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2017-11-15
Journal Article
2017-32-0120
Go Asai, Yusuke Watanabe, Shuntaro Ishiguro, Gen Shibata, Hideyuki Ogawa, Yoshimitsu Kobashi
To extend the operational range of premixed diesel combustion, fuel reformation by piston induced compression of rich homogeneous air-fuel mixtures was conducted in this study. Reformed gas compositions and chemical processes were first simulated with the chemistry dynamics simulation, CHEMKIN Pro, by changing the intake oxygen content, intake air temperature, and compression ratio. A single cylinder diesel engine was utilized to verify the simulation results. With the simulation and experiments, the characteristics of the reformed gas with respect to the reformer cylinder operating condition were obtained. Further, the thermal decomposition and partial oxidation reaction mechanisms of the fuel in extremely low oxygen concentrations were obtained with the characteristics of the gas production at the various reaction temperatures.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2327
Joonsik Hwang, Choongsik Bae, Chetankumar Patel, Avinash Kumar Agarwal, Tarun Gupta
Abstract Fuel atomization and air-fuel mixing processes play a dominant role on engine performance and emission characteristics in a direct injection compression ignition engine. Understanding of microscopic spray characteristics is essential to predict combustion phenomena. The present work investigated near nozzle flow and atomization characteristics of biodiesel fuels in a constant volume chamber. Waste cooking oil, Jatropha, and Karanja biodiesels were applied and the results were compared with those of conventional diesel fuel. The tested fuels were injected by a solenoid injector with a common-rail injection system. A high-speed camera with a long distance microscopic lens was utilized to capture the near nozzle flow. Meanwhile, Sauter mean diameter (SMD) was measured by a phase Doppler particle analyzer to compare atomization characteristics.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2329
Xiao Ma, Yue Ma, Shuaishuai Sun, Shi-Jin Shuai, Zhi Wang, Jian-Xin Wang
Abstract Polyoxymethylene dimethyl ethers (PODEn) are promising alternative fuel candidates for diesel engines because they present advantages in soot reduction. This study uses a PODEn mixture (contains PODE3-6) from mass production to provide oxygen component in blend fuels. The spray combustion of PODEn-diesel bend fuels in a constant volume vessel was studied using high speed imaging, PLII-LEM and OH* chemiluminescence. Fuels of several blend ratios are compared with pure diesel. Flame luminance data show a near linear decrease tendency with the blend ratio increasing. The OH* images reveal that the ignition positions of all the cases have small differences, which indicates that using a low PODEn blend ratio of no more than 30% does not need significant adjustment in engine combustion control strategies. It is found that 30% PODEn blended with diesel (P30) can effectively reduce the total soot by approximately 68% in comparison with pure diesel.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2332
Tamara Ottenwaelder, Stefan Pischinger
Abstract In order to reduce engine out CO2 emissions it is a main subject to find new alternative fuels out of renewable sources. For this paper, several fuels were selected which can be produced out of biomass or with hydrogen which is generated directly via electrolysis with electricity from renewable sources. All fuels are compared to conventional diesel fuel and two diesel surrogates. It is well known that there can be a large effect of fuel properties on mixture formation and combustion, which may result in a completely different engine performance compared to the operation with conventional diesel fuels. Mixture formation and ignition behavior can also largely affect the pollutant formation. The knowledge of the combustion behavior is also important to design new engine geometries or implement new calibrations for an existing engine. The fuel properties of the investigated fuels comprise a large range, for example in case of the derived cetane number, from below 30 up to 100.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2365
Murugesa Pandian M, Anand Krishnasamy
Abstract Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) is one of the most promising low temperature combustion (LTC) strategies to achieve higher thermal efficiencies along with ultra low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter emissions. Small single cylinder diesel engines of air-cooled type are finding increasing applications in the agriculture pump-set and small utility power generation owing to their lower cost and fuel economy advantages. In the present work, a small single cylinder diesel engine is initially operated under conventional combustion mode at rated speed, varying load conditions to establish the base line reference data. Then, the engine is modified to operate under RCCI combustion mode with a newly designed cylinder head to accommodate a high pressure, fully flexible electronically controlled direct diesel fuel injection system, a low pressure gasoline port fuel injection system and an intake air pre heater.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2363
Murugesa Pandian M, Anand Krishnasamy
Abstract Advanced low temperature combustion (LTC) modes are most promising to reduce green house gas emissions owing to fuel economy benefits apart from simultaneously reducing oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions from diesel engines. Various LTC strategies have been proposed so far and each of these LTC strategies have their own advantages and limitations interms of precise ignition control, achievable load range and higher unburned emissions. In the present work, a small single cylinder diesel engine is initially operated under conventional combustion mode at rated speed, varying load conditions to establish the base line reference data. Then, the engine is modified to operate under different LTC strategies including Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI).
