Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 863
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2168
Khadeeja Nusrath, Ankur Sarmah, Jatinder Singh
This paper presents the implementation of flight path reconstruction (FPR) and wind estimation techniques applied to a high performance fighter aircraft. The analysis is carried out for the flight test data gathered and stored in a Crash Data Recorder (CDR). The data signals obtained from CDR are generally highly noisy, with frequent data drop outs and also with low sampling rate. The estimation technique applied for data reconstruction is the extended Kalman filtering (EKF). The reconstructed trajectories can be compared with the actual flight trajectories such that, in case of unavailability of data from other sources (e.g., digital flight control computer), the algorithm should be able to reconstruct the trajectories with the minimum set of data available from the CDR. Wind estimation along with the trajectory reconstruction can give better accuracy in airspeed as well as flow angles. The algorithm also aims at determining the bias/systematic instrument errors and generating accurate aircraft state trajectories.
2014-08-13
Standard
J184_201408
Various SAE vehicle sound level measurement procedures require use of a sound level meter which meets the Type 1 or Type 2 requirements of ANSI S1.4-1983 (see 2.1.1.1), or an alternative system which can be proved to provide equivalent test data. The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to provide a procedure for determining if a sound data acquisition system (SDAS) has electro-acoustical performance equivalent to such a meter. By assuring equivalent performance of the test instrumentation, the equivalence of test data is assured. Two general configurations of sound data acquisition systems will be encompassed (see Figure 1). The first configuration consists of instrument sections which perform as a sound level meter. The second configuration is a system which records data for later processing. The intent of this document is to establish guidelines which permit the test engineer to insure equivalence of sound data acquisition systems to a sound level meter. It requires that the test engineer have a working knowledge of the characteristics of the sound data being measured.
2014-07-11
WIP Standard
J1674
The purpose of this SAE Standard is to offer simplified and prioritized guidelines for collecting and preserving on-scene data related to motor vehicle accidents. It is intended that these guidelines improve the effectiveness of data collection, which will assist subsequent analysis and reconstruction of a particular incident. The document is to guide early data collectors whose objectives include documenting information related to the incident. it may be used by law enforcement personnel, safety officials, insurance adjusters and other interested parties. The document identifies categories of scene physical features that deteriorate relatively quickly and recomends documentation task priorities. Detailed methods of collecting data are not part of this document. However, some widely used methods are described in the references in Seciton 2.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1171
Aleš Kolar, Ralf Cerna, Werner Hofegger, Christoph Pichler, Markus Riener, Nathan Murphy, Georg Zembacher
The correct information about legal demands of the On-Board-Diagnostic (OBD) system in a vehicle project is required throughout the entire development process. Usually, the main obstacle in succeeding is to provide the company's expertise of some few experts for all employees who work in OBD related projects. The paper describes the AVL solution for knowledge management and tool supported control system design and calibration: OBD System Development Database. The software enables the user to access the regulatory requirements for a specific application and legislation from past, present and future (proposed rule-making) point of view. Information concerning already available and stored monitoring concepts is linked to the requirements in order to re-use potentially suitable concepts and to enable an efficient knowledge exchange within the company. Also, various reporting functionalities are implemented, for example the listing and comparison of legal requirements and monitoring concepts.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0183
Sooncheol Park, Wonwook Jung, Chunwoo Shin, Jaewung Jung
Abstract Customer vehicle usage monitoring is one of the most fundamental elements to consider in the process of developing a durable vehicle. The extant method to research customer vehicle usage takes considerable time and effort because it requires attaching a series of sensors to the vehicle-gyroscope, accelerometer, microphone, and GPS-to gather information through data logs and then to analyze data in a computer where designated analyzing software has been installed. To solve the problem, this paper introduces a new concept of integrated system developed to examine customer vehicle usage that can analyze data by collecting it from a variety of sensors installed on a smartphone.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0278
Olof Lindgarde, Rune Prytz
Abstract This paper presents an approach to fault detection and isolation that is based on off-board 1D simulation tools such as GT-power or AVL Boost. The proposed method enables engineers to develop diagnostic functions early on in a development project. The proposed algorithm is evaluated based on measurements from the air path system of the new Volvo FH truck. The results are encouraging. The paper discusses pros and cons of the method and concludes that it has clear potential to be used for on-board diagnostics.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0501
Roger Bortolin, Matthew Arbour, James Hrycay
Abstract Whether large or small, a truck fleet operator has to know the locations of its vehicles in order to best manage its business. On a day to day basis loads need to be delivered or picked up from customers, and other activities such as vehicle maintenance or repairs have to be routinely accommodated. Some fleets use aftermarket electronic systems for keeping track of vehicle locations, driver hours of service and for wirelessly text messaging drivers via cellular or satellite networks. Such aftermarket systems include GPS (Global Positioning System) technology, which in part uses a network of satellites in orbit. This makes it possible for the fleet manager to remotely view the location of a vehicle and view a map of its past route. These systems can obtain data directly from vehicle sensors or from the vehicle network, and therefore report other information such as fuel economy. The fleet manager can receive alerts when high-level brake applications occur, which could be an indication of tailgating or aggressive driving behavior.
