Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 1254
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2303
Yan Wang, Xudong Wang, Zhen Zhang, Yong Wang, Guoxiu Li, Yusong Yu
Abstract Fuel spray impingement is a common phenomenon during the combustion processes of a DI diesel engine. When liquid droplets impinge on the hot surface of a combustion chamber, a complex heat transfer and mechanical interaction occur between the droplets and combustion chamber. This probably changes the surface topography and microstructure of the impact position. Based on the experimental method, the fuel spray phenomenon and conditions of a surface pit caused by droplet impingement were investigated. The experimental results indicate that the surface pit is formed under specific conditions, i.e., a specific droplet diameter and surface temperature. Scanning electron microscopy of the pit area shows that the microstructure of the pit changed from an original dense and smooth surface to a loose structure. The microstructure of the pit did not show a molten state. The concentration of metal and nonmetallic elements in the pit area changed significantly.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2254
Sirui Huang, Changpu Zhao, Yayong Zhu
In order to improve the combustion and emissions for high-speed marine diesel engines, numerical investigations on effects of different combustion chamber structures combined with intake air humidification have to be conducted in this paper. The study uses AVL Fire code to establish three-dimensional combustion model and simulate the in-cylinder flow, air-fuel mixing and combustion process with the flow dynamics metrics such as swirl number and uniformity index, analyze the interactional effects of combustion chamber structures and intake air humidification against the experimental data for a part load operation at 1350 r/min, find the optimized way to improve engine performance as well as decrease the NOx and soot emissions. The novelty is that this study is to combine different air humidifying rates with different combustion chamber structures including the re-entrant chamber, the straight chamber and the open chamber.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2280
Yuzuru Nada, So Morimoto, Yoshiyuki Kidoguchi, Ryu Kaya, Hideaki Nakano, Shinichi Kobayashi
In our previous studies, we have developed natural gas engines operating under lean conditions to improve thermal efficiency and emission characteristics. We applied a sub-chamber injection system to our engines, in which natural gas is directly injected into a combustion sub-chamber in order to completely separate stoichiometric mixture in the sub-chamber from ultra-lean mixture in the main chamber. The results obtained from engine tests demonstrated excellent performance of our engines in view point of efficiency and NOx emissions. However, we have poor knowledge of mixture distributions in the combustion chambers to understand the mechanism of the improvements. The aim of this paper is to clarify the mixture formation in combustion chambers by means of numerical simulations in the combustion chamber with and without the sub-chamber at a variety of operating conditions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0090
Robert E. Morgan, Morgan Heikal, Emily Pike-Wilson
Abstract Traffic related NOx and particle emission remain a significant concern particularly in the urban environment. Electrification offers a medium to long term solution, but there remains a need to significantly reduce internal combustion engine emissions in the short and medium term, and potentially in the long term for long range inter city transportation. Late injection low temperature combustion (LTC) has the potential to achieve ultra-low emissions levels in a compression ignition engine by increasing the lean pre-mixed burn fraction. However, significant quantities of diluent are normally required to achieve the required delay in ignition and pre-mixing to achieve LTC. This results in high boost requirements, increased pumping work and the complexity of the air handling system and potentially adversely impacting fuel economy.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0129
Vladimir Merzlikin, Svetlana Parshina, Victoria Garnova, Andrey Bystrov, Alexander Makarov, Sergey Khudyakov
Abstract Running efficiency of LHR diesel has been confirmed by mean of well-known types of heat-insulating (HICs) or thermal barrier (TBCs) coatings. These materials are considered as a semitransparent media SHICs (STBCs) in the form of an ensemble of diffraction objects, forming own thermoradiative fields under the scattering theory laws. This problem is relevant for a diesel with combustion chamber (CC) in which intensive IR radiation reaches ~50% of total thermal flux. The authors indicate that predetermined selection of optical and thermoradiative parameters in the same spectrum for coatings (due to specific structural composition and porosity) can change their temperature fields inside its subsurface zone and hence in the CC gas volume. Previous author's research of optical parameters for ceramic semitransparent materials allowed offering SHIC (STBC) samples for rig testings.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0714
