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Viewing 9631 to 9660 of 10319
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580050
R. W. Perkins
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580047
W. S. Berry
THE air suspension offered by Rambler employs a rolling lobe air spring, designed to go inside a coil spring. The combination coil and air springs are utilized on the rear wheels only. This arrangement enhances the 4-coil spring suspension by using the air spring for leveling and for maintaining essentially the same ride characteristics whether the car is empty or loaded. The author considers the simplicity of the system to be one of its outstanding features. Reliability and ease of service were goals in the design.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580048
C. F. O'Shea
FORD'S answer to the air suspension problem is a system of the “open” type in which the air is exhausted from the springs to the atmosphere. It features a 2-speed automatic height and leveling control to handle differing load conditions. In adapting the air springs to the suspension arms, the front suspension was modified only slightly, while the rear was completely redesigned. The author reports that a significant improvement in passenger comfort has been achieved with the new suspension, especially for the rear seat passenger. Also, the car height remains constant under all loadings—a contribution to the car's appearance.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580197
R. A. PITTMAN, W. A. VAN WICKLIN
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580098
JAMES H. KRAMER
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580036
V. D. Polhemus, L. J. Kehoe, F. H. Cowin, S. L. Milliken
PART I of this paper describes the basic research and experimental development program of the air-spring suspension, Part II details the application of the principle to the 1957 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham. The authors think that the final design successfully met the development program criteria of cost, size, life, adaptability, and rate characteristics. This design, in turn, offered the features of constant height, smoother ride, and better handling, which appealed to the design engineers working on the Cadillac.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580046
Forest R. McFarland, E. G. Peckham, Eric Dietrich
THIS paper describes the springs, control system, and ride of the air suspension system on the 1958 Buick. The system is a semiclosed one, providing a variable-rate suspension, automatic leveling and trim control, and manual lift. The latter feature is a knob below the instrument panel which can be operated when necessary to cope with unusual clearance conditions. The car remains at the same height with loads of up to five passengers and 500 lb in the trunk. The authors describe the road-holding ability of a car with this suspension system as excellent.
1957-12-01
Magazine
1957-11-01
Magazine
1957-10-01
Magazine
1957-08-01
Magazine
1957-06-01
Magazine
1957-05-01
Magazine
1957-04-01
Magazine
1957-03-01
Magazine
1957-02-01
Magazine
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570107
H. T. SEALE
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570113
J. G. LOCKLIN
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570122
P. C. MORTENSON
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570071
T. A. ROBERTSON
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570073
J. MYERS
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570076
C.O. SLEMMONS
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570082
D. J. LaBELLE
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570284
HENRY N. ARD
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570348
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570038
Joseph B. Bidwell, Robert E. Owen
THE FIREBIRD II represents an interpretation of future trends in powerplant and chassis design. It was conceived as a high-speed, turbine-powered vehicle to carry its four passengers comfortably for long distances on smooth highways. The chassis and suspension provide a smooth level ride, the brakes give adequate stopping power, and the hydraulic system furnishes the means for powering accessories for convenient and easy car control.
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570021
T. H. Thomas
THE disc-servo brake was designed to eliminate brake fade. To overcome limitations of existing brake structures, desirable features of the disc and shoe brakes were combined. The introduction of three friction surfaces, two pads, and a shoe, and the addition of a ball-and-ramp self-energizing mechanism contribute, the author says, to a brake that has greater fade resistance and longer wear of small segments of the brake lining.
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570275
R. G. FLAGAN
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