2013-09-24
Technical Paper
2013-01-2400
Adam Duran, Kevin Walkowicz
In an effort to characterize the dynamics typical of school bus operation, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers set out to gather in-use duty cycle data from school bus fleets operating across the country. Employing a combination of Isaac Instruments GPS/CAN data loggers in conjunction with existing onboard telemetric systems resulted in the capture of operating information for more than 200 individual vehicles in three geographically unique domestic locations. In total, over 1,500 individual operational route shifts from Washington, New York, and Colorado were collected. Upon completing the collection of in-use field data using either NREL-installed data acquisition devices or existing onboard telemetry systems, large-scale duty-cycle statistical analyses were performed to examine underlying vehicle dynamics trends within the data and to explore vehicle operation variations between fleet locations. Based on the results of these analyses, high, low, and average vehicle dynamics requirements were determined, resulting in the selection of representative standard chassis dynamometer test cycles for each condition.
2013-07-09
Standard
AIR5925A
The report shows how the methodology of measurement uncertainty can usefully be applied to test programs in order to optimize resources and save money. In doing so, it stresses the importance of integrating the generation of the Defined Measurement Process into more conventional project management techniques to create a Test Plan that allows accurate estimation of resources and trouble-free execution of the actual test. Finally, the report describes the need for post-test review and the importance of recycling lessons learned for the next project.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0202
Yi L. Murphey, Dev Kochhar, Fang Chen, Yinghao Huang, Yong Wang
We present research in progress to develop and implement a transportable instrumentation package (TIP) to collect driver data in a vehicle. The overall objective of the project is to investigate the symbiotic relationship between humans and their vehicles. We first describe the state-of-art technologies to build the components of TIP that meet the criteria of ease of installation, minimal interference with driving, and sufficient signals to monitor driver state and condition. This method is a viable alternative to current practice which is to first develop a fully instrumented test vehicle, often at great expense, and use it to collect data from each participant as he/she drives a prescribed route. Another practice, as for example currently being used in the SHRP-2 naturalistic driving study, is to install the appropriate instrumentation for data collection in each individual's vehicle, often requiring several hours. TIP is designed to take some 30 minutes to install in a vehicle, and is portable from vehicle to vehicle.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0774
Bradley E. Heinrichs, Jean-Francois Goulet, Ryan Fix, Mathieu King
Numerical parameters describing suspension stiffness and damping are required for 3D simulation of vehicle trajectories, but may not be available. This paper outlines a simple, portable method of measuring these properties with a coefficient of variation of 5% on stiffness. 24 of 26 vehicles tested were significantly stiffer in roll than pitch, complicating analyses with models that don't include anti-roll. Suspension parameters did not correlate with static wheel load distribution, and damping coefficient did not correlate with natural frequency. Computer simulations of the speed required to initiate rollover in an S-curve were highly sensitive to the suspension parameters used. When pre-impact tire marks and rollover distance were considered, the simulations became almost insensitive to suspension parameters.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0796
Nicolas Poirette, Fawzi P. Bayan, Jeffrey Suway, Anthony Cornetto, Alfred Cipriani, Ronny Wahba
Accident reconstruction specialists have long relied on post-crash deformation and energy equivalence calculations to determine impact severity and the experienced change in velocity during the impact event. In order to utilize post-crash deformation, information must be known about the vehicle's structure and its ability to absorb crash energy. The Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS), the New Car Assessment Program (NCAP), and the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety (IIHS), have created databases with crash testing data for a wide range of vehicles. These crash tests allow reconstruction specialists to determine a specific vehicle's ability to absorb energy as well as to generalize the energy absorption characteristics across vehicle classes. These methods are very well publicized. Crash tests of commercial vehicles, however, are less common; and as a result, current literature has more limited information on the energy absorption characteristics of heavy vehicles such as traditional heavy trucks, motor coaches, buses or cab-over trucks.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1189
