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Viewing 1 to 30 of 1848
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Saeed Asgari, Xiao Hu, Michael Tsuk, Shailendra Kaushik
The thermal behavior of a fluid-cooled battery can be modeled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Depending on the size and complexity of the battery module and the available computing hardware, the simulation can take days or weeks to run. This work introduces a reduced-order model that combines proper orthogonal decomposition, capturing the variation of the temperature field in the spatial domain, and linear time-invariant system techniques exploiting the linear relationship between the resulting proper orthogonal decomposition coefficients and the uniform heat source considered here as the input to the system. After completing an initial CFD run to establish the reduction, the reduced-order model runs much faster than the CFD model. This work will focus on thermal modeling of a single prismatic battery cell with one adjacent cooling channel. The extension to the multiple input multiple output case such as a battery module will be discussed in another paper.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xiao Hu, Scott Stanton
Abstract Due to growing interest in hybrid and electric vehicles, li-ion battery modeling is receiving a lot of attention from designers and researchers. This paper presents a complete model for a li-ion battery pack. It starts from the Newman electrochemistry model to create the battery performance curves. Such information is then used for cell level battery equivalent circuit model (ECM) parameter identification. 28 cell ECMs are connected to create the module ECM. Four module ECMs are connected through a busbar model to create the pack ECM. The busbar model is a reduced order model (ROM) extracted from electromagnetic finite element analysis (FEA) results, taking into account the parasitic effects. Battery thermal performance is simulated first by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Then, a thermal linear and time-invariant (LTI) ROM is created out of CFD solution. The thermal LTI ROM is then two-way coupled with the battery pack ECM to form a complete battery pack model. Thanks to the ROM technology, such a battery pack model can finish a complete charge discharge cycle within seconds of simulation time.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Zhang Yan, Liu Zhien, Xiaomin Wang, Hao Zheng, Yu Xu
For fracture cracks that occurred in the tight coupling exhaust manifold durability test of a four-cylinder gasoline engine with EGR channel, causes and solutions for fracture failure were found with the help of CFD and FEA numerical simulations. Wall temperature and heat transfer coefficient of the exhaust manifold inside wall were first accurately obtained through the thermal-fluid coupling analysis, then thermal modal and thermoplastic analysis were acquired by using the finite element method, on account of the bolt pretightening force and the contact relationship between flange face and cylinder head. Results showed that the first-order natural frequency did not meet the design requirements, which was the main reason of fatigue fracture. However, when the first-order natural frequency was rising, the delta equivalent plastic strain was increasing quickly as well. Ultimately, to solve the problem, the semi-shell was strengthened and some dents of critical areas were added so as to absorb some energy, consequently, the plastic strain decreased in the process of thermal expansion and cooling contraction.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Daniela Siano, Luigi Teodosio, Vincenzo De Bellis, Fabio Bozza
Abstract The present paper reports 1D and 3D CFD analyses of the air-filter box of a turbocharged VVA engine, aiming to predict and improve the gas-dynamic noise emissions through a partial re-design of the device. First of all, the gas-dynamic noise at the intake mouth is measured during a dedicated experimental campaign. The developed 1D and 3D models are then validated at full load operation, based on experimental data. In particular, 1D model provides a preliminary evaluation of the radiated noise and simultaneously gives reliable boundary conditions for the unsteady 3D CFD simulations. The latter indeed allow to better take into account the geometrical details of the air-filter and guarantee a more accurate gas-dynamic noise prediction. 3D CFD analyses put in evidence that sound emission mainly occur within a frequency range of 350 to 450 Hz. Starting from the above result, the original air-box design is modified through the installation of a single Helmholtz resonator, taking into account layout constraints and the influence on engine performance, as well.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Liu Zhien, Xiaomin Wang, Zhang Yan, Xueni Li, Yu Xu
