects the combustion process development. At the same time it is widely recognized that the spray formation is influenced by numerous parameters, among which also the cavitation process inside every single hole of the injector nozzle. The proper prediction of the cavitation development inside the injector nozzle holes is crucial in predicting the liquid jet emerging from them.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0103
Marlene Wentsch, Marco Chiodi, Michael Bargende
Abstract Main limiting factor in the application of 3D-CFD simulations within an engine development is the very high time demand, which is predominantly influenced by the number of cells within the computational mesh. Arbitrary cell coarsening, however, results in a distinct distortion of the simulation outcome. It is rather necessary to adapt the calculation models to the new mesh structure in order to ensure reliability and predictability of the 3D-CFD engine simulation. In the last decade, a fast response 3D-CFD tool was developed at FKFS in Stuttgart. It aims for a harmonized interaction between computational mesh, implemented calculation models and defined boundary conditions in order to enable fast running simulations for engine development tasks. Their susceptibility to errors is significantly minimized by various measures, e.g. extension of the simulation domain (full engine) and multi-cycle simulations.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0101
Pedro Marti-Aldaravi, Kaushik Saha, Jaime Gimeno, Sibendu Som
Abstract Actual combustion strategies in internal combustion engines rely on fast and accurate injection systems to be successful. One of the injector designs that has shown good performance over the past years is the direct-acting piezoelectric. This system allows precise control of the injector needle position and hence the injected mass flow rate. Therefore, understanding how nozzle flow characteristics change as function of needle dynamics helps to choose the best lift law in terms of delivered fuel for a determined combustion strategy. Computational fluid dynamics is a useful tool for this task. In this work, nozzle flow of a prototype direct-acting piezoelectric has been simulated by using CONVERGE. Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes approach is used to take into account the turbulence. Results are compared with experiments in terms of mass flow rate. The nozzle geometry and needle lift profiles were obtained by means of X-rays in previous works.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0098
Christophe Barro, Curdin Nani, Richard Hutter, Konstantinos Boulouchos
Abstract The operation of dual fuel engines, operated with natural gas as main fuel, offers the potential of substantial savings in CO2. Nevertheless, the operating map area where low pollutant emissions are produced is very narrow. Especially at low load, the raw exhaust gas contains high concentrations of unburned methane and, with high pilot fuel portions due to ignition limitations, also soot. The analysis of the combustion in those conditions in particular is not trivial, since multiple combustion modes are present concurrently. The present work focuses on the evaluation of the individual combustion modes of a dual fuel engine, operated with natural gas as main and diesel as pilot fuel, using a combustion model. The combustion has been split in two partwise concurrent combustion phases: the auto-ignition phase and the premixed flame propagation phase.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0093
Lorenzo Bartolucci, Stefano Cordiner, Vincenzo Mulone, Vittorio Rocco
Abstract Using natural gas in internal combustion engines (ICEs) is emerging as a promising strategy to improve thermal efficiency and reduce exhaust emissions. One of the main benefits related to the use of this fuel is that the engine can be run with lean mixtures without compromising its performances. However, as the mixture is leaned out beyond the Lean Misfire Limit (LML), several technical problems are more likely to occur. The flame propagation speed gradually decreases, leading to a slower heat release and a low combustion quality, thus increasing the occurrence of misfiring and incomplete combustions. This in turn results in a sharp increment in CO and UHC emissions, as well as in cycle-to-cycle variability. In order to limit the above-mentioned problems, different solutions have been proposed over the last decade.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0121
Ivan Arsie, Giuseppe Cialeo, Federica D'Aniello, Cesare Pianese, Matteo De Cesare, Luigi Paiano
Abstract In the last decades, NOx emissions legislations for Diesel engines are becoming more stringent than ever before and the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is considered as the most suitable technology to comply with the upcoming constraints. Model-based control strategies are promising to meet the dual objective of maximizing NOx reduction and minimizing NH3 slip in urea-selective catalytic reduction. In this paper, a control oriented model of a Cu-zeolite urea-SCR system for automotive diesel engines is presented. The model is derived from a quasi-dimensional four-state model of the urea-SCR plant. To make it suitable for the real-time urea-SCR management, a reduced order one-state model has been developed, with the aim of capturing the essential behavior of the system with a low computational burden. Particularly, the model allows estimating the NH3 slip that is fundamental not only to minimize urea consumption but also to reduce this unregulated emission.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0119
Jos Feijen, Gerard Klink, Ed Jong, Andreas Schmid, Niels Deen, Michael Boot
Abstract Second generation biomass is an attractive renewable feedstock for transport fuels. Its sulfur content is generally negligible and the carbon cycle is reduced from millions to tens of years. One hitherto non-valorized feedstock are so-called humins, a residual product formed in the conversion of sugars to platform chemicals, such as hydroxymethylfurfural and methoxymethylfurfural, intermediates in the production of FDCA, a building block used to produce the polyethylene furanoate (PEF) bottle by Avantium. The focus of this study is to investigate the spray combustion behavior of humins as a renewable alternative for heavy fuel oil (HFO) under large two-stroke engine-like conditions in an optically accessible constant volume chamber.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0113
Ezio Mancaruso, Luigi Sequino, Bianca Maria Vaglieco, Maria Cristina Cameretti
Abstract The management of multiple injections in compression ignition (CI) engines is one of the most common ways to increase engine performance by avoiding hardware modifications and after-treatment systems. Great attention is given to the profile of the injection rate since it controls the fuel delivery in the cylinder. The Injection Rate Shaping (IRS) is a technique that aims to manage the quantity of injected fuel during the injection process via a proper definition of the injection timing (injection duration and dwell time). In particular, it consists in closer and centered injection events and in a split main injection with a very small dwell time. From the experimental point of view, the performance of an IRS strategy has been studied in an optical CI engine. In particular, liquid and vapor phases of the injected fuel have been acquired via visible and infrared imaging, respectively. Injection parameters, like penetration and cone angle have been determined and analyzed.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0107
Alessandro Montanaro, Luigi Allocca, Vittorio Rocco, Michela Costa, Daniele Piazzullo
Abstract Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines are characterized by complex phenomena involving spray dynamics and possible spray-wall interaction. Control of mixture formation is indeed fundamental to achieve the desired equivalence ratio of the mixture, especially at the spark plug location at the time of ignition. Droplet impact on the piston or liner surfaces has also to be considered, as this may lead to gasoline accumulation in the liquid form as wallfilm. Wallfilms more slowly evaporate than free droplets, thus leading to local enrichment of the charge, hence to a route to diffusive flames, increased unburned hydrocarbons formation and particulate matter emissions at the exhaust. Local heat transfer at the wall obviously changes if a wallfilm is present, and the subtraction of the latent heat of vaporization necessary for secondary phase change is also an issue deserving a special attention.
Viewing 151 to 180 of 33411