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Viewing 1 to 30 of 7328
Technical Paper
2014-05-20
Lei Zhang
Existing multi-axle steering system designs generally use the deterministic optimization method without considering the uncertainties during the design process; therefore an actual steering movement may deviate from the ideal movement calculated by some mathematical models. In order to make design results have less sensitive to the uncertainties in the design process, some uncertainties need be taken into account at the early design stage. This paper proposes a robust optimization design method for a double front axle steering system (DFASS) of heavy trucks based on Monte Carlo method. The DFASS consists of two trapezoidal steering mechanisms (TSM) and one rocker system, and the optimization objectives of DFASS include the minimum mean value and variance of the maximum turning angle error of the TSM and rocker system. In addition, the robust optimization model includes 13 design variables which are all geometry parameters of DFASS and represented by normal distribution. Through the orthogonal experiment, we obtain the important factors affecting optimization objectives and build the response surface models of optimization objective.
Technical Paper
2014-05-10
Daogao Wei, Peng Wang, Zhijie Pan, Siming Hu, Huaiyang Xiao
Tie rod end clearance is an important parameter influencing automobile stability under slalom maneuver. In this paper the steering mechanism is simplified into a plane linkage mechanism and an analysis of the effects on vehicle stability exerted by kinematic pair clearance under slalom maneuver is also presented. A 4DOF mathematical model of vehicle maneuvering system is thus being built. On the basis of this model, we adopt the numerical analysis method to conduct a simulated analysis about the stability of prototype vehicle side slip angle as the clearance parameter changes. According to the results, vehicle slalom dynamics behaviors manifest itself in shifting from single cycle to chaos directly. With the increase in clearance, nearly no change is displayed in the upper critical frequency of vehicle slalom instability. However, an increasing rise is shown in the lower critical frequency. The instability frequency bandwidth, accordingly, bears an increase as well and a marked difference manifests itself with regard to the characteristics of window dynamics in chaotic areas.
Technical Paper
2014-05-10
Hyeonu Heo, Jaehyung Ju, Doo Man Kim, Harkbong Kim
An understanding of the flow around a tire in contact with the ground is important when designing fuel-efficient tires as the aerodynamic drag accounts for about one third of an entire vehicle's rolling loss. Recently, non-pneumatic tires (NPTs) have drawn attention mainly due to their low rolling resistance associated with the use of low viscoelastic materials in their construction. However, an NPT's fuel efficiency should be re-evaluated in terms of aerodynamic drag: discrete flexible spokes in an NPT may cause more aerodynamic drag, resulting in greater rolling resistance. In this study, the aerodynamic flow around a non-pneumatic tire in contact with the ground is investigated for i) stationary and ii) rotating cases using the steady state Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) method. A sensitivity analysis was carried out with a varying mesh density. The flow into cavity by the discrete spoke geometry of the NPT does not significantly affect the overall aerodynamic drag.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Pragadish Nandakumar
The fuel prices are increasing every day and so are the pollution caused by vehicles using fossil fuels. Moreover, in a car with an internal combustion engine, we get on average 25% efficiency, the other 75% is wasted, mostly through friction and heat. One important loss is the dissipation of vibration energy by shock absorbers in the vehicle suspension under the excitation of road irregularity and vehicle acceleration or deceleration. In this paper we design, manufacture and test a regenerative coil-over strut that is compact, simple in design and more economical. Since our strut is a modification of an existing strut design, it would be much more feasible to implement. We tested our prototype strut using a TATA Indica car under city road conditions. The damping characteristics and output voltage of the strut were recorded and compared with a normal coil over strut. Based on the test data, it was found that the strut was able to recover about 8-10 watts of electricity at 20kmph.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Walid Oraby, Mahmoud Atef Aly, Samir El-demerdash, M. El-Nashar
Abstract Integral Control strategy for vehicle chassis systems had been of great interest for vehicle designers in the last decade. This paper represents the interaction of longitudinal control and lateral control. In other words the traction control system and handling control system. Definitely, tire properties are playing a vital role in such interaction as it is responsible for the generated forces in both directions. A seven degrees of freedom half vehicle model is derived and used to investigate this interaction. The vehicle body is represented as a rigid body with three degrees of freedom, lateral and longitudinal, and yaw motions. The other four degrees are the two rotation motion of the front wheel and the rear wheel. This two motions for each wheel are spin motion and the steering motion. The traction controller is designed to modulate engine torque through adjusting the throttle angle of the engine upon utilized adhesion condition at the driving road wheels. The active four steering (4WS) control system is designed to enhance vehicle lateral dynamics through controlling rear steer angle.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mina M.S. Kaldas, Aref M.A. Soliman