Qinglong Tang, Haifeng Liu, Mingfa Yao
Abstract Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) is a potential combustion strategy to achieve high engine efficiency with ultra-low NOx and soot emissions. Fuel stratification can be used to control the heat release rate of RCCI combustion. But the in-cylinder combustion process of the RCCI under different fuel stratification degrees has not been well understood, especially at a higher engine load. In this paper, simultaneous measurement of natural flame luminosity and emission spectra was carried out on a light-duty optical RCCI engine under different fuel stratification degrees. The engine was run at 1200 revolutions per minute under a load about 7 bar indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP). In order to form fuel stratification degrees from low to high, the common-rail injection timing of n-heptane was changed from -180° CA after top dead center (ATDC) to -10° CA ATDC, while the iso-octane delivered in the intake stroke was fixed.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0087
Satoshi Ichihashi
Abstract Motorcycle usage continues to expand globally. Motorcycles use various fuels in different countries and regions, and it is required that they comply with emissions and fuel consumption regulations as specified in UN-GTR No.2 (WMTC). In general, a motorcycle engine has a large bore diameter and a high compression ratio due to demands of high performance. Poor fuel quality may cause damage to the engine, mainly by knocking. Knock control systems utilizing high-frequency vibration detection strategies like knock sensors, which are equipped on several sport-touring motorcycles, are not used widely for reasons of complex construction and high cost. This research aims to develop a new concept of combustion control for common motorcycle as an alternative.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0079
Daisuke Fukui, Yoshinari Ninomiya
Abstract With the remarkable rise of gas prices and global air pollution, measures to improve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions have become urgently needed in the motorcycle industry, as in the automobile industry. One approach is to improve the thermal efficiency of the engine, and much research and development has been done for many years on this subject. Community-based small motorcycles require both high mobility and fuel efficiency in developed and developing countries. Drivability and emission control of recreation and sports motorcycles are also needed. However, when developing engines for small motorcycles, due to differences in engine speed range, driving load range, devices for driving and emission control, market prices, and infrastructure, some different approaches from those for automobile engines with their many advanced technologies are needed.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2177
Kevin L. Hoag, Barrett Mangold, Terrence Alger, Zainal Abidin, Christopher Wray, Mark Walls, Christopher Chadwell
Abstract A unique single cylinder engine was used to assess engine performance and combustion characteristics at three different strokes, with all other variables held constant. The engine utilized a production four-valve, pentroof cylinder head with an 86mm bore. The stock piston was used, and a variable deck height design allowed three crankshafts with strokes of 86, 98, and 115mm to be tested. The compression ratio was also held constant. The engine was run with a controlled boost-to-backpressure ratio to simulate turbocharged operation, and the valve events were optimized for each operating condition using intake and exhaust cam phasers. EGR rates were swept from zero to twenty percent under low and high speed conditions, at MBT and maximum retard ignition timings. The increased stroke engines demonstrated efficiency gains under all operating conditions, as well as measurably reduced 10-to-90 percent burn durations.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2333
Akio Kawaguchi, Hiroki Iguma, Hideo Yamashita, Noriyuki Takada, Naoki Nishikawa, Chikanori Yamashita, Yoshifumi Wakisaka, Kenji Fukui
Abstract To improve fuel efficiency of engines, cooling heat loss is one of the most dominant losses among the various engine losses to reduce. The present work proposes a new heat insulation concept in combustion chamber, "TSWIN (Thermo-Swing Wall Insulation Technology)" that can reduce heat loss to the coolant without any sacrifice in other engine performances. Surface temperature of insulation coat on combustion chamber wall changes rapidly, according with the fluctuating temperature of in-cylinder gas. Reduced temperature differences between them lead to lower heat transfer. During the intake stroke, surface temperature of the insulation coat goes down rapidly, and prevents intake air heating. To realize the scheme mentioned above, a new insulation material with both low thermal conductivity and low volumetric heat capacity, "SiRPA (Silica Reinforced Porous Anodized Aluminum)" was developed and applied on the top surface of the piston.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0636
