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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2051
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1491
Dinesh Munjurulimana, Dhanendra Nagwanshi, Matthew Marks
Automotive OEMs, insurance agencies and regulatory bodies are continuously looking at various accident statistics and proper ways of evaluating unaccounted (as per current regulations and safety ratings) accident scenarios to improve the safety standards of cars. Small overlap and oblique impacts during which a corner of a car hits a tree or the corner of another vehicle are two such situations. To address these scenarios, IIHS has incorporated small overlap impact in the NCAP rating. Similarly, NHTSA is developing an oblique test to address this. Most of the vehicles which are on road scored low when tested for these impact scenarios. This is mainly because most of the energy-absorbing structures (in a vehicle) such as rails and crush boxes during a high speed crash do not get engaged with the impactor as the overlap is very small.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1492
Kazunobu Ogaki, Takayuki Kawabuchi, Satoshi Takizawa
We test the mid-size sedan according to NHTSA Oblique test to assess the occupant protection and to provide possible design changes to improve the oblique collision performance. This test result predicted high potential injury for BrIC, chest deflection, and lower extremities. Injury reductions could likely be achieved through optimization of the restraint devices. We focus to reduce the lower extremity injury. Traditionally, lower extremity injuries are often mitigated by reducing the intrusion of the cabin’s dashboard lower region; however, this type of design change can lead to a significant increase in vehicle weight. Increasing the energy absorbed within the engine compartment is more efficient than reinforcing the passenger compartment.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1614
Yijung Chen, Derek Board, Omar Faruque, Cortney Stancato, James Cheng, Nikhil Bolar, Sreevidhya Anandavally
The Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle (“MMLV”) is a joined lightweight vehicle development project between Ford and Magna International, 50% co-funded by US Department of Energy (DOE) and Canadian Provincial grants. The goal of the project is to use lightweight material systems and manufacturing technologies to achieve significant overall weight reduction and demonstrate viability of such design by manufacturing a limited number of prototypes and by proving out attribute performance through tests. This paper presents a summary of the MMLV design development for safety, supported by extensive use of CAE analysis and crash testing of prototypes. Safety design was focused to meet critical crash modes including NCAP full frontal impact, IIHS offset deformable barrier (ODB) impact, Low speed damageability (LSD), Side pole impact and Offset rear impact. A list of critical safety requirements pertaining to the response of the structure were chosen to drive MMLV design.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0567
Kenji Takada, Kentaro Sato, Ninshu Ma
Abstract In order to reduce automobile body weight and improve crashworthiness, the use of high-strength steels has increased greatly in recent years. An optimal combination of both crash safety performance and lightweight structure has been a major challenge in automobile body engineering. In this study, the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion was applied to predict the fracture of high-strength steels. Marciniak-type biaxial stretching tests for high-strength steels were performed to measure the material constant of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion. Furthermore, in order to improve the simulation accuracy, local anisotropic parameters based on the plastic strain (strain dependent model of anisotropy) were measured using the digital image grid method and were incorporated into Hill's anisotropic yield condition by the authors. In order to confirm the validity of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion, uniaxial tensile tests were performed.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1362
Chao Li, Il Yong Kim
Abstract A bumper system plays a significant role in absorbing impact energy and buffering the impact force. Important performance measures of an automotive bumper system include the maximum intrusions, the maximum absorbed energy, and the peak impact force. Finite element analysis (FEA) of crashworthiness involve geometry-nonlinearity, material-nonlinearity, and contact-nonlinearity. The computational cost would be prohibitively expensive if structural optimization directly perform on these highly nonlinear FE models. Solving crashworthiness optimization problems based on a surrogate model would be a cost-effective way. This paper presents a design optimization of an automotive rear bumper system based on the test scenarios from the Research Council for Automobile Repairs (RCAR) of Europe. Three different mainstream surrogate models, Response Surface Method (RSM), Kriging method, and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) method were compared.
