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1954-08-01
Magazine
1954-07-01
Magazine
1954-02-01
Magazine
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540227
C.W. Lincoln
THE Saginaw design of hydraulic steering gear is described in this paper. This gear employs a screw and nut, with a novel system of circulating balls between these two members. The motion of the nut is transmitted to the cross-shaft or pitman shaft by means of rack and sector teeth. Advantages claimed for this design include simplicity and versatility. The loads of the centering springs and even the size and number of reaction plungers can be varied, making the steering “firm” or “soft,” as desired.
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540263
F.P. Zimmerli, W.P. Wood
ENDURANCE limits and load losses at various temperatures from -75 F to 650 F for several spring materials are reported in this paper. The materials tested were in the form of helical springs, both shot peened and unpeened. Some general observations made by the authors include: 1. Shot-peened springs had higher endurance limits and greater relaxation than unpeened springs at -75 F and 75 F. 2. As test temperatures rose above atmospheric, endurance limit of all unpeened springs tended to hold steady or increase somewhat, while that of shot-peened springs tended to decrease. 3. Except for high-speed steel and stainless steel, chrome-silicon steel showed lowest load loss in both static and dynamic tests in the temperature range from atmospheric to 450 F. 4. Both unpeened and shot-peened high-speed-steel springs showed high endurance limits at all test temperatures. 5. Endurance limits at -75 F were similar to those at atmospheric temperature, but the amount of set was less, on the average.
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540262
R. L. Mattson, W. S. Coleman
RESULTS of an investigation into the effect of shot-peening variables and the resulting residual stresses on fatigue life are reported in this paper. Leaf springs were the simple specimens heat-treated, cold worked, and tested in this study. Some of the conclusions reached are: 1. There is a minimum shot velocity for each shot size to obtain best fatigue life, and this value is much lower than that normally used. 2. Exposure time for this type of shot-peened specimen beyond some minimum value is wasteful and costly. 3. Shot size has little influence on fatigue life for these specimens. 4. Shot peening specimens while under tensile strain greatly increases fatigue life at 200,000 psi nominal stress over that of nonpeened or strain-free-peened specimens. 5. Shot peening these specimens gave residual compressive stresses 50% of yield strength, and these stresses can be increased to more than 50% by strain peening. 6.
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540007
R. A. GOEPFRICH
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540004
R. H. MOORE
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540006
Mr. Stephen Johnson
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540069
DON ROHRER
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540064
R. R. PETERSON
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540020
Lt. Col. M. G. BEKKER
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540019
R. K. SUPER
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540040
L. H. Nagler
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540124
R. A. GARRISON
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540128
CHRIS HESS, LLOYD ETHIGTON, ROBERT GIERTZ
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540134
C. W. MOSS
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540089
M. F. TORRENCE
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540170
F. C. WALTERS, J. K. JENSEN
1954-01-01
Magazine
1953-08-01
Magazine
1953-04-01
Magazine
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530036
O. D. Dillman, E. J. Collier
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530048
J. J. ROBSON
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530237
FORMULATION of a standard test code covering the use of brake testing dynamometers has been completed, approved, and published in the 1953 SAE Handbook as a recommended practice. Increasing use of these brake testing machines has made it apparent that brake evaluation should be reduced to common terms in order to compare performance characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to facilitate use of the code by presenting additional explanatory information. On the basis of both laboratory and field experience, the working committee has accumulated data covering design features of the dynamometer, dynamometer instrumentation, general features of the test code, and correlation of dynamometer and road tests. The working committee which formulated the code - and wrote the report given here - includes the following members: R. K. Super (chairman), Timken-Detroit Axle Co.; D. J. Bonawit, Marshall-Eclipse Axle Corp.; D. P. Dyer, Budd Co.; R. A. Goepfrich, Bendix Products Corp.; G. H.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530234
G. A. G. Fazekas
The main purpose of this paper is to show that the phenomena classed under the generic thermal failure are not due to excessive temperature alone, but to a combination of high stresses and high temperature; other factors of importance are brake design, geometry, physical properties of brake lining, and those of the drum. Concerning stresses, it will be shown that temperature gradients alone can cause them to reach well into the plastic state, even in a comparatively cool drum. Such heat stresses are known to give rise to crazing of the track, but in addition it is explained here that they are also responsible for heavy scoring, heat checks, or outright fracture. A detailed analysis indicates why and how certain purely mechanical design aspects lower stresses and heat concentrations, thereby mitigating or even preventing the onset of thermal failure.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530261
Philip Barkan
THE author present a method for calculating high-speed motion of a cam-actuated engine valve, operated with a flexible linkage. Correlation between calculated and experimental valve motion is shown to be reasonably good. The designer is enabled to understand the valve-motion phenomenon, and to predict it quantitatively, thereby eliminating many of the usual expensive trial processes. Discussion of this and other papers on “Valve-Gear Problems in Modern Overhead-Valve Engines” starts on page 714.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530263
M.C. Turkish
THE author shows how the success of a valve-spring design is intrinsically related to both the cam design and the valve gear dynamics obtained at high engine speeds. Good valve gear dynamics, which is characterized by minimum vibration, he says, minimizes hydraulic lifter pump-up tendency and greatly simplifies the job of making a satisfactory spring design. He shows that the use of the smooth-acceleration curve is very helpful in producing good valve gear dynamics, and that it is to be recommended over other types. The author also discusses the use of dual springs and cyclo-pelting and presetting of springs. Discussion of this and other papers on “Valve Gear Problems in Modern Overhead-Valve Engines” starts on page 714.
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530256
George T. Ladd, Sidney B. Dew
THE bonded bimetallic brake drum has been developed to help solve the increasingly difficult problem of providing satisfactory braking service for modern cars. These drums have an aluminum-alloy housing bonded to a cast-iron liner. In this combination, the cast iron provides the wearing surface and the aluminum alloy provides the high heat conductivity and low weight. The result is an improvement in the rate at which heat is dissipated and a lower unsprung weight for the car. These brake drums have also been found to help considerably in eliminating squeal. In England, it is reported, several car manufacturers are already using these drums successfully.
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