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Viewing 271 to 300 of 33163
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0558
Lei Cui, Tianyou Wang, Kai Sun, Zhen Lu, Zhizhao Che, Yanzhe Sun
Abstract The scavenging process in two-stroke marine engines not only transports burnt gas out of the cylinder but also provides fresh air for the next cycle, thereby significantly affecting the engine performance. In order to enhance fuel-air mixing, the scavenging process usually generates swirling flow in uniflow-type scavenging engines. The scavenging stability directly determines the scavenging efficiency and even influences fuel-air mixing, combustion, and emission of the engine. In the present study, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the scavenging process in a steady-state scavenging flow test is conducted. A precession phenomenon is found in the high swirl model, and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) method is used to analyze the reason and the multi-scale characteristics of the precession phenomenon.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0560
Mateusz Pucilowski, Mehdi Jangi, Sam Shamun, Changle Li, Martin Tuner, Xue-Song Bai
Abstract Methanol as an alternative fuel in internal combustion engines has an advantage in decreasing emissions of greenhouse gases and soot. Hence, developing of a high performance internal combustion engine operating with methanol has attracted the attention in industry and academic research community. This paper presents a numerical study of methanol combustion at different start-of-injection (SOI) in a direct injection compression ignition (DICI) engine supported by experimental studies. The aim is to investigate the combustion behavior of methanol with single and double injection at close to top-dead-center (TDC) conditions. The experimental engine is a modified version of a heavy duty D13 Scania engine. URANS simulations are performed for various injection timings with delayed SOI towards TDC, aiming at analyzing the characteristics of partially premixed combustion (PPC).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0559
Lucas Eder, Constantin Kiesling, Peter Priesching, Gerhard Pirker, Andreas Wimmer
Abstract Using natural gas as a fuel in internal combustion engines is a promising way to obtain efficient power generation with relatively low environmental impact. Dual fuel operation is especially interesting because it can combine the safety and reliability of the basic diesel concept with fuel flexibility. To deal with the greater number of degrees of freedom caused by the interaction of two fuels and combining different combustion regimes, it is imperative to use simulation methods in the development process to gain a better understanding of the combustion behavior. This paper presents current research into ignition and combustion of a premixed natural gas/air charge with a diesel pilot spray in a large bore diesel ignited gas engine with a focus on 3D-CFD simulation. Special attention was paid to injection and combustion. The highly transient behavior of the diesel injector especially at small injection quantities poses challenges to the numerical simulation of the spray.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0554
Yu Li, Hongsheng Guo, Hailin Li
Abstract Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been widely applied in internal combustion (IC) engine research. The integration of chemical kinetic model with CFD provides an opportunity for researchers to investigate the detailed chemical reactions for better understanding the combustion process of IC engines. However, the simulation using CFD has generally focused on the examination of primary parameters, such as temperature and species distributions. The detailed investigation on chemical reactions is limited. This paper presents the development of a post-processing tool capable of calculating the rate of production (ROP) of interested species with the known temperature, pressure, and concentration of each species in each cell simulated using CONVERGE-SAGE CFD model.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0561
Federico Perini, Kan Zha, Stephen Busch, Rolf Reitz
Abstract In this work, linear, non-linear and a generalized renormalization group (RNG) two-equation RANS turbulence models of the k-epsilon form were compared for the prediction of turbulent compressible flows in diesel engines. The object-oriented, multidimensional parallel code FRESCO, developed at the University of Wisconsin, was used to test the alternative models versus the standard k-epsilon model. Test cases featured the academic backward facing step and the impinging gas jet in a quiescent chamber. Diesel engine flows featured high-pressure spray injection in a constant volume vessel from the Engine Combustion Network (ECN), as well as intake flows in a high-swirl diesel engine. For the engine intake flows, a model of the Sandia National Laboratories 1.9L light-duty single cylinder optical engine was used.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0557
Masumeh Gholamisheeri, Bryce Thelen, Elisa Toulson
