Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 2060
2015-07-20
WIP Standard
AS4108/1A
SCOPE IS UNAVAILABLE.
2015-07-20
WIP Standard
AS4108/3A
SCOPE IS UNAVAILABLE.
2015-07-20
WIP Standard
AS4108/2A
SCOPE IS UNAVAILABLE.
2015-06-29
WIP Standard
J1555
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to all portions of the vehicle, but design efforts should focus on components and systems with the highest contribution to the overall average repair cost (see 3.7). The costs to be minimized include not only insurance premiums, but also out-of-pocket costs incurred by the owner. Damageability, repairability, serviceability and diagnostics are inter-related. Some repairability, serviceability and diagnostics operations may be required for collision or comprehensive loss-related causes only, some operations for non-collision-related causes only (warranty, scheduled maintenance, non-scheduled maintenance, etc.), and some for both causes. The scope of this document deals with only those operations that involve collision and comprehensive insurance loss repairs.
2015-06-05
WIP Standard
J3102
This SAE Recommended Practice describes the dynamic and static testing procedures required to evaluate the integrity of the ambulance substructure, to support the safe mounting of a SAE J3027 compliant litter retention device or system, when exposed to a frontal, side or rear impact (i.e. a crash impact). Its purpose is to provide manufacturers, ambulance builders, and end-users with testing procedures and, where appropriate, acceptance criteria that, to a great extent, ensure the ambulance substructure meets the same performance criteria across the industry. Prospective manufacturers or vendors have the option of performing either dynamic testing or static testing. Descriptions of the test set-up, test instrumentation, photographic/video coverage, test fixture, and performance metrics are included.
2015-06-01
WIP Standard
AS1708F
Scope is unavailable.
2015-05-20
WIP Standard
AS4130C
Scope is unavailable.
2015-05-20
WIP Standard
AS4136C
Scope is unavailable.
2015-05-20
WIP Standard
AS4134C
Scope is unavailable.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1492
Kazunobu Ogaki, Takayuki Kawabuchi, Satoshi Takizawa
Abstract The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has developed moving deformable barriers for vehicle crash test procedures to assess vehicle and occupant response in partial overlap vehicle crashes. For this paper, based on the NHTSA Oblique Test procedure, a mid-size sedan was tested. The intent of this research was to provide insight into possible design changes to enhance the oblique collision performance of vehicles. The test results predicted high injury risk for BrIC, chest deflection, and the lower extremities. In this particular study, reducing lower extremity injuries has been focused on. Traditionally, lower extremity injuries have been reduced by limiting the intrusion of the lower region of the cabin's toe-board. In this study, it is assumed that increasing the energy absorbed within the engine compartment is more efficient than reinforcing the passenger compartment as a method to reduce lower extremity injuries.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1491
Dinesh Munjurulimana, Dhanendra Nagwanshi, Matthew Marks
Abstract Automotive OEMs, insurance agencies and regulatory bodies are continuously looking at various accident statistics and proper ways of evaluating unaccounted (as per current regulations and safety ratings) accident scenarios to improve the safety standards of cars. Small overlap and oblique impacts during which a corner of a car hits a tree or the corner of another vehicle are two such situations. Most of the vehicles that are on road scored low when tested for these impact scenarios. This paper focuses on development of energy-absorbing members, using engineering thermoplastics materials, which can be mounted on the BIW of a vehicle, as countermeasures to small overlap impact. Various design and material configurations options, including metal plastic and composite plastic structural members mounted on the BIW are evaluated through CAE studies, against small overlap/oblique impact scenarios.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1369
Kai Liu, Andres Tovar, Emily Nutwell, Duane Detwiler
Abstract This work introduces a new design algorithm to optimize progressively folding thin-walled structures and in order to improve automotive crashworthiness. The proposed design algorithm is composed of three stages: conceptual thickness distribution, design parameterization, and multi-objective design optimization. The conceptual thickness distribution stage generates an innovative design using a novel one-iteration compliant mechanism approach that triggers progressive folding even on irregular structures under oblique impact. The design parameterization stage optimally segments the conceptual design into a reduced number of clusters using a machine learning K-means algorithm. Finally, the multi-objective design optimization stage finds non-dominated designs of maximum specific energy absorption and minimum peak crushing force.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1364
Tao Wang, LIangmo Wang, Yuanlong Wang, Xiaojun Zou, Fuxiang Guo
Abstract The design of aluminum foam reinforced thin-walled tubes has garnered much interest recently due to the high energy absorption capacity of these tubes. As a new kind of engineering composite material, aluminum foam can hugely increase the crashworthiness capacity without sacrificing too much weight. In this paper, axisymmetric thin-walled hollow tubes with four different kinds of cross-sections (circular, square, hexagonal and octagonal) are studied to assess their performance for crashworthiness problems. It is found that the tube with square cross-section has the best crashworthiness performance under axial impact. To seek optimal designs of square aluminum foam reinforced thin-walled tubes, a surrogate modeling technique coupled with a multi-criteria particle swarm optimization algorithm has been developed, to maximize specific energy absorption (SEA) and minimize peak crash force (PCF).