Kevin L. Hoag, Anthony Megel
Abstract The objective of this work was to develop a methodology to rapidly assess comparative intake port designs for their capability to produce tumble flow in spark-ignition engine combustion chambers. Tumble characteristics are of relatively recent interest, and are generated by a combination of intake port geometry, valve lift schedule, and piston motion. While simple approaches to characterize tumble from steady-state cylinder head flow benches have often been used, the ability to correlate the results to operating engines is limited. The only available methods that take into account both piston motion and valve lift are detailed computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, or optical measurements of flow velocity. These approaches are too resource intensive for rapid comparative assessment of multiple port designs.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0545
Vincenzo De Bellis, Fabio Bozza, Stefano Fontanesi, Elena Severi, Fabio Berni
Abstract It is widely recognized that spatial and temporal evolution of both macro- and micro- turbulent scales inside internal combustion engines affect air-fuel mixing, combustion and pollutants formation. Particularly, in spark ignition engines, tumbling macro-structure induces the generation of a proper turbulence level to sustain the development and propagation of the flame front. As known, 3D-CFD codes are able to describe the evolution of the in-cylinder flow and turbulence fields with good accuracy, although a high computational effort is required. For this reason, only a limited set of operating conditions is usually investigated. On the other hand, thanks to a lower computational burden, 1D codes can be employed to study engine performance in the whole operating domain, despite of a less detailed description of in-cylinder processes. The integration of 1D and 3D approaches appears hence a promising path to combine the advantages of both.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0732
Jessica Dahlstrom, Oivind Andersson, Martin Tuner, Håkan Persson
Abstract Heat loss is one of the greatest energy losses in engines. More than half of the heat is lost to cooling media and exhaust losses, and they thus dominate the internal combustion engine energy balance. Complex processes affect heat loss to the cylinder walls, including gas motion, spray-wall interaction and turbulence levels. The aim of this work was to experimentally compare the heat transfer characteristics of a stepped-bowl piston geometry to a conventional re-entrant diesel bowl studied previously and here used as the baseline geometry. The stepped-bowl geometry features a low surface-to-volume ratio compared to the baseline bowl, which is considered beneficial for low heat losses. Speed, load, injection pressure, swirl level, EGR rate and air/fuel ratio (λ) were varied in a multi-cylinder light duty engine operated in conventional diesel combustion (CDC) mode.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0722
Yoshihiro Funayama, Hiroshi Nakajima, Kiyohiro Shimokawa
Abstract In order to improve the brake thermal efficiency of the engine, such as cooling and friction losses from the theoretical thermal efficiency, it is necessary to minimize various losses. However, it is also essential to consider improvements in theoretical thermal efficiency along with the reduction of the various losses. In an effort to improve the brake thermal efficiency of heavy-duty diesel engines used in commercial vehicles, this research focused on two important factors leading to the engine's theoretical thermal efficiency: the compression ratio and the specific heat ratio. Based on the results of theoretical thermodynamic cycle analyses for the effects of the above two factors, it was predicted that raising the compression ratio from a base engine specification of 17 to 26, and increasing the specific heat ratio would lead to a significant increase in theoretical thermal efficiency.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1086
Taiyu Zhang, Jing Qin, Bing Li, Minyue Wu, Tongjin Wang, Jing Qin, Bing Li, Minyue Wu, Tongjin Wang, Yunlong Li, Bo Qin
Abstract In order to improve the fuel consumption and expand the range of low fuel consumption area of a 1.5L Atkinson cycle PFI engine, the effect of the intake manifold length and chamber shape on the engine performance is investigated by setting up a GT-power (1-D) and an AVL-Fire (3-D) computational model which are calibrated with experimental data. After this the new engine was transformed to the test bench to do the calibration experiment. The results demonstrate that the intake manifold case_1 (the length is 300mm, side intake form) matched with a new designed chamber improves combustion in cylinder with a range 1.6∼7.4g/(kW•h) reduced in fuel consumption of speed that has been studied; the case_3 (the length is 100mm, intermediate intake form) matched with the new designed chamber with a range 3.86∼7g/(kW•h) reduced in fuel consumption of speed that has been studied. Both case_1 and case_3 expand the range of low fuel consumption area significantly.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0661