Abstract Three dimensional numerical simulation of the transient turbulent jet and ignition processes of a premixed methane-air mixture of a turbulent jet ignition (TJI) system is performed using Converge computational software. The prechamber initiated combustion enhancement technique that is utilized in a TJI system enables low temperature combustion by increasing the flame propagation rate and therefore decreasing the burn duration. Two important components of the TJI system are the prechamber where the spark plug and injectors are located and the nozzle which connects the prechamber to the main chamber. In order to model the turbulent jet of the TJI system, RANS k-ε and LES turbulent models and the SAGE chemistry solver with a reduced mechanism for methane are used.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0567
Andrea Twellmeyer, Fabian Kopple, Bernhard Weigand
Abstract Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is a promising alternative fuel for internal combustion engines as its combustion is fuel-efficient and lean in carbon dioxide compared to gasoline. The high octane number of methane gives rise to significant increase of the thermodynamic efficiency due to higher possible compression ratios. In order to use this potential, new stratified mixture formation concepts for CNG are investigated by means of numerical fluid simulations. For decades RANS methods have been the industry standard to model three-dimensional flows. Indeed, there are well-known deficiencies of the widely used eddy viscosity turbulence models based on the applied Boussinesq hypothesis. Reynolds stress turbulence models as well as scale resolving simulation approaches can be appealing alternative choices since they offer higher accuracy. However, due to their large computing effort, they are still mostly impractical for the daily use in industrial product development processes.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0568
Valentina Fraioli, Carlo Beatrice, Gabriele Di Blasio, Giacomo Belgiorno, Marianna Migliaccio
Abstract The adoption of gaseous fuels for Light Duty (LD) engines is considered a promising solution to efficiently reduce greenhouse gases emissions and diversify fuels supplies, while keeping pollutants production within the limits. In this respect, the Dual Fuel (DF) concept has already proven to be, generally speaking, a viable solution, industrially implemented for several applications in the Heavy-Duty (HD) engines category. Despite this, some issues still require a technological solution, preventing the commercialization of DF engines in wider automotive fields, including the release of high amounts of unburned species, possibility of engine knock, chance of thermal efficiency reduction. In this framework, numerical simulation can be a useful tool, not only to better understand specific characteristics of DF combustion, but also to explore specific geometrical modifications and engine calibrations capable to adapt current LD architectures to this concept.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0563
Anand Karpatne, Douglas P. Breden, Laxminarayan Raja
Abstract The arc breakdown phase in automotive spark-plugs is a sub-microsecond event that precedes the main spark event. This phase is typically characterized by strong non-equilibrium plasma phenomena with high voltage and currents. The nature of the initial breakdown phase has strong implications for the successful spark formation and the electrode erosion/lifetime. There are evidently very few studies that seek to characterize this phase in detail. The goal of this work is to investigate this non-equilibrium plasma arc breakdown phase, using high-fidelity computational modeling. We perform studies using the VizGlow non-equilibrium plasma modeling tool. During the early breakdown phase, the plasma forms thin filamentary streamers that provide the initial conductive channel across the gap. Once the streamers bridge the gap, the plasma begins to transition to a thermal arc.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0564
Prithwish Kundu, Muhsin Ameen, Umesh Unnikrishnan, Sibendu Som
Abstract Modeling unsteady turbulent flame development in lifted spray flames is important as a strong correlation exists between pollutant formation and the transient flame features such as auto-ignition, flame propagation and flame stabilization. Detailed chemistry mechanisms with large number of species are required to resolve the chemical kinetics accurately. These factors make high-fidelity simulation of engine combustion computationally expensive. In this work, a turbulent combustion model is proposed based on tabulation of flamelets. The aim is to develop a comprehensive combustion modeling approach incorporating detailed chemistry mechanisms, turbulence models and highly resolved grids leveraging the computational cost advantage of tabulation. A novel technique of implementing unsteady flamelet libraries without the use of progress variables is implemented for igniting sprays called Tabulated Flamelet Model (TFM).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0565
Ji Yu, Motoyuki Abe, Yoshihiro Sukegawa