The integrated control between the vehicle chassis subsystems (suspension, brake, and steering) became one of the most important aspects for current developments to improve the dynamics of the vehicles. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the preview control of the active suspension on the vehicle ride and braking performance. The vehicle performance was examined theoretically using a longitudinal half vehicle model with four degrees of freedom considering the rotational motion of the tires. The active suspension system model, tire-road interface model and braking system model are included in the vehicle model. In order to study the influence of the preview control on the vehicle ride and braking performance, an active suspension system control algorithm employing the lock-ahead preview information and the wheel-base time delay based on the optimal control theory is derived. On the other hand, the ABS control algorithm is designed based on the slip-control strategy.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xiaomin Lin, Nenggen Ding, Guoyan Xu, Feng Gao
Abstract Most tractor-semitrailers are fitted with multi-axle trailers which cannot be actively steered, and such vehicles with an articulated configuration are inclined to exhibit instability such as trailer swing, jack-knifing, and rollover at high speed. Proposed in this paper is an optimal control of the yaw stability of tractor-semitrailers at high speed by applying an active trailer's steering angle. An optimal control algorithm is designed by employing a 3-DOF vehicle model in the yaw plane. The optimal linear quadratic regulator (LQR) approach is used with a cost function including sideslip angles, yaw rates of both tractor and trailer, and trailer's steering angle. The yaw stability at the high speed is also quantified by the dynamic performance measurements of lateral path deviation, hitch angle and rearward amplification (RA). The algorithm is evaluated by co-simulations using TruckSim and Matlab/Simulink softwares. Simulation results under double lane change maneuvers show that trailer swing and jack-knifing are suppressed with a small path-tracking error and it is concluded that the optimal control of semi-trailer steering can improve the yaw stability at high speed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Austin Gurley
Abstract Selection of springs and dampers is one of the most important considerations when finalizing a race car suspension design. It is also one of most complex due to the dynamic interaction of the vehicle with the ground. Current tuning methods for spring and dampers' effect on vehicle ride can be based on simplified dynamic models of the vehicle, such as the quarter-car model. While efficient computationally, the traditional quarter-car model does not account for the non-linear variation in grip seen by a fluctuating contact-patch. Both amplitude and frequency of suspension oscillation contribute to loss of tire grip. The method can be improved by incorporation of a dynamic tire model, though resulting in non-linear effects. An improved ‘rolling quarter-car’ model is created, which includes the effect of dynamic tire forces in the analysis of improved grip. Using typical Formula SAE race car, characteristics as a test case, a linearized dynamic model is made. The effect of suspension parameters on the dynamic tire forces produced are surveyed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Meng Huang
A disc-pad system is established to study impacts of surface topography on brake squeal from the perspective of statistical analysis. Firstly, surface topographies of brake disc and pad are precisely measured on the scale of micron and are statistically analyzed with a three-dimensional evaluation system. Secondly, the finite element model of brake disc and pad without surface topographies is created and verified through component free modal tests. Thereby the valid brake squeal model for complex modal analysis is built with ABAQUS. An effective method is developed to apply interface topographies to the smooth contact model, which consequently establishes sixty brake squeal models with topographies. Thirdly, impacts of surface topography on brake squeal are studied through comparison and statistical analysis of prediction results with and without topographies. The analysis manifest that topography amplitudes and evaluation index deviations of brake pad far exceed those of the disc, indicating the surface of brake pad is relatively much rougher.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ovun Isın, Ilyas Istif, Deniz Uzunsoy, Feray Guleryuz
Abstract The brake friction materials in an automotive brake system play an important role in the overall braking performance of a vehicle. Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have been widely investigated and applied due to their advantages of improved strength, stiffness and increased wear resistance over the monolithic alloys in automobile industries. In this paper, Al/B4CP and Mg/B4CP composites were compared to find a suitable candidate material for automotive disk brake application, in terms of wear behavior results of the materials. In addition, the experimental data was also used to model this behavior by identification. The measured tangential force was considered as the input parameter, whereas the weight loss as the output parameter. Preliminary results of this work showed that B4CP addition improved wear resistance of both aluminum and magnesium matrix composites. Additionally, the study pointed out that identified models provide a reliable and cost effective tool for wear prediction.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sajjad Beigmoradi, Kambiz Jahani, Babak Ravaji