In order to predict the thermal fatigue life of the internal combustion engine exhaust manifold effectively, it was necessary to accurately obtain the unsteady heat transfer process between hot streams and exhaust manifold all the time. This paper began with the establishment of unsteady coupled heat transfer model by using serial coupling method of CFD and FEA numerical simulations, then the bidirectional thermal coupling analysis between fluid and structure was realized, as a result, the difficulty that the transient thermal boundary conditions were applied to the solid boundary was solved. What's more, the specific coupling mode, the physical quantities delivery method on the coupling interface and the surface mesh match were studied. On this basis, the differences between strong coupling method and portioned treatment for solving steady thermal stress numerical analysis were compared, and a more convenient and rapid method for solving static thermal stress was found. Finally, aiming at the thermal stress analysis of steady and unsteady temperature fields, the thermal fatigue life of the exhaust manifold was estimated in application of Manson-Coffin formula, giving a general qualitative analysis.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Emma Frosina, Adolfo Senatore, Dario Buono, Micaela Olivetti
Abstract In recent years, in order to optimize performance and exhaust emissions of internal combustion engines, the design of auxiliary systems assumed a particular importance especially due to the need to obtain higher efficiency and reduce power losses required by these components. In this sense, looking at the lubrication circuit, it appears important to use solutions that allow to optimize the fluid dynamics of both the ducts and the pump. In this paper a tridimensional CFD analysis of a lubrication circuit oil pump of a modern high-performance engine will be shown. In this particular application there is a variable displacement pump used to optimize the operative conditions of the lubricant circuit in all engine running conditions. This variable displacement pump changes the positions of the ring as a function of the boundary conditions. The model was build up with PumpLinx®, a commercial CFD 3D code developed by Simerics Inc.®, taking into account all the thermo-fluid dynamic conditions with particular attention to the cavitation phenomena.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Manimaran Renganathan, Thundil Karuppa Raj Rajagopal
Abstract In this work, combustion and pollutant formation phenomena in a direct injection Diesel engine are studied using n-Dodecane as fuel. The initial part of work is to validate the results from three dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with the engine experimental data. Various state-of-the-art models for simulating the droplet spray, impingement, collision, boiling and combustion are employed with the full kinetic mechanism. Extended coherent flame model for three zones predicts the averaged in-cylinder pressure data within 5 % of the experimental readings. CO, CO2, UBHC and NOx are found to be within the error limits between the CFD and experimental results. The CFD study is further extended towards the addition of little EGR for achieving lower NOx emissions and partial injection of fuel in the intake stroke followed by main injection. To facilitate the easy evaporation and mixing of fuel, preheated air is introduced. As compared with early fuel injection without preheating, computed results with preheated inlet air show an increase in peak cylinder pressure.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Asya Gabbasa, Selin Arslan, Badih Jawad, Andrew Gerhart
Abstract This paper discusses the uses of shape morphing/optimization in order to improve the lift to drag ratio for a typical 3D multi-element airfoil. A mesh morpher algorithm is used in conjunction with a direct search optimization algorithm in order to optimize the aerodynamics performance of a typical high-lift device. Navier-Stokes equations are solved for turbulent, steady-state, incompressible flow by using k-epsilon model and SIMPLE algorithm using the commercial code ANSYS Fluent. Detailed studies are done on take-off/landing flight conditions; the results show that the optimization is successful in improving the aerodynamic performance.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Asya Gabbasa, Badih Jawad, Liping Liu, Selin Arslan, Andrew Gerhart
Abstract This work studies an optimization tool for 2D and 3D a multi-element airfoil which utilizes the power of CFD solver of a Shape Optimizer package to find the most optimal shape of multi-element airfoil as per designer's requirement. The optimization system coupled with Fluent increases the utilization and the importance of CFD solver. This work focuses on combining the high fidelity commercial CFD tools (Fluent) with numerical optimization techniques to morph high lift system. In this work strategy we performed morphing (grid deformation) directly inside the Fluent code without rebuilding geometry and the mesh with an external tool. Direct search method algorithms such as the Simplex, Compass, and Torczon are used; Navier-Stokes equations were solved for turbulent, incompressible flow using k-epsilon model and SIMPLE algorithm using the commercial code ANSYS Fluent. Detailed studies are done on take-off/landing flight conditions; a number of different built-in optimization algorithms and the way to best employ them are investigated.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kambiz Jahani, Sajjad Beigmoradi
