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2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1644
Haizhen Liu, Weiwen Deng, Rui He, Lei Qian, Shun Yang, Jian Wu
Abstract This paper presents a power assisted braking control based on a novel mechatronic booster system. A brake pedal feel control unit is first discussed which includes a pedal emulator with an angular sensor to detect driver’s pedal travel, a signal processing module with a Kalman filter for sensor signal conditioning, and a driver braking intention detection and behavior recognition module based on the displacement and velocity of the pedal travel. A power assisted braking control is then presented as the core of the system which consists of controls on basic power assist, velocity compensation and friction compensation. The friction is estimated based on a generic algorithm offline. A motor controller is designed to provide the desired torque for the power assist. Finally, a novel mechatronic booster system is designed and built with an experimental platform set up with a widely adopted rapid prototype system using dSPACE products, such as MicroAutoBox, RapidPro, etc.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1666
Ryo Yamaguchi, Hiromichi Nozaki
Abstract In this research, we examine the three controls inside-outside wheel braking force and driving force, camber angle, and the derivative steering assistance to determine how angle differences affect cornering performance and controllability. This is accomplished by comparing body slip angle area differences in a closed loop examination of the grip to drift area using a driving simulator. The results show that inside-outside wheel braking force and driving force control in the area just before critical cornering occurs has a significant effect on vehicle stability. We also clarified that controlling the camber angle enhances grip-cornering force, and confirmed that the sideslip limit could be improved in the vicinity of the critical cornering area. Additionally, when the counter steer response was improved by the use of derivative steering assistance control in the drift area exceeding the critical cornering limit, corrective steering became easier.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1649
Jose Velazquez Alcantar, Farhad Assadian
Abstract Optimizing/maximizing regen braking in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) is one of the key features for increasing fuel economy. However, it is known [1] that maximizing regen braking by braking the rear axle on a low friction surface results in compromising vehicle stability even in a vehicle which is equipped with an ESP (Enhanced Stability Program). In this paper, we develop a strategy to maximize regen braking without compromising vehicle stability. A yaw rate stability control system is designed for a hybrid electric vehicle with electric rear axle drive (ERAD) and a “hang on” center coupling device which can couple the front and rear axles for AWD capabilities. Nonlinear models of the ERAD drivetrain and vehicle are presented using bond graphs while a high fidelity model of the center coupling device is used for simulation.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1660
Takahiro Okano, Akira Sakai, Yusuke Kamiya, Yoshio Masuda, Tomoyuki Yamaguchi
Abstract The use of hybrid, fuel cell electric, and pure electric vehicles is on the increase as part of measures to help reduce exhaust gas emissions and to help resolve energy issues. These vehicles use regenerative-friction brake coordination technology, which requires a braking system that can accurately control the hydraulic brakes in response to small changes in regenerative braking. At the same time, the spread of collision avoidance support technology is progressing at a rapid pace along with a growing awareness of vehicle safety. This technology requires braking systems that can apply a large braking force in a short time. Although brake systems that have both accurate hydraulic control and large braking force have been developed in the past, simplification is required to promote further adoption.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1679
Shingo Koumura, Takahiro Shionoya
Abstract A dynamics model considering series rigidity was constructed to examine suspension friction, which has a major effect on ride comfort on paved roads. The friction characteristics of the bushings, ball joints, and shock absorbers are expressed with series elastic elements such as arm rigidity and the spring constant of the oil seals. It was confirmed that the calculated values for the overall spring constant and damping coefficient of the suspension virtually matched values measured in a 4-post shaker test. In addition, the results of analysis using this dynamics model confirmed that the degree of friction affects both the damping coefficient and the spring constant of the suspension, especially when the series rigidity is high. Also highly rigid friction has an adverse effect on sprung motion in frequency ranges above 15 Hz. After suspension enhancements were adopted based on these findings, 4-post shaker tests confirmed that sprung motion above 2 Hz improved..
