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Viewing 9631 to 9660 of 10714
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670914
J. Banshoya, H. Okoshi, S. Asano, K. Okamoto
Mainly intended for small passenger cars which have more dimentional restrictions than large ones do, a new energy-absorbing column is developed utilizing frictional and plastic deformation resistance as absorbing means. This paper presents its design details, test results on various specifications and conditions, discussions on various factors which affect the performance, analysis of column compression both statically and dynamically, testing methods and equipments for components and complete assembly, confirming that its intended features of relatively low peak load and reasonable compression length has been achieved.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670968
Thomas R. Wheaton
The free turbine type of gas turbine engine, because of its light weight, compactness, and inherent torque characteristics, permits the design of a new type of passenger train with light weight, high performance, and good economy. Conversely, the inherent advantages of the turbine can be realized only in a vehicle designed as a system. The United Aircraft TurboTrain is such a system design. In addition to turbine powerplants, it incorporates high strength lightweight structure, a lightweight banking suspension system, aerodynamic streamlining, and modern conveniences.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670933
Wesley R. Master
This paper discusses hydrostatic drives for heavy duty trucks. These have been employed on auxiliaries such as cranes, transit mixers, and winches on a production basis for several years, and they are now moving into the drive area. Typical among these would be front wheels, rear wheels, utilizing both powered axles and powered wheels. This paper discusses these drives, both fixed and steerable, and makes some comparison between the powered wheel and the powered axle. Some typical components and circuits are discussed and the future of this drive is outlined.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670070
Joseph J. Ihnacik,, Jerome F. Meek
The design and development of Mark II GT brake system within the parameters dictated by the Mark I chassis presented many problems. The Mark II GT with its larger 427 cubic inch engine had more weight and much higher performance than the Mark I. Space limitations of the carryover wheels and suspension imposed a severe handicap on individual brake component design. This was compounded by shortening the normal one year development time to a three month period. Part I of this paper is devoted to the consideration of factors which control the design of a brake. The concept of kinetic energy and its effects on brake performance is reviewed briefly. Use of the ventilated rotor design is explained for applications where severe heat is a problem, as in the case of the Mark II GT. The development of the brake system from the 24 hour Daytona endurance race to the Le Mans Grand Prix race is reviewed.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670131
Howard C. Hansen
The wide acceptance in the last 10 years of utility equipment, such as hydraulic derricks and aerial devices, has pointed out many long existing problems in mounting equipment to truck chassis. The newer equipment developments have brought to light many new problems. Many of these problems are herein documented, together with possible solutions.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670144
D. W. Howard, J. L. Winge
The multiple dynamometer described in this paper is capable of testing complete four-wheel braking systems similar to the actual vehicle operation by the use of magnetic tape programming techniques. Vehicle tests up to 6 hr in length can be accommodated on a single reel of tape. The use of digital programming permits a high degree of test flexibility coupled with excellent test repeatability. Secondary advantages include the capability of performing these tests on an unattended basis, thereby effecting a savings in manpower. The paper tape and magnetic tape programs can be cataloged and stored, and the test procedure can be duplicated at a later time if so desired. The instrumentation system furnishes precise measurements of the braking parameters, thereby providing accurate test data for the design engineering group.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670204
Paul J. Brown
Abstract The Office of Vehicle Systems Research of NBS is concerned with the research, development. testing, and evaluation necessary to provide the technical basis for recommended safety performance standards of motor vehicle systems issued by the National Traffic Safety Bureau. It will also develop the test methods required to determine compliance to these standards. This paper describes the three areas NBS will concentrate on initially: tire systems, occupant restraint systems. and braking systems. In developing its research data, NBS is looking to building on work already done by the automotive industry. The author comments on the mutual benefits to be obtained from the exchange of research data.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670001
Fernand L Picard
The complexity of developing automotive design to meet the competitive market demands has necessitated closely coordinated teamwork to solve the various engineering problems. This paper describes the development of the power unit and front axle of the Renault 16, from the initial specifications and engineering decisions through the manufacturing details and performance ratings of the final model.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670006
Ingobert Schmid
A simplified analysis is made of the directional stability of vehicle combinations, such as a tractor combined with one or two semitrailers or a truck and full trailer. Vehicle combinations are treated as linear dynamic systems with two degrees-of-freedom for each unit. The equations of motion are derived considering the influence of braking and acceleration, and a characteristic equation for traveling at constant speed is obtained. The Routh criteria are examined to distinguish between stability and instability, considering oscillatory and aperiodic motions separately. Special attention is given to the behavior of the vehicle during braking, with discussion of the influence of various design parameters and the distribution of the braking forces applied to the wheels. Finally, a new design of fifth wheel device is presented in order to stabilize tractor-semitrailer combinations.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670015
James T. Moore
This paper describes the 1967 American Motors car-lines, which represent the largest and most far-reaching product programs to be undertaken by this company. Emphasis is placed on design features as related to conceptual factors established in the planning phases of the programs.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670017
B. T. Andren, T. J. Feaheny
The Mercury Cougar, Lincoln-Mercury Division’s entrant in the rapidly expanding specialty car market, is discussed. Attention is given to the growing demand for this type of vehicle, its styling evolution, and unique product features. Details of body and chassis construction along with safety features, powertrain, convenience, and performance options are reviewed.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670039
Donald P. Marquis
While the collision of cars is not an exact science, the 1967 General Motors energy absorbing steering column shows what can be done in one area to improve the finished product through the achievement of a sequence of design goals. It is felt that, based on tests of a great number of vehicles, the energy absorbing column will definitely improve the driver’s chances of survival in a significant range of head-on collision conditions.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670044