Abstract Adequate visibility through the automobile windscreen is a critical aspect of driving, most often at very low temperatures when ice tends to be formed on the windscreen. The geometry of the existing defroster system needs to be improved in the vehicles, with the main aim of substantial increase in air mass flow reaching the windscreen through defroster nozzles and appropriate velocity distribution over the windscreen, while respecting all packaging constraints. The reason of this study is to investigate the windscreen deicing behavior of a vehicle by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) with the main concern of improving deicing process by design an appropriate defroster. Two different defrosters with completely different geometry are considered for this purpose. A detailed full interior model of an existing vehicle is created via CAE tools. A transient simulation is performed and results are extracted to show how a proper design of the defroster will lead to considerable improve in deicing process.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kamalesh Bhambare, Junya Fukuyama, Jaehoon Han, Kosuke Masuzawa, Akihiro Iwanaga, Steven Patterson
Abstract The climate inside a vehicle cabin is affected by the performance of the vehicle HVAC system, the thermal characteristics of the vehicle structure and the components, as well as the external environmental conditions. Due to the complex interactions among these various factors, the flow field and the temperature distribution can be very complicated. The need for a fully three-dimensional transient analysis is increasing in order to provide sufficiently detailed information that can be used to improve the vehicle design. In this study, a numerical simulation methodology to predict the local climate conditions in a passenger vehicle cabin is presented. The convective heat transfer from both the exterior and the interior of the cabin were calculated by three dimensional CFD simulations using a Lattice-Boltzmann method based flow solver. The conduction and the radiation effects including the solar loading were solved using a finite-difference based radiation-conduction thermal solver.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kambiz Jahani, Sajjad Beigmoradi
The efficiency of the vehicle cooling system strongly depends on the air flow through the radiator core. The flow through the radiator core in turn depends on other panels that are in the vicinity of the radiator. In this study, the effect of geometrical change at vehicle front-end including the whole bonnet, grille and bumper area is investigated by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Numerical modeling is carried out by means of CAE tools. Simulations are performed for maximum power and maximum torque conditions, monitoring the mass flow rate through the radiator core and velocity contribution over the radiator face. To the velocity field of the airflow, the heat exchangers are represented as porous media and fan module is modeled utilizing Multiple Reference Frame (MRF) approach. The validity of the developed simulation capability is tested by successful comparison with the available experimental data for the base model at the given operating conditions. On studying the model with complete new front-end style, local modifications are applied incorporating adding airguide, flap and anti-recycler in order to enhance the flow distribution in the vicinity of radiator and increase the mass flow rate passing through it.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kristian Haehndel, Angus Pere, Torsten Frank, Frieder Christel, Sylvester Abanteriba
Abstract As computational methodologies become more integrated into industrial vehicle pre-development processes the potential for high transient vehicle thermal simulations is evident. This can also been seen in conjunction with the strong rise in computing power, which ultimately has supported many automotive manufactures in attempting non-steady simulation conditions. The following investigation aims at exploring an efficient means of utilizing the new rise in computing resources by resolving high time-dependent boundary conditions through a series of averaging methodologies. Through understanding the sensitivities associated with dynamic component temperature changes, optimised boundary conditions can be implemented to dampen irrelevant input frequencies whilst maintaining thermally critical velocity gradients. A sub-module derived from real vehicle geometry was utilised to evaluate a series of alternative averaging schemes (consisting of steady-state CFD points) in comparison to full CFD transient conditions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Felix Regin A, Abhinav Agarwal, Niraj Kumar Mishra