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
J1301
The scope and purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to provide a classification system for deformation sustained by trucks involved in collisions on the highway. Application of the document is limited to medium trucks, heavy trucks, and articulated combinations. The TDC classifies collision contact deformation, as opposed to induced deformation, so that the deformation is segregated into rather narrow limits or categories. Studies of collision deformation can then be performed on one or many data banks with assurance that data under study are of essentially the same type. Many of the features of the SAE J224 MAR80 have been retained in this document, although the characters within specific columns vary. Each document must therefore be applied to the appropriate vehicle type. It is also important to note that the Truck Deformation Classification (TDC) does not identify specific vehicle configurations and body types.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1075
Jonathan Plail, Petr Grinac, Helen Ballard
Abstract In this paper, a mathematical model for simulating the 3D dynamic response of a valve spring is described. The 3D model employs a ‘geometrically exact’ 3D beam connected between each mass of the discretised mass-elastic system. Shear deformations within the beam are also considered, which makes it a Timoshenko type finite element. Results from the 3D model are compared with results from a more conventional 1D model. To validate the results further, some results are compared with real test data that was gathered during a technical consulting project. In this project, a prototype valvetrain that was originally giving acceptable durability began to wear the spring seats when a new batch of springs were procured and tested. 1D and 3D simulation results were used to help understand the cause of the failure and to make recommendations to resolve the issue. Results showed that the 3D model was able to predict the spring seat loads with greater precision than the 1D spring could.
2016-04-05
Standard
J1123_201604
NOTE—For leaf springs made to customary U.S. units, see SAE J510. This SAE Standard is limited to concise specifications promoting an adequate understanding between spring maker and spring user on all practical requirements in the finished spring. The basic concepts for the spring design and for many of the details have been fully dealt with in HS-J788.
2016-04-05
Standard
J1528_201604
Only fully processed new springs which are representative of springs intended for the vehicle shall be used for the tests. No complete spring or separate leaf shall be used for more than one test.
2016-04-05
Standard
J217_201604
This SAE Recommended Practice covers a high-quality corrosion-resisting steel wire, cold drawn, formed, and heat treated to produce uniform mechanical properties. It is magnetic in all conditions. It is intended for the manufacture of springs and wire forms that are to be heat treated after forming to enhance the spring properties. This document also covers processing requirements of the springs and forms fabricated from this wire.
2016-04-05
Standard
J230_201604
This SAE Recommended Practice covers a high-strength corrosion-resisting steel wire, uniform in mechanical properties, intended for the manufacture of springs and wire forms. It also covers processing requirements of springs and forms fabricated from this wire.
2016-04-05
Standard
J510_201604
NOTE—For leaf springs made to metric units, see SAE J1123. This SAE Standard is limited to concise specifications promoting an adequate understanding between spring maker and spring user on all practical requirements in the finished spring. The basic concepts for the spring design and for many of the details have been fully addressed in HS-J788, SAE Information Report, Manual on Design and Application of Leaf Springs, which is available from SAE Headquarters.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0091
Hikaru Watanabe, Tsutomu Segawa, Takumi Okuhira, Hiroki Mima, Norishige Hoshikawa
Abstract This paper presents a custom integrated circuit (IC) on which circuit functions necessary for “Active Hydraulic Brake (AHB) system” are integrated, and its key component, “Current-to-Digital Converter” for solenoid current measurement. The AHB system, which realizes a seamless brake feeling for Antilock Brake System (ABS) and Regenerative Brake Cooperative Control of Hybrid Vehicle, and the custom IC are installed in the 4th-generation Prius released in 2015. In the AHB system, as linear solenoid valves are used for hydraulic brake pressure control, high-resolution and high-speed sensing of solenoid current with ripple components due to pulse width modulation (PWM) is one of the key technologies. The proposed current-to-digital converter directly samples the drain-source voltage of the sensing DMOS (double-diffused MOSFET) with an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter (ADC) on the IC, and digitizes it.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0092
Stijn Kerst, Barys Shyrokau, Edward Holweg
Abstract Active vehicle safety and driving assistance systems can be made more efficient, more robust and less complex if wheel load information would be available. Although this information could be determined via numerous different methods, due to various reasons, no commercially feasible approach has yet been introduced. In this paper the approach of bearing load estimation is topic of interest. Using the bearing for load measurement has considerable advantages making it commercially attractive as: i) it can be performed on a non-rotating part, ii) all wheel loads can be measured and iii) usually the bearing serves the entire lifetime of the vehicle. This paper proposes a novel approach for the determination of wheel loading. This new approach, based on the strain variance on the surface of the bearing outer ring, is tested on a dedicated bearing test setup.
