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Viewing 1 to 30 of 80
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1921
Yusuke Sunagawa, Tsuyoshi Kondo
Brake squeal noise is generally classified into two vibration modes of disc. One is called “out-of plane mode” which vibrates in disc’s out-of-plane direction. The other is “In-plane mode” which vibrates in disc’s in-plane direction, it means the disc is contracted partially or is extended. There are few “In-plane noise” analysis reports from Disc pad standpoint, so it has been unclear how disc pad contributes to “In-plane mode” until now. This paper confirms that we successfully analyzed direct pad vibration mode by laser scanning under in-plane mode condition. Based on these results, we assume that pad stiffness affected in-plane mode and carried out validation tests.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1922
Yongchang Du, Yujian Wang
Modelling of disc is crucial in analyzing brake squeal since the disc rotates past the non-rotating pads and the pads are coupled with different areas of the disc at different times. However, in most of the complex eigenvalue analysis of brake squeal, the effect of disc rotation was ignored. This paper proposes a closed-loop coupling model for brake squeal analysis. A modal parameter–based rotating disc model, whose dynamic behavior is represented by rotation speed-dependent equivalent modal parameters, is built through space and time-frequency transformation between reference and moving systems. The orthogonality of the equivalent modal parameters in state-space is derived. By performing modal synthesis in state-space, the rotating disc is incorporated into brake squeal closed-loop coupling model with other stationary components. Dynamic instability of the system is solved through complex eigenvalue analysis in state-space.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1909
Diego Adolfo Santamaria Razo, Fernao Persoon
Environmental and financial factors are leading developments in the automotive industry, friction materials are not an exception. Different associations around the globe are increasing their attention in regards to fine dust emissions. End users are increasing their focus on comfort and cost due to global economic conditions. Two of these factors are directly related to each other: comfort and fine dust. They are the result of tribologic mechanisms deriving in pad and disc wear. Such mechanisms linked to friction performance are the consequence of the interaction between friction material surface and disc surface. The definition of what is being formed between the two surfaces is a continuously evolving layer called third body layer (transfer layer, tribologic film, among others) and it has been deeply studied in different papers. In order to be formed and to work properly, the third body layer needs to possess a strong chemical and mechanical stability.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1932
Niclas Strömberg
During several years a toolbox for performing virtual rig tests of a brake disc has been developed by the author. A thermo-flexible multi-body model of a test rig is derived and implemented. A thermo-mechanical model of the pad-disc system is formulated including thermo-elasticity, frictional contact and wear. The energy balance at the contact interface is governed by contact conductance that depends linearly on the contact pressure and the frictional heat depends on a temperature dependent coefficient of friction. Instead of adopting a standard Lagrangian approach, the disc is formulated in an Eulerian frame like a fluid. This is then coupled to the pad most accurately by using Signorini’s contact conditions, Coulomb’s law of friction and Archard’s law of wear. The numerical treatment of these laws are performed by applying an augmented Lagrangian formulation, which in turn is solved with a non-smooth Newton method.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0411
Yosuke Akita, Kenji Abe, Yoshihiro Osawa, Yoshitsugu Goto, Yuji Nagasawa, Noboru Sugiura, Satoshi Wakamatsu, Kyoko Kosaka
Abstract If a vehicle is left in a humid environment, the coefficient of friction between the brake pads and discs increases, generating a discomforting noise during braking called brake squeal. It is assumed that this increase in the coefficient of friction in a humid environment is the effect of moisture penetrating between the brake friction surfaces. Therefore, this paper analyzes the factors causing coefficient of friction variation with moisture between the friction surfaces by dynamic observation of these surfaces. The observation was achieved by changing the disc materials from cast iron to borosilicate glass. One side of the glass brake disc was pushed onto the brake pad and the sliding surface was observed from the opposite side by a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. First, a preliminary test was carried out in a dry state using two pad materials with different wear properties to select the appropriate pad for observing the friction surfaces.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1619
Lara Schembri Puglisevich, Adrian Gaylard, Matthew Osborne, Jonathan Jilesen, Adriano Gagliardi
Abstract Brake disc materials are being utilised that have low noise/dust properties, but are sensitive to contamination by surface water. This drives large dust shields, making brake cooling increasingly difficult. However, brake cooling must be delivered without compromising aerodynamic drag and hence CO2 emissions targets. Given that front brake discs sit in a region of geometric, packaging and flow complexity optimization of their performance requires the analysis of thermal, aerodynamic and multi-phase flows. Some of the difficulties inherent in this task would be alleviated if the complete analysis could be performed in the same CAE environment: utilizing common models and the same solver technology. Hence the project described in this paper has sought to develop a CFD method that predicts the amount of contamination (water) that reaches the front brake discs, using a standard commercial code already exploited for both brake disc thermal and aerodynamics analysis.