Abstract We developed a numerical method for PFI engine, which would take complex intake-port phenomena into consideration. Numerical study for PFI engine has additional difficulty compared with that for GDI engine, because in-cylinder distribution of mixture is strongly affected by remaining fuel in intake-port. The new simulation method proposed in this paper has adopted split calculation of two steps. Fuel distribution in intake-port is calculated in the first step, and then this result of adhered and floating fuel distribution in intake-port is used as boundary and initial conditions in the next step. Together these two steps realize accurate in-cylinder mixture distribution prediction. According to experimental verification, the new method showed a capability to predict accurate liquid film distribution with less calculation cost. And then we applied the method into the investigation for optimum injection strategy to improve engine performance and to reduce emission.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0566
Ramachandra Diwakar, Vicent Domenech-Llopis
Abstract With the ability of modern high pressure diesel injectors to deliver accurate, closely coupled multiple pulse injections, it is possible to minimize engine combustion noise without negative effect on exhaust emissions. Literature shows that, splitting the cycle heat release into several parts helps to lower peak heat release rate and combustion noise. The charge cooling caused by fuel vaporization can be effectively used to influence ignition delay and achieve lower noise, emissions and fuel consumption. With the traditional pilot-main injection scheme, researchers have shown that, the injection dwell time between the pilot and main is primarily responsible for noise reduction. The current objective is to analytically explore the fundamental physics behind the experimentally observed noise reduction phenomena with multiple injections. This computational study was conducted at a key part-load operation (2000RPM and 5Bar BMEP) with five injection pulses.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0576
Minyue Wu, Yiqiang Pei, Jing Qin, Xiang Li, Jianwei Zhou, Zhang Song Zhan, Qi-yi Guo, Bin Liu, Tie Gang Hu
Abstract Wall temperature in GDI engine is influenced by both water jacket and gas heat source. In turn, wall temperature affects evaporation and mixing characteristics of impingement spray as well as combustion process and emissions. Therefore, in order to accurately simulate combustion process, accurate wall temperature is essential, which can be obtained by conjugate heat transfer (CHT) and piston heat transfer (PHT) models based on mapping combustion results. This CHT model considers temporal interaction between solid parts and cooling water. This paper presents an integrated methodology to reliably predict in-cylinder combustion process and temperature field of a 2.0L GDI engine which includes engine head/block/gasket and water jacket components. A two-way coupling numerical procedure on the basis of this integrated methodology is as follows.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0577
Bersan Akkurt, Hayri Yigit Akargun, L. M. T. Somers, N. G. Deen, Ricardo Novella, Eduardo Javier Pérez-Sánchez
Abstract Advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of reacting sprays provides access to information not available even applying the most advanced experimental techniques. This is particularly evident if the combustion model handles detailed chemical kinetic models efficiently to describe the fuel auto-ignition and oxidation processes. Complex chemistry also provides the temporal evolution of key species closely related to emissions formation, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are well-known as soot precursors. In this framework, present investigation focuses on the analysis of the so-called Spray-A combustion characteristics using two different flamelet-based combustion models. Both Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) predictions are combined to study not only the averaged spray characteristics, but also the relevance of different realizations in this particular problem.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0572
Mianzhi Wang, Suya Gao, Chia-Fon Lee
Abstract In this work, an efficient and unified combustion model is introduced to simulate the flame propagation, diffusion-controlled combustion, and chemically-driven ignition in both SI and CI engine operation. The unified model is constructed upon a G-equation model which addresses the premixed flame propagation. The concept of the Livengood-Wu integral is used with tabulated ignition delay data to account for the chemical kinetics which is responsible for the spontaneous ignition of fuel-air mixture. A set of rigorously defined operations are used to couple the evolution of the G scalar field and the Livengood-Wu integral. The diffusion-controlled combustion is simulated equivalent to applying the Burke-Schumann limit. The combined model is tested in the simulation of the premixed SI combustion in a constant volume chamber, as well as the CI combustion in a conventional small bore diesel engine.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0571
Tim Lackmann, Tommaso Lucchini, Gianluca D'Errico, Alan Kerstein, Michael Oevermann