Abstract Increased engine thermal load, front end styling and compact vehicle requirements have led to significant challenges for vehicle front end designer to provide innovative thermal management solutions. The front end cooling module design which consists of condenser, radiator, fan and intercooler is an important part of design as it ensures adequate heat removal capacity of radiator over a wide range of operating conditions to prevent overheating of engine. The present study describes the optimization of cooling air flow opening in the front end using CFD methodology of a typical passenger car. The predicted vehicle system resistance curve and coolant inlet temperature to the radiator are used for the selection of cooling modules and to further optimize the front end cooling opening area. This leds to the successful optimization of the front end, selection of cooling modules with significant cost savings by reducing prototype testing and design cycle time.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nikolaos Karras, Timo Kuthada, Jochen Wiedemann
Abstract The increasing importance of electric mobility results into the need for optimizing all power train components to further reduce the energy consumption of the vehicle. The aim of this study is to predict the thermal behavior and the pressure losses in water jackets of electric machines by use of CFD. The heat loss of electric machines in passenger cars is sufficient to let its components reach critical temperatures. For this reason, the optimization of heat dissipation plays an important role. The goal of efficient heat dissipation is a high heat transfer coefficient. At the same time, the pressure loss should be low in order to reduce the required power of the pump. Flow simulations can help to evaluate different water jacket concepts in an early stage of development. In this work, the validation of flow simulations in water jackets is based on measurements of a simplified geometry with constant boundary conditions. Afterwards, a coupled flow simulation of Exa PowerFLOW® and Exa PowerTHERM® is set up with the boundary conditions adopted from the measurements.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vinod Kumar Srinivasa, Renjith S, Biswadip Shome
Abstract Increasing demands on engine power to meet increased load carrying capacity and adherence to emission norms have necessitated the need to improve thermal management system of the vehicle. The efficiency of the vehicle cooling system strongly depends on the fan and fan-shroud design and, designing an optimum fan and fan-shroud has been a challenge for the designer. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques are being increasingly used to perform virtual tests to predict and optimize the performance of fan and fan-shroud assembly. However, these CFD based optimization are mostly based on a single performance parameter. In addition, the sequential choice of input parameters in such optimization exercise leads to a large number of CFD simulations that are required to optimize the performance over the complete range of design and operating envelope. As a result, the optimization is carried out over a limited range of design and operating envelope only. In this paper, a Design of Experiments (DoE) based CFD approach has been used to optimize the fan and fan-shroud design of a cooling pack system.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Daniela Anna Misul, Mirko Baratta, Hamed Kheshtinejad
Abstract Sustainable mobility has become a major issue for internal combustion engines and has led to increasing research efforts in the field of alternative fuels, such as bio-fuel, CNG and hydrogen addition, as well as into engine design and control optimization. To that end, a thorough control of the air-to-fuel ratio appears to be mandatory in SI engine in order to meet the even more stringent thresholds set by the current regulations. The accuracy of the air/fuel mixture highly depends on the injection system dynamic behavior and to its coupling to the engine fluid-dynamic. Thus, a sound investigation into the mixing process can only be achieved provided that a proper analysis of the injection rail and of the injectors is carried out. The present paper carries out a numerical investigation into the fluid dynamic behavior of a commercial CNG injection system by means of a 0D-1D code. The model has been validated by comparing the experimental readings to the numerical outputs in terms of injection system pressure profiles versus time.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yoshihiro Sukegawa, Kengo Kumano, Kenichiro Ogata