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1362
Chao Li, Il Yong Kim
Abstract A bumper system plays a significant role in absorbing impact energy and buffering the impact force. Important performance measures of an automotive bumper system include the maximum intrusions, the maximum absorbed energy, and the peak impact force. Finite element analysis (FEA) of crashworthiness involve geometry-nonlinearity, material-nonlinearity, and contact-nonlinearity. The computational cost would be prohibitively expensive if structural optimization directly perform on these highly nonlinear FE models. Solving crashworthiness optimization problems based on a surrogate model would be a cost-effective way. This paper presents a design optimization of an automotive rear bumper system based on the test scenarios from the Research Council for Automobile Repairs (RCAR) of Europe. Three different mainstream surrogate models, Response Surface Method (RSM), Kriging method, and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) method were compared.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0567
Kenji Takada, Kentaro Sato, Ninshu Ma
Abstract In order to reduce automobile body weight and improve crashworthiness, the use of high-strength steels has increased greatly in recent years. An optimal combination of both crash safety performance and lightweight structure has been a major challenge in automobile body engineering. In this study, the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion was applied to predict the fracture of high-strength steels. Marciniak-type biaxial stretching tests for high-strength steels were performed to measure the material constant of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion. Furthermore, in order to improve the simulation accuracy, local anisotropic parameters based on the plastic strain (strain dependent model of anisotropy) were measured using the digital image grid method and were incorporated into Hill's anisotropic yield condition by the authors. In order to confirm the validity of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion, uniaxial tensile tests were performed.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1352
Ashish Kumar Sahu, Abhijit Londhe, Suhas Kangde, Vishal Shitole
Abstract Body in White (BIW) is one of the major mass contributors in a full vehicle. Bending stiffness, torsional stiffness, durability, crashworthiness and modal characteristics are the basic performance parameters for which BIW is designed. Usually, to meet these parameters, a great deal of weight is added to BIW. Sensitivity analysis helps to identify the critical panels contributing to the performance while BIW optimization helps to reduce the overall mass of the BIW, without compromising on the basic performances. This paper highlights the optimization study carried out on the BIW of a Sports Utility Vehicle (SUV) for mass reduction. This optimization was carried out considering all the basic performance parameters. In the initial phase of BIW development, optimization helps to ensure minimum BIW weight rather than carrying out mass reduction post vehicle launch.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1614
Yijung Chen, Derek Board, Omar Faruque, Cortney Stancato, James Cheng, Nikhil Bolar, Sreevidhya Anandavally
Abstract The Multi Material Lightweight Vehicle (MMLV) developed by Magna International and Ford Motor Company is a result of a US Department of Energy (DOE) project DE-EE0005574. The project demonstrates the lightweighting potential of a five passenger sedan, while achieving frontal crash test performance comparable to the baseline vehicle. Prototype vehicles were manufactured and limited full vehicle testing was conducted. The Mach-I vehicle design comprised of commercially available materials and production processes, achieved a 364 kg (23.5%) full vehicle mass reduction, enabling the application of a 1.0 liter three-cylinder engine, leading to the potential for reduced environmental impact and improved fuel economy.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1428
Shane Richardson, Andreas Moser, Tia Lange Orton, Roger Zou
Abstract Current techniques that can be used to evaluate and analyse lateral impact speeds of vehicle crashes with poles/trees are based on measuring the deformation crush and using lateral crash stiffness data to estimate the impact speed. However, in some cases the stiffness data is based on broad object side impacts rather than pole impacts. Some have argued that broad object side impact tests can be used for analysing narrow object impacts; however previous authors have identified the fallacy of this premise. Publicly available side pole crash test data is evaluated in terms of crush depth impact speed and impact energy for six general vehicle types. A range of simulated pole impact tests at various speeds and impact angles were conducted using LS-Dyna and PC-Crash. Publicly available Finite Element Vehicle models of a 1996 Ford Taurus, a 1994 Chevrolet C2500 and a 1997 Geo Metro (Suzuki Swift) were used, providing relationships among impact speeds, crush depths and impact angles.