Yoshifumi Wakisaka, Minaji Inayoshi, Kenji Fukui, Hidemasa Kosaka, Yoshihiro Hotta, Akio Kawaguchi, Noriyuki Takada
The reduction of the heat loss from the in-cylinder gas to the combustion chamber wall is one of the key technologies for improving the thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines. This paper describes an experimental verification of the “temperature swing” insulation concept, whereby the surface temperature of the combustion chamber wall follows that of the transient gas. First, we focus on the development of “temperature swing” insulation materials and structures with the thermo-physical properties of low thermal conductivity and low volumetric heat capacity. Heat flux measurements for the developed insulation coating show that a new insulation material formed from silica-reinforced porous anodized aluminum (SiRPA) offers both heat-rejecting properties and reliability in an internal combustion engine. Furthermore, a laser-induced phosphorescence technique was used to verify the temporal changes in the surface temperature of the developed insulation coating.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0647
Azmi Osman, M. Khairul Arif Muhammad Yusof, Mohammad Rafi
Abstract Additional fuel consumption reduction during the NEDC test cycle and real life driving can be effectively achieved by quickly raising the temperatures of the powertrain’s parts, oils and coolant closer to the optimal operating temperatures. In particular, the engine cooling system today must play a bigger role in the overall thermal management of the powertrain’s fluids and metals during warm-up, idle and severe operating conditions. In responding to these additional requirements, the previously proposed cost effective split cooling system has been further evolved to expedite the powertrain’s warming up process without compromising the overall heat rejection performance during severe operating conditions. In achieving these warming and cooling functions, the coolant flow rate in the cylinder head is almost stagnant when the single thermostat is closed and at its maximum when the thermostat is fully opened.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0703
Yoshihiro Imaoka, Kiyotaka Shouji, Takao Inoue, Toru Noda
Abstract Technologies for improving the fuel economy of gasoline engines have been vigorously developed in recent years for the purpose of reducing CO2 emissions. Increasing the compression ratio is an example of a technology for improving the thermal efficiency of gasoline engines. A significant issue of a high compression ratio engine for improving fuel economy and low-end torque is prevention of knocking under a low engine speed. Knocking is caused by autoignition of the air-fuel mixture in the cylinder and seems to be largely affected by heat transfer from the intake port and combustion chamber walls. In this study, the influence of heat transfer from the walls of each part was analyzed by the following three approaches using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and experiments conducted with a multi-cooling engine system. First, the temperature rise of the air-fuel mixture by heat transfer from each part was analyzed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0654
Lakshmaiah Brahmasani, Sarangapani K, Samson Solomon, Parvej Khan
Abstract The paper presents the development of a proposed rear powertrain cooling system of a minivan. The packaging of cooling system is finalized such that the radiator faces towards the rear of the vehicle bumper which is opposite to the conventional rear cooling system (i.e. radiator faces towards the front of the vehicle). In the small minivan, the space ahead of the engine is used as a floor for passenger foot. Due to these space constraints, the cooling system has no choice, but to move rear of the vehicle and above the departure plane to meet packaging requirements. Furthermore, in the conventional rear cooling system, in front of the radiator, there is engine and exhaust system, which heats up the air going to the radiator and reduces radiator cooling performance. Thus the cooling system is placed such that the radiator faces the rear bumper to draw in cooler air.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0658
Tomoyuki Kogo, Yoshihiko Hamamura, Koichiro Nakatani, Tadashi Toda, Akio Kawaguchi, Akira Shoji
Abstract A highly efficient new 2.8-liter inline 4-cylinder diesel engine has been developed in response to growing demand for diesel engines and to help save energy while providing high-torque performance. Engine efficiency was improved by reducing cooling loss based on an innovative combustion concept applied across the whole engine. Cooling loss was reduced by restricting in-cylinder gas flows and improving combustion chamber insulation. To prevent the restricted gas flows from affecting emissions, a new combustion chamber shape was developed that increased air utilization in the cylinder through optimizing the in-cylinder fuel distribution. Combustion chamber insulation was improved by a new insulation coat that changes the wall surface temperature in accordance with the gas temperature. This reduces cooling loss and avoids the trade-off effect of intake air heating.