2016-04-01
Standard
J2800_201604
This lab test procedure should be used when evaluating the combined corrosion and fatigue performance for a particular coating system, substrate, process and design. The test is intended to provide an A to B comparison of a proposed coil spring design versus an existing field validated coil spring when subjected to the combined effects of corrosion and fatigue. The corrosion mechanisms covered by this test include general, cosmetic and pitting corrosion. Fatigue testing covers the maximum design stress and/or stress range of the coil spring design (typically defined as excursion from jounce to rebound positions in a vehicle). The effects of gravel and heat are simulated by pre-conditioning the springs prior to fatigue testing. Time dependant corrosion mechanisms such as stress corrosion cracking are not addressed with this test.
2016-04-01
Standard
J511_201604
This pneumatic spring terminology has been developed to assist engineers and designers in the preparation of specifications and descriptive material relating to pneumatic springs and their components. It does not include gas supply or control systems.
2016-03-30
WIP Standard
J1194
Fulfillment of the intended purpose requires testing as follows: A laboratory test, under repeatable and controlled loading, to permit analysis of the ROPS for compliance with the performance requirements of this SAE Standard. Either the static test (6.1) or the dynamic test (6.2) shall be conducted. A crush test to verify the effectiveness of the deformed ROPS in supporting the tractor in an upset attitude. A field upset test under reasonably controlled conditions, both to the rear and side, to verify the effectiveness of the protective system under actual dynamic conditions. (See 6.4.1.1 for requirements for the omission of this test). In addition to the laboratory and field loading requirements, there is a temperature-material requirement. (See 7.1.2.) The test procedures and performance requirements outlined in this document are based on currently available engineering data.
2016-03-30
WIP Standard
J2194
Any ROPS meeting the performance requirement of ISO 5700 (Static ROPS Test Standard) or ISO 3463 (Dynamic ROPS Test Standard) meets the performance requirements of this SAE Standard if the ROPS temperature/material and seat belt requirements of this document are also met. Fulfillment of the intended purpose requires testing as follows: A temperature-material requirement (6.9). This can be satisfied by using the appropriate materials or by performing any of the structural performance tests (Sections 7, 8, or 9) at -18 °C. A laboratory test, under repeatable and controlled loading, to permit analysis of the ROPS for compliance with the performance requirements of this document. Either the static test sequence (Section 7) or the impact test sequence (Section 8 ) shall be conducted. See Figure 1. A seat belt anchorage test (Section 10). The test procedures and performance requirements outlined in this document are based on currently available engineering data.
2016-03-29
WIP Standard
J1337
This SAE Information Report covers the important fundamental maintenance and service precautions for all off-road single-piece and multi-piece rims. Detailed information on specific procedures concerning mounting, demounting, maintenance and service of a particular type, style, or design of off-road rim assembly can be obtained by consulting rim or tire manufacturers or distributors. These procedures and service precautions are guidelines to be considered in preparation of the machine service manual and operator's manual and workplace procedures. It is the intent of this Information Report to allow for further development and review of these guidelines and then make this document a Recommended Practice.
2016-03-25
WIP Standard
J712
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to provide a selection of disc wheels for industrial and agricultural application with a maximum of interchangeability. This is accomplished by establishing five groups of disc wheels, in each of which the hub mounting elements are common. These groups are designated 4 bolt, 5 in bolt circle; 5 bolt, 4.5 in bolt circle; 5 bolt, 5.5 in bolt circle; 6 bolt, 6 in bolt circle; and 8 bolt, 8 in bolt circle. Further, this document establishes an SAE part number and the maximum rated radial load for each standard wheel. In addition, the document requires the wheel manufacturer's name or trademark to be impression stamped on the wheel with location at the discretion of the manufacturer.
