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1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550123
L. J. KEHOE
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550125
MAURICE OLLEY
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550162
R. K. SUPER
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550111
T. G. ROEHNER, E. L. ARMSTRONG
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550109
C. R. CASE
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550108
T. A. ROBERTSON, R. P. POWERS
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550103
J. D. NEESLEY, L. C. BRUNSTRUM, H. J. LIEHE
New automatic chassis lubricators renew lubricant problems. Oils feed well but drip from the bearings; chassis greases do not drip but feed poorly. A new rheopectic grease overcomes these deficiencies. Originally, it is fluid like an oil, yet upon one pass through the lubricator, it acquires the consistency of a chassis grease. Normal handling has no effect on its fluidity and use has little effect upon its set-up consistency. Thus, it feeds well but does not drip.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550106
J. F. McGROGAN
A road test was conducted by the Automotive Laboratory of The Atlantic Refining Company on six cars, each of two different makes, to obtain the driver's reactions to four chassis lubricants. Factors to be evaluated included squeaks heard by the driver. An investigation was made of the influence of grease composition on chassis performance; greases tested included an aluminum stearate grease, two lithium soap thickened greases and a non-soap type of grease. Results indicate that a 1,000 mile lubrication frequency is important since a large increase in complaints beyond 1,250 miles of operation was recorded.
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550101
J. B. BELTZ
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550102
CARL H. MUELLER
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550006
ROT W. BROWN
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550008
PAUL H. TAYLOR
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550007
A. S. KROTZ, R. E. HOUSER, J. H. KRAMER
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550039
R. E. SPOKES
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550313
D. A. GOTSCH
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550311
H. P. HAYES
1955-01-01
Magazine
1954-12-01
Magazine
1954-11-01
Magazine
1954-10-01
Magazine
1954-08-01
Magazine
1954-07-01
Magazine
1954-02-01
Magazine
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540227
C.W. Lincoln
THE Saginaw design of hydraulic steering gear is described in this paper. This gear employs a screw and nut, with a novel system of circulating balls between these two members. The motion of the nut is transmitted to the cross-shaft or pitman shaft by means of rack and sector teeth. Advantages claimed for this design include simplicity and versatility. The loads of the centering springs and even the size and number of reaction plungers can be varied, making the steering “firm” or “soft,” as desired.
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540263
F.P. Zimmerli, W.P. Wood
ENDURANCE limits and load losses at various temperatures from -75 F to 650 F for several spring materials are reported in this paper. The materials tested were in the form of helical springs, both shot peened and unpeened. Some general observations made by the authors include: 1. Shot-peened springs had higher endurance limits and greater relaxation than unpeened springs at -75 F and 75 F. 2. As test temperatures rose above atmospheric, endurance limit of all unpeened springs tended to hold steady or increase somewhat, while that of shot-peened springs tended to decrease. 3. Except for high-speed steel and stainless steel, chrome-silicon steel showed lowest load loss in both static and dynamic tests in the temperature range from atmospheric to 450 F. 4. Both unpeened and shot-peened high-speed-steel springs showed high endurance limits at all test temperatures. 5. Endurance limits at -75 F were similar to those at atmospheric temperature, but the amount of set was less, on the average.
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540262
R. L. Mattson, W. S. Coleman
RESULTS of an investigation into the effect of shot-peening variables and the resulting residual stresses on fatigue life are reported in this paper. Leaf springs were the simple specimens heat-treated, cold worked, and tested in this study. Some of the conclusions reached are: 1. There is a minimum shot velocity for each shot size to obtain best fatigue life, and this value is much lower than that normally used. 2. Exposure time for this type of shot-peened specimen beyond some minimum value is wasteful and costly. 3. Shot size has little influence on fatigue life for these specimens. 4. Shot peening specimens while under tensile strain greatly increases fatigue life at 200,000 psi nominal stress over that of nonpeened or strain-free-peened specimens. 5. Shot peening these specimens gave residual compressive stresses 50% of yield strength, and these stresses can be increased to more than 50% by strain peening. 6.
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540007
R. A. GOEPFRICH
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540004
R. H. MOORE
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540006
Mr. Stephen Johnson
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