Abstract Many new combustion concepts are currently being investigated to further improve engines in terms of both efficiency and emissions. Examples include homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), lean stratified premixed combustion, stratified charge compression ignition (SCCI), and high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in diesel engines, known as low temperature combustion (LTC). All of these combustion concepts have in common that the temperatures are lower than in traditional spark ignition or diesel engines. To further improve and develop combustion concepts for clean and highly efficient engines, it is necessary to develop new computational tools that can be used to describe and optimize processes in nonstandard conditions, such as low temperature combustion.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0574
Ishan Verma, Ellen Meeks, Eric Bish, Martin Kuntz, Karthik Puduppakkam, Long Liang, Chitralkumar Naik
Abstract Emissions from Diesel engines have been a major concern for many years, particularly with regards to the impact of NOx and particulate matter on human health. Exhaust gas re-circulation (EGR) is a widely used method in diesel engines for controlling NOx production. While EGR rates can be varied to ensure engine performance and reduce NOx emissions, EGR also influences the ignition delay, reduces the peak combustion temperature and increases particulate emissions. Moreover, the injection timing directly affects NOx and particulate emissions under the broad and highly variable operating conditions. An effective CFD-based design tool for diesel engines must therefore include robust and accurate predictive capabilities for combustion and pollutant formation, to address the complex design tradeoffs. The objective of the present study is to evaluate CFD modeling of diesel engine combustion and emissions for various combinations of EGR rates and injection timings.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0006
Harald Bucher, Clemens Reichmann, Juergen Becker
Abstract The increasing complexity of electric/electronic architectures (EEA) in the automotive domain raised the necessity of model-based development processes for the design of such heterogeneous systems, which combine different engineering principles with different viewpoints. High-level simulation is a great means to evaluate the EEA in the concept phase of the design, since it reduces costly real-world experiments. However, model-based EEA design and analysis as well as its simulation are often separate processes in the development lifecycle. In this paper, we present a novel approach that extends state-of-the-art model-based systems engineering principles of EEA by a behavior specification reusing library components. The specification is seamlessly integrated in the development process of a single source EEA model. Therewith, the starting point is the abstract logical function architecture of the EEA.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0005
Yun Liu, Sung-Kwon Hong, Tony Ge
Abstract Powertrain drivability evaluation and calibration is an important part of vehicle development to enhance the customer experience. This step mainly takes place on vehicle testing very late in the product development cycle, and is associated with a considerable amount of prototype, test facility, human resource and time cost. Design change options at this stage are also very limited. To reduce the development cost, a model based computer aided engineering (CAE) method is introduced and combined with hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation technology. The HIL simulation method offers a possibility for drivability prediction and development in early phase of product cycle. This article describes the drivability HIL simulation process under development in Ford. The process consists of real time capable multi-domain CAE model integration, powertrain control module (PCM) and HIL simulator interface development and drivability HIL simulation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0004
Norbert Wiechowski, Thomas Rambow, Rainer Busch, Alexander Kugler, Norman Hansen, Stefan Kowalewski
Abstract Modern vehicles become increasingly software intensive. Software development therefore is critical to the success of the manufacturer to develop state of the art technology. Standards like ISO 26262 recommend requirement-based verification and test cases that are derived from requirements analysis. Agile development uses continuous integration tests which rely on test automation and evaluation. All these drove the development of a new model-based software verification environment. Various aspects had to be taken into account: the test case specification needs to be easily comprehensible and flexible in order to allow testing of different functional variants. The test environment should support different use cases like open-loop or closed-loop testing and has to provide corresponding evaluation methods for continuously changing as well as for discrete signals.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0010
Vinay Vaidya, Ramesh S, Venkatesh Kareti, Smitha K.P., Priti Ranadive