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2368
Wenji Song, Weiyong Tang, Bob Chen
Abstract The 4JB1 diesel engine originated from Isuzu has large share in the China light duty truck market. However, the tightened NOx emission target enforced by NS-V legislation compared with NS-IV regulatory standard is very challenging for this engine platform which originally adopted the DOC+POC catalyst layout. Furthermore, combustion characterization of this type engine leads to high soluble organic fraction (SOF) content in engine out particulates, which requires the catalysts in the exhaust after-treatment system (ATS) to deliver high SOF conversion efficiency in order to meet the regulation limit for particulate matters (PM). In this paper, an innovative exhaust catalyst layout with DOC+V-SCR is introduced. The front DOC is specially formulated with optimized PGM (Platinum Group Metal) loading which ensures effective SOF oxidation while keeping sulfuric acid and sulfate generation minimal.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2398
Bei Liu, Xiaobei Cheng, Jialu Liu, Han Pu, Li Yi
Abstract Partially-premixed low-temperature combustion avoids the soot and NOx generation area on the Ф-T diagram to reduce both engine NOx and soot emissions. Compared with the HCCI combustion mode, partially-premixed combustion (PPC) has better combustion controllability. The purpose of controlling the combustion phase can be achieved by adjusting injection timing and strategy. Based on a 4 cylinder turbocharged diesel engine, this paper aims at investigating the influence of injection strategy to the engine combustion and emission formation under the condition of single injection and split injection PPC strategy respectively, in which the primary purpose focus on the emission characteristics of particles. Results show that the early-injection PPC formed by single injection can reduce the quantity, quality and geometric mean diameter (GMD) of particles obviously.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2397
Zhan Gao, Lei Zhu, Xinyao Zou, Chunpeng Liu, Zhen Huang
Abstract Biodiesel is a potential alternative fuel which can meet the growing need for sustainable energy. Partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) is an important low-temperature combustion strategy to reduce NOx and soot emission of diesel engines. To investigate partial premixing impact on particle formation in flames of biodiesel or biodiesel surrogates, an experimental study was performed to compare the soot morphology and nanostructure evolution in laminar co-flow methyl decanoate non-premixed flame (NPF) and partially premixed flame (PPF). The thermophoretic sampling technique was used to capture particles along flame centerlines. Soot morphology information and volume fraction were obtained from TEM analysis and nanostructure features were evaluated by HR-TEM. With primary equivalence ratio of 19, gas temperature of PPF is higher along flame centerline compared with NPF. The results show an initially stronger sooting tendency in PPF at lower positions.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2403
Yanzhao An, R Vallinayagam, S Vedharaj, Jean-Baptiste Masurier, Alaaeldin Dawood, Mohammad Izadi Najafabadi, Bart Somers, Bengt Johansson
Abstract In-cylinder visualization, combustion stratification, and engine-out particulate matter (PM) emissions were investigated in an optical engine fueled with Haltermann straight-run naphtha fuel and corresponding surrogate fuel. The combustion mode was transited from homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) to conventional compression ignition (CI) via partially premixed combustion (PPC). Single injection strategy with the change of start of injection (SOI) from early to late injections was employed. The high-speed color camera was used to capture the in-cylinder combustion images. The combustion stratification was analyzed based on the natural luminosity of the combustion images. The regulated emission of unburned hydrocarbon (UHC), carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides (NOX) were measured to evaluate the combustion efficiency together with the in-cylinder rate of heat release.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2412
Dojoong Kim, Dong Hyeong Lee, Jong Wung Park, Soo Hyun Hwang, Wan Jae Jeon
Abstract This paper introduces a two-step variable valve actuation (VVA) mechanism equipped with an electronic switching system, which can be applied to OHC valve trains with end pivot rocker arms. The electronic switching system is driven by a dedicated solenoid and is not affected by the temperature or pressure of the engine oil. Therefore, not only can the dynamic stability be secured at the time of mode switching but the operation delay time can also be kept short enough. Several models of two-step VVA mechanisms were fabricated and the operability of the mechanism and switching system was experimentally confirmed. The two-step VVA mechanism developed in this study can also be used as a cylinder deactivation (CDA) system by assigning the lift of the low-speed cam to be zero. By attaching a roller to the portion of the rocker arm that is in contact with the base cam, the problem of pad wear, which is often present in CDA mechanism, is also fundamentally solved.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2429