2015-03-13
Standard
J972_201503
Collision tests are conducted on automotive vehicles to obtain information of value in evaluation of structural integrity and in reducing the risk of occupant injuries. The deformation resulting from a moving rigid barrier impact is more severe at a given speed than that produced by using an actual vehicle, but is more readily reproducible than that occurring during vehicle to vehicle impacts. The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to establish sufficient standardization of such moving barriers and moving barrier collision methods so that results of tests conducted at different facilities may be compared.
2015-03-12
WIP Standard
AS6323
AS PART STANDARD FOR AN EXTENDED UNION TO REPLACE A CUT OUT AS6117 UNION
2015-03-11
WIP Standard
AS6322
AS PART STANDARD FOR AN EXTENDED UNION TO REPLACE A CUT OUT AS5969 UNION.
2015-03-10
Technical Paper
2015-01-0027
Tia Lange Gaffney, Blake Winter, Arky Elston, Andreas Sandvik, Tandy Pok, Shane Richardson, Nikola Josevski
Abstract When a vehicle is involved in a collision, often a question arises regarding the vehicle's pre-crash velocity. In modern vehicles, velocity data can typically be extracted from the vehicle's Electronic Data Recorder (EDR) via OEM or aftermarket diagnostic tools. However, many modern vehicles - and particularly vehicles operated and/or manufactured in Australia - are not equipped with downloadable EDRs. In these cases, the pre-crash velocity must be calculated based on physical forensic evidence. One method for estimating collision velocity is the crush-energy method, wherein the vehicle is modeled as a spring system. The velocity is then estimated based on the vehicle-specific stiffness properties and on the post-collision crush profile. The vehicle-specific stiffness properties must be derived from a comparable staged crash test. Often, no such crash test exists.
2015-03-05
WIP Standard
AS1946E
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the requirements for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) lined, metallic reinforced, hose assemblies suitable for use in aerospace hydraulic, fuel and lubricating oil systems at temperatures between -67 °F and 450 °F for Class I assemblies, -67 °F and 275 °F for Class II assemblies, and at nominal pressures up to 1500 psi. The hose assemblies are also suitable for use within the same temperature and pressure limitations in aerospace pneumatic systems where some gaseous diffusion through the wall of the PTFE liner can be tolerated. The use of these hose assemblies in pneumatic storage systems is not recommended. In addition, installations in which the limits specified herein are exceeded, or in which the application is not covered specifically by this standard, for example oxygen, shall be subject to the approval of the procuring activity.
2015-02-27
WIP Standard
AS6121B
Scope is unavailable.
2015-02-27
WIP Standard
AS6116A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) establishes the requirements for externally swaged aluminum tube fittings on aluminum tubing with flareless separable fitting ends for use in hydraulic supply and return aerospace fluid systems including pneumatic, coolants, and fire extinguishers up to a maximum operating pressure of 1500 psig (10 340 kPa) and a maximum operating temperature range of -65 to +225 °F (-54 to +107 °C).

This specification covers a common aluminum fitting that may be used for a range of operating pressures up to 1500 psi with different tubing materials and tubing wall thicknesses, and is assembled with the same tooling in accordance with AS6124. Table 12 shows applicable aerospace fitting part number standard and tubing materials and operating pressures.