Abstract Currently, Model Based Development (MBD) is the de-facto methodology in automotive industry. This has led to conversions of legacy code to Simulink models. Our previous work was related to implementing the C2M tool to automatically convert legacy code to Simulink models. While the tool has been implemented and deployed on few OEM pilot code-sets there were several improvement areas identified w.r.t. the generated models. One of the improvement areas identified was that the generated model used atomic blocks instead of abstracted blocks available in Simulink. E.g. the generated model used an ADD block and feedback loop to represent an integration operation instead of using an integrator block directly. This reduced the readability of the model even though the functionality was correct. Thus, as a user of the model, an engineer would like to see abstract blocks rather than atomic blocks.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0008
James Andrew Miloser
Abstract Simulink is a very successful and popular method for modelling and auto-coding embedded automotive features, functions and algorithms. Due to its history of success, university feeder programs, and large third party tool support, it has, in some cases, been applied to areas of the software system where other methods, principles and strategies may provide better options for the software and systems engineers and architects. This paper provides approaches to determine when best to apply UML and when best to apply Simulink to a typical automotive feature. Object oriented software design patterns as well as general guidelines are provided to help in this effort. This paper's intent is not to suggest a replacement for Simulink but to provide the software architects and designers additional options when decomposing high level requirements into reusable software components.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0007
Jose-Guillermo Saavedra, Asaad Makki, Raciel Cruz
Abstract The advancement in connectivity technology is driving a shift in business models in almost every field. Automakers need to adapt to a new business model in which the platform (automobile) and the mobility solutions (Devices and Services) are enabled by a strong dynamic connectivity. To succeed in this business model, it is imperative to deliver an unparalleled customer experience. Traditional customer experiences focused only in the platform (automobile) are no longer sufficient to address the mobility needs. The development of in-vehicle features should consider both the platform and the connectivity in a single development scope. This paradigm shift sets new challenges for the in-vehicle features designers. Designers have to speak not only the language of the experience but rather a language to address different levels of abstractions to ensure effective communication with all stakeholders and developers including those outside the organization.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0012
Zia Hossain, Shengling Deng, Jim Sellers, Gary Loechelt, Mo Grimaldi, Irene Wan, Emily Linehan, Alexander Young, Ali Salih
Abstract To meet the increasing demand for lower RDS(ON) MOSFETs in medium voltage automotive applications, the shielded gate trench MOSFET architecture is becoming increasingly popular in recent years for its ability to achieve both lower RDS(ON) and faster switching speed. The lower specific drain-to-source resistance (RDS(ON).Area) translates into smaller chip size and consequently cheaper die cost for the end customers. Furthermore, shielded gate trench architecture offers smaller gate-to-drain capacitance by utilizing the shielding effect from the shield-poly, leading to lower G-D charge (QGD), faster switching speed, and increased dv/dt immunity. A comprehensive portfolio of medium voltage shielded gate power MOSFET products in several voltage classes (40V, 60V, 80V, and 100V) in automotive and industrial markets is presented in this paper.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0018
Jeong Chan Kim, Kai Richter, Myung Hyun Koo, Matthias Hagner, Chung Hi Lee
Abstract Along with the efforts to cope with the increase of functions which require higher communication bandwidth in vehicle networks using CAN-FD and vehicle Ethernet protocols, we have to deal with the problems of both the increased busload and more stringent response time requirement issues based on the current CAN systems. The widely used CAN busload limit guideline in the early design stage of vehicle network development is primarily intended for further frame extensions. However, when we cannot avoid exceeding the current busload design limit, we need to analyze in more detail the maximum frame response times and message delays, and we need good estimation and measurement techniques. There exist two methods for estimating the response time at the design phase, a mathematical worst-case analysis that provides upper bounds, and a probability based distributed response time simulation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0549
Insuk Ko, Alessandro D'Adamo, Stefano Fontanesi, Kyoungdoug Min