Nantu Roy, Mark Villaire
The concept of full vehicle simulation has been embraced by the automobile industry as it is an indispensable tool for analyzing vehicles. Vehicle loads traditionally obtained by road load data acquisition such as wheel forces are typically not invariant as they depend on the vehicle that was used for the measurement. Alternatively, virtual road load data acquisition approach has been adopted in industry to derive invariant loads. Analytical loads prior to building hardware prototypes can shorten development cycles and save costs associated with data acquisition. The approach described herein estimate realistic component load histories with sufficient accuracy and reasonable effort using full vehicle simulations. In this study, a multi-body dynamic model of the vehicle was built and simulated over digitized road using ADAMS software, and output responses were correlated to a physical vehicle that was driven on the same road.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1270
Hussein Dourra
Two on-line algorithms have been developed to acquire driveline component loads in terms of revolutions at torque and rainflow cycle counting matrix. These algorithms have been implemented in real-time on a standard engine controller unit and have been optimized for fast run-time and low memory requirements. The revolutions at torque algorithm is intended to count the number of driveshaft revolutions in each torque level for each gear and store the number of counts in the engine controller memory. The rainflow cycle counting algorithm is intended to count driveshaft torque cycles and to store the number of counts in a two dimensional “from-to” matrix format in the engine controller memory. The revolutions at torque histogram data and the rainflow cycle counting matrix are then downloaded from the vehicle using the data collection device. Download occurs when the vehicle is serviced at a dealership. This data based on the real customer usage information can then be used to develop durability passing criteria for vehicle, system and component tests.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1384
Zhen Jiang, Wei Chen, Yan Fu, Ren-Jye Yang
Reliability-based design optimization (RBDO) has been widely used to obtain a reliable design via an existing CAE model considering the variations of input variables. However, most RBDO approaches do not consider the CAE model bias and uncertainty, which may largely affect the reliability assessment of the final design and result in risky design decisions. In this paper, the Gaussian Process Modeling (GPM) approach is applied to statistically correct the model discrepancy which is represented as a bias function, and to quantify model uncertainty based on collected data from either real tests or high-fidelity CAE simulations. After the corrected model is validated by extra sets of test data, it is integrated into the RBDO formulation to obtain a reliable solution that meets the overall reliability targets while considering both model and parameter uncertainties. The proposed technique is demonstrated through a vehicle design problem aiming at minimizing the vehicle weight through gauge optimization while satisfying reliability constraints.
2013-03-25
Technical Paper
2013-01-0053
Marc Del Sol, Roger Mateu
Brake NVH is nowadays a first priority in braking system development for OEMs and Tier1 suppliers. Cheap and reliable solutions are constantly researched for identification and analysis of brake NVH phenomena. An innovative procedure for brake NVH durability testing has been developed by Applus+ IDIADA in order to investigate noise events during braking. An acquisition system (dbBrake) and software (dbSoft) have been developed with the aim of analyzing high and low frequency noise during braking and carrying out an automatic analysis of occurrence, frequency and SPL (Sound Pressure Level) of brake noise. Noise can be triggered using different parameters. Brake line pressure, temperature and speed conditions are also automatically recorded and analyzed when noise occurs In order to corroborate the objective results logged by dbBrake system, the correlation with subjective evaluation from expert drivers is also automatically carried out. This presentation focuses on the development and integration of the procedure, and gives a brief overview on the results achieved so far.
