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Viewing 9631 to 9660 of 10699
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670146
James M. Herring
The object of this study was to determine the major mechanism which produces brake fade in organic brake lining materials. The major mechanism of fade was developed and illustrated by a series of experiments. This mechanism is not limited to phenolic base materials, but includes a variety of materials with particular properties in common. Methods of reducing fade based on this mechanism are examined.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670197
T. H. Thomas
Although relatively new on American cars, disc brakes do not represent a new concept of braking. This paper reviews their development and first testing in the 1930's, their application to European cars in the 1950's, and their subsequent introduction on American cars in the 1960's. Described in detail are the three categories of caliper disc brakes: disc floating, caliper fixed; disc and caliper fixed; disc fixed, caliper floating. The author believes the latter will be the brake that eventually becomes standard equipment on American cars, first on front wheels and later. after development of an adequate parking brake mechanism, on four wheels.
1967-01-01
Standard
J40C_196701
ABSTRACT
1966-12-01
Standard
ARP813
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) recommends the maintainability features which should be considered in the design of aircraft wheels and brakes. The effect on other factors, such as, cost, weight, reliability, and compatibility with other systems should be weighed before the incorporation of any of these maintainability features into the design.
1966-12-01
Standard
J918B_196612
This SAE Standard provides minimum performance requirements and accompanying uniform laboratory test procedures for evaluating certain essential characteristics of new tires and newly retreaded tires intended for use on passenger cars. (The requirements published in this SAE Standard pertain to tire sizes currently used on American passenger cars and popular sizes used on imported passenger cars. For related information on tire sizes not listed, contact SAE Automotive Headquarters, 18121 East Eight Mile Road, East Detroit, Michigan 48021.)
1966-11-01
Magazine
1966-10-01
Magazine
1966-09-01
Standard
J971_196609
The code provides test procedures and methods of calculating a brake rating from the data obtained for brakes used in highway commercial vehicles over 4.5 T (10 000 lbs) GVWR air and hydraulic. Some general correlation may be expected between brake ratings established by this means and those obtained from vehicle tests such as outlined in SAE J880. The brake rating power, kW (hp) calculated by conduct of this code is an arbitrary index of performance of the brake and drum when tested by this procedure and may be appreciably different from the values obtained by other techniques.
1966-09-01
Standard
J866A_196609
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to provide a uniform means of identification which may be used to classify the friction coefficient of brake linings, based on data obtained from tests conducted in accordance with SAE J661 Brake Lining Quality Test Procedure and SAE J2975 Measurement of Copper and other elements in Brake Friction Materials. NOTE: It is emphasized that this document does not establish friction requirements for brake linings, nor does it designate significant characteristics of brake linings which must be considered in overall brake performance. Due to other factors that include brake system design and operating environment, the friction codes obtained from this document cannot reliably be used to predict brake system performance.
1966-08-01
Standard
J966_196608
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a test procedure for determining passenger car tire revolutions per mile. It is intended to supplement SAE J678.
1966-06-20
Standard
AIR764A
This technical report documents three surveys to determine realistic vibration requirements for skid control systems specifications and obtain updated vibration information for locations in aircraft where skid control system components are mounted.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660614
T. J. Malott, Robert C. Westveer
A new concept in construction equipment hydraulic systems has been developed that couples the implement and steering circuits in such a manner that constant steering horsepower is available throughout the engine speed range with no sacrifice in implement performance. This paper discusses the overall power requirements for articulated loaders and how this new system improves the overall efficiency.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660613
Paul E. Gies
The Universal Engineer Tractor (UET), an earthmoving machine, can work as a bulldozer, scraper, rough grader, prime mover, dump truck, cargo carrier, or personnel carrier. Versatility is made possible through the use of a hydropneumatic suspension. Because random variables of terrain and soil are traversed at speeds up to 30 mph, components in the suspension have been subjected to extremely high pressures and to heavy loadings of structural components, due to mechanical feedback. This paper reports on the nature of these problems, describes modifications made to overcome the difficulties, and gives results of subsequent field and laboratory tests.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660399
Walter D. Noon, Gary L. Smith, Paul A. Bochnig
The evaluation of commercial vehicle brake system balance is a complex analytical task. Tractor-trailer combinations frequently include different brake designs on different axles, which have widely varying characteristics. In addition, variations in brake parameters such as pressure, response times, linings, and heat transfer under various operating conditions add to the complexity of analyzing the brake system. This paper describes a mathematical model of the vehicle brake system and a program for a digital computer to solve the mathematical expressions. Using the computer to simulate dynamic brake system operation, current designs can be evaluated rapidly for effectiveness and possible improvement, and future designs can be analyzed prior to expensive prototype fabrication.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660400
William C. Eaton, Ivan J. Schreur
The operation and installation of a brake proportioning valve for large commercial vehicles are discussed. Comments on areas of usefulness are included and test data presented. An appendix contains generalized equations pertaining to predicted vehicle performance.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660398
Robert J. Morse
Two means of making substantial improvements in brake balance are discussed. The first, the use of dynamic rather than static weights in braking power calculations has greatest value on loaded vehicles. Dynamic weights existing at 0.3 g deceleration are proposed as a standard. The second, load proportioned braking, is helpful on empty vehicles but must be used on all axles which have a substantial change in weight from the empty to the loaded condition. If used on only one unit of a combination vehicle, it may have a detrimental effect on brake balance.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660758