Abstract A technique of estimating particulate matter (PM) from gasoline direct injection engines is proposed that is used to compute mass density and particle number density of PM by using fuel mass in rich mixtures obtained by using non-combustion computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The CFD code that was developed by the authors employed a Cartesian coordinates system as a discretization method and large eddy simulation (LES) as a turbulence model. Fuel spray droplets were treated with the discrete droplet model (DDM). The code was verified with some experimental data such as those obtained from in-cylinder gas-flows with a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) and in-cylinder fuel concentration with laser induced fluorescence (LIF). PM emissions from a single-cylinder gasoline direct injection engine were measured with an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) to determine the model constants that were required in the estimation model. We confirmed that the technique could be applied to various engine operating conditions and fuel spray patterns.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Randy Hessel, Rolf Reitz, Mark Musculus, Jacqueline O'Connor, Daniel Flowers
One in-cylinder strategy for reducing soot emissions from diesel engines while maintaining fuel efficiency is the use of close-coupled post injections, which are small fuel injections that follow the main fuel injection after a short delay. While the in-cylinder mechanisms of diesel combustion with single injections have been studied extensively and are relatively well understood, the in-cylinder mechanisms affecting the performance and efficacy of post injections have not been clearly established. Here, experiments from a single-cylinder heavy-duty optical research engine incorporating close- coupled post injections are modeled with three dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The overall goal is to complement experimental findings with CFD results to gain more insight into the relationship between post-injections and soot. This paper documents the first stage of CFD results for simulating and analyzing the experimental conditions. In this stage, an engineering CFD model with a two-stage soot sub-model facilitates development of new and appropriate analysis methods.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kar Mun Pang, Mehdi Jangi, Xue-Song Bai, Jesper Schramm
Abstract In this reported work, 2-dimsensional computational fluid dynamics studies of n-heptane combustion and soot formation processes in the Sandia constant-volume vessel are carried out. The key interest here is to elucidate how the chemical kinetics affects the combustion and soot formation events. Numerical computation is performed using OpenFOAM and chemistry coordinate mapping (CCM) approach is used to expedite the calculation. Three n-heptane kinetic mechanisms with different chemistry sizes and comprehensiveness in oxidation pathways and soot precursor formation are adopted. The three examined chemical models use acetylene (C2H2), benzene ring (A1) and pyrene (A4) as soot precursor. They are henceforth addressed as nhepC2H2, nhepA1 and nhepA4, respectively for brevity. Here, a multistep soot model is coupled with the spray combustion solver to simulate the soot formation/oxidation processes. Comparison of the results shows that the simulated ignition delay times and liftoff lengths have good agreements with the experimental measurements across wide range of operating conditions when the nhepC2H2 model is implemented.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Claudio Forte, Enrico Corti, Gian Marco Bianchi, Stefania Falfari, Stefano Fantoni
Abstract Knocking combustions heavily limits the efficiency of Spark Ignition engines. The compression ratio is limited in the design stage of the engine development, letting to Spark Advance control the task of reducing the odds of abnormal combustions. A detailed analysis of knocking events can help improving engine performance and diagnosis strategies. An effective way is to use advanced 3D CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation for the analysis and prediction of combustion performance. Standard 3D CFD approach is based on RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes) equations and allows the analysis of the mean engine cycle. However knocking phenomenon is not deterministic and it is heavily affected by the cycle to cycle variation of engine combustions. A methodology for the evaluation of the effects of CCV (Cycle by Cycle Variability) on knocking combustions is here presented, based on both the use of Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools and experimental information. The focus of the numerical methodology is the statistical evaluation of the local air-to-fuel and turbulence distribution at the spark plugs and their correlation with the variability of the initial stages of combustion.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Teresa Donateo, Antonio Paolo Carlucci, Luciano Strafella, Domenico Laforgia