Felix Leach, Martin Davy, Adam Weall, Brian Cooper
Abstract Diesel engine designers often use swirl flaps to increase air motion in cylinder at low engine speeds, where lower piston velocities reduce natural in-cylinder swirl. Such in-cylinder motion reduces smoke and CO emissions by improved fuel-air mixing. However, swirl flaps, acting like a throttle on a gasoline engine, create an additional pressure drop in the inlet manifold and thereby increase pumping work and fuel consumption. In addition, by increasing the fuel-air mixing in cylinder the combustion duration is shortened and the combustion temperature is increased; this has the effect of increasing NOx emissions. Typically, EGR rates are correspondingly increased to mitigate this effect. Late inlet valve closure, which reduces an engine’s effective compression ratio, has been shown to provide an alternative method of reducing NOx emissions.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2417
Houchuan Fan, Jimin Ni, Xiuyong Shi, Nan Jiang, Dayong Qu, Yi Zheng, Yinghong Zheng
Abstract An electronic waste-gated turbocharger for automotive application can accurately control the boost pressure and effectively reduce turbo-lag. It can improve the transient responsive performance of engine and the acceleration performance of vehicle, which makes vehicle have a better adaptation to the complex traffic environment. A detailed analysis of aerodynamic working principle of electronic wastegate is the foundation for designing the control strategy of electronic wastegate. Putting turbine with electronic wastegate under unsteady condition that simulates the pulse exhaust gas of engine and studying influences of different valve opening on the performance of turbine has the practical value. This paper sets fixed and periodical unsteady conditions and adopts numerical methods to explore the performance of turbine in twin-entry turbocharger and the flow loss of bypass. Steady simulation structure is given for reference.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2182
Xikai Liu, Xingyu Liang, Yonge Wu, Yuesen Wang
Abstract According to the study of the soot emission in the combustion of diesel,a new reduced mechanism for n-Heptane was constructed to describe the combustion process in diesel engine by using sensitivity analysis.Furthermore,verifying the ignition delay time in combustion process by using CHEMKIN PRO in different pressure of 13.5 atm and 42 atm, initial temperatures of 600k and equivalence ratio of 0.5 and 1.0.Then,compare the simulated results with the experiment data, the mechanisms used in the simulation were Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) detail mechanism and the State Key Laboratory of Engine (SKLE) mechanism.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2184
Vincenzo De Bellis, Fabio Bozza, Daniela Tufano
Abstract Nowadays, the development of a new engine is becoming more and more complex due to conflicting factors regarding technical, environmental and economic issues. The experimental activity has to comply with the above complexities, resulting in increasing cost and duration of engine development. For this reason, the simulation is becoming even more prominent, thanks to its lower financial burden, together with the need of an improved predictive capability. Among the other numerical approaches, the 1D models represent a proper compromise between reliability and computational effort, especially if the engine behavior has to be investigated over a number of operating conditions. The combustion model has a key role in this contest and the research of consistent approaches is still on going. In this paper, two well-assessed combustion models for Spark Ignition (SI) engines are described and compared: the eddy burn-up theory and the fractal approach.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2185
Chao He, Jiaqiang Li, Longqing Zhao, Yanyan Wang, Wei Gu
Abstract More and more stringent emission regulations and the desire to reduce fuel consumption lead to an increasing demand for precise and close-loop combustion control of diesel engines. Cylinder pressure-based combustion control is gradually used for diesel engines in order to enhance emission robustness and reduce fuel consumption. However, it increases the cost. In this paper, a new prediction method of combustion parameters is presented for diesel engines. The experiment was carried out on a test bench to obtain the ECU (Electronic Control Unit) signals of a heavy-duty diesel engine by calibration software. The combustion parameters was measured by a combustion analyzer, such as maximum cylinder pressure (MCP), maximum combustion temperature (MCT), and combustion center of gravity (CA50). A combustion model using genetic programming (GP) is built. The input parameters are chosen from the ECU signals, such as engine speed, engine load, injection quantities, inlet air flow rate.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2186