C. E. Strigle
Present and future changes in the trucking industry have, and will, place greater significance on adequate tire inflations to meet increasing service demands. Truck tire inflation monitoring devices over the years have offered promise as one method of insuring, controlling, and maintaining tire inflations. In this connection, both low inflation warning systems and constant inflation systems have been extensively tested and evaluated.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660238
B. C. Hudgens, R. L. Goff
With the advent of ever larger mobile machines in the earthmoving industry new methods of steering control had to be developed. Three basic systems which had sufficed in the past were mechanical, electrical, and hydraulic power steering mechanisms. This paper describes a new hydrostatic power steering system which appears particularly applicable to large off-road construction machines. Basic features of the V2 Hydraguide system are discussed. It is believed this system meets the general requirements for a high-flow steering unit and represents a new era in controlability for articulated vehicles.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660143
J. C. Vaverek
A unique 400 electrical horsepower chassis dynamometer capable of rolling five loaded axles of any wheelbase at speeds up to 90 mph provides the environment for demonstrating tractor-trailer ride dynamics. An actual tractor cab pitch problem occurring in the cruise speed range is described. Dynamometer data gathered during the definitive stages and from attempts to improve tractor ride by changing trailer geometry are presented.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660158
Kenneth G. Brown
This paper discusses a linkage analysis of the Jaguar type C torque reactor, reducing linkage configuration to a simple distance ratio and providing for an additional link to assure directional stability during braking. The suspension described is of value to automobile builders who, for cost reasons, must use a solid, live rear axle, but wish to improve performance through improvement in rear wheel adhesion with this simple four-bar linkage.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660141
O. Lee Henry
Abstract Air suspension systems for highway trailers offer changes in ride characteristics which affect cargo transport, driver comfort, and structural design. These changes have brought about new considerations for those responsible for designing and maintaining highway vehicles, as well as for those concerned with the effects of shock and vibration upon both cargo and operator. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design principles of Neway Equipment Company 's trailer air suspension, to illustrate certain applications of this suspension system, and to present results of comparative ride tests. Conclusions are drawn on the effectiveness of road testing, and suggestions are made on an improved approach to ride analysis.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660024
Yao T. Li
A general study of the basic requirements of vehicles for individual and public transportation systems leads to the belief that the incorporation of an active suspension system into the vehicle would constitute a major step forward. Various aspects of an active suspension system were scrutinized. Favorable results from an experimental test vehicle confirmed that belief. By incorporating the principle of an active suspension system, a narrow vehicle was proposed for commuter traffic; a utility vehicle for agriculture and military application; and a monorail vehicle for public transportation as well as for super high-speed intercity transportation.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660038
B. J. Sirois
A variety of high copper alloys has been studied to determine suitability for use in tubular form in automotive hydraulic brake lines. A 1% iron-bearing copper alloy in a light cold worked temper was found to have the strength, ductility, resistance to fatigue and to salt, and the stress corrosion characteristics required for this application.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660740
Don D. Cummins
The Jacobs engine brake, introduced early in 1961, has enjoyed a success unequaled by any retarding device marketed in this country. Although the engine brake is a new device, it simply harnesses the built-in braking ability which is as old as Dr. Diesel's first engine. The operation, design, and performance of this engine brake are discussed in this paper. As of this writing, approximately 30,000 units are in operation in both on and off-highway applications.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660599
Robert T. Larsen
Dynamic testing yields more realistic values for the spring rates of rubber mounts used in vibration isolation systems. Shore durometer, 20% load deflection, tensile modulus, and other static tests have generally shown little relation to the actual spring behavior under field conditions.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660578
K. W. Anderson
Narrow-row spacing (30, 20 and 15 inches) of corn and soybeans a newly developing farm practice, aimed at increasing yields, affects tractor design and usage. Problem areas include tires, rear wheel tread, rear axles and rear axle housings.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660375
John J. Goudie
Developments in the automotive industry have placed new demands on the performance of passenger car tires. The tire industry is conducting numerous tests to assure continued improvements and verify the capabilities of today's tires. Particular emphasis is being placed in the areas of durability, high speed performance, traction, and handling. The importance of keeping pace with new requirements is of the utmost significance in developing better tires for future needs.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660378
R. F. Bogan, W. J. Dobie
During the last five years 2-ply tires have replaced 4-ply in a very substantial percentage of all passenger tire production. This move was primarily motivated by the improved performance potential of the 2-ply construction with particular reference to extended high speed driving. This paper reviews the engineering principles involved and includes a performance comparison on controlled laboratory and proving ground tests. It also includes a comprehensive performance history comparing 2-ply versus 4-ply on millions of tires produced during this five year period. The results leave no doubt that the 2-ply tire has proven itself superior to the 4-ply on an overall basis.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660377
J. A. Davisson
This paper describes in general terms the major improvements in materials used in the manufacture of conventional bias angle tires. Due to the broad scope of the subject matter, detailed technical explanations in chemical terms are omitted in favor of a more general review of the type, method, and history of materials improvement. In addition, many of the materials, their requirements, properties, and contribution to tire performance are related. Some of the probable future materials trends are also included.
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