Display:

Results

Viewing 9631 to 9660 of 10923
HISTORICAL
1970-01-01
Standard
J849B_197001
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the recommended locations for the air brake and electrical connections for towing multiple trailers. It applies to all commercial trailers except drop frame and car haul types.
1969-12-01
Magazine
1969-11-01
Magazine
1969-09-01
Magazine
1969-08-01
Magazine
HISTORICAL
1969-08-01
Standard
AS666A
This AS applies to the cavity design and the selection of O-rings for tubeless tire wheels.
HISTORICAL
1969-07-01
Standard
J108_196907
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes a uniform procedure for the level road test of the brake systems of all classes of motorcycles intended for highway use.
HISTORICAL
1969-07-01
Standard
J109_196907
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes performance requirements for the service brake systems of all classes of motorcycles intended for highway use.
HISTORICAL
1969-07-01
Standard
J1402A_196907
This recommended practice covers minimum requirements for air brake hose assemblies made from reinforced elastomeric hose and suitable fittings for use in automotive air brake systems including flexible connections from frame to axle, tractor to trailer, trailer to trailer and other unshielded air lines with air pressures up to 1 MPa, that are exposed to potential pull or impact. This hose is not to be used where temperatures, external or internal, fall outside the range of -40 °C to +100 °C.
HISTORICAL
1969-06-01
Standard
J992A_196906
This SAE Recommended Practice presents performance requirements for the brake systems of motor vehicles intended for roadway use and falling into the following classifications: Light trucks and buses: 6001-10 000 lb (2700-4500 kg) gvw; Truck and bus: Over 10 000 lb (4500 kg) gvw; combination of vehicles towing vehicles over 10 000 lb (4500 kg) gvw. Acceptable performance requirements are based on data obtained from applicable sections of SAE J786a (March, 1978). The purpose of this recommended practice is to establish the minimum brake system performance requirements with regard to: 3.1 Stopping ability--of cold brakes, as affected by vehicle speed. 3.2 Stopping ability--of hot brakes, as affected by vehicle speed and duty cycle. 3.3 Pedal force (air pressure) requirements--maximum allowable. 3.4 Brake stability. 3.5 stopping ability and recovery of wet brakes. 3.6 Stopping ability of emergency brake system. 3.7 Brake effectiveness distribution for vehicles in combination.
HISTORICAL
1969-06-01
Standard
J393_196906
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes uniform engineering nomenclature for wheels, hubs, rims, and their components used in truck, bus, and trailer applications. This nomenclature and accompanying drawings are intended to define functional truck wheel, hub, and rim designs. The International Standard (ISO) nomenclature is shown in parentheses when different than SAE J393.
1969-05-01
Magazine
HISTORICAL
1969-03-01
Standard
J345A_196903
This SAE Recommended Practice defines the best known techniques for evaluating peak and locked wheel braking traction. It covers an important phase of tire braking traction, namely, the wet or dry pavement straight ahead conditions. However, this is but a small portion of the whole field of tire traction. As test procedures are established for other phases of this complex study, additional supplementary procedures will be written. A discussion of this entire subject is contained in Appendix B to this recommended practice.
CURRENT
1969-03-01
Standard
J345_196903
This SAE Recommended Practice defines the best known techniques for evaluating peak and locked wheel braking traction. It covers an important phase of tire braking traction, namely, the wet or dry pavement straight ahead conditions. However, this is but a small portion of the whole field of tire traction. As test procedures are established for other phases of this complex study, additional supplementary procedures will be written. A discussion of this entire subject is contained in Appendix B to this recommended practice.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690766
T. E. Kashmerick
This paper emphasizes the need for correct component specification in the procurement of a vehicle so that expected performance results can be obtained. Areas of component selection affecting vehicle ride, handling, durability, and performance are utility body application problems, tire and wheel effects, related frame stiffness, and fifth wheel location problems. Besides mechanical factors, interstate fleet operational problems with varying legal requirements by states will have an effect on vehicle usage. Basic selection factors reviewed are vehicle capability from gvw-gcw characteristics and component minimums, correct selection of wheelbase, and component matching to static and dynamic requirements. In conclusion, it is recommended that an immediate evaluation of a vehicle under actual operating conditions be conducted to determine its true effective capability.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690757
J. M. Adgey, A. B. Birks, G. P. Blair
Modern turbocharged diesel engines employ exhaust driven turboblowers operating at high speeds up to 100,000 rpm. The performance assessment of such units demands precise and controllable power absorption and torque measurements at these very high rotational speeds. Additionally the parameters, speed, mass flow, static and dynamic pressures and temperatures must be measured. The turbine power absorption and torque measutement present unique problems. The remaining parameters may present some difficulties but generally the problems are not so great. The design of a high speed dynamometer and the development problems encountered are described. The dynamometer has been used to establihs the performance characteristics of a C. A. V. 01 turbocharger and these are reported.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690221
Edwin J. Miller
S A major increase in damping capacity of pearlitic gray iron for brake discs has been obtained by modification of chemical composition. Car tests indicate that sufficient disc damping can be obtained to substantially reduce squeal tendency in disc brakes. The investigations showed that the frequency dependent damping is due to magnetoelastic and elastoplastic mechanisms at low frequencies. Apparently, the contributions from both mechanisms are enhanced by an abundance of large graphite flakes and a coarse pearlitic matrix microstructure. High carbon and silicon concentrations with minimal pearlite stabilizers are required. High damping capacity brake discs exhibited good braking characteristics and appeared significantly more wear resistant than conventional brake iron discs.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690222
R. H. Hellmann
Do the brake fluid suppliers really know what the brake engineer wants from brake fluid? Of course they realize that the safety conscious brake engineer wants improvements in boiling point. But do they realize that he is interested in other characteristics which in the long run will help improve the end product - the automobile? One brake engineer speaks out about the characteristics he would like in brake fluids.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690223
Ramsey B. Broadwater, Michael Neale