Abstract Efficient function of brake system is considered a crucial stage in the vehicle development process. Heat exchange reduction can decrease the operational condition of braking system. Although the rims patterns have a significant role on vehicle aerodynamics, they can also have effect on air flow around the brake disk. So, selecting a rim is vital from both a safety and an aerodynamic point of view. In this paper the effect of air flow around a brake disk for two different types of rims was studied; a steel casting and an aluminum alloy rim. Numerical simulation was used for this analysis. First, the flow field around brake disk with iron casting rim was investigated at different velocities. Second, the flow field around the same brake disk system with an aluminum alloy rim was modeled at the same velocities. Finally, the effect of rim design on flow pattern over brake disk was compared. It was found that changing rim design has significant influence on velocity distribution around brake disc and pads.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Matthew R. James, Simon Watkins, Matthew Watts
Abstract As open-wheeled racing cars frequently race in close proximity, a limiting factor on the ability to overtake is the aerodynamic performance of the vehicle while operating in a leading car's wake. Whilst various studies have examined the effectiveness of wings operating in turbulent flow, there has been limited research undertaken on the aerodynamic effect of such conditions on wheels. This study describes the influence of upstream turbulence on the wake flow features of an isolated wheel, since the flow field of a wheel will generally be turbulent (due to the wakes of upstream cars and/or bodywork). Pressure distributions and velocity vector plots are examined, which were obtained using a four-hole pressure-sensitive Cobra probe on a traverse 2.5 diameters downstream of the wheel axle line, in smooth and turbulent flow. This analysis also compares the effect of upstream turbulence on the wake for the rotating and stationary wheel; as well as investigating the sensitivity of the wake to the wheel-to-road gap in smooth and turbulent flow.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tau Tyan, Jeff Vinton, Eric Beckhold, Xiangtong Zhang, Jeffrey Rupp, Nand Kochhar, Saeed Barbat
This paper presents the final phase of a study to develop the modeling methodology for an advanced steering assembly with a safety-enhanced steering wheel and an adaptive energy absorbing steering column. For passenger cars built before the 1960s, the steering column was designed to control vehicle direction with a simple rigid rod. In severe frontal crashes, this type of design would often be displaced rearward toward the driver due to front-end crush of the vehicle. Consequently, collapsible, detachable, and other energy absorbing steering columns emerged to address this type of kinematics. These safety-enhanced steering columns allow frontal impact energy to be absorbed by collapsing or breaking the steering columns, thus reducing the potential for rearward column movement in severe crashes. Recently, more advanced steering column designs have been developed that can adapt to different crash conditions including crash severity, occupant mass/size, seat position, and seatbelt usage.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Alexey Vdovin, Lennart Lofdahl, Simone Sebben
There are a number of numerical and experimental studies of the aerodynamic performance of wheels that have been published. They show that wheels and wheel-housing flows are responsible for a substantial part of the total aerodynamic drag on passenger vehicles. Previous investigations have also shown that aerodynamic resistance moment acting on rotating wheels, sometimes referred to as ventilation resistance or ventilation torque is a significant contributor to the total aerodynamic resistance of the vehicle; therefore it should not be neglected when designing the wheel-housing area. This work presents a numerical study of the wheel ventilation resistance moment and factors that affect it, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is demonstrated how pressure and shear forces acting on different rotating parts of the wheel affect the ventilation torque. It is also shown how a simple change of rim design can lead to a significant decrease in power consumption of the vehicle. A way of introducing ventilation torque into the driving resistance equation is discussed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael Flad, Simon Rothfuss, Gunter Diehm, Sören Hohmann
Brake pedal feedback is important for driver's perception during the driving task as well as the pedal feel is an important factor in customer satisfaction. Therefore, a force emulation device is beneficial during the design phase to evaluate the pedal characteristic. Such a system is also needed for driving simulators. Usually, brake feedback systems in simulators rely on passive elements like springs and dampers to emulate the force. This does not allow the implementation of an arbitrary nonlinear pedal force characteristic. In this paper we propose an active pedal feedback simulator which can emulate an arbitrarily customizable and online adjustable brake pedal characteristic. The particular advantage of our pedal simulator is that the system can also emulate the exact pedal dynamics. This is advantageous compared to other active brake feedback simulators which rely on hydraulic actors. We show the mechatronic, electronic and software concept along with the required control framework and state observer.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Christian Angrick, Sebastiaan van Putten, Günther Prokop
