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1942-12-01
Magazine
1942-09-01
Magazine
1942-06-01
Magazine
1942-02-01
Magazine
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420114
W. F. BENNING, M. C. HORINE
FAR from presenting a more difficult problem than other types, the six-wheeler can be made to give better braking performance than any, these authors contend. They are less likely to skid than either four-wheeled straight trucks or tractor-semi-trailers, they continue, and in general stopping ability they rate high. However, they acknowledge the complaints against the six-wheeler for behavior known as “bogie hopping” and loss of steering control when brakes are applied on slippery roads. Comparing the three principal types of commercial vehicles, they conclude that the complaints on this score are based if at all upon something other than dynamic weight transfer. “The reason why the problem is so acute with six-wheelers is that the supposedly rigid alignment of the rear bogie wheels constitutes a resistance to steering and that, therefore, any tendency for the front wheels to lose traction is of graver concern than with either a four-wheel truck or a tractor-semi-trailer.”
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420128
PAUL K. BEEMER, F. C. LINDVALL
THIS paper describes an “above-gravity, dynamically stable” spring suspension in which the car or coach is elastically supported at each end on a virtual, universal center bearing on the longitudinal centerline above the center of gravity of the car or coach body. It is pointed out that this virtual support permits sufficient universal swivel action of the truck relative to the car body to account for all operating conditions, and the springs, together with the positioning linkage, cooperate to achieve the desired vibration isolation. The actual car support, however, is at two points on either side of the car centerline with a third attachment below the floor level. The car or coach body rests on soft coil springs which are recessed into the car structure on either side of the center aisle.
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420044
M. E. Nuttila
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420080
W. F. BILLINGSLEY, R. D. EVANS, W. H. HULSWIT, E. A. ROBERTS
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420100
BERNHARD STERNE
THIS paper attempts to clarify the functioning of the volute spring and to eliminate the confusion which is at present connected with volute-spring computations. A number of contradictory formulas are currently in use, many of them usable only for one coil or for half a coil at a time. The paper shows the relationship between the volute spring and other forms of coiled springs; it explains the similarities and dissimilarities of formulas for these spring forms, with particular emphasis on stress determination. Because of the high stress invariably encountered in some part of a volute spring, it is clear that special consideration must be given to proper bulldozing and load-checking methods, and a set of specifications incorporating these methods is suggested. In order to steer clear of excessive overstressing and the attendant spring settling, the stress reductions obtainable with partial tapering of the spring blade are discussed in detail.
1941-11-01
Magazine
1941-08-01
Magazine
1941-04-01
Magazine
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410097
E. A. ROBERTS
RESULTS of tests conducted on wide-rim tires announced in this paper show that: 1. There is an average improvement of 20% in non-skid tread mileage, the increase ranging from 5% for easy driving conditions to 80% for tests at maximum speed under hard driving conditions. 2. Stability and cornering power increase with rim width - approximately in the same proportion. 3. The effect of increased stability is very evident in improved cross-wind handling, especially at high speed. 4. From 2 to 4 lb per sq in. reduction in tire pressure was found necessary with wide-rim tires to produce equivalent ride, equal harshness, thump, and so on.
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410119
S. JOHNSON
IN its discussion of the analysis and balancing of air-brake systems, this paper places particular stress on brake rigging, or the foundation brake, and its maintenance. Most of the chronic braking troubles could be eliminated, Mr. Johnson contends, if all brakes were balanced and then subjected to a well-planned and executed periodic maintenance program. In balancing, he explains, the brakes are modified so that all the brake shoes on the vehicle are contacting the drum at the same low pressure at the same time during the brake application. Benefits of such balancing and maintenance reported by the author include increased brake lining life; and reduction of: brake-drum breakage and checking, drum scoring, grease on brake linings, brake adjustments, and bearing failures and tire blowouts caused by heat. The remainder of the paper is devoted to details of the brake analysis and maintenance program.
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410124
SIDNEY M. CADWELL
WIDE-BASE rims impose different conditions of strains in tires and emphasize certain inherent performance differences, some of which are advantages and others disadvantages. After a year of exhaustive testing by the combined car and tire industries, the wide-base rim proposal seems to have settled on the use of existing tire sizes on rims 1 to 1½ in. wider than at present, giving a rim ratio of 75 to 82% of tire width as compared with a ratio of 62 to 68% of the inflated width on existing tires. The principal benefits of the proposed rim resizing combination, using present tire load-carrying capacity and 2 psi lower inflation pressure are: (1) considerably more stability in the car; and (2) a 20 to 22% increase in tire tread life.
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410123
R. D. EVANS
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410041
C. J. BECHSTEDT
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410031
F. H. Comey
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410026
Hamilton Migel,
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410029
John W. Votypka, E. Vance Howe
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410054
Oliver Smalley
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410055
W. A. Blume
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400020
John C. Cox
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400021
W. B. Paine
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400068
J. N. STREET
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400040
Tore Franzen
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400050
Jean Y. Ray
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