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Viewing 9631 to 9660 of 10679
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660158
Kenneth G. Brown
This paper discusses a linkage analysis of the Jaguar type C torque reactor, reducing linkage configuration to a simple distance ratio and providing for an additional link to assure directional stability during braking. The suspension described is of value to automobile builders who, for cost reasons, must use a solid, live rear axle, but wish to improve performance through improvement in rear wheel adhesion with this simple four-bar linkage.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660141
O. Lee Henry
Abstract Air suspension systems for highway trailers offer changes in ride characteristics which affect cargo transport, driver comfort, and structural design. These changes have brought about new considerations for those responsible for designing and maintaining highway vehicles, as well as for those concerned with the effects of shock and vibration upon both cargo and operator. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design principles of Neway Equipment Company 's trailer air suspension, to illustrate certain applications of this suspension system, and to present results of comparative ride tests. Conclusions are drawn on the effectiveness of road testing, and suggestions are made on an improved approach to ride analysis.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660024
Yao T. Li
A general study of the basic requirements of vehicles for individual and public transportation systems leads to the belief that the incorporation of an active suspension system into the vehicle would constitute a major step forward. Various aspects of an active suspension system were scrutinized. Favorable results from an experimental test vehicle confirmed that belief. By incorporating the principle of an active suspension system, a narrow vehicle was proposed for commuter traffic; a utility vehicle for agriculture and military application; and a monorail vehicle for public transportation as well as for super high-speed intercity transportation.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660038
B. J. Sirois
A variety of high copper alloys has been studied to determine suitability for use in tubular form in automotive hydraulic brake lines. A 1% iron-bearing copper alloy in a light cold worked temper was found to have the strength, ductility, resistance to fatigue and to salt, and the stress corrosion characteristics required for this application.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660740
Don D. Cummins
The Jacobs engine brake, introduced early in 1961, has enjoyed a success unequaled by any retarding device marketed in this country. Although the engine brake is a new device, it simply harnesses the built-in braking ability which is as old as Dr. Diesel's first engine. The operation, design, and performance of this engine brake are discussed in this paper. As of this writing, approximately 30,000 units are in operation in both on and off-highway applications.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660599
Robert T. Larsen
Dynamic testing yields more realistic values for the spring rates of rubber mounts used in vibration isolation systems. Shore durometer, 20% load deflection, tensile modulus, and other static tests have generally shown little relation to the actual spring behavior under field conditions.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660578
K. W. Anderson
Narrow-row spacing (30, 20 and 15 inches) of corn and soybeans a newly developing farm practice, aimed at increasing yields, affects tractor design and usage. Problem areas include tires, rear wheel tread, rear axles and rear axle housings.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660375
John J. Goudie
Developments in the automotive industry have placed new demands on the performance of passenger car tires. The tire industry is conducting numerous tests to assure continued improvements and verify the capabilities of today's tires. Particular emphasis is being placed in the areas of durability, high speed performance, traction, and handling. The importance of keeping pace with new requirements is of the utmost significance in developing better tires for future needs.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660378
R. F. Bogan, W. J. Dobie
During the last five years 2-ply tires have replaced 4-ply in a very substantial percentage of all passenger tire production. This move was primarily motivated by the improved performance potential of the 2-ply construction with particular reference to extended high speed driving. This paper reviews the engineering principles involved and includes a performance comparison on controlled laboratory and proving ground tests. It also includes a comprehensive performance history comparing 2-ply versus 4-ply on millions of tires produced during this five year period. The results leave no doubt that the 2-ply tire has proven itself superior to the 4-ply on an overall basis.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660377
J. A. Davisson
This paper describes in general terms the major improvements in materials used in the manufacture of conventional bias angle tires. Due to the broad scope of the subject matter, detailed technical explanations in chemical terms are omitted in favor of a more general review of the type, method, and history of materials improvement. In addition, many of the materials, their requirements, properties, and contribution to tire performance are related. Some of the probable future materials trends are also included.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660411
R. T. Eddy, R. A. Wilson
Load sensing brake proportioning is a means of optimizing the ratio of front-to-rear wheel retarding forces for the full range of vehicle loadings and decelerations. A relatively simple system of providing two-axled vehicles with improved brake balance has been developed. Simulation studies of vehicle brake system requirements, effects of a pressure regulating device used to implement these requirements, and the resulting improvements are compared in actual tests of vehicle and hardware.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660412
A. R. Spencer, W. M. Spurgeon, J. L. Winge
Automotive brake lining is a complex composite of organic resin binder, asbestos fiber reinforcement, and friction modifying fillers. Laboratory and vehicle tests used to select and qualify specific formulations are time consuming and not generally suitable for quality control. A new integrated system of tests is therefore proposed. The tests are X-ray radiography and optical resinography for structural definition; thermal analysis for chemical composition and state of cure; and a short sliding friction (drag) test utilizing the widely available SAE J661 friction materials test machine. The tests are described in detail and typical results are presented.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660431
Theodore J. Budzynski, Robert J. Parker
This paper analyzes present-day heavy truck steering systems to provide a basis upon which to continue improvements. The discussion includes areas which mechanically and physiologically affect steering efforts and structural loads. Consideration is given to steering geometry, component design parameters, and human factors influential in the steering acceptability of a vehicle. This analysis is based on actual vehicle test data and a literature survey of related anthropometry.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660228
Ralph H. Kress
