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Viewing 33091 to 33120 of 33398
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470248
H. W. LUETKEMEYER
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470206
BERNARD E. O'CONNOR
THE theory of the untuned viscous damper is developed mathematically here by Mr. O'Connor to show that its characteristics are such as to make practical the use of silicone fluid as a damping medium. That this type of damper achieves a high relative efficiency throughout a wide range of damping is indicated by a consideration of a simple mass system. The performance of a damper applied to the mass elastic system of a typical 6-cyl gasoline engine is predicted to be satisfactory over a range of speeds and values of the damping constant. An exact tabular method and a simpler approximate method are proposed for calculating the maximum amplitude and the frequency at which it occurs. The approximate value of optimum damping can also be found by a simple procedure.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470215
RAY E. BOLZ
A SERIES of charts for predicting the performance of the continuous-flow jet engine and its individual components is presented here. Efficiencies of components as well as the momentum pressure loss in the combustion chamber (assuming constant cross-sectional area) are taken into consideration. Performance of a typical jet engine under various operating conditions is calculated by means of the charts and graphed to show the effect of each operating condition on performance when all other conditions are held constant. A set of large, usable charts similar to the figures in this paper may be obtained upon request to the Cleveland Laboratories, National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470188
KENNETH A. HOPKINS
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470198
Harold T. Youngren
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470175
W. D. APPEL
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470147
VIRGIL M. EXNER
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470135
HAROLD L. ERICSON
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470130
J. H. Brewster
ABSTRACT
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470124
J. A. NEWTON
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470098
W. E. BURNHAM
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470093
GEORGE W. PAPEN
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470081
Franklin R. Cawl
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470075
W. A. DAVIDSON, P. H. PELLEY, R. E. SAUNDERS, J. W. RIX
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470070
Merrill A. Hayden
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470037
LEWIS A. RODERT
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470016
EARL V. FARRAR
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470012
WARNER T. COWELL
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460033
Frank R. Nail
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460031
Edward W. Anger
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460255
JOHN C. MATHES, EARL ROTTMAYER
RESULTS of an extensive experimental program for the development of monocoque magnesium wing structures, which culminated in the design and testing of a full-size wing for the PV-1 airplane, are evaluated here. Additional tests are now in progress on a B-26 section to evaluate various combinations of chordwise and longitudinal stiffeners. Practically all current aircraft construction is of the semimonocoque type, the authors say, adding that simplified construction, rigidity of surface, and overall cost reduction led to comprehensive investigation of magnesium as particularly suitable for such uses. As aircraft speeds increase, they point out that more aerodynamic efficiency will be essential. Monocoque magnesium structures, they conclude, should provide the necessary characteristics and should be better suited to mass production. Note: Any opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and in no way reflect endorsement by the Navy Department.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460207
F. W. DISCH
THIS paper presents a brief history of past experience at Boeing with turbosupercharged airplanes. Installation problems are discussed by the author who also offers suggestions for future design. A basic airplane and engine are chosen and several types of supercharging analyzed by Mr. Disch. A method of turbo selection is also briefly presented by him. Assuming that flight at 25,000 ft is desired, a comparison of range and payload is shown, depicting the benefits of employing a cruising type of turbosupercharger for increased fuel economy and range. In conclusion, the author summarizes the overall benefits with this type of installation.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460216
HUGH B. STEWART
AN electrical analyzer is described here which was designed in order to solve crankshaft torsional vibration problems.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460212
RALPH K. SUPER
OF the various methods of establishing the size of vehicle brakes that have been in use the author points out that the ones found most satisfactory have been based on the fundamental fact that the brake is an energy-converting unit. Formulation of rating factors at the present time, he says further, shows promise of incorporating the effect of engine horsepower on the brake factors by introducing a time element. For those advocates of a simple method of rating brakes on the basis of liner area, Mr. Super recommends that this area be established on the basis of the projected length of the liner so that the most efficient use of the liner material is obtained.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460222
MAC SHORT, W. E. MILLER
THE fundamental difference between land and air vehicles, the authors explain, is that the plane is supported in the air dynamically, while the car is supported on the ground statically, thus accounting for the importance of weight, strength, and shape in plane design, but not necessarily so in car design. The authors feel that the aircraft approach may not be directly applicable to car body designing, but they point out that the same basic principles that make for efficient weight, structure, and performance of airplanes can and should unquestionably be useful tools of the automobile body designer.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460233
R. H. DAVIES
GERMAN aircraft hydraulic systems are analyzed here under the following headings: 1. General review of German practices and policies with regard to design and manufacture. 2. Basic design features of German systems. 3. Representative hydraulic systems as installed in three of the latest German airplanes. 4. Design and operation of hydraulic systems of different planes and manufacturers. 5. German hydraulic developments in relation to American practice.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460171
R. R. BURKHALTER
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460175
RALPH L. HAVER, HARRY A. GOODIN
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460190
ARTHUR B. SCHULTZ
THEORETICAL principles of cargo pickup are outlined here by Mr. Schultz, who describes the design of pickup units, contact means, transfer equipment, and ground stations for both 200-lb and 60-lb units. He also outlines the basic features desirable in future pickup airplanes, as well as structural design requirements. The author then describes glider pickup, giving consideration to the basic theory behind this type of pickup, the design of pickup units, their installation in the airplane, the cable guide system, and contact means. He outlines the design features of glider pickup airplanes and structural design requirements to be used in the installation of the equipment. In closing the author points out that aircraft pickup has obvious military possibilities and that the peacetime potential is practically unlimited.