2012-12-03
Standard
AIR1703A
In-Flight Thrust Determination, SAE AIR1703 reviews the major aspects of processes that may be used for the determination of in-flight thrust (IFT). It includes discussions of basic definitions, analytical and ground test methods to predict installed thrust of a given propulsion system, and methods to gather data and calculate thrust of the propulsion system during the flight development program of the aircraft. Much of the treatment is necessarily brief due to space limitations. This document and the British Ministry/Industry Drag Analysis Panel (MIDAP) Guide (Reference 1.11), which SAE Committee E-33 used as a starting point, can be used to understand the processes and limitations involved in the determination of in-flight thrust. Application to a specific in-flight thrust determination program will require the use of many important assumptions not fully developed in this document, and these assumptions must be evaluated during the conduct of the program. The determination of in-flight thrust is a complex process.
2012-10-22
Technical Paper
2012-01-2206
Thomas Allen Baudendistel, Michael Boyd, Jon Zumberge
With the advent of modern parallel computing systems, larger and more accurate simulation models have been developed to simulate real-world hardware. These models require verification and validation (V&V), the latter using data acquired from representative hardware to ascertain the uncertainty of the model. An understanding of the errors introduced by the measurement system into the validation assessment allows for the model assessor to attribute errors to the measurement system as opposed to the model or experimental setup. Once the model(s) have been through the validation process, decision makers can better understand the risk associated with using these models. This paper describes one possible procedure to quantify the uncertainty of the data acquisition (DAQ) system. This DAQ uncertainty procedure includes; developing a test system in hardware, employing it in a laboratory environment, developing a test procedure to cover expected signal ranges, and developing an analysis scheme.
2012-10-02
Technical Paper
2012-36-0158
Thais Christina S. Santos, Danilo Mattos Batista, Filipe Marins Maduro
This material presents a project for data acquisition applied to monitoring climatic road simulators. The developed system acquires accelerometers and thermocouple signals from the vehicle suspension and body, point-by-point. This implementation allows real-time monitoring during tests, with the objective of making is autonomous. The platform used for the data-logger and automation system is composed by analog and digital input/output, TCP/IP and OPC protocols. The result obtained by this approach consisted mainly on the possibility of mapping the vehicle response throughout the tests, the integration of climatic and vibration control and overall contribution to a higher use of road simulators.
2012-05-29
Standard
AIR4065A
This document has been declared "Stabilized" and will no longer be subjected to periodic reviews for currency. Users are responsible for verifying references and continued suitability or technical requirements. New technology may exist. AIR 4065, "Propeller/Propfan In-Flight Thrust Determination" addresses steady state propeller thrust as applied to aircraft which are usually powered by gas turbine engines. It includes theory, examples, and methods which have been used. Specifically two methods are discussed, the "J" or traditional J,Cp,Ct,ν method including the SBAC variation and a new method we call the "Theta" method which is dependent on knowing blade angle, power/torque and flight Mach number. Implementation guidelines are offered as well as overall approaches to flight testing. Appendices include expansions on theory and testing as well as examples.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0204
Zigmund Bluvband
Accelerated Reliability/Durability testing (ART/ADT) is an extremely important and quite complicated problem of reliability theory and practice. It is known to be today the most efficient reliability estimation of equipment and systems. The main problems reliability engineer withstands with in connection with the accelerated tests are twofold: 1 How to be sure that we can successfully and appropriately apply the acceleration to the system under observation (SUO)2 How to handle statistics obtained when the situation is not “clear-cut” This paper is dealing with each of the above questions trying to give a comprehensive organizational and statistical framework for an accelerated Reliability test planning, tracking and decision making. Accurate prediction and control of reliability and durability plays a very important role in the profitability of a product. Service costs for products within the warranty period or under a service contract are a major expense and a significant pricing factor.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0064
Vijitashwa Pandey, Zissimos Mourelatos
In this article we present an approach to identify the system topology using simulation for reliability calculations. The system topology provides how all components in a system are functionally connected. Most reliability engineering literature assumes that either the system topology is known and therefore all failure modes can be deduced or if the system topology is not known we are only interested in identifying the dominant failure modes. The authors contend that we should try to extract as much information about the system topology from failure or success information of a system as possible. This will not only identify the dominant failure modes but will also provide an understanding of how the components are functionally connected, allowing for more complicated analyses, if needed. We use an evolutionary approach where system topologies are generated at random and then tested against failure or success data. The topologies evolve based on how consistent they are with test data. We demonstrate the proposed methodology by approximately identifying the topology of an electric motor.