In investigation and development of road tires within passenger car development, temperature dependency of tire characteristics is often neglected. This research however explicitly focuses on investigation and identification of temperature dependency of tire characteristics and its interaction with other inner tire states. To this extent, a novel method using a thermographic camera for measurement of both tire core and surface temperature is used. On the basis of these measurements, the dependency of cornering stiffness, relaxation length and lateral coefficient of friction on either core or surface temperature is presented. Moreover, the effect of tire core temperature on inner pressure is investigated. By choice of appropriate operating conditions, the effects of temperature and inner pressure on tire characteristics is investigated separately. A mechanical-analytical analysis forms the basis for derivation of the relationship between material attributes and tire characteristics. Material measurements of a sample taken from the tire under investigation are performed utilizing a hydropulser test rig.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mohamed Sithik, Rama Vallurupalli, Barry (Baizhong) Lin, Subash Sudalaimuthu
Abstract In recent trend, there is a huge demand for lightweight chassis frame, which improves fuel efficiency and reduces cost of the vehicle. Stiffness based optimization process is simple and straightforward while durability (life) based optimizations are relatively complex, time consuming due to a two-step (Stress then life) virtual engineering process and complicated loading history. However, durability performances are critical in chassis design, so a process of optimization with simplified approach has been developed. This study talks about the process of chassis frame weight optimization without affecting current durability performance where complex durability load cases are converted to equivalent static loadcases and life targets are cascaded down to simple stress target. Sheet metal gauges and lightening holes are the parameters for optimization studies. The optimization design space is constrained to chassis unique parts. The optimized design is verified for detailed load case and life target.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yuan Qu, Wang Hongbin, Dechao Zhang, Linbo Zhang, Shen Wu
Abstract The understeer of vehicle is desired for the vehicle's handling performance, and the roll rate of rear suspension is one of the key characteristics to achieve the understeer performance. A proper roll rate of the rear suspension is required to assure a certain level of understeer. Generally, in the vehicle dynamic tuning process, several methods are available for improving understeer performance, e.g., changing the hard-points of suspensions, adjusting stiffness of bushings, etc. On the other hand, structure optimization of components can be used in some case to improve the performance. In this paper, the optimization method is applied to the twist beam of rear suspension. The change in local geometry by optimized design leads to appropriate adjustment of the roll rate. Finally the vehicle understeer performance reaches design target.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Flaura Winston, Catherine McDonald, Venk Kandadai, Zachary Winston, Thomas Seacrist
Abstract Driving simulators offer a safe alternative to on-road driving for the evaluation of performance. In addition, simulated drives allow for controlled manipulations of traffic situations producing a more consistent and objective assessment experience and outcome measure of crash risk. Yet, few simulator protocols have been validated for their ability to assess driving performance under conditions that result in actual collisions. This paper presents results from a new Simulated Driving Assessment (SDA), a 35- to-40-minute simulated assessment delivered on a Real-Time® simulator. The SDA was developed to represent typical scenarios in which teens crash, based on analyses from the National Motor Vehicle Crash Causation Survey (NMVCCS). A new metric, failure to brake, was calculated for the 7 potential rear-end scenarios included in the SDA and examined according two constructs: experience and skill. The study included an inexperienced group (n=21): 16-17 year olds with 90 days or fewer of provisional licensure, and an experienced group (n=17): 25-50 year olds with at least 5 years of PA licensure, at least 100 miles driven per week and no self-reported collisions in the previous 3 years.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Renaud Deborne, Skárlet Khouri Silva, Andras Kemeny
Abstract By the action on the steering wheel, the driver has the capability to control the trajectory of its vehicle. Nevertheless, the steering wheel has also the role of information provider to the driver. In particular, the torque level at the steering wheel informs the driver about the interaction between the vehicle and the road. This information flow is natural due to the mechanical chain between the road and the steering wheel. Many studies have shown that steering wheel torque feedback is crucial to ensure the control of the vehicle. In the context of uncoupled steering (steer-by-wire vehicle or driving simulators), the torque rendering on the steering wheel is a major challenge. In addition, of the trajectory control, the quality of this torque is a key for the immersion of drivers in virtual environment such as in driving simulators. The torque-rendering loop is composed of different steps. At first, a vehicle dynamics model computes the torque level at the steering wheel regarding the vehicle state (steering wheel position, vehicle speed, etc.).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Gary A. Davis