Abstract In recent years, Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) is spotlighted as an engineering tool and severe research efforts are carried out on its applicability to Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). However, there is a general lack of definitive conclusions on LES quality criteria for ICE. This paper focuses on the application of LES quality criteria to ICE and to their correlation, in order to draw a solid background on future LES quality assessments for ICE. In this paper, TCC-III single-cylinder optical engine from University of Michigan is investigated and the analysis is conducted under motored condition. LES quality is mainly affected by grid size and type, sub-grid scale (SGS) model, numeric schemes. In this study, the same grid size and type are used in order to focus on the effect on LES quality of SGS models and blending factors of numeric scheme only.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0545
Adrian Irimescu, Silvana Di Iorio, Simona Silvia Merola, Paolo Sementa, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Abstract Multi-fuel operation is one of the main topics of investigative research in the field of internal combustion engines. Spark ignition (SI) power units are relatively easily adaptable to alternative liquid-as well as gaseous-fuels, with mixture preparation being the main modification required. Numerical simulations are used on an ever wider scale in engine research in order to reduce costs associated with experimental investigations. In this sense, quasi-dimensional models provide acceptable accuracy with reduced computational efforts. Within this context, the present study puts under scrutiny the assumption of spherical flame propagation and how calibration of a two-zone combustion simulation is affected when changing fuel type. A quasi-dimensional model was calibrated based on measured in-cylinder pressure, and numerical results related to the two-zone volumes were compared to recorded flame imaging.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0553
Lorenzo Sforza, Tommaso Lucchini, Angelo Onorati, Xiucheng Zhu, Seong-Young Lee
Abstract Objective of this work is the incorporation of the flame stretch effects in an Eulerian-Lagrangian model for premixed SI combustion in order to describe ignition and flame propagation under highly inhomogeneous flow conditions. To this end, effects of energy transfer from electrical circuit and turbulent flame propagation were fully decoupled. The first ones are taken into account by Lagrangian particles whose main purpose is to generate an initial burned field in the computational domain. Turbulent flame development is instead considered only in the Eulerian gas phase for a better description of the local flow effects. To improve the model predictive capabilities, flame stretch effects were introduced in the turbulent combustion model by using formulations coming from the asymptotic theory and recently verified by means of DNS studies. Experiments carried out at Michigan Tech University in a pressurized, constant-volume vessel were used to validate the proposed approach.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0547
Zvonimir Petranovic, Wilfried Edelbauer, Milan Vujanović, Peter Priesching, Reinhard Tatschl, Neven Duić
Abstract Commonly, the spray process in Direct Injection (DI) diesel engines is modeled with the Euler Lagrangian discrete droplet approach which has limited validity in the dense spray region, close to the injector nozzle hole exit. In the presented research, a new reactive spray modelling method has been developed and used within the 3D RANS CFD framework. The spray process was modelled with the Euler Eulerian multiphase approach, extended to the size-of-classes approach which ensures reliable interphase momentum transfer description. In this approach, both the gas and the discrete phase are considered as continuum, and divided into classes according to the ascending droplet diameter. The combustion process was modelled by taking into account chemical kinetics and by solving general gas phase reaction equations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0543
Oliver Hofmann, Shijin Han, Daniel Rixen
Abstract This study discusses model-based injection rate estimation in common rail diesel injectors exhibiting aging phenomena. Since they result in unexpected injection behavior, aging effects like coking or cavitation may impair combustion performance, which justifies the need for new modeling and estimation approaches. To predict injection characteristics, a simulation model for the bottom section of the injector is introduced, with a main focus on modeling the hydraulic components. Using rail pressure and control piston lift as inputs, a reduced model is then derived in state-space representation, which may be used for the application of an observer in hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) environments. Both models are compared and validated with experimental data, with which they show good agreement. Aging effects and nozzle wear, which result in model uncertainties, are considered using a fault model in combination with an extended Kalman filter (EKF) observer scheme.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 33163