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Magazine
1938-03-01
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
L. L. Fawcett
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
Murray Aitken
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
J. E. Hale
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
Joseph Ledwinka
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
J. R. North
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
Roy W. Brown
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
M. C. Horine
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
null, R. P. Gaylord
THE cooperative tractor tire tests described in this paper were discussed originally at a meeting of the Society several years ago. The tractor engineers present at the discussion suggested to the tire engineers that there was need for a cooperative test program to determine the efficiency of the various tire sizes over a range of soil conditions. Among the ten conclusions drawn from the comprehensive tests reported in this paper are that the most important factor affecting the coefficient of traction or tire thrust of rubber-tired tractors is the nature or surface of the operating soil; that, for a given soil, the most important factor is the weight that the tire carries; and that inflation pressure has a relatively small effect.
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
J. E. Hale
THIS paper is a non-technical review of an up-to-date survey of the lines of tires needed in all types and classes of fleet operation. To understand better how to get the best results from their operations, operators must know the proper type of tire to use. The author first describes and catalogs the principle forms of tire failures, then reviews the characteristics of the fundamental lines of tires available at the present time. Next, an attempt is made to classify the different types of fleet operation so that definite recommendations can be made as to the most appropriate tire equipment for these vehicles. The types of tire trouble most commonly encountered in each group are brought out with suggestions on how to avoid them. This part is followed by a section giving advice on the care of tires. The paper concludes with a brief survey of worthwhile facts about repairs and retreading. An appendix contains the load-inflation tables which are most widely used.
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
A. S. Van Halteren
MODERN developments in the automobile industry have created a paradox. On the one hand, increased speeds have placed greater demands on the brakes whereas, on the other hand, the trend toward streamlining has greatly handicapped brake performance. As a result brake drum and wheel diameters have been reduced and the flow of air to the brakes has been restricted by shrouding them with wheels and skirted fenders. In the solution of brake heat-transmission problems, the subject is considered under the following headings: the amount of heat generated; the manner and rate of heat flow into the brake; and the manner and rate of heat flow out of the brake. Heat-transmission calculations of specific examples are made that indicate the amount of heat dissipated by conduction, radiation, and convection.
Technical Paper
1938-01-01
C. R. Paton
DISCUSSION is limited in this paper to ride problems pertinent to cars equipped with independent-type front and non-independent rear suspensions. Emphasis is placed on problems arising in connection with the newer so-called “flat-type” rides. Approach is made to the problem of the control or damping of springs and some of the factors, important from a balance standpoint, in securing these flat pitch-free ride characteristics. It is pointed out that shock absorbers should more properly be called “ride controls,” so great is the importance of proper damping characteristics in obtaining the newer flat-type drives. The tremendous number of interrelating factors involved in the attainment of ride excellence is given as the reason why effective instrumentation has never been developed. The author concludes that the maze of compromises involved will always require the experienced observer.
Magazine
1938-01-01
Magazine
1937-11-01
Magazine
1937-08-01
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
P.H. Smith
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
Earl Bartholomew, Cleveland Walcutt
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
J. G. SWAIN
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
H. W. Delzell
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
JOHN H. PLOEHN
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
A. W. Bull, M. K. Jessup
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
Stanley E. Knauss
THE experience gained over a period of many years in the development of light-weight, high-strength structures is now finding its way into the bus industry. Investigation of present-day bus operations showed the need for a road vehicle that would carry the greatest possible payload of passengers with a smaller horsepower engine without dragging along a load of dead weight and useless structure that would eat up gasoline instead of miles. A motor coach is now available in which are incorporated aircraft materials, design, and construction features resulting in a vehicle that is approximately 1000 lb. lighter than the lightest conventional design with the same engine horsepower and seating accommodations. Motor-bus operators today can reduce costs by the use of light-weight equipment provided there is no sacrifice of strength and reliability. They must also meet the ever-increasing demands of the public for quietness, comfort, absence of vibration and engine odors - all of which can be accomplished by placing the engine in the rear which automatically gives a better distribution of weight than has heretofore been possible with the front-engine design.
Technical Paper
1937-01-01
Chris Bockius, John Bassett
Magazine
1937-01-01
Magazine
1936-12-01
Magazine
1936-11-01
Magazine
1936-10-01

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