2015-04-09
Standard
J850_201504
Fixed rigid barrier collisions can represent severe automotive impacts. Barrier collision tests are conducted on automotive vehicles to obtain information of value in reducing occupant injuries and in evaluating structural integrity. The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to establish sufficient standardization of barrier collision methods so that results of similar tests conducted at different facilities can be compared. The barrier device may be of almost any configuration, such as flat, round, offset, etc.
2015-04-09
WIP Standard
AS5975C
Scope is unavailable.
2015-03-13
Standard
J972_201503
Collision tests are conducted on automotive vehicles to obtain information of value in evaluation of structural integrity and in reducing the risk of occupant injuries. The deformation resulting from a moving rigid barrier impact is more severe at a given speed than that produced by using an actual vehicle, but is more readily reproducible than that occurring during vehicle to vehicle impacts. The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to establish sufficient standardization of such moving barriers and moving barrier collision methods so that results of tests conducted at different facilities may be compared.
2015-03-12
WIP Standard
AS6323
AS PART STANDARD FOR AN EXTENDED UNION TO REPLACE A CUT OUT AS6117 UNION
2015-03-11
WIP Standard
AS6322
AS PART STANDARD FOR AN EXTENDED UNION TO REPLACE A CUT OUT AS5969 UNION.
2015-03-10
Technical Paper
2015-01-0027
Tia Lange Gaffney, Blake Winter, Arky Elston, Andreas Sandvik, Tandy Pok, Shane Richardson, Nikola Josevski
Abstract When a vehicle is involved in a collision, often a question arises regarding the vehicle's pre-crash velocity. In modern vehicles, velocity data can typically be extracted from the vehicle's Electronic Data Recorder (EDR) via OEM or aftermarket diagnostic tools. However, many modern vehicles - and particularly vehicles operated and/or manufactured in Australia - are not equipped with downloadable EDRs. In these cases, the pre-crash velocity must be calculated based on physical forensic evidence. One method for estimating collision velocity is the crush-energy method, wherein the vehicle is modeled as a spring system. The velocity is then estimated based on the vehicle-specific stiffness properties and on the post-collision crush profile. The vehicle-specific stiffness properties must be derived from a comparable staged crash test. Often, no such crash test exists.
2015-02-27
WIP Standard
AS6116A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) establishes the requirements for externally swaged aluminum tube fittings on aluminum tubing with flareless separable fitting ends for use in hydraulic supply and return aerospace fluid systems including pneumatic, coolants, and fire extinguishers up to a maximum operating pressure of 1500 psig (10 340 kPa) and a maximum operating temperature range of -65 to +225 °F (-54 to +107 °C).

This specification covers a common aluminum fitting that may be used for a range of operating pressures up to 1500 psi with different tubing materials and tubing wall thicknesses, and is assembled with the same tooling in accordance with AS6124. Table 12 shows applicable aerospace fitting part number standard and tubing materials and operating pressures.

Viewing 1 to 30 of 2060

Filter