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Magazine
1935-12-01
Magazine
1935-11-01
Magazine
1935-09-01
Magazine
1935-07-01
Magazine
1935-02-01
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
N. E. Hendrickson
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
Fred L. Dennis
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
H. D. Hukill
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
Karl K. Probst
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
Burns Dick
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
W. S. James, H. E. Churchill, F. E. Ullery
IN this paper the authors present some experimental results obtained by using the analysis outlined by Prof. James J. Guest before the Institution of Automobile Engineers, in 1926. To make the experimental work more understandable, they present the essential points of Professor Guest's analysis. Professor Guest begins his analysis of the movements of a car body with the simplest set of conditions and presents a graphical as well as an algebraic solution. He then includes one additional factor after another in his analysis until the principal factors in car suspension are included. After all factors are considered, the essential structure of the simple analysis is retained. The authors' efforts at the experimental determination of the moment of inertia of passenger cars were started in January, 1932, on Sir Charles Dennistoun Burney's “tear-drop” design with which he visited leading American manufacturers. The first of the series of experiments was made by jouncing the car alternately about the front and rear axles.
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
Chris Bockius, J. Harold Hunt
IN this paper, the authors have made no mention of the various types of brakes used in any of the tests, and have endeavored to avoid partiality to any particular type of brake drum or lining, as each fills a particular need which can only be determined by the individual requirements of each car manufacturer. Brake drums and brake lining must be considered together in present-day brake engineering. The manufacturers of both products have found it necessary to carry on extensive development programs in order to improve the performance of their respective products. Test results should not be a matter of opinion, or subject to a wide variation in the personal equation. Therefore, this paper is devoted to a general description of the latest inertia-type brake-drum-and-lining testing-dynamometers, giving illustrations of both machines and descriptions of the functions of the various attachments, followed by an outline of the general methods at present in vogue for their use. No attempt has been made to present actual test-data, and a general discussion is given regarding the use of the machines at present.
Technical Paper
1935-01-01
Norman Leeds
THIS paper sets forth some of the many problems connected with the design and maintenance of heavy-duty brakes that urgently require solution. Satisfactory brakes, on the heavier vehicles at least, should include the following features: (1) Brakes should be on all wheels, utilizing the entire weight of the vehicle. (2) They should be of internal construction with hinged shoes of some type. (3) Power of some sort should be used to obtain the pressures necessary to stop the vehicle with comfortable effort on the part of the operator. (4) Cast-iron drums, which give the best results so far as known at present. (5) The friction element should be some kind of so-called “fabricated” material, not so hard as the drum and in an easily replaceable form. Detailed consideration of each of the foregoing five points is then presented, and a summary covering 10 desirable features for heavy-duty brakes is appended.
Magazine
1935-01-01
Magazine
1934-12-01
Magazine
1934-09-01
Magazine
1934-03-01
Magazine
1934-02-01
Technical Paper
1934-01-01
A. J. Blackwood, A. C. Spencer
Technical Paper
1934-01-01
Wm. K. Creson
Technical Paper
1934-01-01
F. F. Chandler
Technical Paper
1934-01-01
Arthur W. Bull
Technical Paper
1934-01-01
Maurice Olley
“ALTHOUGH it is not presented as a narrative,” Mr. Olley says, “this paper is really the story of our work for the past three years. The sequence of the paper follows almost exactly the development of the story.” Independent suspension affects two things, it is pointed out-ride and steering. The first part of the paper discusses ride; the second part, independent suspension as it affects both ride and steering. Mr. Olley offers no apology for injecting ride into the discussion, because, he says, “this is the reason why front suspension has been changed”. He adds: “It has always seemed to me that the most interesting thing about any design is not the design itself, but the reason behind it.” This paper gives the reasons.
Magazine
1933-11-01
Magazine
1933-10-01
Magazine
1933-09-01
Magazine
1933-05-01
Magazine
1933-04-01

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