Lukas Urban, Michael Grill, Sebastian Hann, Michael Bargende
Abstract Engine Knock is a stochastic phenomenon that occurs during the regular combustion of spark ignition (SI) engines and limits its efficiency. Knock is triggered by an autoignition of local “hot spots” in the unburned zone, ahead of the flame front. Regarding chemical kinetics, the temperature and pressure history as well as the knock resistance of the fuel are the main driver for the autoignition process. In this paper, a new knock modeling approach for natural gas blends is presented. It is based on a kinetic fit for the ignition delay times that has been derived from chemical kinetics simulations. The knock model is coupled with an enhanced burn rate model that was modified for Methane-based fuels. The two newly developed models are incorporated in a predictive 0D/1D simulation tool that provides a cost-effective method for the development of natural gas powered SI engines.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2188
Bruno S. Soriano, Edward S. Richardson, Stephanie Schlatter, Yuri M. Wright
Abstract Dual-fuel combustion is an attractive approach for utilizing alternative fuels such as natural gas in compression-ignition internal combustion engines. In this approach, pilot injection of a more reactive fuel provides a source of ignition for the premixed natural gas/air. The overall performance combines the high efficiency of a compression-ignition engine with the relatively low emissions associated with natural gas. However the combustion phenomena occurring in dual-fuel engines present a challenge for existing turbulent combustion models because, following ignition, flame propagates through a partially-reacted and inhomogeneous mixture of the two fuels. The objective of this study is to test a new modelling formulation that combines the ability of the Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) approach to describe autoignition of fuel sprays with the ability of the G-equation approach to describe the subsequent flame propagation.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2190
Alessandro D'Adamo, Marco Del Pecchia, Sebastiano Breda, Fabio Berni, Stefano Fontanesi, Jens Prager
Abstract CFD simulations of reacting flows are fundamental investigation tools used to predict combustion behaviour and pollutants formation in modern internal combustion engines. Focusing on spark-ignited units, most of the flamelet-based combustion models adopted in current simulations use the fuel/air/residual laminar flame propagation speed as a background to predict the turbulent flame speed. This, in turn, is a fundamental requirement to model the effective burn rate. A consolidated approach in engine combustion simulations relies on the adoption of empirical correlations for laminar flame speed, which are derived from fitting of combustion experiments. However, these last are conducted at pressure and temperature ranges largely different from those encountered in engines: for this reason, correlation extrapolation at engine conditions is inevitably accepted. As a consequence, relevant differences between proposed correlations emerge even for the same fuel and conditions.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2191
Yachao Chang, Ming Jia, Yanzhi Zhang, Yaopeng Li, Weiwei Fan, MaoZhao Xie
Abstract Dimethyl ether (DME) attracts increasing attentions in recent years, because it can reduce the carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbon (HC), and soot emissions for engines as the transportation fuel or the fuel additive. In this paper, a reduced DME oxidation mechanism is developed using the decoupling methodology. The rate constants of the fuel-related reactions are optimized using the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) to reproduce the ignition delay times in shock tubes and major species concentrations in jet-stirred reactors (JSR) over low-to-high temperatures. In NSGA-II, the range of the rate constants was considered to ensure the reliability of the optimized mechanism. Moreover, an improved objective function was proposed to maintain the faithfulness of the optimized mechanism to the original reaction mechanism, and a new method was presented to determine the optimal solution from the Pareto front.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2192
Shenghui Zhong, Zhijun Peng, Yu Li, Hailin Li, Fan Zhang