2015-11-17
Technical Paper
2015-32-0790
Takahiro Shima, Yuki Takamura, Hirotaka Suzuki, Keisuke Mochizuki, Akira Iijima, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji
Internal combustion engines today are required to achieve even higher efficiency and cleaner exhaust emissions. Currently, research interest is focused on premixed compression ignition (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition, HCCI) combustion. However, HCCI engines have no physical means of initiating ignition such as a spark plug or the fuel injection timing and quantity. Therefore, it is difficult to control the ignition timing. In addition, combustion occurs simultaneously at multiple sites in the combustion chamber. As a result, combustion takes place extremely rapidly especially in the high load region. That makes it difficult for the engine to operate stably at high loads. This study focused on the fuel composition as a possible means to solve these problems. The effect of using fuel blends on the HCCI operating region and combustion characteristics was investigated using a single-cylinder test engine.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2449
Mark Aaron Hoffman, Zoran Filipi
The limited operational range of low temperature combustion engines is influenced by near-wall conditions. A major factor is the accumulation and burn-off of combustion chamber deposits. Previous studies have begun to characterize in-situ combustion chamber deposit thermal properties with the end goal of understanding, and subsequently replicating the beneficial effects of CCD on HCCI combustion. Combustion chamber deposit thermal diffusivity was found to differ depending on location within the chamber, with significant initial spatial variations, but a certain level of convergence as equilibrium CCD thickness is reached. A previous study speculatively attributed these spatially dependent CCD diffusivity differences to either local differences in morphology, or interactions with the fuel-air charge in the DI engine. In this work, the influence of directly injected gasoline on CCD thermal diffusivity is measured using the in-situ technique based on fast thermocouple signals.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-1788
Hiroshi Mizokami, Mina Nishi, Norimasa Iida
HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) engine has a problem which causes knocking when the maximum PRR (Pressure Rise Rate) reaches a certain level because it takes the form of combustion of simultaneous multi-point ignition by compression of the air-fuel pre-mixture. This study focused on stratified charge of fuel in combustion chamber. This method disperses the timing of local ignition. The distribution of fuel concentration is measured by using LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence). As a result, the maximum PRR is reduced by stratified charge of fuel. In addition, it is confirmed that the dispersion of combustion timing depends on the dispersion of fuel concentration.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-1847
Akira Kikusato, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D-CFD) code was combined with a detailed combustion chamber heat transfer model. The established model allowed not only prediction of instantaneous combustion chamber wall surface temperature distributions in practical calculation time but also investigation of the characteristics of combustion, emissions and heat losses affected by the wall temperature distributions. Although zero-dimensional combustion analysis can consider temporal changes in the heat transfer coefficient and in-cylinder gas temperature, it cannot take into account the effect of interactions between spatially distributed charge and wall temperatures. In contrast, 3D-CFD analysis can consider temporal and spatial changes in both parameters. However, in most zero-/multi- dimensional combustion analyses, wall temperatures are assumed to be temporally constant and spatially homogeneous.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-1996
Osamu Aoki, Tatsuya Tanaka, Yusuke Nakao, Ryo Kiyosue, Yuji Harada, Hiroyuki Yamamoto
Coating the heat insulation materials on the combustion chamber walls is one of the solutions to reduce the cooling loss of internal combustion engines. In order to examine the coatings, the evaluation of the heat transfer coefficient and the analysis of the heat transfer phenomena on the heat insulated walls are important. Firstly, the highly-responsive wall temperature sensor is developed, and the instantaneous wall heat flux is measured to evaluate the heat transfer coefficient on the heat insulated walls. The results show that the Nusselt number on the heat insulated walls is less influenced by the Reynolds number variation than that on the metal walls. Secondly, the high speed µ-PIV is employed to analyze the various turbulent flow characteristics. The results show that the turbulent dissipation on the heat insulated walls is smaller than that on the metal walls.