Abstract An analytical methodology to efficiently evaluate design alternatives in the conversion of a Common Rail Diesel engine to either CNG dedicated or dual fuel engine has been presented in a previous investigation. The simulation of the dual fuel combustion was performed with a modified version of the KIVA3V code including a modified version of the Shell model and a modified Characteristic Time Combustion model. In the present investigation, this methodology has been validated at two levels. The capability of the simulation code in predicting the emissions trends when changing pilot specification, like injected amount, injection pressure and start of injection, and engine configuration parameters, like compression ratio and axial position of the diesel injector has been verified. The second validation was related to the capability of the proposed computer-aided procedure in finding optimal solutions in a reduced computational time. Therefore, a multi-objective genetic algorithm was run for 100 generations with a population of 50 individuals including the same geometric and control variables taken into account in the first validation.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Benjamin Lawler, Joshua Lacey, Nicolas Dronniou, Jeremie Dernotte, John Dec, Orgun Guralp, Paul Najt, Zoran Filipi
Abstract Refinements were made to a post-processing technique, termed the Thermal Stratification Analysis (TSA), that couples the mass fraction burned data to ignition timing predictions from the autoignition integral to calculate an apparent temperature distribution from an experimental HCCI data point. Specifically, the analysis is expanded to include all of the mass in the cylinder by fitting the unburned mass with an exponential function, characteristic of the wall-affected region. The analysis-derived temperature distributions are then validated in two ways. First, the output data from CFD simulations are processed with the Thermal Stratification Analysis and the calculated temperature distributions are compared to the known CFD distributions. The results show very good agreement between the calculated TSA and known CFD distributions, except at the leading (hottest) edge where the CFD distributions exhibit a discrete step change and the calculated TSA distributions show a smooth progression.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sandip Pawar, Upender Rao Gade, Atish Dixit, Suresh Babu Tadigadapa, Sambhaji Jaybhay
Abstract The objective of the work presented in this paper is to provide an overall CFD evaluation and optimization study of cabin climate control of air-conditioned (AC) city buses. Providing passengers with a comfortable experience is one of the focal point of any bus manufacturer. However, detailed evaluation through testing alone is difficult and not possible during vehicle development. With increasing travel needs and continuous focus on improving passenger experience, CFD supplemented by testing plays an important role in assessing the cabin comfort. The focus of the study is to evaluate the effect of size, shape and number of free-flow and overhead vents on flow distribution inside the cabin. Numerical simulations were carried out using a commercially available CFD code, Fluent®. Realizable k - ε RANS turbulence model was used to model turbulence. Airflow results from numerical simulation were compared with the testing results to evaluate the reliability. Qualitative parameters such as mean Age of Air (AOA), Broadband Noise model, and Human Thermal Comfort Module (PMV/PPD) were used to gain deeper insight into the problem.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yinhong Liu, Dazhong Lao, Yixiong Liu, Ce Yang, Mingxu Qi
Abstract Variable nozzle turbine (VNT) adjusts the openings of its nozzles to insure the required flow at throat area, which broadens the operating range of the turbine, and improves the matching relationship between the turbocharger and the engine. But the changes of nozzle openings have significant influence on the flow field structure of downstream radial turbine. To evaluate this effect, the leakage flow through nozzle clearance in various nozzle openings were simulated by unsteady computational fluid dynamic (CFD). Meanwhile, the interaction between nozzle clearance leakage flow and nozzle wake were investigated to reveal its effects on aerodynamic losses and forced responses for downstream rotor. The results showed that the changes of nozzle openings not only affect the interaction between nozzle leakage flows and wake significantly, but also affect aerodynamic performance of the rotor and the blade forced response. With the decreases of nozzle openings, the nozzle leakage flow increases and the interaction between nozzle leakage flow and wake enhances.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Gianluca Montenegro, Augusto Della Torre, Angelo Onorati, Dalia Broggi, Gerd Schlager, Christian Benatzky
Abstract This work proposes a focus on the simulation of a rotative volumetric expander via a CFD code. A customized application of OpenFOAM® has been developed to handle the particular motion of the calculation grid. The model uses a mesh to mesh interpolation technique, switching from a calculation grid to the new one on the basis of mesh quality considerations performed on the fly. This particular approach allows to account for the presence of leakages occurring between the stator and blade tips and also occurring at the top and bottom of the vanes. The fluid considered is the refrigerant R245fa, whose particular properties have been determined resorting to the NIST database. Experimental data, measured at different conditions of mass flow and fluid temperature, are compared to calculation results. Moreover, the CFD analysis has allowed the estimation of the influence of the leakage mass flow occurring at the tip of the vanes on the overall machine performances.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Benjamin Reveille, Nicolas Gillet, Julien Bohbot, Olivier Laget
