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Viewing 9631 to 9660 of 11115
1972-02-01
Technical Paper
720743
Masatoshi Satake, Tsuneo Mukai
The problems due to the soft soil often found at job sites in Japan call for a tire superior in traction and flotation to be used on wheel-type earthmovers. We have developed several types of experimental tires by applying various theories about such influences on the characteristics of tires as configuration of the tire, internal structure, and design of the tread. Tests on such experimental tires have been conducted with a new machine for evaluating the traction and flotation of earthmover tires. After careful experimentation and testing, we formulated a theory, which is a slight modification of Bekker's experimental formula, and this theory has been proved to be applicable to common practices in the field.
1972-02-01
Technical Paper
720742
R. N. Klaas
This paper lays out some guidelines for selecting the proper tire for off-the-road vehicles and then maintaining those tires so the machine-tire relationship is optimized for maximum performance. Essentially, this involves selecting the proper size tire, choosing the best available tire design, construction, and compound compromise for specific job requirements, and finally following good maintenance practices on each unit.
1972-02-01
Technical Paper
720765
M. L Pules, D. J. Eves
Flotation tires on all-terrain vehicles (ATV) are an essential component for good, overall off-the-road mobility. Water displacement by the large volume tires provide additional buoyancy for amphibious vehicles. The large contact area of the deflected tire provides low ground pressure for flotation on soft ground. ATV tires are a special breed of tires with design features for better mobility such as carcass flexibility, wide tire section, and special tread design.
1972-02-01
Technical Paper
720473
A. L. Nedley, W. J. Wilson
A new laboratory test facility for measuring the various understeer influences on complete vehicles is described. The machine actuates the body and suspension in the same manner as it occurs on the road while turning or braking. Changes in steer and camber angles of the wheels are measured as body roll, tire lateral forces, and tire aligning torques are applied to the vehicle separately or simultaneously. It makes a direct measurement of vehicle roll susceptibility (tendency to roll in a turn). Steer caused by braking, called brake steer, is measured by applying brake forces. A description is given of the systems and interacting subsystems of the machine, which provide duplication of a wide range of actual over-the-road conditions while preventing application of unrealistic constraints to the vehicle. Design features that create the capability to obtain the desired accuracies while minimizing test time are also discussed.
1972-02-01
Technical Paper
720514
Robert Baboian
The choice of material for a particular application depends on many factors, including cost, availability, appearance, strength, fabricability, and corrosion resistance. Frequently, use of a monolithic metal is compromised by one or more of its properties. The metallurgical materials systems concept provides a means of designing specific properties into a single composite material. Two or more metals are bonded at the atomic level to form a clad metal that meets the precise requirements of a specific application. In this report technical factors involved in designing corrosion-resistance materials systems are considered. Advantages and limitations are discussed and specific automotive engineering applications are used.
1972-02-01
Technical Paper
720525
Richard R. Golze
There are numerous engineering solutions to the energy management problem in low-speed vehicle bumper impact situations. This paper covers a North American Rockwell volute spring energy storage assembly. Selection of a system involves price, performance, installation, weatherability, reliability, etc. Extensive tests-pendulum corner impact, barrier, and pendulum-were carried out and showed that the volute spring assembly on a test vehicle withstood more than 100 impacts without evidence of failure.
1972-02-01
Technical Paper
720678
Kazuhiko Aoki
In order to determine the operational characteristics of human pedal force, a driving simulator consisting of a driver's seat, pedals, analog computer, double gun synchroscope, etc., was developed. The driver was asked to guide the spot representing the controlled variable using the spot as a target. A simple transfer function to match the test results was derived and the effect of parameters on the constants in this function was analyzed. This experiment established that a pedal force of 200 daN seemed best for control.
1972-02-01
Technical Paper
720623
Theodore Berland
Trucks are the major source of noise on our streets and highways, affecting the sleep and sanity of millions of city and suburban residents. Truck noise sources are many, but mainly are engine and tires. Since the automotive and trucking industries have not volunteered to quiet truck noises, the Federal government will have to legally require they do so.
1972-02-01
Technical Paper
720463
W. K. Klamp, J. Meingast
A number of tires have been examined in terms of the higher orders of radial and fore-and-aft force variations. Presented in this paper are some typical values of higher orders as measured on a specially designed high-speed machine. These measurements are related to the following factors: 1. Tire operating conditions. 2. Tire construction variations. 3. Influence of wheel and balance. 4. Radial force correction. 5. Ride evaluation. With experience, emphasis has shifted to understanding how tire manufacturing introduces higher harmonic disturbances, and thereby improving tire production, and making better use of conventional uniformity grading equipment.