Abstract A 3-D DNS (Three-Dimensional Direct Numerical Simulation) study with detailed chemical kinetic mechanism of methane has been performed to investigate the characteristics of turbulent premixed oxy-fuel combustion in the condition relevant to Spark Ignition (SI) engines. First, 1-D (one-dimensional) laminar freely propagating premixed flame is examined to show a consistent combustion temperature for different dilution cases, such that 73% H2O and 66% CO2 dilution ratios are adopted in the following 3-D DNS cases. Four 3-D DNS cases with various turbulence intensities are conducted. It is found that dilution agents can reduce the overall flame temperature but with an enhancement of density weighted flame speed. CO2 dilution case shows the lowest flame speed both in turbulent and laminar cases.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2193
Andreas Nygren, Anders Karlsson
Abstract When developing new combustion concepts, CFD simulations is a powerful tool. The modeling of spray formation is a challenging but important part when it comes to CFD modelling of non-premixed combustion. There is a large difference in the accuracy and robustness among different spray models and their implementation in different CFD codes. In the work presented in this paper a spray model, designated as VSB2 has been implemented in OpenFOAM. VSB2 differ from traditional spray models by replacing the Lagrangian parcels with stochastic blobs. The stochastic blobs consists of a droplet size distribution rather than equal sized droplets, as is the case with the traditional parcel. The VSB2 model has previously been thoroughly validated for spray formation and combustion of n-heptane. The aim of this study was to validate the VSB2 spray model for ethanol spray formation and combustion as a step in modelling dual-fuel combustion with alcohol and diesel.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2195
Mei Wang, Xianyin Leng, Zhixia He, Shengli Wei, Liang Chen, Yu Jin
Abstract The spark-ignited pre-chamber stratified combustion system is one of the most effective ways of expanding lean-burn ability and improving the performance of a natural gas engine. For these pre-chamber engines, the geometrical structure of orifices between the pre- and main chamber plays a significant role on the gas flow and flame propagation behaviors. The present study aims to investigate the effects of orifice number and diameter on combustion characteristics of a Shengdong T190 natural gas engine through CFD simulation. Various geometrical structures for the pre-chamber orifices were designed, offering variations in the number of orifices (4 to 8), and in the diameter of orifices (1.6mm to 2.9mm). A non-dimensional parameter β was employed to characterize the relative flow area of the orifices in the design. CFD simulations of combustion processes for these designs were carried out using a simplified chemical reaction kinetic mechanism for methane.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2199
Maria Cristina Cameretti, Vincenzo De Bellis, Luca Romagnuolo, Agostino Iorio, Luigi Maresca
Abstract In recent years, engine manufacturers have been continuously involved in the research of proper technical solutions to meet more and more stringent CO2 emission targets, defined by international regulations. Many strategies have been already developed, or are currently under study, to attain the above objective. A tendency is however emerging towards more innovative combustion concepts, able to efficiently burn lean or highly diluted mixtures. To this aim, the enhancement of turbulence intensity inside the combustion chamber has a significant importance, contributing to improve the burning rate, to increase the thermal efficiency, and to reduce the cyclic variability. It is well-known that turbulence production is mainly achieved during the intake stroke. Moreover, it is strictly affected by the intake port geometry and orientation.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2200
Peter Priesching, Mijo Tvrdojevic, Ferry Tap, Casper Meijer
Abstract Turbulent combustion modeling in a RANS or LES context imposes the challenge of closing the chemical reaction rate on the sub-grid level. Such turbulent models have as their two main ingredients sources from chemical reactions and turbulence-chemistry interaction. The various combustion models then differ mainly by how the chemistry is calculated (level of detail, canonical flame model) and on the other hand how turbulence is assumed to affect the reaction rate on the sub-grid level (TCI - turbulence-chemistry interaction). In this work, an advanced combustion model based on tabulated chemistry is applied for 3D CFD (computational fluid dynamics) modeling of Diesel engine cases. The combustion model is based on the FGM (Flamelet Generated Manifold) chemistry reduction technique. The underlying chemistry tabulation process uses auto-ignition trajectories of homogeneous fuel/air mixtures, which are computed with detailed chemical reaction mechanisms.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2202