2016-03-23
Standard
J175_201603
The SAE Recommended Practice establishes minimum performance requirements and related uniform laboratory test procedures for evaluating lateral (curb) impact collision resistance of all wheels intended for use on passenger cars and light trucks.
2016-03-18
Standard
J1986_201603
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to serve as a guide for standardization of features, dimensions, and configurations of balance weights for aluminum and steel wheels intended for use on passenger cars, light trucks, and multipurpose vehicles to assure good installation and retention of the balance weight. This document also provides test procedures and minimum performance requirements for testing balance weight retention.
2016-03-18
Standard
J328_201603
This SAE Recommended Practice provides minimum performance requirements and uniform procedures for fatigue testing of wheels intended for normal highway use and temporary use on passenger cars, light trucks, and multipurpose vehicles. For heavy truck wheels and wheels intended to be used as duals, see SAE J267. For wheels used on trailers drawn by passenger cars, light trucks, or multipurpose vehicles, see SAE J1204. These minimum performance requirements apply only to wheels made of materials included in Tables 1 to 4. The minimum cycles noted in Tables 1 through 4 are to be used on individual test and a sample of tests conducted, with Weibull Statistics using 2 parameter, median ranks, 50% confidence level and 90% reliability, typically noted as B10C50.
2016-03-17
WIP Standard
ARP6412
The scope of the Landing Gear Integrity Programs (LGIP) Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is intended to assist in the safe-life structural integrity management of the landing gear system and subsystems components. In addition, component reliability, availability, and maintainability is included in a holistic LGIP.
2016-03-16
Standard
AIR5656A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides a methodology for performing a statistical assessment of gas-turbine-engine stability-margin usage. Consideration is given to vehicle usage, fleet size, and environment to provide insight into the probability of encountering an in-service engine stall event. Current industry practices, such as ARP1420, supplemented by AIR1419, and engine thermodynamic models, are used to determine and quantify the contribution of individual stability threats. The statistical technique adopted by the S-16 committee for performing a statistical stability assessment is the Monte Carlo method (see Applicable References 1 and 2). While other techniques may be suitable, their application is beyond the scope of this document. The intent of the document is to present a methodology and process to construct a statistical-stability-assessment model for use on a specific system and its mission or application.
2016-03-16
Standard
AS6296
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) specifies minimum performance standards for Electronic Flight Information System (EFIS) displays that are head-down and intended for use in the flight deck by the flight crew in all 14 CFR Part 23, 25, 27, and 29 aircraft. This document is expected to be used by multiple regulatory agencies as the basic requirement for a technical standard order for EFIS displays. The requirements and recommendations in this document are intended to apply to, but are not limited to, the following types of display functions: Primary Flight and Primary Navigation displays, including vertical situation and horizontal situation functions. Displays that provide flight crew alerts, which may include engine instrument, aircraft systems information/control. Control displays including communication, navigation and system control displays.
2016-03-15
Article
Cadillac has aggressively used light materials for its recently-launched new cars, but for the all-new C1 architecture underpinning the XT5 crossover, engineers stuck with steel—and still achieved a major weight reduction.
2016-03-15
WIP Standard
AIR6411
Provide information and guidance for landing gear operation in cold temperature environment. Covers all operational aspects on ground and in flight. Includes effects on: tires, wheels, brakes, shock strut, seals, and actuation.
2016-03-15
WIP Standard
AS5714
To assist the FAA with the technical update of TSO-C26d to address Electric Brake Actuation, standardize with TSO-C135a and address any remaining concerns with the current document.
2016-03-15
Standard
J1817_201603
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a marking system to distinguish long-stroke from standard stroke for service, parking, and combination air-brake actuators, roto-chambers, and components. Said actuators are used for applying cam and disc-type foundation brakes by slack adjuster means.
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