1972-01-01
Technical Paper
726039
Yoshio Serizawa
Nissan's Experimental Safety Vehicle is a small-sized passenger car. "Small-sized" means small in overall dimensions and light weight. Differences between the Japanese 2,500 pound ESV and the 4,000 pound ESV specifications are outlined. This paper discusses small car safety and ESV specifications
HISTORICAL
1972-01-01
Standard
AS1188
This specification covers minimum design and test requirements for aircraft tire inflation-deflation equipment for use on all types of aircraft. It shall be the responsibility of the airframe manufacturer to determine the compatibility of the requirement with the applicable aircraft and to specify requirements in excess of these minimums as necessary.
HISTORICAL
1971-09-01
Standard
J661A_197109
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to establish a uniform laboratory procedure for securing and reporting the friction and wear characteristics of brake linings. The performance data obtained can be used for in-plant quality control by brake lining manufacturers and for the quality assessment of incoming shipments by the purchasers of brake linings.
HISTORICAL
1971-08-01
Standard
J380_197108
Specific gravity is a nondestructive test used as a quality control check of the consistency of formulation and processing of brake lining. The specific gravity and the range of specific gravity are peculiar to each formulation and, therefore, the acceptable values or range must be established for each formulation by the manufacturer. Specific gravity alone shows nothing about a materials in use performance. The specific gravity of sintered metal powder friction materials, particularly those which have steel backing members, is usually determined somewhat differently. Reference ASTM B 376. Purpose To establish a uniform procedure for determining the specific gravity of brake friction material.
HISTORICAL
1971-07-01
Standard
ARP1107
This recommended practice covers the fixed structure, or independent energy absorbing system affixed to the airframe to afford protection to the control surfaces, engine and other portions during ground handling, take-off and landing.
HISTORICAL
1971-07-01
Standard
J1703C_197107
This SAE Standard covers motor vehicle brake fluids of the nonpetroleum type for use in the braking system of any motor vehicle such as a passenger car, truck, bus, or trailer. These fluids are not intended for use under arctic conditions. These fluids are designed for use in braking systems fitted with rubber cups and seals made from styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), or a terpolymer of ethylene, propylene, and a diene (EPDM).
HISTORICAL
1971-07-01
Standard
J212_197107
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes a uniform laboratory dynamometer method of testing all classes of passenger car brake systems.
1971-06-07
Technical Paper
710575
D. R. Elliott, W. K. Klamp, W. E. Kraemer
The rolling resistance of a tire can have a marked effect on such factors as gasoline mileage and high speed durability. In an effort to understand better the mechanisms involved, 80 tires were analyzed. This analysis resulted in dividing the rolling resistance into a component (Ra) independent of speed, and a component (Rb), which is very speed dependent. The body of this paper discusses the effect of operating conditions and tire design variations on both of these components.
HISTORICAL
1971-05-01
Standard
J786A_197105
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes a uniform procedure for the level road test of the brake systems of new trucks, buses, and combination of vehicles designed for roadway use and falling in the following classifications: Light trucks and buses: 6001–10,000 lb (2700–4500 kg) gvw Truck and bus: Over 10,000 lb (4500 kg) gvw Combination of vehicles (towing vehicle over 10,000 lb (4500 kg) gvw)
HISTORICAL
1971-05-01
Standard
J992B_197105
This SAE Recommended Practice presents performance requirements for the brake systems of motor vehicles intended for roadway use and falling into the following classifications: Light trucks and buses: 6001-10 000 lb (2700-4500 kg) gvw; Truck and bus: Over 10 000 lb (4500 kg) gvw; combination of vehicles towing vehicles over 10 000 lb (4500 kg) gvw. Acceptable performance requirements are based on data obtained from applicable sections of SAE J786a (March, 1978). The purpose of this recommended practice is to establish the minimum brake system performance requirements with regard to: 3.1 Stopping ability--of cold brakes, as affected by vehicle speed. 3.2 Stopping ability--of hot brakes, as affected by vehicle speed and duty cycle. 3.3 Pedal force (air pressure) requirements--maximum allowable. 3.4 Brake stability. 3.5 stopping ability and recovery of wet brakes. 3.6 Stopping ability of emergency brake system. 3.7 Brake effectiveness distribution for vehicles in combination.
HISTORICAL
1971-05-01
Standard
J840C_197105
This SAE Recommended Practice covers equipment capabilities and the test procedure to quantify and qualify the shear strength between the friction material and backing plate or brake shoe for automotive applications. This SAE Recommended Practice is applicable to: bonded drum brake linings; integrally molded disc brake pads; disc brake pads and backing plate assemblies using mechanical retention systems (MRS); coupons from drum brake shoes or disc brake pad assemblies. The test and its results are also useful for short, semi-quantitative verification of the bonding and molding process. This Recommended Practice is applicable during product and process development, product verification and quality control. This Recommended Practice does not replicate or predict actual vehicle performance or part durability.
HISTORICAL
1971-03-01
Standard
J109A_197103
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes performance requirements for the service brake systems of all classes of motorcycles intended for highway use.
HISTORICAL
1971-03-01
Standard
J108A_197103
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes a uniform procedure for the level road test of the brake systems of all classes of motorcycles intended for highway use.
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