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Viewing 33091 to 33120 of 33250
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370182
Frederic A. Seljé
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370157
Ralph H. Upson
AIRCRAFT have taken more from automobile design than they have given, but they can now repay much of the obligation without necessarily transgressing the requirements of production economy and reasonable design stability. Some of these possibilities are: (1) Improved streamlining of necessary exposed parts, particularly underneath, and incorporation of other accessories in the general body lines. (2) Use of curved glass in the windshield and lightening of all window material. (3) Reduction of the frame to the status of an assembly unit, with structural significance only in combination with the body. (4) More effective distribution of flange material around the doors. (5) Lightening of skin by use of internal stiffeners, particularly on top. (6) Development of a smaller, more efficient radiator and lightening of various engine parts. Most important is the mental attitude behind the work.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370131
Edward G. Budd
STREAMLINING, introduced into the aircraft industry because of practical necessity, became a no less compelling force in automobile body design. Even though the power saving is not as great as with aircraft, it improved the appearance of the car, and people wanted it. And so a force as great as necessity mothered invention. The body engineer must share the credit for the flowing lines of modern bodies with the steel industry for developing wide sheets of proper composition, with the press builders for producing the huge, powerful presses necessary, and with the ingenuity of the die makers. The all-steel body is discussed, explaining its greater strength and stiffness and stressing its ease of assembly into complete units that can be transported easily to assembly plants. Restraining factors in body design are given as what the public is prepared to accept and what it is commercially practicable for the manufacturer to produce.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370085
J. H. Middlekamp
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370082
W. A. Hamilton
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370079
W. F. McGINTY
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370132
R. J. Minshall, John K. Ball, F. P. Laudan
THIS paper contains a general discussion of the problems involved in arriving at the final design of large airplanes having gross weights of 35,000 lb. up to approximately 100,000 lb. It deals with certain aerodynamic features that evidence themselves when airplanes are increased to the sizes just noted. Comments are made on wing-taper airfoil sections and the possibility of increasing the L/D in large airplanes, and on certain factors that enter into the control of large airplanes. A rather detailed account of structural considerations is undertaken; it shows the methods used by the aircraft designer in scaling up his ideas from airplanes of a year ago to the larger types to follow. Several types of aircraft construction are discussed, showing the advantages and disadvantages of each type. The question of strength-weight ratios also is discussed. The methods of analyzing semi-monocoque and pure monocoque structures are reviewed, and examples are given of the analysis procedure.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370176
A. H. R. Fedden
THE author has written an addendum to his paper: “Future Research on Air-Cooled Aero Engines” delivered in July, 1935. General prophesies are made on airplane performance, types, trends on the number of engines per airplane, engine sizes in airplanes, wing loading, and engine arrangement. His analysis of engine types to complete the desired power range indicates a definite trend toward higher powers The advantages of the use of higher octane fuels are stressed. Mr. Fedden deplores the fact that no development work on compression-ignition aircraft engines is being done in England, and thinks that the 1500-hp. class should be tackled energetically. The comparative qualities of various engine types are discussed. Negative cooling drag is claimed to be possible at airplane speeds of 400 m.p.h. The flat engine is mentioned as a possibility although its use depends on the thickness of the airplane wing.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370167
F. W. Caldwell
THIS paper represents an effort on the part of the propeller designer to look at some phases of the vibration problem as it affects him. A very brief description of some of the work being done in vibration is given. The subject is treated from the aspect of experimentation and the physical phenomena without any effort to introduce the mathematical phase of the subject. Examples are given of the measurements of the vibratory stress in propeller blades by a new method introduced during the last year.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370193
Donald H. Wood
RECENT work on cowlings for air-cooled engines has been characterized by the correlation of the cooling function of the cowl with the drag-reducing function into a rational design procedure, whereas earlier work was devoted largely to drag reduction and this was a cut-and-try proceeding. The fundamental relations between the pressures and velocities of the external and internal air flows are discussed here in their relation to the quantity of air available for cooling and the effect on drag. Experimental results are outlined, and a design procedure is indicated. It is pointed out that certain factors must be determined by the engine manufacturers in order that a rational design of cowl may be laid out. The shape of the cowling nose is not critical, and the part of the drag that is subject to control is determined by the air flow out the cowl exit. For an efficient cowling and for control of the air flow, the exit is the important part.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370164
John H. Hunt
PRESENTING a cross-section of the constructive thought of Society members on motor-vehicle design from the standpoint of highway safety, this paper deals with progress that is being made in present-day cars and offers pertinent suggestions regarding possible improvements for the future.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370181
Austin M. Wolf
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370021
Henry Lowe Brownback
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370063
Mac Short
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370112
Joseph A. Anglada
This paper contains a general discussion of the trends of truck construction touching upon such subjects as cab over engine, six wheel, and all wheel driven vehicles. Comments are made on various parts, such as axles, engines, etc. A comparison of English truck design as affected by legal requirements and design as affected by S.A.E. proposed standards of weight and size limitations is included.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370192
Austin M. Wolf
DEPENDING upon the location of the front wheel, the door and step are placed either at the front or back of the cab. Some designs incorporate a protruding “hood” portion, whereas others extend the cab fully forward. The engine compartment is either immediately back of the radiator or under the cross seat. The floor and seat heights are relatively higher than in the conventional truck, and better visibility is obtained. The engine hood is well insulated for heat and sometimes for sound as well. Most powerplants are removable readily for major repairs although, in most instances, major maintenance operations can be done readily within the cab. Front axle treads have been increased in order to give greater stability on the road as well as to avoid an excessively large wheelhouse. The change in weight distribution has called for considerably more study on braking distribution.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360005
Amos E. Northup
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360012
W. A. Hamilton
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360134
George J. Mercer
EVOLUTION of body engineering is recalled with the traditional practices of the profession and the difficulty of obtaining information and instruction. Relations and locations of side-sweep, turnunder sweep, and belt line are discussed; definite suggestions are made and design procedure outlined. How the first visual impression or “eye appeal” of a new design affects public acceptance is emphasized, and the special influence of this factor upon women is pointed out. Responses from three authorities in body design to a twelve-point questionnaire on debatable policies and principles give an indication of modern body-design trends and practice.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360129
Hall L. Hibbard
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360008
J. C. Fox
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360010
Otto C. Koppen
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360075
John H. Jouett
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360105
E. S. Taylor
CRANKSHAFT torsional vibration has become a serious problem in aircraft engines. Thanks to much experimental work, we now have a good working knowledge of the two phases of the problem, the elastic and inertia characteristics of the crankshaft-propeller combination and the forces to which this system is subjected. Methods used in the past to reduce vibration have been to change the elastic characteristics of the crankshaft, or to incorporate direct damping or some form of vibration damper of which the Lanchester and the resonant damper are examples. All of these methods have serious limitations. An interesting device which is capable of eliminating vibration in constant speed machinery is the undamped absorber. For variable speed machinery this absorber is of no value. By arranging an undamped absorber so that the restoring force varies with speed, it is possible, theoretically, to eliminate vibration in certain variable speed machinery.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360097
G. L. Neely
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360141
Austin M. Wolf
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360004
Herbert Chase
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360003
Austin M. Wolf
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360006
E. L. Johnston
Viewing 33091 to 33120 of 33250