Abstract The critical speed method uses measurements of the radii of yawmarks left by vehicles, together with values for centripetal acceleration, to estimate the speeds of the vehicles when the yawmarks were made. Several field studies have indicated that equating the centripetal force with braking friction produced biased estimates, but that the biases tended to be small (e.g. within 10%-15% on average) and led to underestimates, suggesting that the method can be useful for forensic purposes. Other studies, however, have challenged this conclusion. The critical speed method has also seen use in safety-related research, where it is important to have a reliable assessment of the uncertainty associated with a speed estimate. This paper describes a variant of the critical speed method, where data from field tests lead to an informative prior probability distribution for the centripetal acceleration. Using Bayes theorem, this distribution is combined with the measured radius to produce a posterior probability distribution for the desired speed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jakub Zebala, Wojciech Wach
Abstract The objective of the paper is to present the results of an investigation of the effect of reduced tire pressure on car lateral dynamics in lane change maneuver. The intended aim was attained by performing bench and road tests. The aim of the bench tests was parameterization of the mathematical model of the tested car. The road tests covered the vehicle motion with reduced and no tire pressure on a curvilinear track adequate for bypassing an unexpected appearing obstacle. Next, simulations in PC-Crash were performed, and the results were compared with those obtained in experiments.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Felix Wittmeier, Timo Kuthada, Nils Widdecke, Jochen Wiedemann
Abstract The geometric shape of the tires can have a large influence on the aerodynamic drag of a passenger car as it has been shown already in different publications like for example [1, 2, 3]. However, to optimize the shape of a tire, nowadays quite some effort is needed in terms of wind tunnel time and costs for prototype tires. In this paper an approach to optimize the tire's shape in model scale is described, which can help to reduce both development time and costs. The first step in the development of this method was to verify that the aerodynamic effects of the tire geometry in model scale are comparable to full scale tests. This was achieved by measuring different production tires in full scale and also by measuring the quarter scale version of the same tires. The only difference between the original and the model scale tires was that the scaled tires were not deformable. The results show that the difference between two sets of tires is comparable in full scale and in quarter scale.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Donald F. Tandy, Steven Beane, Robert Pascarella
Abstract There have been many articles published in the last decade or so concerning the components of an electronic stability control (ESC) system, as well as numerous statistical studies that attempt to predict the effectiveness of such systems relative to crash involvement. The literature however is free from papers that discuss how engineers might develop such systems in order to achieve desired steering, handling, and stability performance. This task is complicated by the fact that stability control systems are very complex and their designs and what they can do have changed considerably over the years. These systems also differ from manufacturer to manufacturer and from vehicle to vehicle in a given maker of automobiles. In terms of ESC hardware, differences can include all the components as well as the addition or absence of roll rate sensors or active steering gears to name a few. Like in the development of passive suspensions and steering systems, a development engineer must take into account the mission of a vehicle.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Toshiya Hirose, Masato Gokan, Nobuyo Kasuga, Toichi Sawada
Collision avoidance systems for rear-end collisions have been researched and developed. It is necessary to activate collision warnings and automatic braking systems with appropriate timing determined by a monitoring system of a driver's braking action. Although there are various systems to monitor driving behavior, this study aims to create a monitoring system using a driver model. This study was intended to construct a model of a driver's braking action with the Time Delay Neural Network (TDNN). An experimental scenario focuses on rear-end collisions on a highway, such as the driver of a host vehicle controlling the brake to avoid a collision into a leading vehicle in a stationary condition caused by a traffic jam. In order to examine the accuracy of the TDNN model, this study used four parameters: the number of learning, the number of neurons in the hidden layer, the sampling time with 0.01 second as a minimum value, and the number of the delay time. In addition, this study made a comparative review of the TDNN model and the Neural Network (NN) model to examine the accuracy of the TDNN model.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tomislav Lovric, Manuel Schneider-Scheyer, Samir Sarkic
