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Viewing 33151 to 33180 of 33395
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440179
CARLOS WOOD
THIS paper deals primarily with the considerations affecting the airplane design, leaving discussion of operations to the operators. The big probable field for air cargo lies in the transportation of perishable and relatively high valued classes of goods. The structural design of floors, tie-down equipment, and the like, is shown to be basically dependent only on the maximum allowable cargo load and the maximum available cargo volume. Analysis shows that the actual operations of the cargo airplane determine the relative importance of speed of loading and weight. Speed is essential in short-range operation, but minimum weight is essential in long-range operation. In conclusion, the author suggests that reduction of rates can make air cargo a really big business, capable of affecting the prosperity of our country and the rest of the world.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440188
JOHN GAILLARD
THE number of rejections can be reduced or, in many cases, trouble can be spotted in the production process before rejections occur, so that production can be increased - these are some of the advantages to be obtained when a control chart is used to control the quality of manufactured products. The quality control chart here introduced by Mr. Gaillard is based on the statistical method. It is applicable particularly to highly repetitive operations, and its use presents opportunities for getting a better grip on quality control in regard to physical and chemical properties of raw materials or the dimensional accuracy of interchangeable parts.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440191
B. B. BACHMAN
THESE down-to-earth speculations by Mr. Bachman should help to clarify for all their picture of the truck of the future. Mr. Bachman considers such a detailed but important item as increasing the overall width up to the rear fender top line to 102 in. from the 96-in. Figure now adhered to in all but two states for the maximum width at any point, but keeping the width of the cab at 96 in., because in traveling along the highway, the cab actually takes up several more inches, anyway. These extra inches across the fenders would allow improvements to be made in tire mounting, spring suspension, riding qualities, stability, and braking. Other changes foreseen by Mr. Bachman include: increases in weight and horsepower, allowing for faster and more efficient transportation, especially on the first-class highways planned by the Federal government for connecting all large cities and most small ones; more comfortable cabs for the driver; and quieter operation.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440205
FRANK M. MALLETT
THE problem of sheet metal production design is separated into two parts, the determining of working limits of elongation and compression in different types of sheet metal forming, and the application of these limits to the design for formability. This paper is concerned with the second part of the problem. An analytical method of approach is suggested and is illustrated by five examples. In the case of curved flanges, flanged holes, and beads, formulas are given by which the amount of elongation or compression called for by the design may be computed directly from the dimensions given by the design. A possibility for a refinement in the use of the formulas is indicated, and an experimental method for achieving this refinement is pointed out.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440207
HOLLEY B. DICKINSON
A DISCUSSION of the aircraft-engine charge-air cooling problem is given here from the point of view of the airframe designer. Many of the factors which enter into the selection of the type and capacity of charge-air cooling installations are difficult to subject to quantitative analysis. Among these are problems of simplicity, maintenance, accessibility, and arrangement of the engine installation. In general, however, the difficulty of installation of the charge-air system is out of proportion to the core size. The weight increase due to the system, for instance, is in the neighborhood of five times the weight of the air-to-air intercooler core. The use of a liquid-to-air aftercooler system as opposed to an air-to-air intercooler system shows promise only in applications with liquid-cooled engines where the separation of the ultimate cooling unit from the rest of the installation is a definite arrangement advantage.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440211
R. S. SCHAIRER
FOR aircraft designed for cruising operation it is important that there be high propulsive efficiency at the engine speed for minimum specific fuel consumption for almost all cruising conditions. For a given airplane with a single-stage, two-speed engine supercharger there is ordinarily more than one combination of propeller diameter and gear ratio which give within 1% of maximum propulsive efficiency for all cruising conditions up to an altitude of 20,000 ft and up to maximum cruising speed. Of these combinations, that one is best which has the largest diameter and the lowest ratio of propeller speed to engine speed, because it gives the best take-off and climbing performance.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440213
A. L. KLEIN
DESIGNERS and vendors of aircraft parts need both foresight and pessimism, Dr. Klein feels, if they are not to violate the fundamentals of safety, weight, manufacturability, and serviceability in manufacturing aircraft. Safety requires that gadgets work not only if they are treated properly but even if they are neglected or misused. Weight is so important that it justifies an incredible amount of work in engineering and the shop to save it. Airplane manufacturers are harassed by several problems that must be kept in mind by designers. The manufacturer must schedule and keep track of a great number of parts. The parts must fit after they are made. Some operations cause parts to expand, others to shrink, making the problem of assembly a major one - made even more difficult if there are serious deflection troubles.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440097
E. F. Burton, Carlos Wood
ABSTRACT
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440119
R. L. Anderson
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440121
F. F. Kishline
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440135
Robert J. Nebesar
Summary An extensive study on the efficiencies of cargo airplane designs, especially with respect to increasing speeds resulting from different combinations of wing and power loadings, is presented. As it is always possible to achieve great speeds for a given price with sacrifice in economy (this, however, not being the best solution to the problem), a study was therefore prepared on the air cargo transportation economics with respect to obtainable cruising speeds. Several designs are presented for three different engine sizes and four different wing loadings. As a primary takeoff requirement, the Hon. E. P. Warner's formula, which specifies that the product of wing and power loadings should equal 300, is used. This is assumed for normal gross weights, while for the alternate overload weight condition, a 20 per cent overload effectsis analyzed. This brings the product of wing and power loadings to 432, which would still give a fair takeoff performance on existing A class airports.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440031
E. G. Jackson
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440026
R. E. Cole
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440049
Charles A. Chayne
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440065
Wm. B. Stout
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440067
Brooks Stevens
The Industrial Designer reviews Automotive Styling Progress with his viewpoint on the Necessary Consideration of Manufacturing Limitations and Public Acceptance.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440016
D. L. Moseley
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440215
J. S. DECKER
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430064
Frank M. Bondor
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430062
R. S. Damon
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430082
R. E. Cole
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430104
T. Hammen, Jr.
ABSTRACT
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430095
C. M. Larson
ABSTRACT
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430010
Ralph Ruud
ABSTRACT
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430022
Harold Harrison
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430027
P. A. Collins
ABSTRACT
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430025
Harry Karcher
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430024
L. T. Miller
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430040
J. E. Barfoot