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Viewing 1 to 13 of 13
CURRENT
2014-11-24
Standard
J2698_201411
This SAE Recommended Practice covers the design and application of primary on-board wiring distribution system harnessing for surface vehicles. This document is intended for single phase nominal 120 VAC circuits that provide power to truck sleeper cab hotel loads so that they may operate with the main propulsion engine turned off. The power supply comes from alternative sources such as land-based grid power, DC-AC inverters and auxiliary power generators. The circuits may also provide power to improve vehicle performance through charging batteries or operating cold-weather starting aids.
CURRENT
2011-12-06
Standard
J1310_201112
The scope of this SAE Information Report is to acquaint and inform those concerned with cold weather operation of diesel-powered machines and vehicles with the selection and application of electrically powered starting aids currently available. It deals specifically with the design, function, and application of line voltage electrically powered engine preheaters and battery warmers.
CURRENT
2011-12-06
Standard
J226_201112
This SAE Standard describes electric immersion engine preheaters for use in the coolant jacket of heavy-duty and intermediate size diesel engines. This document gives the dimensional information on the four basic styles of engine preheaters. The tables for each style will list the wattage commonly used. Small engines that typically require less than 600 W of preheat for cold weather starting are not covered by this document. These types of engines generally have very little space available to accommodate an immersion heater of the styles presented in this document. No related ISO standards were found.
CURRENT
2011-02-18
Standard
J2233_201102
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes uniform cold weather test procedures and performance requirements for engine coolant type heating systems of bus that are all vehicles designed to transport 10 or more passengers. The intent is to provide a test that will ensure acceptable comfort for bus occupants. It is limited to a test that can be conducted on uniform test equipment in commercially available laboratory facilities. Required test equipment, facilities, and definitions are included. There are two options for producing hot coolant in this recommended practice. Testing using these two approaches on the same vehicle will not necessarily provide identical results. Many vehicle models are offered with optional engines, and each engine has varying coolant temperatures and flow rates. If the test is being conducted to compare the performance of one heater design to another heater design, then the external coolant source approach (Test A) will yield the most comparable results.
HISTORICAL
2002-06-07
Standard
J2233_200206
This SAE Recommended Practice, limited to liquid coolant systems, establishes uniform cold weather bus vehicle heating system test procedures for all vehicles designed to transport 10 or more passengers. Required test equipment, facilities, and definitions are included. Defrosting and defogging procedures and requirements are established by SAE J381 which is hereby included by reference. This procedure is designed to provide bus manufacturers with a cost-effective, standardized test method to provide relative approximations of cold weather interior temperatures.
HISTORICAL
1995-12-01
Standard
J2233_199512
This SAE Recommended Practice, limited to liquid coolant systems, establishes uniform cold weather bus vehicle heating system test procedures for all vehicles designed to transport 10 or more passengers. Required test equipment, facilities, and definitions are included. Defrosting and defogging procedures and requirements are established by SAE J381 and SAE J382, which are hereby included by reference. This procedure is designed to provide bus manufacturers with a cost- effective, standardized test method to provide relative approximations of cold weather interior temperatures.
HISTORICAL
1995-06-01
Standard
J226_199506
This SAE Standard describes electric immersion engine preheaters for use in the coolant jacket of heavy-duty and intermediate size diesel engines. This document gives the dimensional information of the four basic styles of engine preheaters. The tables for each style will list the wattage commonly used. Small engines that typically require less than 600 W of preheat for cold weather starter are not covered by this document. These types of engines generally have very little space available to accommodate an immersion heater of the styles presented in this document. The purpose of this document is to establish commonality of engine preheater designs. The user of this document can use these current styles and wattages early on in their designing. This will give the user of this document a good engine preheater design.
HISTORICAL
1993-06-01
Standard
J1310_199306
The scope of this SAE Information Report is to acquaint and inform those concerned with cold weather operation of diesel-powered machines and vehicles with the selection and application of electrically powered starting aids currently available. It deals specifically with the design, function, and application of line voltage electrically powered engine preheaters and battery warmers.
HISTORICAL
1990-07-01
Standard
J1310_199007
The scope of this SAE Information Report is to acquaint and inform those concerned with cold weather operation of diesel-powered machines and vehicles with the selection and application of electrically powered starting aids currently available. It deals specifically with the design, function, and application of line voltage electrically powered engine preheaters and battery warmers.
HISTORICAL
1986-01-01
Standard
J226_198601
This SAE Standard describes electric immersion engine preheaters for use in the coolant jacket of heavy-duty and intermediate size diesel engines. This document gives the dimensional information of the four basic styles of engine preheaters. The tables for each style will list the wattage commonly used. Small engines that typically require less than 600 W of preheat for cold weather starter are not covered by this document. These types of engines generally have very little space available to accommodate an immersion heater of the styles presented in this document. The purpose of this document is to establish commonality of engine preheater designs. The user of this document can use these current styles and wattages early on in their designing. This will give the user of this document a good engine preheater design.
HISTORICAL
1981-04-01
Standard
J1310_198104
The scope of this SAE Information Report is to acquaint and inform those concerned with cold weather operation of diesel-powered machines and vehicles with the selection and application of electrically powered starting aids currently available. It deals specifically with the design, function, and application of line voltage electrically powered engine preheaters and battery warmers.
HISTORICAL
1977-02-01
Standard
J226A_197702
This SAE Standard describes electric immersion engine preheaters for use in the coolant jacket of heavy-duty and intermediate size diesel engines. This document gives the dimensional information of the four basic styles of engine preheaters. The tables for each style will list the wattage commonly used. Small engines that typically require less than 600 W of preheat for cold weather starter are not covered by this document. These types of engines generally have very little space available to accommodate an immersion heater of the styles presented in this document. The purpose of this document is to establish commonality of engine preheater designs. The user of this document can use these current styles and wattages early on in their designing. This will give the user of this document a good engine preheater design.
CURRENT
1951-10-01
Standard
AIR13A
INTRODUCT ION Conventional internal conbustion a i r c r a f t engines require the same basic conditions for starting in cold weather as they do in warn weather. These are: (1) The engine must be cranked a t a reasonable speed. ( 2 ) A combustible mixture must be delivered t o the cylinders. (3) An ignition spark must be supplied which is capable of igniting t'ne charge a t the proper t i m e . (4) The fits and olearanoes of mating parts in the engine m u s t be such that normal Sunctions occur a t a l l temperatures. (5) The engine must receive a usable lubricant. (6) The engine must develop s u f f i c i e n t power t o overcome its own f r i c t i o n and accelerate itself t o the desired operating speed.
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