Abstract An automatic mesh generation process for a body fitted 3D CFD code is presented in this paper along with the methodology to guarantee the mesh quality. This tool named OMEGA (Optimized MEsh Generation Automation) uses a direct coupling procedure between the IFP-C3D solver and a hybrid mesher Centaur. Thanks to this automatic procedure, the engineering time needed for body fitted 3D CFD simulation in internal combustion engines is drastically reduced from a few weeks to a few hours. Valve and piston motion laws are just given as input files and geometries and meshes are automatically moved and generated. Unlike other procedures, this automatic mesh generation does not use an intermediate geometry discretization (STL file, tetrahedral surface mesh) but directly the original CAD that has been modified thanks to the geometry motion functionalities integrated into the mesher. All the meshes generated by the tool discretize precisely the surface geometry (nodes are projected on the correct CAD surfaces) to guarantee a correct flow prediction around intake valves and piston.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tommaso Lucchini, Marco Fiocco, Roberto Torelli, Gianluca D'Errico
The definition of a robust methodology to perform a full-cycle CFD simulation of IC engines requires as first step the availability of a reliable grid generation tool, which does not only have to guarantee a high quality mesh but also has to prove to be efficient in terms of required time. In this work the authors discuss a novel approach entirely based on the OpenFOAM technology, in which the available 3D grid generator was employed to automatically create meshes containing hexahedra and split-hexahedra from triangulated surface geometries in Stereolithography (STL) format. The possibility to introduce local refinements and boundary layers makes this tool suitable for IC engine simulations. Grids are sequentially generated at target crank angles which are automatically determined depending on user specified settings such as maximum mesh validity interval and quality parameters like non-orthogonality, skewness and aspect ratio. This ensures high quality grids for the entire cycle and requires a very reduced amount of user time.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Chen Huang, Ehsan Yasari, Andrei Lipatnikov
Abstract In recent years, a free, open source CFD software package called OpenFOAM has been attracting increasing amounts of attention as a promising, inexpensive, and efficient CFD tool for the numerical simulation of processes such as fuel injection and evaporation, turbulent mixing and burning. Here, we describe the further development of OpenFOAM to enable its use in simulating stratified turbulent combustion in DI SI engines. Advanced models of various phenomena relevant to partially premixed turbulent flames were implemented into the code, and the effects of these implementations were investigated by performing unsteady 3D RANS simulations of stratified turbulent burning in a DI SI engine. First, the Flame Speed Closure (FSC) model of premixed turbulent combustion was implemented. Second, a method for evaluating the mean density in premixed turbulent flames that is available in the standard OpenFOAM library was improved. Third, a semi-detailed chemical mechanism was introduced to describe the influence of the equivalence ratio, pressure, and temperature of the unburned gas on the burning rate and flame temperature.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Stefano Fontanesi, Stefano Paltrinieri, Giuseppe Cantore
Abstract The paper critically discusses Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) potential to investigate cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV) in internal combustion engines. Particularly, the full load/peak power engine speed operation of a high-performance turbocharged GDI unit, for which ample cycle-to-cycle fluctuations were observed during experimental investigations at the engine test bed, is analyzed through a multi-cycle approach covering 25 subsequent engine cycles. In order to assess the applicability of LES within the research and development industrial practice, a modeling framework with a limited impact on the computational cost of the simulations is set up, with particular reference to the extent of the computational domain, the computational grid size, the choice of boundary conditions and numerical sub-models [1, 2, 3]. In order to evaluate the applicability of the adopted approach to the resolution of an adequate portion of the overall turbulent energy spectrum, different grid metrics are at first introduced, based on criteria available in literature [4, 5].
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