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Viewing 33151 to 33180 of 33458
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470188
KENNETH A. HOPKINS
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470198
Harold T. Youngren
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470175
W. D. APPEL
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470147
VIRGIL M. EXNER
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470124
J. A. NEWTON
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470081
Franklin R. Cawl
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470070
Merrill A. Hayden
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470037
LEWIS A. RODERT
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470012
WARNER T. COWELL
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470215
RAY E. BOLZ
A SERIES of charts for predicting the performance of the continuous-flow jet engine and its individual components is presented here. Efficiencies of components as well as the momentum pressure loss in the combustion chamber (assuming constant cross-sectional area) are taken into consideration. Performance of a typical jet engine under various operating conditions is calculated by means of the charts and graphed to show the effect of each operating condition on performance when all other conditions are held constant. A set of large, usable charts similar to the figures in this paper may be obtained upon request to the Cleveland Laboratories, National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470253
JOHN E. STEINER
A SYSTEM of plots of wing loading versus power loading is developed for showing the effect on performance, of all combinations of wing area, aspect ratio, number of engines, and power rating allowed by the Civil Air Regulations for transport planes. C.A.R. climb requirements appear on the plots as boundaries defining allowable combinations of design variables and gross weight. The charts included give a fairly detailed consideration of weight limits imposed by climb requirements for 4-engine and 2-engine airplanes. The assumptions made are explained. Useful for initial design studies and comparisons of existing designs, the charts indicate relative performance of various designs. The system can be used to study field lengths required and cruising speeds obtainable as well as climb performance.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470240
A. T. GREGORY, A. L. POMEROY
THIS report on a canvass of a number of engineers concerned with aircraft, aircraft powerplants, and fuels and lubricants indicates that the reciprocating engine will continue to occupy a paramount position among aircraft powerplants for the next 10 years. Turboprops will gradually displace reciprocating engines in some types of airplanes, chiefly air transports and bombers. Turbojets will be common soon in fighters and later in bombers. But small aircraft will still be relying on reciprocating engines in 1957, according to the survey.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470016
EARL V. FARRAR
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470075
W. A. DAVIDSON, P. H. PELLEY, R. E. SAUNDERS, J. W. RIX
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470093
GEORGE W. PAPEN
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470098
W. E. BURNHAM
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470130
J. H. Brewster
ABSTRACT
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470135
HAROLD L. ERICSON
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460033
Frank R. Nail
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460216
HUGH B. STEWART
AN electrical analyzer is described here which was designed in order to solve crankshaft torsional vibration problems.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460212
RALPH K. SUPER
OF the various methods of establishing the size of vehicle brakes that have been in use the author points out that the ones found most satisfactory have been based on the fundamental fact that the brake is an energy-converting unit. Formulation of rating factors at the present time, he says further, shows promise of incorporating the effect of engine horsepower on the brake factors by introducing a time element. For those advocates of a simple method of rating brakes on the basis of liner area, Mr. Super recommends that this area be established on the basis of the projected length of the liner so that the most efficient use of the liner material is obtained.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460222
MAC SHORT, W. E. MILLER
THE fundamental difference between land and air vehicles, the authors explain, is that the plane is supported in the air dynamically, while the car is supported on the ground statically, thus accounting for the importance of weight, strength, and shape in plane design, but not necessarily so in car design. The authors feel that the aircraft approach may not be directly applicable to car body designing, but they point out that the same basic principles that make for efficient weight, structure, and performance of airplanes can and should unquestionably be useful tools of the automobile body designer.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460171
R. R. BURKHALTER
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460191
O. W. LOUDENSLAGER
It is the purpose of this paper to discuss in detail unusually precise structural model design, construction, and test procedure. A statement of the laws of similarity to which all structural models must conform if precise results are to be obtained in the simplest manner is given by Mr. Loudenslager. Scale selection, choice of materials, and construction methods are all considered by him. Three model members of designs which can represent a number of prototype properties are described in detail, as well as the use of each of these members, and the determination of bending, torsional, tensile, and compressive stresses by means of simple equipment. In addition, design formulas are set forth for a member which represents the axial, torsional, and bending (in two planes) properties. Finally, three test procedures, all applicable to a variety of simple or complicated indeterminate structures, and the methods used in evaluating the test results are presented by the author.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460109
ROBERT S. ARCHER
The development of NE steels was facilitated by the previous work on the standardization of hardenability testing and on the calculation of hardenability from chemical composition and grain size. The importance of susceptibility to brittle failure has been emphasized by war experiences. Stress concentrations, low temperatures and high loading rates contribute to brittle failures. Temper brittleness, a potential cause of brittle failures, requires the determination of impact strength at a number of temperatures rather than just at room temperature. The best combinations of strength and toughness are generally found in steel which has been tempered after having been hardened to a fully martensitic structure. If present, the nature and distribution of the non-martensitic constituents are important.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460094
J. L. S. SNEAD
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460072
R. E. BINGMAN
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460073
WILLARD D. BIXBY, RALPH M. WERNER, HARVEY H. EARL
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460063
Austin Wolf
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460011
A. G. Cattaneo, E. P. Viscia
Operation of a CFR and a Wright G-200 single-cylinder engine with excessive spark advance under high load and temperature conditions led to characteristic preignition-type piston failures and permitted study of the factors and mechanism involved. It is shown that the local peak piston temperature determines whether and where piston failure takes place. This temperature is determined by the general temperature level and temperature distribution on the piston, and by the effects of local blow-by and scuffing. In these laboratory tests made with new and clean engine parts under closely controlled operating conditions, the piston failure could be produced or averted at will by adjustment of two blow-by controlling factors: piston-cylinder clearance and ring gap position.