A. W. Moesta
Through continuing and realistic innovations in concept, design, and testing, mechanical spring seating in trucks has vastly improved in recent years. Development of modern truck seats begins with the original seat package layout derived from the cab package. Then the details covering seat frame design are worked out so that prototype models can be received by the truck manufacturer at least a year in adfance of model production in order to provide adequate test, development, ride, and refinement time. Numerous and comprehensive laboratory and road vehicle tests are conducted to insure that the best seat is made available for the intended truck, with comfortable seating for the occupant at an economical cost.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670461
Walter E. DeVinney
Of the many variables involved in the problem of wet skidding, the most significant single factor is speed, since it is the one item which remains entirely within the control of each individual vehicle operator. On wet surfaces, the effects of speed on the apparent coefficient of friction are reduced as the surface texture becomes more coarse. Although more consistent frictional coefficients obtained by increasing surface coarseness would assist greatly in reducing skidding, the many other variables involved remain an integral part of the tire traction problem. Factors considered in this paper are: tread design and compound, tire construction, inflation pressure, road surface, tire load, and temperature.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670146
James M. Herring
The object of this study was to determine the major mechanism which produces brake fade in organic brake lining materials. The major mechanism of fade was developed and illustrated by a series of experiments. This mechanism is not limited to phenolic base materials, but includes a variety of materials with particular properties in common. Methods of reducing fade based on this mechanism are examined.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670197
T. H. Thomas
Although relatively new on American cars, disc brakes do not represent a new concept of braking. This paper reviews their development and first testing in the 1930's, their application to European cars in the 1950's, and their subsequent introduction on American cars in the 1960's. Described in detail are the three categories of caliper disc brakes: disc floating, caliper fixed; disc and caliper fixed; disc fixed, caliper floating. The author believes the latter will be the brake that eventually becomes standard equipment on American cars, first on front wheels and later. after development of an adequate parking brake mechanism, on four wheels.
1967-01-01
Standard
J40C_196701
ABSTRACT
HISTORICAL
1966-12-01
Standard
ARP813
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) recommends the maintainability features which should be considered in the design of aircraft wheels and brakes. The effect on other factors, such as, cost, weight, reliability, and compatibility with other systems should be weighed before the incorporation of any of these maintainability features into the design.
HISTORICAL
1966-12-01
Standard
J918B_196612
This SAE Standard provides minimum performance requirements and accompanying uniform laboratory test procedures for evaluating certain essential characteristics of new tires and newly retreaded tires intended for use on passenger cars. (The requirements published in this SAE Standard pertain to tire sizes currently used on American passenger cars and popular sizes used on imported passenger cars. For related information on tire sizes not listed, contact SAE Automotive Headquarters, 18121 East Eight Mile Road, East Detroit, Michigan 48021.)
1966-11-01
Magazine
1966-10-01
Magazine
HISTORICAL
1966-09-01
Standard
J971_196609
The code provides test procedures and methods of calculating a brake rating from the data obtained for brakes used in highway commercial vehicles over 4.5 T (10 000 lbs) GVWR air and hydraulic. Some general correlation may be expected between brake ratings established by this means and those obtained from vehicle tests such as outlined in SAE J880. The brake rating power, kW (hp) calculated by conduct of this code is an arbitrary index of performance of the brake and drum when tested by this procedure and may be appreciably different from the values obtained by other techniques.
HISTORICAL
1966-09-01
Standard
J866A_196609
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to provide a uniform means of identification which may be used to classify the friction coefficient of brake linings, based on data obtained from tests conducted in accordance with SAE J661 Brake Lining Quality Test Procedure and SAE J2975 Measurement of Copper and other elements in Brake Friction Materials. NOTE: It is emphasized that this document does not establish friction requirements for brake linings, nor does it designate significant characteristics of brake linings which must be considered in overall brake performance. Due to other factors that include brake system design and operating environment, the friction codes obtained from this document cannot reliably be used to predict brake system performance.
HISTORICAL
1966-08-01
Standard
J966_196608
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a test procedure for determining passenger car tire revolutions per mile. It is intended to supplement SAE J678.
HISTORICAL
1966-06-20
Standard
AIR764A
This technical report documents three surveys to determine realistic vibration requirements for skid control systems specifications and obtain updated vibration information for locations in aircraft where skid control system components are mounted.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660614
T. J. Malott, Robert C. Westveer
A new concept in construction equipment hydraulic systems has been developed that couples the implement and steering circuits in such a manner that constant steering horsepower is available throughout the engine speed range with no sacrifice in implement performance. This paper discusses the overall power requirements for articulated loaders and how this new system improves the overall efficiency.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660613
Paul E. Gies
The Universal Engineer Tractor (UET), an earthmoving machine, can work as a bulldozer, scraper, rough grader, prime mover, dump truck, cargo carrier, or personnel carrier. Versatility is made possible through the use of a hydropneumatic suspension. Because random variables of terrain and soil are traversed at speeds up to 30 mph, components in the suspension have been subjected to extremely high pressures and to heavy loadings of structural components, due to mechanical feedback. This paper reports on the nature of these problems, describes modifications made to overcome the difficulties, and gives results of subsequent field and laboratory tests.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660399
Walter D. Noon, Gary L. Smith, Paul A. Bochnig
The evaluation of commercial vehicle brake system balance is a complex analytical task. Tractor-trailer combinations frequently include different brake designs on different axles, which have widely varying characteristics. In addition, variations in brake parameters such as pressure, response times, linings, and heat transfer under various operating conditions add to the complexity of analyzing the brake system. This paper describes a mathematical model of the vehicle brake system and a program for a digital computer to solve the mathematical expressions. Using the computer to simulate dynamic brake system operation, current designs can be evaluated rapidly for effectiveness and possible improvement, and future designs can be analyzed prior to expensive prototype fabrication.
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