2015-05-01
Journal Article
2015-01-9081
Sakthinathan Ganapathy Pandian, Srivathsan Puzhuthivakkam Rengarajan, Terrin P Babu, Vignesh Natarajan, Harikrishnan Kanagasabesan
Abstract Functionally Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings (FG-TBC) increases the performance of high temperature components in gasoline engines by decreasing the thermal conductivity and increasing the unburned charge oxidation in the flame quenching area with the increase in temperature near the entrance of the crevice volume between the piston and the liner during the compression and the early part of the expansion strokes. In this study, a 3-D finite element steady state thermal and structural analysis are carried out on both uncoated and functionally graded NiCrAlY/YSZ/Al2O3 coated gasoline engine piston using a commercial code, namely ANSYS. The effects of coating on the thermo mechanical behaviours of the piston are investigated. It has been shown that the maximum surface temperature of the ceramic coated piston is improved approximately by 7% for the Al-Si alloy.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0743
Michael Clifford Kocsis, Shinhyuk Joo, Thomas Briggs, Terrence Alger
Abstract In response to the sensitivity to diesel aftertreatment costs in the medium duty market, a John Deere 4045 was converted to burn gasoline with high levels of EGR. This presented some unique challenges not seen in light duty gasoline engines as the flat head and diesel adapted ports do not provide optimum in-cylinder turbulence. As the bore size increases, there is more opportunity for knock or incomplete combustion to occur. Also, the high dilution used to reduce knock slows the burn rates. In order to speed up the burn rates, various levels of swirl were investigated. A four valve head with different levels of port masking showed that increasing the swirl ratio decreased the combustion duration, but ultimately ran into high pumping work required to generate the desired swirl. A two valve head was used to overcome the breathing issue seen in the four valve head with port masking.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0786
Keita Arato, Teruyuki Takashima
Abstract A method to improve fuel consumption in diesel engines is to enhance their theoretical thermal efficiency by increasing their compression ratio. However, this results in an increase in heat loss due to the elevation of the concomitant in-cylinder temperature and the expansion of the impingement area between fuel spray and chamber wall. Therefore, reducing heat loss to the chamber wall is important to effectively benefit from a high compression ratio. To meet this challenge, in this study, we optimized the combustion chamber shape using the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation software, CONVERGE. A rationale proposed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison was selected to outline the shape and combined with a multiobjective optimization software, modeFRONTIER. The calculations produced a shallow dishlike combustion chamber comprising a plateau at its center that may reduce heat loss.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0599
Akhilendra Pratap Singh, Aditya Gupta, Avinash Kumar Agarwal
Abstract Better understanding of flow phenomena inside the combustion chamber of a diesel engine and accurate measurement of flow parameters is necessary for engine optimization i.e. enhancing power output, fuel economy improvement and emissions control. Airflow structures developed inside the engine combustion chamber significantly influence the air-fuel mixing. In this study, in-cylinder air flow characteristics of a motored, four-valve diesel engine were investigated using time-resolved high-speed Tomographic Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). Single cylinder optical engine provides full optical access of combustion chamber through a transparent cylinder and flat transparent piston top. Experiments were performed in different vertical planes at different engine speeds during the intake and compression stroke under motoring condition. For visualization of air flow pattern, graphite particles were used for flow seeding.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0524
Maniraj Perumal, Baskar Anthonysamy, Ashokkumar Sundaramoorthy
This method and its special process are particularly suited for the production of Porous free combustion chamber prototype aluminium cylinder head casting. Current methods for producing porous free combustion chamber are graphite coating and CI/Cu metal chill which are moderately effective in achieving porous free combustion chamber. However, these current methods have serious drawbacks like high rejections due to blow holes/gas porosity generated from graphite coating and fine porosity due to prolonged cooling because of slow rate of cooling while peak temperature of metal chills. The present work shows how this goal can be achieved in cylinder head casting of single cylinder high speed engine. Fundamental micro structural investigations are shown as well as the results of tensile tests, high temperature strength, corrosion behavior and static and dynamic component testing.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 1254

Filter