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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2027
WIP Standard
2014-07-28
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the requirements for a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) lined, para-aramid fiber reinforced, hose assembly suitable for use up to 4000 psi, and up to 275 °F, aircraft and missile hydraulic and pneumatic systems.
Standard
2014-07-14
This SAE Recommended Practice describes the dynamic and static testing procedures required to evaluate the integrity of an equipment mount device or system when exposed to a frontal or side impact (i.e. a crash impact). Its purpose is to provide equipment manufacturers, ambulance builders, and end-users with testing procedures and, where appropriate, acceptance criteria that, to a great extent, ensure equipment mount devices or systems meet the same performance criteria across the industry. Prospective equipment mount manufacturers or vendors have the option of performing either dynamic testing or static testing. Descriptions of the test set-up, test instrumentation, photographic/video coverage, test fixture, and performance metrics are included.
Standard
2014-07-14
This SAE Recommended Practice describes the testing procedures required to evaluate the integrity of a ground ambulance-based patient litter, litter retention system, and patient restraint when exposed to a frontal or side impact. Its purpose is to provide litter manufacturers, ambulance builders, and end-users with testing procedures and, where appropriate, acceptance criteria that, to a great extent ensures the patient litter, litter retention system, and patient restraint utilizes a similar dynamic performance test methodology to that which is applied to other vehicle seating and occupant restraint systems. Descriptions of the test set-up, test instrumentation, photographic/video coverage, test fixture, and performance metrics are included.
Standard
2014-07-08
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the requirements for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) lined, metallic reinforced, hose assemblies suitable for use in aerospace hydraulic, fuel and lubricating oil systems at temperatures between -67 °F and 450 °F for Class I assemblies, -67 °F and 275 °F for Class II assemblies, and at nominal pressures up to 1500 psi. The hose assemblies are also suitable for use within the same temperature and pressure limitations in aerospace pneumatic systems where some gaseous diffusion through the wall of the PTFE liner can be tolerated. The use of these hose assemblies in pneumatic storage systems is not recommended. In addition, installations in which the limits specified herein are exceeded, or in which the application is not covered specifically by this standard, for example oxygen, shall be subject to the approval of the procuring activity.
WIP Standard
2014-07-02
This SAE Recommended Practice provides guidelines for procedures and practices used to obtain and record measurements and to analyze and present results of frictional drag tests of a vehicle with its brakes fully applied at a given roadway location. It is for use at accident sites and test sites and is applicable to straight-line stopping of vehicles such as passenger cars, light trucks and vans under fully braked conditions including locked-wheel skids for vehicles with a conventional braking system and for vehicles with full or partial antilock braking systems (ABS). The average deceleration resulting from a given series of tests is intended to be representative of a frictional drag factor for the conditions under which the test was conducted such as the type of vehicle, type and condition of tires, roadway material and roadway surface conditions. The frictional drag factor is intended to conform to use with the stopping distance formula (Fricke, 1990) as stated in Equation 1. Two methods are included: Stopping Distance Method (measurement of the distance required to bring a vehicle to a complete stop from a known initial speed) and Average Acceleration Measurement (using acceleration measuring devices and data analysis to determine the average drag factor).
Standard
2014-06-25
This SAE Recommended Practice describes the test procedures for conducting rear impact occupant restraint and equipment mounting integrity tests for ambulance patient compartment applications. Its purpose is to describe crash pulse characteristics and establish recommended test procedures that will standardize restraint system and equipment mount testing for ambulances. Descriptions of the test set-up, test instrumentation, photographic/video coverage, and the test fixtures are included.
Standard
2014-04-22
Scope is unavailable.
Standard
2014-04-22
Scope is unavailable.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sanjeev Kumar, Rahul Bettakote, Pinak Deb
Abstract Offset crash compliance of a compact car is severe due to the compact layout and stringent fuel economy, weight and cost targets. Scope of the current work is to improve the structural crash performance of a compact car through CAE, in order to meet the offset frontal crash requirements as per ECE R94 Regulation. The project has been classified in three main phases. First phase includes the evaluation of baseline vehicle in CAE. In order to ensure the accuracy of CAE prediction, a methodology for predicting Spotweld rupture was implemented. Using this methodology, it is possible to find out the location and time of spotweld rupture as well as propagation of spotweld rupture in CAE. CAE results of spotweld rupture prediction showed good agreement with the physical test. In second phase, design iterations were carried out in order to meet the performance targets of structural deformation. At critical locations of spotweld rupture, spotwelds were reinforced by addition of arc welds tugs and bolts.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sanjeev Kumar, Pinak Deb
Abstract The side impact accident is one of the very severe crash modes for the struck side occupants. According to NHTSA fatality reports, side impact accounts for over 25% of the fatalities in the US. Similar fatality estimates have been reported in the EU region. Side crash compliance of a compact car is more severe because of the less space available between the occupant and the vehicle structure, stringent fuel economy, weight and cost targets. The current work focuses on the development of Side body structure of a compact car through Computer Aided Tools (CAE), for meeting the Side crash requirements as per ECE R95 Regulation. A modified design philosophy has been adopted for controlling the intrusion of upper and lower portion of B-pillar in order to mitigate the injury to Euro SIDII dummy. At first, initial CAE evaluation of baseline vehicle was conducted. Further design iterations were carried out to optimize the stiffness of B-pillar for meeting the performance targets of B-pillar intrusion and velocity.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ali Seyed Yaghoubi, Paul Begeman, Golam Newaz, Derek Board, Yijung Chen, Omar Faruque
Abstract The present investigation details an experimental procedure for frontal impact responses of a generic steel front bumper crush can (FBCC) assembly subjected to a rigid full and 40% offset impact. There is a paucity of studies focusing on component level tests with FBCCs, and of those, speeds carried out are of slower velocities. Predominant studies in literature pertain to full vehicle testing. Component level studies have importance as vehicles aim to decrease weight. As materials, such as carbon fiber or aluminum, are applied to vehicle structures, computer aided models are required to evaluate performance. A novel component level test procedure is valuable to aid in CAE correlation. All the tests were conducted using a sled-on-sled testing method. Several high-speed cameras, an IR (Infrared) thermal camera, and a number of accelerometers were utilized to study impact performance of the FBCC samples. A linear potentiometer was installed next to each crush-can to directly measure crush length of the can.
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