The precision of measuring the boiling point of high boiling brake fluids was determined by 18 laboratories on three brake fluid samples (374, 450, and 550 F). Tests were made using both a heating mantle and an electric heater. Reproducibility on the 374 and 450 F fluids. Two results (each the average of duplicates), obtained by analysts in different laboratories, should be considered suspect (95% confidence level) if they differ by more than 9 F. Reproducibility on the 550 fluid. Two results (each the average of duplicates), obtained by analysts in different laboratories, should be considered suspect (95% confidence level) if they differ by more than 19 F.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690215
Edwin E. Stewart, Lauren L. Bowler
The use of a laboratory simulator to evaluate the performance of wheel slip control systems under controlled operating conditions is reported. It is shown how an analog computer can be interconnected with a hydraulic brake system and wheel slip control hardware to form a hybrid simulation of a vehicle installation. An analog computer can also be used to simulate vehicle dynamics and tire-to-road friction characteristics. Simulator accuracy is established by correlating laboratory results with road data. Advantages and disadvantages of using the simulator in lieu of experimental road testing are pointed out.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690233
Teruo Maeda, Hitoshi Uemura
Throughout the development of a small sized passenger car, a simulation method using digital computers has been proved to be useful in achieving the desired dynamics. Among the types of independent rear suspension systems available, the semitrailing type has been shown preferable because of its negligible effect on jack-up. Ride motion is discussed within the concept of “dynamical pitching centers.” In some cases, shock absorbers proved very effective in controlling the pitching mode. A system having four degrees of freedom was used for the analysis of steering response. A practical method for evaluating driver reaction is proposed.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690235
Ronald L. Leffert
This paper discusses the use of a time-sharing digital computer for computation of dynamic system responses. The program illustrated is a dynamic simulation of the linear vehicle directional control problem. State variable and matrix algebra techniques are used to calculate steady-state and transient responses of the linear directional control model for use in suspension analysis.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690234
Walter Bergman
This paper examines the many facets of vehicle handling and relates handling to real life conditions. Included in the paper is a description of driver-vehicle handling qualities in terms of safety and performance. The mechanics of accidents as well as the primary and secondary driving events influencing the accident situation are analyzed. The importance of the unexpected event is brought into focus and discussed. Subjective evaluation, performance task testing and response measurement methods are reviewed and compared in terms of merit in developing desirable vehicle handling characteristics. New test methods for measuring effects of braking and acceleration in cornering are described and illustrated with experimental results. The results of preliminary studies attempting to find correlation between objective measurements and subjective evaluation are shown.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690190
R. C. Tashjian, J. A. Simmons
The U. S. Marine Corps, in conjunction with the U. S. Army, is developing a marginal terrain vehicle, based on the airoll principle, to replace the M76 and Ml16 vehicles. The first phase of the XM759 development program established the overall vehicle configuration. Following approval of the basic design, detail design and pilot fabrication were developed. Initial testing was considered unsatisfactory. However, after tire modifications involving a Chevron tread design, slope climbing capability was achieved with no reduction in mobility. Extensive mobility tests have verified that the marginal terrain vehicle can negotiate the most extreme soft soil conditions.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690153
W. R. Herling, E. G. Markow
The problem of designing wheels for vehicle operation on a variety of soil conditions has been approached in several ways. Each method generally tries to develop a large ground contact area to minimize soil bearing pressure and motion resistance. Tracks and large diameter wheels are commonly used to cope with off-road driving conditions. While they can effectively deal with the soil mechanics aspect of the problem, tracks and large wheels in certain design applications are unacceptable solutions because of their required size and weight. Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation has proposed as an off the road locomotion device a hybrid design that provides the required large soil bearing area and also approaches the stability and efficiency of a circular spoked wheel. Several models of this device have been built and tested, the latest of which is currently being developed under contract from the U. S. Army Tank-Automotive Command.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690152
G. H. Howe, C. G. Wells
Recent studies by Missiles and Space Division-Michigan, LTV Aerospace Corp., have quantitatively verified that the air cell track/suspension concept originally applied to the pneumatic all-terrain amphibian (PATA) vehicle offers a unique solution to off-road mobility problems of tactical vehicles. Analog computer simulation techniques were employed to determine ride characteristics and experiments with scaled models were conducted to analyze air cell performance in water and soft soils. This paper covers current efforts to develop and perfect the air cell concept, concentrating on analytical studies and recent significant design improvements that promise improved suspension capabilities.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690106
John D. Kelley, William R. Woodall
A completely new tire concept has resulted in a development which goes far beyond body constructions, cord materials, compounds, and tread designs. Basically this is a new, shaped tire that offers significant improvements in tire safety, durability, and performance. Since this new tire, the “LXX, “ utilizes a new rim which is large in diameter and low in stresses, the automotive engineer is afforded greater latitude in optimizing braking systems.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690107
R. L. Carr
This paper is concerned with performance of low aspect ratio radial passenger tires. The performance characteristics considered are: tread wear, ride softness, traction, and tire strength. A review of low aspect ratio radial ply construction and inflated profiles of various other tires are included along with styling of the ultra low profile radial tire, as it relates to overall vehicle appearance.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690097
H. Viereck
This paper describes a series of rubber compression springs that obtain large deflections and progressive rates from a special configuration. Functioning of the basic spring is explained. Factors influencing the performance and service life are discussed. Examples of progressive rate suspensions using hollow rubber springs singly and in combination with other spring media are presented.
Viewing 9631 to 9660 of 10923

Filter