Abstract Today's Automotive ECU development is a global engineering exercise. It requires efficient planning, design and implementation. Time to market, innovative customer functions and cost effective design are key to success. Not only the technical realization with compressed time schedules and frequent change requests, but also the documentation, and the proof of compliance to ISO-26262 requires efficient solutions to be applied. Key to successful ECU development of complex safety critical systems inside a global team is a systematic approach to identify the ideal realization out of multiple design alternatives. This is why TRW Electronics Engineering for its Braking ECU products decided to design the new product generation with the help of Model Based System Engineering methods (MBSE). With these methods the team is realizing the opportunities provided by top-down driven development considering Requirements Engineering, Semi-formal Architecture Description, and early support to create evidence to conform to ASIL D in accordance to ISO 26262.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lijiao Yu, Hongyu Zheng, Changfu Zong
Abstract Nowadays, electric control steering system has been a main tendency. It consists of Electric Power Steering (EPS) system, Steer by Wire (SBW) system and Active Front Steering (AFS) system. EPS is more widely applied and its technology is more developed. By 2010, the cars equipped with EPS have reached almost 30%. This paper describes one integrated test bench which can test and verify electric control steering system. The main target of the paper is to design and set up a resistance loading system for the test bench referred. The paper takes EPS as a prototype to verify the designed resistance loading system. If the resistance loading system provides a precise simulated torque for the bench, the results of tests will be more approximate with vehicle tests and the acquired data will be reliable for electric control steering system's design and improvement. The linear electric cylinder applied in the loading system is used to provide simulated torque for the bench. The linear electric cylinder is combined with a kind of software independently designed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lijiao Yu, Hongyu Zheng, Changfu Zong
Abstract Nowadays, conventional steering system cannot meet consumers' requirements as their environmental awareness increasing. Electrically controlled steering system can solve this problem well [1] [2]. Electrically controlled steering system has been not only applied widely in automobile steering technique but also becomes an important section of automobile integrated chassis control technology. It is necessary for vehicles to test their every component repeatedly before every component assembled. So a test bench becomes an essential part for vehicle products' design and improvement. The electrically controlled steering system consists of Electric Power Steering system (EPS), Active Front Steering (AFS) and Steer by Wire (SBW). The similarity among them is containing pinion-and-rack mechanical structure, so it is viable to design a test bench suitable for these three systems. This paper takes EPS as a prototype to verify the design's availability. The designed test bench is also used to detect and verify the electrically controlled steering system's performance at the same time.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Philip Axer, Daniel Thiele, Rolf Ernst, Jonas Diemer, Simon Schliecker, Kai R. Richter
Ethernet is the hottest candidate for future in-car communication architecture, promising much higher bandwidth, flexibility and reduced costs. In the coming years, Ethernet will likely evolve from a separate communication medium for special applications like surround-view cameras and infotainment to a central communication infrastructure as a backbone technology. To make this transition, many difficult design decisions have to be made in order to make the technology suitable for the stricter time and safety requirements of todays and future cars. There are a lot of potential real-time effects that must be taken into account. To guide these design decisions, it is necessary to analyze the various architecture concepts with respect to load, performance and real-time capabilities. In this paper, we present different design space axes of Ethernet and propose a methodology of assessing and comparing them. This includes a formal worst-case timing analysis approach and a set of metrics that make the timing analysis results comprehensible and comparable across different design options.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Maki Kawakoshi, Takanobu Kaneko, Toru Nameki
Abstract Controllability (C) is the parameter that determines the Automotive Safety Integrity Level (ASIL) of each hazardous event based on an international standard of electrical and/or electronic systems within road vehicles (ISO 26262). C is classified qualitatively in ISO 26262. However, no specific method for classifying C is described. It is useful for C classification to define a specific classification based on objective data. This study assumed that C was classified using the percentage of drivers who could reduce Severity (S) in one or more classes compared with the S class in which the driver did not react to a hazardous event. An experiment simulated a situation with increased risk of collision with a leading vehicle due to insufficient brake force because of brake-assist failure when the experiment vehicle decelerated from 50 km/h on a straight road. First, the relationship between the S class and the difference of speed at the moment of collision obtained in the experiment was classified according to ISO/DIS 26262 Part 3 Annex B.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 7328