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Viewing 33091 to 33120 of 33425
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490020
WALTER DORWIN TEAGUE
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490046
REID A. RAILTON, A. C. SAMPIETRO
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490051
AUSTIN M. WOLF
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490029
WILLIAM B. STOUT
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490023
HERB RAWDON
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490038
THEODORE ULRICH
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490055
GEORGE U. BRUMBAUGH
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480150
Howard S. Currier
ABSTRACT
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480167
CLARENCE L. JOHNSON
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480154
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480175
CHARLES W. THOMAS, B. G. RADIN
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480168
W. F. JOACHIM
HERE are some of the highlights of the wartime testing and development work done on various diesel engines by the U. S. Naval Engineering Experiment Station at Annapolis, Md. The author suggests that future development work on diesels be directed toward improving efficiencies, reducing noise, and increasing specific power-without sacrifice in reliability, of course. The statements and opinions expressed are those of the author and not necessarily of the Navy Department.
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480194
W. A. BYCHINSKY
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480231
C. M. McDOWELL
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480217
WALTER A. GRAF
THE many activities involved in designing, making, and assembling steel automobile bodies are covered here. The story begins with the establishment of the body style by the stylist, with the assistance of scale models. It covers the preparation of the full-size layouts, hardwood die models, the making of dies and assembly tools, plaster cases, patterns, and the cerrobend frame checking fixtures - to mention only a few of these activities.
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480221
A. HUNDERE, J. A. BERT
A THOROUGH study of the problem has convinced the authors that preignition causes more aircraft-engine failures than detonation does. It has also brought them to the conclusion that the spark plug is the most common cause of this phenomenon, the combustion-chamber deposits the second cause, and the exhaust valve the least common cause.
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480047
L. R. KOEPNICK
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480048
ALFRED K. HUSE
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480086
FRANK S. SPRING
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480096
WILDER HOBSON
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480021
HARRY S. GOLDEN
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480169
H. H. Cherry, A. B. Croshere
FOR preliminary design work on transport airplanes, a graphical method is outlined for determining the effect which changes in a set of chosen major design variables will have on the airplane's ability to meet a given set of specifications and regulations. Engines, propellers, and wing geometry are selected. Then for each condition laid down as a specification or regulation, a limiting curve of maximum weight allowed by the condition is plotted as a function of wing area. These curves are developed from basic data and standard equations. If it is possible to meet all the conditions, the limiting curves - when plotted together on one graph - will enclose an area on the “allowable” side of all curves.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470253
JOHN E. STEINER
A SYSTEM of plots of wing loading versus power loading is developed for showing the effect on performance, of all combinations of wing area, aspect ratio, number of engines, and power rating allowed by the Civil Air Regulations for transport planes. C.A.R. climb requirements appear on the plots as boundaries defining allowable combinations of design variables and gross weight. The charts included give a fairly detailed consideration of weight limits imposed by climb requirements for 4-engine and 2-engine airplanes. The assumptions made are explained. Useful for initial design studies and comparisons of existing designs, the charts indicate relative performance of various designs. The system can be used to study field lengths required and cruising speeds obtainable as well as climb performance.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470240
A. T. GREGORY, A. L. POMEROY
THIS report on a canvass of a number of engineers concerned with aircraft, aircraft powerplants, and fuels and lubricants indicates that the reciprocating engine will continue to occupy a paramount position among aircraft powerplants for the next 10 years. Turboprops will gradually displace reciprocating engines in some types of airplanes, chiefly air transports and bombers. Turbojets will be common soon in fighters and later in bombers. But small aircraft will still be relying on reciprocating engines in 1957, according to the survey.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470234
C. M. McDOWELL
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470248
H. W. LUETKEMEYER
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470206
BERNARD E. O'CONNOR
THE theory of the untuned viscous damper is developed mathematically here by Mr. O'Connor to show that its characteristics are such as to make practical the use of silicone fluid as a damping medium. That this type of damper achieves a high relative efficiency throughout a wide range of damping is indicated by a consideration of a simple mass system. The performance of a damper applied to the mass elastic system of a typical 6-cyl gasoline engine is predicted to be satisfactory over a range of speeds and values of the damping constant. An exact tabular method and a simpler approximate method are proposed for calculating the maximum amplitude and the frequency at which it occurs. The approximate value of optimum damping can also be found by a simple procedure.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470215
RAY E. BOLZ
A SERIES of charts for predicting the performance of the continuous-flow jet engine and its individual components is presented here. Efficiencies of components as well as the momentum pressure loss in the combustion chamber (assuming constant cross-sectional area) are taken into consideration. Performance of a typical jet engine under various operating conditions is calculated by means of the charts and graphed to show the effect of each operating condition on performance when all other conditions are held constant. A set of large, usable charts similar to the figures in this paper may be obtained upon request to the Cleveland Laboratories, National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.