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1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530048
J. J. ROBSON
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530237
FORMULATION of a standard test code covering the use of brake testing dynamometers has been completed, approved, and published in the 1953 SAE Handbook as a recommended practice. Increasing use of these brake testing machines has made it apparent that brake evaluation should be reduced to common terms in order to compare performance characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to facilitate use of the code by presenting additional explanatory information. On the basis of both laboratory and field experience, the working committee has accumulated data covering design features of the dynamometer, dynamometer instrumentation, general features of the test code, and correlation of dynamometer and road tests. The working committee which formulated the code - and wrote the report given here - includes the following members: R. K. Super (chairman), Timken-Detroit Axle Co.; D. J. Bonawit, Marshall-Eclipse Axle Corp.; D. P. Dyer, Budd Co.; R. A. Goepfrich, Bendix Products Corp.; G. H.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530234
G. A. G. Fazekas
The main purpose of this paper is to show that the phenomena classed under the generic thermal failure are not due to excessive temperature alone, but to a combination of high stresses and high temperature; other factors of importance are brake design, geometry, physical properties of brake lining, and those of the drum. Concerning stresses, it will be shown that temperature gradients alone can cause them to reach well into the plastic state, even in a comparatively cool drum. Such heat stresses are known to give rise to crazing of the track, but in addition it is explained here that they are also responsible for heavy scoring, heat checks, or outright fracture. A detailed analysis indicates why and how certain purely mechanical design aspects lower stresses and heat concentrations, thereby mitigating or even preventing the onset of thermal failure.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530261
Philip Barkan
THE author present a method for calculating high-speed motion of a cam-actuated engine valve, operated with a flexible linkage. Correlation between calculated and experimental valve motion is shown to be reasonably good. The designer is enabled to understand the valve-motion phenomenon, and to predict it quantitatively, thereby eliminating many of the usual expensive trial processes. Discussion of this and other papers on “Valve-Gear Problems in Modern Overhead-Valve Engines” starts on page 714.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530263
M.C. Turkish
THE author shows how the success of a valve-spring design is intrinsically related to both the cam design and the valve gear dynamics obtained at high engine speeds. Good valve gear dynamics, which is characterized by minimum vibration, he says, minimizes hydraulic lifter pump-up tendency and greatly simplifies the job of making a satisfactory spring design. He shows that the use of the smooth-acceleration curve is very helpful in producing good valve gear dynamics, and that it is to be recommended over other types. The author also discusses the use of dual springs and cyclo-pelting and presetting of springs. Discussion of this and other papers on “Valve Gear Problems in Modern Overhead-Valve Engines” starts on page 714.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530256
George T. Ladd, Sidney B. Dew
THE bonded bimetallic brake drum has been developed to help solve the increasingly difficult problem of providing satisfactory braking service for modern cars. These drums have an aluminum-alloy housing bonded to a cast-iron liner. In this combination, the cast iron provides the wearing surface and the aluminum alloy provides the high heat conductivity and low weight. The result is an improvement in the rate at which heat is dissipated and a lower unsprung weight for the car. These brake drums have also been found to help considerably in eliminating squeal. In England, it is reported, several car manufacturers are already using these drums successfully.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530105
B. W. MOORE, J. H. MACPHERSON, V. C. DAVIS
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530090
E. E. HUPP
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530125
J.J. ROBSON
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530130
R.K SUPER, D.J. BONAWIT, D.P. DYER, R.A. GOEPFRICH, G.H. HUNT, J.F. JOHNSON, A.E. KIMBERLY, G.K. McCANN, E.O. REYNOLDS, W.S. RIGBY, E.H. WELLS
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530121
J. DOUGLAS BENNETT
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530221
C.A. Gunsaulus
A CONTROL system is described that has been successfully preventing premature rotation stoppage of airplane wheels when too much braking is used. The system has now been applied to a truck in a series of tests conducted on an icy roadway. It is shown that wheels exert their greatest braking effect when the brakes are applied almost to the point where the wheels lock. Thus, when used on airplanes, the device (1) detects when a brake is about to lock the wheel, (2) releases the brake pressure to allow the wheel to pick up speed, and (3) again permits brake application. This cycle is then repeated until a stop is attained. Similarly, when used on ground vehicles, the device functions by sensing the impending wheel lock, and then relays a signal to actuate the brake valve. The tests showed that individual wheel control devices can prevent out-of-control skidding in trucks and buses, and jackknifing of tractor-trailers.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530208
William W. Henning
DURING the period between the two World Wars the track-type vehicle was stimulated into a position of prime importance both in military and civilian applications. This paper reviews the vast strides made in the design of tracks and suspensions, which in turn have led to higher road speed and more efficient utilization of power. However, with the increase of speed, the importance of controllability and power transmission becomes more evident, necessitating careful consideration of the problems of steering mechanism design. The author describes an ideal system which, when and if designed would undoubtedly be universally adopted. But only those who have attempted to come to grips with the problem in a practical manner realize that the final solution will not be a simple one. The present result is that there are almost as many steering systems as there are different types of vehicles. The many reasons leading to such wide-range developments are covered in this paper.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530203
C. O. SLEMMONS
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530193
LEWIS C. KIBBEE
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530189
H. E. FOX, D. J. LaBelle
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530195
S. G. JOHNSON
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530183
1953-01-01
Magazine
1952-11-01
Magazine
1952-09-01
Magazine
1952-06-01
Magazine
1952-03-01
Magazine
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520041
F. W. DAVIS
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520056
MARVIN H. POLZIN
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520071
E. A. ROBERTS
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520260
W.K. Creson
THE first part of this paper is devoted to pictures of some of the present-day types of, power-steering units. These are followed by pictures of several of the pumps that have been developed for these power-steering units. The remainder of the paper covers: 1. Vehicles equipped with power steering. 2. Le Tourneau electrical power steering. 3. Accessories and hydraulic fluids.
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520264
James H. Booth
A knowledge of ball joints has been applied to the development of a novel improvement in their application to front suspensions. Two functionally different units have been created from the “full ball” type of joint, which has been applied in the past to both upper and lower sockets: 1. A lower socket, hanging on the stud, carries the load on a loose ring of balls and provides a free turning motion for steering. 2. An upper socket, provided with a spring-loaded clutch, dampens the steering motion, and those vibrations resulting from the gyroscopic thrusts of the front wheel. Mr. Booth’s paper delves into the historic background behind the idea of applying ball joints to front suspensions in order to combine suspension and steering action at one point into a neat package. It emphasizes the ability of ball joints to prevent suspension stiffness that results from misalignment.
1952-01-01
Technical Paper
520151
C. W. Lincoln
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