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Viewing 33151 to 33180 of 33425
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460151
MARSDEN H. PEAIRS
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460108
JOHN C. MATHES, EARL ROTTMAYER
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460109
ROBERT S. ARCHER
The development of NE steels was facilitated by the previous work on the standardization of hardenability testing and on the calculation of hardenability from chemical composition and grain size. The importance of susceptibility to brittle failure has been emphasized by war experiences. Stress concentrations, low temperatures and high loading rates contribute to brittle failures. Temper brittleness, a potential cause of brittle failures, requires the determination of impact strength at a number of temperatures rather than just at room temperature. The best combinations of strength and toughness are generally found in steel which has been tempered after having been hardened to a fully martensitic structure. If present, the nature and distribution of the non-martensitic constituents are important.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460094
J. L. S. SNEAD
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460072
R. E. BINGMAN
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460073
WILLARD D. BIXBY, RALPH M. WERNER, HARVEY H. EARL
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460063
Austin Wolf
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460011
A. G. Cattaneo, E. P. Viscia
Operation of a CFR and a Wright G-200 single-cylinder engine with excessive spark advance under high load and temperature conditions led to characteristic preignition-type piston failures and permitted study of the factors and mechanism involved. It is shown that the local peak piston temperature determines whether and where piston failure takes place. This temperature is determined by the general temperature level and temperature distribution on the piston, and by the effects of local blow-by and scuffing. In these laboratory tests made with new and clean engine parts under closely controlled operating conditions, the piston failure could be produced or averted at will by adjustment of two blow-by controlling factors: piston-cylinder clearance and ring gap position.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450212
A NOVEL approach to the motorists' points of view on the post-war automobile was made by the SAE Passenger-Car Body Meetings Committee when four newspaper automobile editors were asked to collate their readers' desires and expectations. Chairman R. I. Schonitzer of the Committee presented the four editors at one of the most successful sessions of the 1945 War Engineering-Annual Meeting in Detroit. This symposium disclosed that: The American motoring public has great faith in design prowess of automobile engineers; Gadget engineering has been largely discounted, and many motorists believe that equal attention to improving functional components would serve them better, and Safety features - including greater visibility - impress the motorist. As might have been expected, some prospective buyers of the post-war automobile wrote rather detailed specifications of improvements they' desired, but cautioned against raising the price.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450215
R. H. Prewitt
PRESENTED here are the basic factors of helicopter design; and in addition, the paper shows a method of designing a helicopter so that it will have optimum efficiency for both hovering and cruising flight. Further extension of helicopter design involves the use of a chart on which an efficiency factor versus operating blade light angle is plotted. All deviations from the theoretical expressions are compensated on this chart, which provides an overall comparison and design aid.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450155
STEPHEN H. ROLLE
THE trend of engine failures of all types, in terms of number per 1,000,000 miles of operation or per 1000 aircraft licensed, has been rising steadily in both air-carrier and non-air-carrier operations, although a decline in frequency has been noted of late in the air-carrier group. The principal increase in air-carrier operation has been due to an epidemic of spark-plug failures. The frequency of the remaining types of failures is noted to have been fairly constant in recent years. The same is generally true of structural engine failures in air-carrier service. The most frequent type of failure in private operation is idling failure. However, idling failures do not entirely account for the increasing frequency of failure, since a rising trend is also noticeable in the number of difficulties exclusive of those in the idling category. Structural failures per unit number of aircraft in private operation also follow the same trend.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450135
A. O. Payne
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450175
L. J. O'BRIEN
BY following the few basic and well-established standards and practices to be considered in bevel-gear design presented here, the author states that the design, manufacture, and use of bevel gears can be easily carried out. The design of bevel gears for aircraft engines is not easy, for it is necessary to take into account many conditions that make proper gear operation difficult, such as improper lubrication, mating parts that are seldom mounted in the same housing, and the wide range of operating temperatures, coupled with plain bearings used throughout, which cause a wide range of center distances. These conditions are now all taken into account when the gears are designed and made, the author says, consequently, the service problem on bevel gears has been practically eliminated.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450159
WILLIAM KNIGHT
ROTATING disc wheels are subject to radial, tangential, and axial stresses, the last of which can usually be neglected. The formulas for calculating the radial and tangential stresses developed by Dr. Stodola give reliable results, but carrying out the required calculations is a long and tedious process. For this reason, Mr. Knight has attempted to put the Stodola formula in such a shape that it will allow its ready use and that will yield the desired design data in a few minutes instead of the 45 hr previously required.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450067
Frederic P. Porter
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450118
R. D. Hicks
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450112
Willis M. Hawkins
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450098
F. Landgraf
ABSTRACT
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450008
Howard K. Edwards
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450003
M. F. Vanik
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450054
Bernard W. Sznycer
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450047
Vincent Ayres
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450036
Bryan Park
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440007
J. P. FLANNERY
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440156
SAMUEL J. LORING
THIS paper presents some further developments of the method of generalized coordinates in flutter analysis, a method which has been described by the author in a previous paper.1 The paper is composed of three distinct parts: Part I shows in detail the calculations by which this method was applied to a flutter model; the method of application of generalized coordinates to a simple flutter problem, and the check with experimental results is shown. Part II is a manual for the carrying out of more complicated flutter problems by this method; this manual has been in actual use for some time and has been very successful. Part III is a discussion of the most important and difficult part of the generalized coordinates method, namely, the choice of the generalized coordinates.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440171
CHARLES FROESCH