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Viewing 33361 to 33390 of 33395
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180015
J EDWARD SCHIPPER
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180024
AMOS F MOYER
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180020
JOHN STURGESS
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180005
G W CARLSON
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180001
V E CLARK
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180003
CORNELIUS T MYERS
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180004
A F MILBRATH
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180033
FAY LEONE FAUROTE
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180039
F W CALDWELL
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170026
J. W. SEDDON
Starting with the statement that command of the air in warfare rests largely with the side that produces the best single-seater fighter, the author proceeds to outline some of the problems confronting the designer of fighting airplanes, and particularly the smaller ones. Considering better performance and better fighting qualities as the main desiderata, the author discusses means of obtaining them by: (1) increasing the horsepower-weight ratio; (2) decreasing the wing or structure resistances; (3) devising a new arrangement of the supporting planes, with regard to the position of pilot or crew, or by a combination of the above. Considerable space is devoted to methods of decreasing wing resistance, principally by employing low-resistance aerofoils, and the shaping of wing tips is also referred to.
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170027
W. O. THOMAS
The title of this paper fully indicates its scope. The author presents an intimate picture of conditions prevailing at the war front which affect the operation and maintenance of war trucks, and these two factors in turn indicate the trend that design should take. The training of the mechanical transport personnel of the Army is also gone into at some length. The English and American trucks used earlier in the war consisted of about nineteen different makes and forty-two totally different models, resulting in a very serious problem of providing spare parts and maintenance in general. In the British Army transportation comes under an Army Service Corps officer called the Director of Transport and Supplies. At the outbreak of the war these officers had had little mechanical experience, horses being employed principally. In the French Army motor vehicles were used to a greater extent before the war, under the artillery command.
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170014
J. EDWARD SCHIPPER
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160031
H. D. Church
The author describes a number of detailed developments that took place during the working out of a line of worm-driven trucks. The details of front axle and steering parts are dealt with at length, the reasons for the final constructions being clearly explained and the constructions themselves well illustrated. Details concerning difficulty with the Hotchkiss type of drive on heavy trucks, troubles with drive-shafts and lubrication of the worm wheel are all covered thoroughly; spring-shackle construction and lubrication, radiator and hood mounting come in for detailed attention and the question of governors is interestingly covered. Brief reference is made to the influence of unsprung weight, the differences between truck and pleasure car practice in this respect being pointed out.
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160010
A. LUDLOW CLAYDEN, L. V. SPENCER
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160024
BENJAMIN LIEBOWITZ
Believing that a knowledge of definite, quantitative relations affecting the behavior of vehicle suspensions will lead to a better understanding of the problems of spring design, the author analyses the problem by considering it as a simple system (a single wheel supporting a weight by means of a frictionless spring), and by assuming that this system encounters certain elementary forms of irregularities. Analysis of this problem results in several expressions, the interpreting of which reveals the influence which the varying of specific factors has upon the action of the spring and its suspended load. These expressions take into account the effect of the ratio between sprung and unsprung weight, of speed, of size and kind of irregularity encountered by the wheel, tire inflation, flexibility of the spring, and wheel diameter. Other factors which are considered as a result of interpreting the curves presented are the effect of friction in the suspension, and of synchronism.
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150019
WILLIAM B. STOUT
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150031
Cornelius T. Myers
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150036
ORREL A. PARKER
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140015
L. P. PROSSEN
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140007
WILLIAM B. STOUT
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140047
HINSDALE SMITH
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140040
ROBERT W. A. BREWER
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140037
ALANSON P. BRUSH
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140038
CHARLES ETHAN DAVIS
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140039
HERBERT CHASE
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140024
J. F. MERKEL
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130009
J. M. THOMAS
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130004
L. C. FREEMAN
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130036
F. E. MOSKOVICS
1912-01-01
Technical Paper
120018
B. B. BACHMAN
Viewing 33361 to 33390 of 33395