Shiyou Yang
Abstract This work presents an application of two sub-models relative to chemical-kinetics-based turbulent pre-mixed combustion modeling approach on the simulation of burn rate and emissions of spark ignition engines. In present paper, the justification of turbulent pre-mixed combustion modeling directly based on chemical kinetics plus a turbulence model is given briefly. Two sub-models relative to this kind of pre-mixed combustion modeling approach are described generally, including a practical PRF (primary reference fuel) chemical kinetic mechanism which can correctly capture the laminar flame speed under a wide range of Ford SI (spark ignition) engines/operating conditions, and an advanced spark plug ignition model which has been developed by Ford recently.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2209
Christian Ibron, Mehdi Jangi, Tommaso Lucchini, Xue-Song Bai
Partially premixed combustion (PPC) can be applied to decrease emissions and increase fuel efficiency in direct injection, compression ignition (DICI) combustion engines. PPC is strongly influenced by the mixing of fuel and oxidizer, which for a given fuel is controlled mainly by (a) the fuel injection, (b) the in-cylinder flow, and (c) the geometry and dynamics of the engine. As the injection timings can vary over a wide range in PPC combustion, detailed knowledge of the in-cylinder flow over the whole intake and compression strokes can improve our understanding of PPC combustion. In computational fluid dynamics (CFD) the in-cylinder flow is sometimes simplified and modeled as a solid-body rotation profile at some time prior to injection to produce a realistic flow field at the moment of injection. In real engines, the in-cylinder flow motion is governed by the intake manifold, the valve motion, and the engine geometry.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2211
Mengqiu Jia, Zhen Lu, Tianyou Wang, Yufeng Li, Yanzhe Sun, Ming Wen, Zhizhao Che, Kai Sun
Abstract The intake process plays an important role in the operation of internal combustion engines. In the present study, a three-dimensional transient simulation of a four-valve diesel engine was performed using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model based on software CONVERGE. The mean velocity components in three directions through the intake valve curtain, the flow separation around the intake valves, the influences of inlet jet on turbulence flow field and cycle-to-cycle variation were investigated in this work. The result shows that the mean velocity distributes non-uniformly near the valve curtain at high valve lifts. In contrast, the mean velocity distribution is uniform at low valve lifts. It is found that the flow separation occurs at valve stem, valve seat and valve sealing through the outlet of the helical port. In contrast, flow separation is only observed in the valve seat through the outlet of the tangential port.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2210
Masayoshi Matsuda, Takeshi Yokomori, Norimasa Iida
Abstract The thermal efficiency of a spark-ignition (SI) engine must be improved to reduce both environmental load and fuel consumption. Although lean SI engine operation can strongly improve thermal efficiency relative to that of stoichiometric SI operation, the cycle-to-cycle variation (CCV) of combustion increases with the air dilution level. Combustion CCV is caused by CCVs of many factors, such as EGR, spark energy, air-fuel ratio, and in-cylinder flow structure related to engine speed. This study focuses on flow structures, especially the influence of a tumble structure on flow fluctuation intensity near ignition timing. We measured the flow field at the vertical center cross section of an optically accessible high-tumble flow engine using time-resolved particle image velocimetry.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2213
Satoshi Hokimoto, Tatsuya Kuboyama, Yasuo Moriyoshi, Minoru Iida, Takahiro Watanabe
Abstract Reduction in the cycle-to-cycle variation (CCV) of combustion in internal combustion engines is required to reduce fuel consumption, exhaust emissions, and improve drivability. CCV increases at low load operations and lean/dilute burn conditions. Specifically, the factors that cause CCV of combustion are the cyclic variations of in-cylinder flow, in-cylinder distributions of fuel concentration, temperature and residual gas, and ignition energy. However, it is difficult to measure and analyze these factors in a production engine. This study used an optically accessible single-cylinder engine in which combustion and optical measurements were performed for 45 consecutive cycles. CCVs of the combustion and in-cylinder phenomena were investigated for the same cycle. Using this optically accessible engine, the volume inside the combustion chamber, including the pent-roof region can be observed through a quartz cylinder.
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