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Viewing 9631 to 9660 of 10253
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560029
V. E. Gough
TIRE-GROUND forces during cornering have been studied with the aid of an experimental device, and tire tread buffing patterns are correlated with tire position and use. Tire characteristic curves are introduced and are shown to be helpful in interpreting the interrelations between cornering force, aligning torque, slip angle, and caster. An example is given of the use of characteristic curves to study an application of power steering. A photo of a standing wave on a tire running at 100 mph is included as a matter of general interest.
1955-12-01
Magazine
1955-11-01
Magazine
1955-10-01
Magazine
1955-09-01
Magazine
1955-07-01
Magazine
1955-04-01
Magazine
1955-03-01
Magazine
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550248
J. G. Oetzel
PRESENT laws call for a single “legal stopping distance” that must be met by all types of vehicles in order for those vehicles to be considered good. However, this stopping-distance requirement cannot always be met by all classes of vehicles on today's highways. General opinion realizes the need for revision of this requirement. This paper does not specify what revisions should be made, but it does present information pertinent to the consideration of such revisions. The factors affecting brake performance and stopping ability which are discussed here are brake capacity, weight shift, tire capacity, and road condition.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550294
David C. Apps, George M.Vanator
TIRE thump has gained prominence as passenger cars have become quieter and roads smoother. Studies at the CM Proving Ground dating back to 1940 have shown thump to be a very complex example of the simple phenomenon that combining two closely spaced frequency components will produce a certain beat. Here the authors detail what has been learned about the physical characteristics of car and tire which go into producing thump of various frequencies and loudnesses. They also describe a newly developed portable instrument which measures the depth of modulation of the beat between two frequencies, thus serving as a uniform standard of tire thump severity.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550183
JACK REBMAN
The turbine power plant has inherent vibratory disturbances. It is also a fragile device. A flexible suspension holding the power plant in the airframe must protect one from the other. To do this, the suspension must control natural frequencies to limit vibration transmission, hold the power plant in the airframe through ultimate load conditions, distribute loads into a desirable pattern, maintain stability, provide adequate service life, and permit simple installation removal without size, weight, and complexity disadvantage to the installation. There are many power plant, airframe, and general installation factors which contribute to these characteristics. The use of these factors and their effect, as well as a tabulation of required data are presented.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550200
A. H. EASTON
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550199
E. B. OGDEN
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550198
GEORGE M. SPROWLS
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550222
R. E. MIZELLE, J. C. PORTER, A. R. RESCORLA
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550238
F. C. Hile
HOW electric-actuated trailer brakes synchronized with the air, hydraulic, or vacuum are braking system as used on tractors is described here. Brake balance between the electric and other systems used involves balance of brake buildup rime. This is done by having the two types of brakes build up simultaneously for their respective axle loads and tire sizes. A load control consisting of a variable rheostat does this job for the electric brakes. It is also used for balancing the electric brakes with the tractor brake system. The speed and versatility of electricity as used for trailer brakes make possible synchronized braking of combination vehicles without sacrifice of tractor brake speed — all brakes work simultaneously, resulting in shorter stops and less danger of jaakknifing. Other important safety features of the electric brake include: (1) They furnish an independent braking system for the trailer. (2) They are operated by a constant source of power.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550235
Robert Schilling
THIS paper explains how the design problems were solved for the Firebird, a high-power, high-speed, light-weight, turbopowered car. Broad latitude was allowed the chassis engineer in designing the frame, suspension system, brakes, and steering. The result is the application of many unique features on the Firebird, some of which are used on an automobile for the first time.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550134
HOMER T. SEALE
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550136
WILLIAM K. CRESON
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550123
L. J. KEHOE
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550125
MAURICE OLLEY
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550162
R. K. SUPER
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550111
T. G. ROEHNER, E. L. ARMSTRONG
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550109
C. R. CASE
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550108
T. A. ROBERTSON, R. P. POWERS
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550103
J. D. NEESLEY, L. C. BRUNSTRUM, H. J. LIEHE
New automatic chassis lubricators renew lubricant problems. Oils feed well but drip from the bearings; chassis greases do not drip but feed poorly. A new rheopectic grease overcomes these deficiencies. Originally, it is fluid like an oil, yet upon one pass through the lubricator, it acquires the consistency of a chassis grease. Normal handling has no effect on its fluidity and use has little effect upon its set-up consistency. Thus, it feeds well but does not drip.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550106
J. F. McGROGAN
A road test was conducted by the Automotive Laboratory of The Atlantic Refining Company on six cars, each of two different makes, to obtain the driver's reactions to four chassis lubricants. Factors to be evaluated included squeaks heard by the driver. An investigation was made of the influence of grease composition on chassis performance; greases tested included an aluminum stearate grease, two lithium soap thickened greases and a non-soap type of grease. Results indicate that a 1,000 mile lubrication frequency is important since a large increase in complaints beyond 1,250 miles of operation was recorded.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550101
J. B. BELTZ
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550102
CARL H. MUELLER
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550006
ROT W. BROWN
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