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1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520078
S. SCOTT HALL
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520040
G. Jake Walkey
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520018
V. E. YUST, E. A. DROEGEMUELLER
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510037
A. W. BULL
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510162
W. W. DAVIES
PREFACE PREFACE There always is a first time. There need not be a second. Many articles have been written to shake persons from a lethargy, or as might be better stated, to keep them from getting into a state of lethargy. The latter is the author's intent for this article. We apparently have not as yet learned the art of extending our total knowledge. We can accomplish complex and brilliant basic designs but then we miss some detail point, and the principle of that point missed may have been known for years. We can, and have, learned to profit by others experience. But not consistently. We have avoided repeating the difficulties of others. But there are times we miss. If this prior information or these experiences are not continually passed along to each and every one, then all cannot benefit and some must of necessity repeat the experiences of others. Some new person or group will then run the gamut, experience the same pitfall.
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510186
James C. Floyd
THE Wright Brothers Medal Board of Award has announced that Mr. Floyd is to be awarded their 1950 medal for the paper given here. The actual presentation of the award is to be made this month at the SAE National Aeronautic Meeting in New York. In this paper Mr. Floyd traces the development of the Jetliner-the first jet transport to fly in the Western Hemisphere - from its conception in 1945. Topics discussed by the author include, among others, pressurizing requirements, choice of engines, structural requirements, general aerodynamic considerations, flight plan, and direct operating costs.
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510191
Robert Schilling
THIS paper describes the line of reasoning on which automotive stress analysis is based. It concerns itself primarily with operational stresses in the chassis proper and only in a limited way with aspects of engine and transmission design. The author tries to show that the automotive method does not rely on trial and error alone, and is tailored to the product and its service.
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510171
M.P. Baker
BY working from notebook memoranda, personal correspondence files, old photographs, and the original laboratory instruments, the author has been able to gather together the story of how the Wright brothers, starting in 1899 with an idea for controlling the flight of a glider, were able, by 1903, to develop a machine that was capable of powered flight. The author describes this airplane and its engine as well as the 1904-1905 and 1908 ones. The latter was the first airplane to pass U. S. Army acceptance tests.
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510131
C. STEWART BRANDT
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500181
H. E. Churchill
THE principles of design and the operating characteristics of the Studebaker automatic transmission are presented here. The basic transmission design consists of the following major elements: 1. A single-stage, three-element torque converter completely fabricated from stampings. 2. Two epicyclic single-planet helical gear sets. 3. Two gear-type oil pumps. 4. One multiple-disc clutch. 5. One single-plate disc clutch submerged in oil for direct drive. 6. Three band-type clutches with suitable servo mechanisms. 7. Three sprag-type freewheel units. 8. One valve block assembly. 9. One centrifugal mechanical governor. Tests results and performance characteristics for the transmission are discussed briefly.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500184
Norman Hoertz, R. Max Rogers
THIS review of valve designs covers materials, hard facing, sodium filling, and valve rotating devices, with the thought of giving the operator an insight into the qualities and limitations of their use. Problems related to seats, springs, guides, and tappet clearances, as they are related to valve performance and problems of sticking and burning, are also covered briefly.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500002
N. M. Hawkins, R. Lithoren
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500023
RAYMOND LOEWY
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500013
A. HOWARD HASBROOK
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500100
P. M. ROTHWELL
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500102
Raymond Loewy
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500155
A. R. ISITT, M. R. WALL, A. G. CATTANEO
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500110
R. A. BECKWITH
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500116
WILLIAM T. BEAN
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500126
F. O. CARROLL
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500161
FLOYD J. SWEET
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500140
GEO. W. LESCHER, JAS. A. STERHARDT
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490200
J. M. STOKELY
EARING failures - what causes them and how to investigate them - are covered in this well-illustrated paper. The author points out that the problem is not solved merely by saying that a failure is caused by fatigue or corrosion. He says that the operator must continue to operate the engine having the failure, so that the specific cause can be located and a recurrence of the trouble prevented.
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490160
WILLIAM LITTLEWOOD, D. J. JORDAN, E. H. ATKIN, CARLOS WOOD, H. R. HARRIS