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1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450182
JACK H. SHEETS, GORDON W. MacKINNEY
THE problem of providing sufficient braking capacity for land planes has become acute with the development of aircraft of high gross weight. One method that helps to solve this problem is discussed in this paper. It consists of reversing the thrust of the controllable-pitch propeller during the landing run. This method has been used successfully in test installations, both in combination with the normal wheel brakes and alone. It is claimed that either type of operation limits the landing run to values less than those obtained with the normal application of wheel braking.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450223
ROBERT N. AUSTEN
PROPER care of truck and bus equipment-always important, but now even more so because of wartime overloading - even applies to such seldom considered parts as the chassis leaf springs. So that fleet operators will know what to do to prevent trouble from happening to these parts, Mr. Austen lists here the various places on the spring where breakage is most likely to occur and the reasons for each type of breakage. These types of breakage depend on where the spring fails, and are listed, by the author, as follows: 1. At the center bolt hole. 2. Just away from the axle and outside of the U-bolt anchorage. 3. Midway between the axle and the eye. 4. At the base of the eye. 5. Just throughout the spring generally.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450209
T. H. Peirce
PRESENTED here is a general picture of the mechanical function of crude rubber when combined with metals for the purpose of torsional vibration control. Dampers of this type have been successfully designed and produced for engines of various displacements up to 650 hp. The author believes that in the future it will be possible to design bonded rubber dampers for engines of greater power output. The characteristics and test data included will show what result can be obtained with the addition of this type of damper.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450203
Duncan B. Gardiner
AIRPLANE hydraulic braking systems must be designed to have the highest standard of performance without sacrificing reliability. By the use of a multielement oscillograph the various characteristics of the braking system can be recorded simultaneously so that the value of design changes can easily be determined. Oscillograms for a typical aircraft braking system show that relatively minor changes result in a wide differential in performance and emphasize the conclusion that design changes in a hydraulic brake system should be evaluated with the oscillograph.
1945-01-01
Magazine
1944-11-01
Magazine
1944-10-01
Magazine
1944-09-01
Magazine
1944-08-01
Magazine
1944-06-01
Magazine
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440021
null, J. V. Bassett
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440047
Melvin W. Marien
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440173
B. J. Lemon, J. J. Robson
THE abrupt stoppage of crude rubber imports early in 1942 called for immediate crystallization of a program to produce, test, and use synthetic rubber as fast as made available for tires for military and commercial motor transportation. The Ordnance Department and the rubber industry pooled their resources of synthetic rubber, of tire know-how, and of testing facilities, to initiate a tire testing program heretofore unapproached in magnitude of effort. Conclusions of interest to fleet men are that Ordnance and rubber industry have completed a large amount of pioneering development work on military synthetic tires, the results of which are being directly utilized in synthetic tires for commercial service; also, that synthetic tires, to do a good job, require more careful supervision by fleet men respecting speeds, loads, and general maintenance attention than has been practiced in the immediate past with respect to tires made of natural rubber.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440195
B. E. HOUSE, R. A. GOEPFRICH
THE trend of brake design is in the direction of better brake performance and simplification of the brake from the manufacturing, service, and maintenance points of view. In the six types of brakes reviewed by the authors, performance was improved by center-mounting them with respect to both the applying and the anchoring forces. Simplicity in manufacture and service was achieved by reducing the number of pieces in the brake to a minimum by eliminating many conventional parts. Simplicity in maintenance is accomplished by eliminating major or anchor-pin adjustment, by simplifying the adjustment for lining wear, and by making it easy to disassemble and reassemble the shoes when they are relined.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440144
P. W. DREW
ALTHOUGH many tire manufacturers are claiming that synthetic tires are better than natural rubber ones, Mr. Drew believes this is too much to expect. He feels that production of synthetic tires 85 to 90% as good as those made of natural rubber would be a scientific achievement of the first rank. The reason for the limitations in the use of present-day synthetic material is that the material as certain deficiencies. The chief faults of GRS Government synthetic are: 1. It develops too much heat when flexed. 2. It loses extensibility when hot. 3. It has low fear resistance when hot. The development of excessive heat in flexing is due to a high hysteresis loss, which is not critical in articles having a low flex or that are thin-walled, and therefore have a low angle of flex, but in heavy articles such as truck tires, it is one of the biggest deficiencies.
1944-01-01
Magazine
1943-09-01
Magazine
1943-06-01
Magazine
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430152
H. O. FUCHS
THE volute spring, long used in railroad work, is now being applied to automotive equipment. The more stringent demands on space and performance in the automotive field have made refinements in materials, design, and manufacture necessary. Mr. Fuchs here presents a discussion of the design phase of the problem. Gradually increasing spring rate (stiffness) and unequal stress distribution along the blade are the chief features of volute springs. Apart from scale factors, Mr. Fuchs says, rate increase and stress distribution depend only on the ratio of smallest to largest free coil radii and on the variation of free helix angles from coil to coil. Use of nondimensional charts simplifies design, enables a rapid survey to be made without calculations, and gives a correct picture of loads and stresses. The importance of the presetting operation is emphasized by the author. Layout of coiling form and presetting bowl are a major design item, for which a rational procedure is proposed.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430015
J. F. Bachman
ABSTRACT
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430050
C. R. Mason, W. H. Elliott
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430093
F. W. Darbro
1942-12-01
Magazine
1942-09-01
Magazine
1942-06-01
Magazine
1942-02-01
Magazine
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420114
W. F. BENNING, M. C. HORINE
FAR from presenting a more difficult problem than other types, the six-wheeler can be made to give better braking performance than any, these authors contend. They are less likely to skid than either four-wheeled straight trucks or tractor-semi-trailers, they continue, and in general stopping ability they rate high. However, they acknowledge the complaints against the six-wheeler for behavior known as “bogie hopping” and loss of steering control when brakes are applied on slippery roads. Comparing the three principal types of commercial vehicles, they conclude that the complaints on this score are based if at all upon something other than dynamic weight transfer. “The reason why the problem is so acute with six-wheelers is that the supposedly rigid alignment of the rear bogie wheels constitutes a resistance to steering and that, therefore, any tendency for the front wheels to lose traction is of graver concern than with either a four-wheel truck or a tractor-semi-trailer.”
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420128
PAUL K. BEEMER, F. C. LINDVALL
THIS paper describes an “above-gravity, dynamically stable” spring suspension in which the car or coach is elastically supported at each end on a virtual, universal center bearing on the longitudinal centerline above the center of gravity of the car or coach body. It is pointed out that this virtual support permits sufficient universal swivel action of the truck relative to the car body to account for all operating conditions, and the springs, together with the positioning linkage, cooperate to achieve the desired vibration isolation. The actual car support, however, is at two points on either side of the car centerline with a third attachment below the floor level. The car or coach body rests on soft coil springs which are recessed into the car structure on either side of the center aisle.
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420044
M. E. Nuttila
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