Criteria

Display:

Results

Viewing 9631 to 9660 of 9981
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410124
SIDNEY M. CADWELL
WIDE-BASE rims impose different conditions of strains in tires and emphasize certain inherent performance differences, some of which are advantages and others disadvantages. After a year of exhaustive testing by the combined car and tire industries, the wide-base rim proposal seems to have settled on the use of existing tire sizes on rims 1 to 1½ in. wider than at present, giving a rim ratio of 75 to 82% of tire width as compared with a ratio of 62 to 68% of the inflated width on existing tires. The principal benefits of the proposed rim resizing combination, using present tire load-carrying capacity and 2 psi lower inflation pressure are: (1) considerably more stability in the car; and (2) a 20 to 22% increase in tire tread life. In addition, the wide-base tire and rim combination will perform somewhat better for: tire cord fatigue, tire rim bruise resistance, tire groove cracking resistance; would perform equally well for: tire heat dissipation up to 75 mph, tire power consumption, tire tread and fabric separation, tire sidewall breaks at the rim, tire squeal on turns, and tire noise or hum on straight roads; but would be inferior for: tire ride, tire harshness, pavement seam bump absorption, tire and car parking effort, rim curbing, and tire tread shoulder cracking.
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410123
R. D. EVANS
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410119
S. JOHNSON
IN its discussion of the analysis and balancing of air-brake systems, this paper places particular stress on brake rigging, or the foundation brake, and its maintenance. Most of the chronic braking troubles could be eliminated, Mr. Johnson contends, if all brakes were balanced and then subjected to a well-planned and executed periodic maintenance program. In balancing, he explains, the brakes are modified so that all the brake shoes on the vehicle are contacting the drum at the same low pressure at the same time during the brake application. Benefits of such balancing and maintenance reported by the author include increased brake lining life; and reduction of: brake-drum breakage and checking, drum scoring, grease on brake linings, brake adjustments, and bearing failures and tire blowouts caused by heat. The remainder of the paper is devoted to details of the brake analysis and maintenance program. Various points are emphasized by charts compiled from data obtained by testing vehicles in actual service.
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400040
Tore Franzen
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400020
John C. Cox
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400021
W. B. Paine
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400068
J. N. STREET
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400050
Jean Y. Ray
1939-11-01
Magazine
1939-08-01
Magazine
1939-06-01
Magazine
1939-03-01
Magazine
1939-01-01
Magazine
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390145
K. A. Browne
ABSTRACT
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390126
E. S. Ewart
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390135
N.E. Hendrickson
THOUGH “commercial vehicles” include motor trucks, omnibuses, and railcars, this paper discusses only the springing of the first two types. Railcar suspension is primarily a railroad development, and thus its problems are much different from those of automotive road vehicles. A review of the fundamentals of spring suspension is given, outlining the requirements for comfort of the passengers of motor buses, or the safety from damage of the merchandise carried in motor trucks. The special problems peculiar to commercial-vehicle springing, as compared with the passenger automobile, will be discussed, notably the difficulty of obtaining satisfactory riding qualities, long life of springs, and reasonable limitation of side-sway, throughout much wider ranges of loading. Various methods of meeting the problems will be described, some already familiar through common usage, whereas others, though promising in the experimental stages, are not as yet commercial.
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390178
A. S. Krotz
THIS paper deals with one system of designing rubber springs; outlines its advantages; indicates its limitations; and describes the approach to the problem. This spring is of the torsion type, called “Torsilastic,” and is claimed to present advantages not only in its characteristics as a spring but also in flexibility of application which makes it possible to meet a wide range of requirements by variations in spring design and in the length of the moment arm which applies the torsional load. In general, it consists of an inner shaft surrounded by an annular layer of rubber bonded to the inner shaft and also to an outer metal shell. The outer shell is split into two segments. The spring is stressed in torsion by anchoring either the shaft or outside shell to the chassis and rotating the other member. When used not only as a spring but also as a mounting, the spring is claimed to offer the following advantages: reduction in harshness of ride; lowered noise level due to insulating properties; elimination of bearings, bearing parts, spring seats, and mountings; reduction of static friction to a minimum due to elimination of bearings; freedom from lubrication, rattles, and squeaks; cleanness and simplicity of design with low weight.
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390152
E. A. Roberts
A NEW method of rating passenger-car tires is suggested by the author in which horsepower as well as load is used as a governing factor. Tires rated by this method, he believes, will give more nearly equal service on all makes and models of automobiles. Horsepower of the car, he explains, was felt to be the factor most likely to be representative of the acceleration, cruising speed, and top speed of the vehicle. Mr. Roberts' paper presents a comprehensive review of tire design and development. Functional units of a tire are taken up one by one-body plies, tread plies, cushion, bead wire, reinforce, chafers, sidewall, and tread. Fundamental factors that affect tire service are discussed, such as load, inflation, speed, and atmospheric temperature, as well as neglect, abuse, horsepower, and road surface. The author also considers the various types of tire failures; a graphic method of measuring tread movement; tire development and improvement; costs; and tailoring the tire to the car.
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390089
Henry H. Kerr, F. C. Frank
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390081
L. W. Fox, A. L. MacCracken
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390050
T. L. Yates
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390033
T. R. STENBERG, C. N. MENZ
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390003
W. S. James, Paul C. Ackerman
1938-11-01
Magazine
1938-07-01
Magazine
1938-03-01
Magazine
1938-01-01
Magazine
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380070
Joseph Ledwinka
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380077
J. E. Hale

Filter

  • Article
    335
  • Book
    60
  • Collection
    22
  • Magazine
    704
  • Technical Paper
    7434
  • Standard
    1426