2011-10-04
Technical Paper
2011-36-0070
Milena Victorette, Andrei Moro de Luca, Marcelo Vandresen, Milton Pereira, José de Pinho Alves Neto
The paper addresses the development of an electromagnetic brake control and data acquisition system to capture speed and torque. LabVIEW™ was used to implement a graphical interface to evaluate the performance of internal combustion engines. This graphical interface allows processing and displaying the signs in their appropriate units, and also the refinement of data in the desired tracks, in ways to evaluate the power and torque curves. This project started with the need to improve research equipment control and data acquisition on eddy-current dynamometers that are installed in the ADeMCI research group of the Instituto Federal de Santa Catarina (IFSC). In the control system and data acquisition parameters other variables can be added, such as temperatures, pressures, etc., this will promote further improvement in the precision of torque and power reading with this device.
2011-10-04
Technical Paper
2011-36-0071
Andrei Moro de Luca, Milena Victorette, Marcelo Vandresen, José de Pinho Alves Neto
The paper addresses the development of an electromagnetic brake control and data capture of torque and rotation, using a graphical interface implemented in LabVIEW for evaluating the performance of internal combustion engines. To control the electromagnetic brake is used like a SMPS Buck, and programming interface developed in LabView is responsible for generating the pulses of voltage that feeds the brake and the data capture system. This project started with the need for improved equipment control and data acquisition dynamometers, eddy-current, installed at the Automotive Laboratory, Instituto Federal de Santa Catarina (IFSC). In the system of control and data acquisition parameters can be added as temperatures, pressures etc., further improving the precision of torque and power these devices.
2011-09-13
Technical Paper
2011-01-2293
Darrell Bowman, William Schaudt
The mission of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is to reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving commercial vehicles [1]. According to the FMCSA, the development, evaluation, and deployment of advanced safety technology will be a key to realizing this goal. Currently, there are many safety systems in development that have the potential to significantly reduce crashes on our nation's roadways. For a variety of reasons, the potential benefits that these systems may provide in reducing crashes may never be realized. The Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI), in cooperation with FMCSA, has developed a program to evaluate promising safety technologies aimed at commercial vehicle operations (CVO). The objective of FMCSA's Advanced System Testing Utilizing a Data Acquisition System on the Highway (FAST DASH) program is to perform quick turnaround and independent evaluations of promising CVO safety technologies. These evaluations will determine the operational efficacy of CVO safety systems using the following high-level metrics: safety benefits, unintended consequences, user acceptance, and system performance.
2011-09-07
Magazine
Hypersonic possibilities When it comes to reviving high-speed air travel, it all comes down to propulsion, propulsion, propulsion. Shrinking electronics help fuel rising usage Integration helps UAVs carry more sensors and send data faster, making unmanned aircraft more valuable. A greener flight path 'Eco-efficient Innovation Leading the Future of Aviation' is the theme of SAE's 2011 AeroTech conference to be held OCt. 18-21 in Toulouse, France. Manufacturing advanced materials A look at some of the challenges of additive layer manufacturing, as well as the advantages it brings to the aerospace industry.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 863

Filter

  • Magazine
    14
  • Technical Paper
    834
  • Standard
    15
  • Collection
    0
  • Book
    0
  • Article
    0