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Technical Paper
1936-01-01
Roy W. Brown
THE results of an extensive research in motorcar suspension fundamentals are presented with a description of a new-type spring member using air as the load-carrying means. Methods of actually realizing extremely low spring rates with attendant comfort to the passenger are shown. Shock absorption and anti-body-roll devices are incorporated in, and function as integral parts of, the new suspension. A series of new tools are presented for the chassis engineer's consideration in designing better riding comfort into the new car. These include in a simple, practical light-weight unit, variation of spring rate with wheel position, approximate aperiodic body damping, body roll reduced to better than that secured with high-rate springs, wide range of load capacity with practically constant body frequency, and ability to adjust wheel position to the optimum point. Typical applications are illustrated together with numerous curves outlining the stated characteristics. Laboratory tests that have indicated phenomenal flexing life have been confirmed by extensive road tests.
Technical Paper
1936-01-01
S. Ward Widney
UNTIL rather recently, this paper states, very little scientific knowledge existed in the service field with reference to the suspension-tires, springs and shock absorbers. The tires are the only element of which the operator has a fairly clear understanding; therefore they are the only element which receives intelligent attention. The shock absorbers receive some attention but not a great deal. It is conceded that the motor-truck operators, large and small, know less about the suspension system than they do about any other important unit of the vehicle and that the reason for such lack of knowledge, is because no one knew much about it. Therefore, a little over three years ago, the author's organization decided it would endeavor to scientifically determine just what the possibilities were toward producing greater cushion in springs. Also to determine just what part the springs play in the suspension, and what part the tires and shock absorbers play. Mr. Widney's paper shows just what happens to the three units of the suspension-tires, springs and shock absorbers on various vehicles, passenger cars, light, medium and heavy trucks, buses and taxi cabs.
Technical Paper
1936-01-01
J. E. Hale
LENGTHY consideration is given to tire overloading, with the understanding that overloading as referred to in tire failures is quite different from the application of the term overload to structural materials which collapse under a reasonably well-defined excess of load. While this paper deals primarily with overloading, there are so many other aspects relating to the use of truck-bus tires affecting the industry that a discussion is included of various other phases of the tire business intended to be instructive along the line of longer life and greater freedom from trouble. The increasing varieties of service in which motor-vehicles are being placed demand different types and characteristics of tires, which are outlined. Then there is a discussion of the relative merits of the balloon type versus high-pressure-type tires. The choice of tires for new trucks and buses is covered in a practical way and also there is a section outlining the variations of the basis for determining loads and air-pressure recommendations.
Technical Paper
1936-01-01
Sidney M. Cadwell
Magazine
1936-01-01
Magazine
1935-12-01
Magazine
1935-11-01
Magazine
1935-09-01
Magazine
1935-07-01
Magazine
1935-02-01
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
N. E. Hendrickson
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
Fred L. Dennis
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
H. D. Hukill
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
Karl K. Probst
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
Burns Dick
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
W. S. James, H. E. Churchill, F. E. Ullery
IN this paper the authors present some experimental results obtained by using the analysis outlined by Prof. James J. Guest before the Institution of Automobile Engineers, in 1926. To make the experimental work more understandable, they present the essential points of Professor Guest's analysis. Professor Guest begins his analysis of the movements of a car body with the simplest set of conditions and presents a graphical as well as an algebraic solution. He then includes one additional factor after another in his analysis until the principal factors in car suspension are included. After all factors are considered, the essential structure of the simple analysis is retained. The authors' efforts at the experimental determination of the moment of inertia of passenger cars were started in January, 1932, on Sir Charles Dennistoun Burney's “tear-drop” design with which he visited leading American manufacturers. The first of the series of experiments was made by jouncing the car alternately about the front and rear axles.
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
Chris Bockius, J. Harold Hunt
IN this paper, the authors have made no mention of the various types of brakes used in any of the tests, and have endeavored to avoid partiality to any particular type of brake drum or lining, as each fills a particular need which can only be determined by the individual requirements of each car manufacturer. Brake drums and brake lining must be considered together in present-day brake engineering. The manufacturers of both products have found it necessary to carry on extensive development programs in order to improve the performance of their respective products. Test results should not be a matter of opinion, or subject to a wide variation in the personal equation. Therefore, this paper is devoted to a general description of the latest inertia-type brake-drum-and-lining testing-dynamometers, giving illustrations of both machines and descriptions of the functions of the various attachments, followed by an outline of the general methods at present in vogue for their use. No attempt has been made to present actual test-data, and a general discussion is given regarding the use of the machines at present.
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
Norman Leeds
THIS paper sets forth some of the many problems connected with the design and maintenance of heavy-duty brakes that urgently require solution. Satisfactory brakes, on the heavier vehicles at least, should include the following features: (1) Brakes should be on all wheels, utilizing the entire weight of the vehicle. (2) They should be of internal construction with hinged shoes of some type. (3) Power of some sort should be used to obtain the pressures necessary to stop the vehicle with comfortable effort on the part of the operator. (4) Cast-iron drums, which give the best results so far as known at present. (5) The friction element should be some kind of so-called “fabricated” material, not so hard as the drum and in an easily replaceable form. Detailed consideration of each of the foregoing five points is then presented, and a summary covering 10 desirable features for heavy-duty brakes is appended.
Magazine
1935-01-01
Magazine
1934-12-01
Magazine
1934-09-01
Magazine
1934-03-01
Magazine
1934-02-01
Technical Paper
1934-01-01
A. J. Blackwood, A. C. Spencer
Technical Paper
1934-01-01
Wm. K. Creson
Technical Paper
1934-01-01
F. F. Chandler

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