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Viewing 9631 to 9660 of 10136
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510143
C. W. Moss
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510121
E. G. McKIBBEN, I. F. REED
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510117
H. W. STOELTING
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510175
G.M. Sprowls
TIRE and tube expenses take a large part of the commercial vehicle maintenance dollar. In fact, for 1948 they amounted to 26% of total maintenance costs. It is for this reason that anything that can be done to keep tire and tube expenses down will quickly pay for itself - and much more. The author discusses two general ways in which tire and tube costs can be-and are being - reduced: 1. By improvements in the tires and tubes themselves, such as: puncture sealing tubes, new tread design, and wide-base rims. 2. By taking care of the tires during their active life, such as: by avoiding driving over foreign material that can be picked up by the tires, by removing such material as is picked up as quickly as possible, by reducing overloads, by avoiding operating conditions that cause slippage between tires and the road
1950-12-01
Magazine
1950-11-01
Magazine
1950-10-01
Magazine
1950-07-01
Magazine
1950-06-01
Magazine
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500165
CHARLES E. STEVENS
ANALYSIS of dynamometer and field tests leads the author to suggest the following criterion for determining when to use bimetallic brake drums: When cooling air is available, the bimetallic drum will outperform the standard all-cast-iron drum. When cooling air is not available, then its use, except to eliminate squeal, gives only a dubious advantage. Cooling air is of little help to the standard cast-iron drum, he explains, because this type acts merely as a heat reservoir. The bimetallic drum, on the other hand, functions as a heat exchanger, for the heat is rapidly conducted from the friction surfaces to the aluminum fins, where it is dissipated by the cooling air. Thus, the brakes can be used steadily without their getting so hot as to become ineffective.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500148
Alfred C. Gunsaulus
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500134
BREHON SOMERVELL
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500115
I. F. REED, J. W. SHIELDS
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500055
W. R. RODGER
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500053
CLARK A. TEA
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500056
CLARK R. LUPTON
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500004
A. J. Carter
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500186
Fred J. Walls
THE problems involved in selecting the proper material for brake drums are discussed here from the standpoints of physics and metallurgy. The author shows that, for the present, at least, high-total-carbon cast irons fulfill the requirements of the braking surface to a greater extent than any alloy discovered so far.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500177
J.G. OETZEL
AFTER making an extensive examination of many brake lining materials, Mr. Oetzel comes to the conclusion that no short test can show adequately the characteristics of a piece of lining. It seems that no one value of coefficient can be used to represent a piece of lining, according to the author, because the coefficient varies so widely with temperature and pressure and with the degree of service curing. He says further that there seems to be no way to reduce the characteristics of a lining material to some simple “index number”; that the best that can be said is that, when correlated with road tests, characteristics determined from samples form a useful basis of judgment.
1950-01-01
Magazine
1949-11-01
Magazine
1949-10-01
Magazine
1949-08-01
Magazine
1949-05-01
Magazine
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490079
R. K. SUPER
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490224
J. RABINOW
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490218
N. E. HENDRICKSON, MURRAY FAHNESTOCK
THIS paper reviews the fundamental principles on which all spring suspension is based and compares various types now in use or under consideration. The capacity for energy storage of steel is analyzed, when stressed in tension, torsion, and bending, and methods of converting this energy storage into required pounds of effective spring steel are outlined. The authors discuss coil springs and torsion bars, which apply the torsion principle of energy storage, and leaf springs, which store energy through bending. The special advantages and also the problems of each type are considered, and proposed new springing methods are described. The riding qualities of modern passenger automobiles, buses, and trucks are compared. Finally, a special plea is made for an improvement in the springing of trucks, in which lack of riding comfort is serious.
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490056
CHESTER S. RICKER
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490048
Wm. A. CLARK
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