2015-02-03
WIP Standard
AS5188B
No scope available.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0154
Anand Ramalingam, Saravanakumar Thangamani
Abstract This paper discusses about the Flange design study carried out in Fuel Delivery Module (FDM) for meeting out contradictory requirements of robustness and crash worthiness. FDM is assembled in the fuel tank with flange covering the tank opening, and swirl pot assembly comprising fuel pump attached to flange through two steel struts. During crash, FDM undergoes sudden deceleration. Due to inertia, swirl pot assembly creates bending moment in the flange-strut interface. At such adverse condition, flange should not exhibit crack on the sealing side, as it might expose fuel in the fuel tank to the atmosphere. To ensure safety, flange-strut interface in the bottom side of flange is designed with higher stress concentration factor. So, the struts along with swirl pot assembly will break away from flange during crash without creating crack in the flange sealing faces.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0169
Simhachalam Bade, Lakshmanarao C
Abstract There is a growing need for improved conceptual vehicle designs along with alternative materials to reduce the damage to the passengers and structures in aerospace and automotive industries. The energy absorption characteristics of materials play a major role in designing a safe vehicle for transport. In this paper, compression behavior and energy absorption of aluminum alloy AA6061 and AA7005 tubes in T4 and T6 conditions are investigated by experimental and numerical methods. The AA7005 and AA6061 tubes are solution heat treated and then aged to achieve the final strength in T6 condition. Experimental compression test results have shown improved energy absorption of tubes in T6 condition compared to tubes in T4 condition. There is less variation of energy among the tested samples. The mean load is compared with the results obtained from analytical formulae. Tensile properties have been obtained from tensile tests using UTM for both AA6061 and AA7005 tubes.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0191
Pablo Cruz, Jose Antonio Muñoz, Jordi Viñas
Abstract Robust and reliable FE-model spotweld characterization has been a challenge since spotweld technology was incorporated extensively into the automotive industry. The innovation required leads to constant enhancement of product performance; reduced time-tomarket, cost and weight. The need for quality requires robust development tools, consistency of design decisions, andrepeatability of the development process. Proper spotweld characterization has a clear impact on the above-mentioned needs and carmakers invest in efforts to increase the efficiency of the development process. Furthermore, the continuoususage of new steel grades increases the complexity of the topic. This paper presents an in-depth spotweld study that involves three different spotweld specimens: KSII; lap shear and peeling, for automotive steel grades and usual part thicknesses for each steel grade.
2014-12-09
WIP Standard
J850
Fixed rigid barrier collisions can represent severe automotive impacts. Deceleration conditions during fixed rigid barrier collisions are more readily reproducible than those occurring during impacts with yielding barriers. Barrier collision tests are conducted on automotive vehicles to obtain information of value in reducing occupant injuries and in evaluating structural integrity. The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to establish sufficient standardization of barrier collision methods so that results of similar tests conducted at different facilities can be compared. The barrier device may be of almost any configuration, such as flat, round, offset, etc.
2014-11-02
WIP Standard
AS4459C
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) establishes the requirements for externally swaged tube-fitting assemblies used in aircraft fluid systems in the following pressure classes: B (1500 psi or 10 500 kPa), and D (3000 psi or 21 000 kPa), and in temperature types I (-65 to 160 °F or -55 to 70 °C), and II (-65 to 275 °F or -55 to 135 °C) of AS2001. This specification covers a common Cres, titanium, and aluminum fittings that may be used for a range of operating pressures up to 3000 psi with different tubing materials and tubing wall thicknesses, and is assembled with the same tooling in accordance with AS5902. Table 10 shows applicable aerospace fitting part number standard and tubing materials and operating pressures.
2014-11-02
WIP Standard
AS5008B
Scope is unavailable.
2014-11-01
Book
This title carries the papers developed for the 2014 Stapp Car Crash Conference, the premier forum for the presentation of research in impact biomechanics, human injury tolerance, and related fields, advancing the knowledge of land-vehicle crash injury protection. The conference provides an opportunity to participate in open discussion the causes and mechanisms of injury, experimental methods and tools for use in impact biomechanics research, and the development of new concepts for reducing injuries and fatalities in automobile crashes. The topics covered this year include: • Head/brain biomechanics • Thorax, spine, and pelvis biomechanics • Overlap/angled frontal crash testing and real-world performance • Pedestrian and cyclist injury factors and testing • Rollover and side-impact crashes and computational modeling
2014-10-27
WIP Standard
AS6306
create a standard derived from AS4383 but with dry film lube
2014-08-26
WIP Standard
J1624
The SAE Recommended Practice applies to all commercial, self- propelled motor vehicles which transport property or passengers when: gross weight~the vehicle has a gross weight rating of more than 4540 kg (10 000 lb); fuel~the fuel used has a boiling point above 0 °C (32 °F) at normal atmospheric pressure.
2014-08-26
WIP Standard
J703
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to all commercial, self-propelled, or towed motor vehicles which transport property or passengers in interstate commerce in which the gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating exceeds 4550 kg (10 000 lb).
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