2015-09-27
Technical Paper
2015-01-2684
Seongjoo Lee, ShinWook Kim, ShinWan Kim, Seong Rhee
Rear disc brake squeal test results confirm the disc wear - brake squeal correlation reported earlier on front disc brakes. A significant amount of Fe transferred from the disc to the NAO pad surface is detected and the distribution of the transferred Fe is very non-uniform on the pad surface. The pad surface formulation reaches that of Low-Steel Lomets. Disc pads from a noisier brake retain more transferred particles than from a less noisy brake. The pad surface retains more transferred Fe after noise test procedures than after performance test procedures. The transferred Fe particles are either barely visible or invisible. During brake noise test procedures, discs wear in weight as much as disc pads. No correlation is found between average in-stop Mu, maximum in-stop Mu or in-stop delta Mu and brake squeal.
2015-09-27
Technical Paper
2015-01-2685
Diego Masotti, Patric Neis, Ney Ferreira, Kássio Gomes, Jean Poletto, Luciano Matozo
Abstract The present work presents evaluation of the sliding surface morphology of brake pads during stick-slip. A low-metallic (LM) and a Non Asbestos Organic (NAO) brake friction materials were subjected to slide against a brake disc under conditions favorable to produce stick-slip phenomenon. The experiments were conducted in a laboratory-scale tribometer, which was especially designed to test brake pads used in vehicle. Delta torque divided by slip time (dT/dtslip) was the parameter used to quantify stick-slip propensity. In addition, optical microscope images of the material's surface were obtained at different stages of the braking test. These images were post-processed in appropriate computational software and by means of the segmentation technique, the real contact area, size and amount of contact plateaus related to the brake pad surface were estimated. This technique was effective to quantify the differences in the sliding surface morphology during low speed braking test.
2015-09-27
Journal Article
2015-01-2673
Toshikazu Okamura
Abstract Brake judder is one of the most serious problems in automotive-brake systems, and brake discs play a significant role in judder. There are two types of brake judder: cold and hot. Hot judder is caused by the thermo-mechanical deformation of a disc rotor due to high-speed braking. There are several causes and shapes of the deformation, e.g., coning and circumferential waviness. Circumferential waviness of brake discs is typically found as a butterfly shape in a 2nd rotational-order and corrugation (or hot-spotting) around a 10th order, which are caused by thermo-mechanical buckling. The author focused on the effects of material and dimensional homogeneity on the transient and permanent wave-like deformation of ventilated discs in low rotational-orders during repetitive high-speed braking. The tested discs were in two groups that had the same design and gray-cast-iron class but were cast in two foundries by using horizontal- and vertical-molding machines, respectively.
2015-05-13
Technical Paper
2015-36-0019
Márcio J. Ciolfi, Paulo E. B. de Mello
Abstract This paper presents the different “gradients” of heat transfer coefficients found in a usual ventilated brake disc type. Although the conduction coefficient depends on the material characteristics applied, the convection and radiation coefficients changes as function of vehicle speed and brake temperature respectively. By comparing the coefficients magnitude orders of each surface and condition is possible to define the most favorable geometries for cool down the system.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0691
Salah H. R. Ali, Sarwat Z. A. Zahwi, Hassan H. Dadoura
Abstract The main aim of this work is to develop an identification method to demonstrate the crucial surfaces of automotive braking system. Two brand new brake discs manufactured by two different manufacturers are tested. A typical disc to the one of them was put under working condition in actual braking system. Dimensional and geometrical deviations are investigated using advanced engineering metrological technique. Mechanical properties, tribological characteristics and chemical analyses are investigated. A coordinate measuring machine, universal hardness tester, mass comparator and XRF spectrometer are used in these diagnoses. Measurements of dimensional and geometrical deviations such as disc thickness variations, thickness deviations, straightness, parallelism, runout of disc surfaces are conducted. A comparison between form deviations in disc surfaces have been carried out and analyzed.
