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1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580388
Howard B. Huntress
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580389
C. S. Batchelor
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580315
C. W. MOSS
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580038
R. P. Lewis, L J. O'Brien
ON THE basis of laboratory and field tests of passenger-car and light-truck rear axles, the authors conclude: 1. The capacity of present axles can be increased, without increasing axle size, when greater load-carrying antiwear and antiscore lubricants are available. 2. Gear noise will always be a major problem because axle gears are operating at varying speeds and loads whenever a car is in motion. Many gear noise problems can be overcome by proper tooth development and by testing in the actual car model under which the axle will be used. 3. The only reliable basis for torque-capacity rating is the tractive effort (wheel-slip torque). 4. The limited-slip type of differential will eventually become standard equipment on all passenger cars, if only to improve car handling and stability during high-speed driving under varying traction conditions.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580031
O. D. Dillman, R. R. Love
IN 1951 Chrysler Corp. began working on a new torsion suspension. In this paper the authors describe details of the development and design of the suspension, now available on 1957 cars. The authors claim the Torsion-Aire suspension has the following advantages: reduced highspeed float, boulevard harshness, impact harshness, road noise, body roll, nose dive, and acceleration squat; better directional stability and cornering ability; fewer lubrication points; and a better balanced ride. The main feature of the front suspension is the use of torsion bars. One of the principal advantages of torsion bars is their weight: 10 lb as compared to 15.8 lb for a 1956 production coil spring.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580049
K. H. Hansen, J. F. Bertsch, R. E. Denzer
CHEVROLET has made its new air-suspension system easily interchangeable in production line assembly with standard full-coil suspension by adopting a 4-link-type rear suspension with short and long arms. A feature of the system is the mounting of the leveling valves within the air-spring assemblies. These valves correct riding height continually at a moderate rate, regardless of whether the springs are leveling or operating in ride motion. The system provides constant frequency ride—ride comfort remains the same whether the car is occupied by the driver alone or is fully loaded.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580050
R. W. Perkins
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580047
W. S. Berry
THE air suspension offered by Rambler employs a rolling lobe air spring, designed to go inside a coil spring. The combination coil and air springs are utilized on the rear wheels only. This arrangement enhances the 4-coil spring suspension by using the air spring for leveling and for maintaining essentially the same ride characteristics whether the car is empty or loaded. The author considers the simplicity of the system to be one of its outstanding features. Reliability and ease of service were goals in the design.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580048
C. F. O'Shea
FORD'S answer to the air suspension problem is a system of the “open” type in which the air is exhausted from the springs to the atmosphere. It features a 2-speed automatic height and leveling control to handle differing load conditions. In adapting the air springs to the suspension arms, the front suspension was modified only slightly, while the rear was completely redesigned. The author reports that a significant improvement in passenger comfort has been achieved with the new suspension, especially for the rear seat passenger. Also, the car height remains constant under all loadings—a contribution to the car's appearance.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580197
R. A. PITTMAN, W. A. VAN WICKLIN
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580098
JAMES H. KRAMER
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580036
V. D. Polhemus, L. J. Kehoe, F. H. Cowin, S. L. Milliken
PART I of this paper describes the basic research and experimental development program of the air-spring suspension, Part II details the application of the principle to the 1957 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham. The authors think that the final design successfully met the development program criteria of cost, size, life, adaptability, and rate characteristics. This design, in turn, offered the features of constant height, smoother ride, and better handling, which appealed to the design engineers working on the Cadillac.
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580046
Forest R. McFarland, E. G. Peckham, Eric Dietrich
THIS paper describes the springs, control system, and ride of the air suspension system on the 1958 Buick. The system is a semiclosed one, providing a variable-rate suspension, automatic leveling and trim control, and manual lift. The latter feature is a knob below the instrument panel which can be operated when necessary to cope with unusual clearance conditions. The car remains at the same height with loads of up to five passengers and 500 lb in the trunk. The authors describe the road-holding ability of a car with this suspension system as excellent.
1957-12-01
Magazine
1957-11-01
Magazine
1957-10-01
Magazine
1957-08-01
Magazine
1957-06-01
Magazine
1957-05-01
Magazine
1957-04-01
Magazine
1957-03-01
Magazine
1957-02-01
Magazine
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570107
H. T. SEALE
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570113
J. G. LOCKLIN
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570122
P. C. MORTENSON
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570071
T. A. ROBERTSON
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570073
J. MYERS
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570076
C.O. SLEMMONS
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570082
D. J. LaBELLE
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570284
HENRY N. ARD
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