Design features of the 100 ton electric drive truck developed by Caterpillar are discussed. Salient features of this vehicle are its power-weight ratio which is equal to or better than many small vehicles, and its maneuverability which enables it to turn within a 52 ft SAE circle. Two additional items mentioned are the use of electric power for smooth shifting of the vehicle and oil-cooled friction brakes for control of the truck under any stopping or retarding requirement. Present testing indicates this vehicle will make a worthwhile contribution to the better handling of construction material.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660785
Paul C. Skeels
This paper describes the development of the new energy absorbing steering column which is standard equipment on all 1967 General Motors and several competitive cars. The paper includes a description of the initial concept, the development stages of the final design, performance goals, and testing procedures. It details problems presented by the different design characteristics of the various car models.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660333
Robert H. Shatz, Thomas R. Wheaton
The turbine motor train designed by United Aircraft Corp. represents a systems approach to high-speed rail service, and incorporates many unique features that will permit operation at speeds up to 160 mph on existing roadbeds with significant savings in trip time and maintenance costs. Special emphasis is given the suspension system used on the UAC turbine powered train. The advantages of this system are that it banks the car body proportional to the lateral force, allowing higher speeds on curves with comfort equal to or greater than is now encountered. Also, intermediate axles are guided to eliminate the oscillations or truck hunting encountered in conventional trucks.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660142
Walter L. Luli, Warren J. Young
Abstract A concept of an entirely new single point tandem axle suspension designed only for highway operation, featuring a torsion rubber spring, independent wheel action, high spring deflection, controlled axle movement, and maximum arm articulation is presented. A superior ride, easier steering, reduced tire wear, weight reduction, ease of maintenance, elimination of friction, no lubrication required, and a balanced driveline under all load conditions are featured. NOTE: This is not a walking beam design of a suspension. This paper attempts to give as broad a picture as possible of the design, development, testing and operational features of the suspension.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660147
W. B. Sponsler
In order to resolve some of the many variables associated with lunar surface vehicle design and to evaluate early analyses and assumptions, an operating model vehicle was constructed and tested over a wide range of surface conditions. The resulting test data permitted making preliminary performance comparisons of 4, 6, and 8-wheel, split-track and full-track vehicles, and predictions of prototype performance. The conflicting requirements imposed by the variable mission and surface conditions stress the necessity for an adaptable or flexible locomotion system. Common wheel or track systems which employ fixed relationships with the ground cannot provide the combination of reliability, efficiency, traction, stability, and maneuverability so important to lunar missions.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660468
George D. Bartels
One of the basic principles in tire compounding, is to base all compounds on 100 parts (by weight) of rubber hydrocarbon, and relate the addition of all other compounding ingredients to this base of 100-RHC. Regarding tread compounds for agricultural tires, major requirements of a rear tractor tire tread are that it have resistance to abrasion (wear), cleat-tearing, and weathering. With the trend towards larger and higher horsepower tractors, the service-performance demands on tractor tires have increased, necessitating certain design, construction, and compound changes. If this trend continues, further changes will be required, and it is possible that some of the larger tractor tires of the future will more closely approach the present off-the-road type tire.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660125
PAUL G. AXELRAD
Abstract Four wheel drive vehicles have long had a reputation for hard riding and clumsy handling. A new coil spring front suspension, the development of a new driving front axle, along with better isolation of the chassis from the body, have been adopted for two new Ford four wheel drive vehicles with improved ride and maneuverability.
1966-01-01
Magazine
1966-01-01
Standard
J918A_196601
This SAE Standard provides minimum performance requirements and accompanying uniform laboratory test procedures for evaluating certain essential characteristics of new tires and newly retreaded tires intended for use on passenger cars. (The requirements published in this SAE Standard pertain to tire sizes currently used on American passenger cars and popular sizes used on imported passenger cars. For related information on tire sizes not listed, contact SAE Automotive Headquarters, 18121 East Eight Mile Road, East Detroit, Michigan 48021.)
1965-12-01
Magazine
1965-12-01
Standard
J944_196512
1. SCOPE Evaluation of the energy absorbing properties of the steering wheel assembly of a motor vehicle, or of the relative merit of altemative designs of such assemblies, is a complex problem involving human tolerance, vehicle and occupant dynamics during an accident, and frequency and severity of injuries to various body areas. T\'lO fundamental approaches are being used currently for steering wheel assembly evaluations: laboratory impact tests of varying degrees of complexity, and simulated collision tests. This SAE Recommended Practice describes a simplified laboratory procedure for evaluating the characteristics of steering wheel assemblies under simulated driver impact conditions. Basically, the test procedure employs a torso shaped body block which is impacted against the steering wheel assembly and the transmitted load -time history is measured.
1965-11-01
Magazine
1965-10-20
Technical Paper
650972
TRAFFORD J. W. LELAND
This paper discusses some of the important details of tire tread design, and presents some test results showing how tread design parameters can delay the build-up of hydrodynamic pressure in the tire footprint area and improve braking and cornering traction on wet or flooded pavement surfaces. It is also shown how even minor differences in pavement texture can be of extreme importance in providing good traction under wet conditions, and a proposed technique for measuring surface roughness and predicting the wet friction level of a given pavement texture is discussed. The paper concludes with a brief summary of current research on tire hydroplaning.
1965-10-04
Technical Paper
650844
W. W. Williams, G. K. Williams, W. C. J. Garrard
The frequent use of large transport aircraft on soft and rough airfields in or near battle zones requires that they be fitted with landing gears having increased capability for ground flotation and shock absorption. Design and parametric studies of aircraft landing gears show feasible approaches to the problems associated with soft and rough airfields. Landing gear concepts, analytical methods, and design parameters are presented for airplanes of 110,000–750,000 lb gross weight. Landing gear weights, sizes, and configurations are compared, and their soft and rough field capabilities are evaluated. Structural and dynamic aspects of rough field operations are discussed for bare soil fields and for fields covered with landing mats.
1965-10-01
Magazine
1965-09-01
Magazine
1965-09-01
Standard
J937_196509
ABSTRACT
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