2014-11-11
Journal Article
2014-32-0053
Yoshihiro Nakagawa, Shinya Takahashi, Mikihito Masaki, Ranju Imao
Abstract In brake squeal analyses using FE models, minimizing the discrepancies in vibration characteristics between the measurement and the simulation is a key issue for improving its reproducibility. The discrepancies are generally adjusted by the shape parameters and/or material properties applied to the model. However, the discrepancy cannot be easily adjusted, especially, for the vibration characteristic of the disc model of a motorcycle. One of the factors that give a large impact on this discrepancy is a thermal history of the disc. That thermal history includes the one experienced in manufacturing process. In this paper, we examine the effects of residual stress on the natural frequency of motorcycle discs. The residual stress on the disc surface was measured by X-ray stress measurement method. It was followed by an eigenvalue analysis. In this analysis, we developed a unique method in which the residual stress was substituted by thermal stress.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2534
Liangxu Ma, Liangyao Yu, Xuhui Liu, Zhizhong Wang, Ning Pan
Abstract The paper is focused on the research of the automotive magneto-rheological brake system whose braking force comes from the shear stress of magneto-rheological fluid under the condition of magnetic field. The MRF brake is designed for an electric passenger car to replace a conventional hydraulic disc-type brake. The braking torque of this system can be linearly adjusted by the current in just a few milliseconds with proper materials. Therefore this system has a quick response and precise control performance with a low hysteresis. Nowadays, most of the related research of MRF is about the construction of the prototype and the realization of the brake force. Main limitation of MRF brake lies in the braking torque cannot meet the actual needs and the power consumption may be too much if it is not well designed. The prototype introduced in the SAE Brake Colloquium-31nd Annual has been manufactured and assembled critically.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2519
ByeongUk Jeong, Hoon Kim, Woochul Kim, Sang Do Kwak
Abstract Owing to the enhanced performance of engines these days, more heat should be dissipated in the braking system. Failure of doing this properly causes temperature rise in the brake disc which result in the brake fade, disc distortion, brake judder, etc. A cooling-air-duct was proposed as a solution to prevent these from happening. In this paper, we present our work based on experiments optimized parameters such as direction, location, shapes and the size of the duct for the cooling-air-duct installation in real cars. We installed the duct extended from a front bumper to a rear wheel guard. Experimental parameters were compared with theoretical analysis using the impinging jet analysis. The heat transfer coefficients were determined by using the finite elements method (FEM). We found that our experimental data is supportive of theoretical analysis. We believe that our results should serve an useful guideline for designing the cooling-air-duct for braking system.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2513
Taeho Jung, Jeongkyu Kim
Abstract Rust accumulated on disc surfaces causes brake judder and grind noise. This paper deals with grind noise(wire brush brake noise) in vehicles which is a low frequency vibration and broadband noise problem at 100∼1kHz that appears in low vehicle speed. Recently, the customer complaints have increased for grind and creep groan noise more than squeal noise. Low frequency brake noise is a combined effect of brake and suspension systems working with each other. The noise transfer path is also important. Experimental results are confirmed through ODS, Modal, TPA and 3D acoustic camera for noise transmission path. Finally, reduction methods of grind noise are presented.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2503
Johannes Schneider
The brake discs and brake drums used on motor vehicles are, in 90% of applications, made from grey cast iron. Although other designs such as composite systems comprising of a grey iron braking band and a light weight mounting bell made from aluminum, Al-MMC or entire ceramic brake discs have been developed, cast iron will continue to play a major role as a work piece material for brakes. Cast iron offers advantages in material characteristics such as good thermal conductivity, high compressive strength and damping capacity. In addition it shows a superior casting behavior and also an unbeatable competitive price per part, when compared to other brake materials or designs. Ongoing research in material and casting science are leading to new types of alloyed CI materials, fulfilling the increasing demands in terms of performance but also increasing the demands for a reliable and economical production.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2505
Ashesh Shah, Sanjay Patil, Umesh Abhyankar
Abstract The customer satisfaction index is higher for disc brake systems because of the advantages like less reaction time, shorter stopping distance and improved pedal feel compared to drum brake system. In current competitive market scenario and as per customer requirements, front disc brake module is becoming necessary. The brake system design is challenging task due to stringent performance meeting criteria and packaging constraints with weight optimization. Brake disc is very important component in the brake system which is expected to withstand high braking torque and dissipate heat during braking event. In existing car to replace front drum brake with disc brake module, vehicle needs to undergo legislative verifications and certifications with respect to pedal effort, stopping distance and circuit failed conditions etc.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2482
Meechai Sriwiboon, Nipon Tiempan, Kritsana Kaewlob, Seong Kwan Rhee
The influence of processing conditions on Low-Copper NAO disc pads were investigated as part of an effort to develop Low-Copper disc pad formulations as this kind of information is not readily available in open literature. Processing conditions as well as formulation modifications are found to influence friction, pad wear, disc wear and brake squeal. Low-Copper disc pads for pick-up trucks, equivalent to an OE pad, are developed. It is also found that brake squeal measured during the SAE J2522 (AK Master) Performance testing is related to the combined total wear rate of the disc plus the inner/outer pads or the disc wear rate alone, and that there is a threshold wear rate, above which brake squeal increases rapidly.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2491
SeongJoo Lee, JooSeong Jeong, ShinWook Kim, ShinWan Kim, Seong Rhee
A previous investigation showed that minor variations in alloying elements in gray cast iron disc contributed to measurable differences in friction and disc wear. This investigation was undertaken to find out if and how the increased friction and disc wear might affect brake squeal. The SAE J2522 and J2521 dynamometer procedures as well as an OEM noise dynamometer procedure and a chassis dynamometer noise procedure were used to find out if a correlation between disc wear and brake squeal could be discovered. In all cases, as the wear rate of a disc increases under a given set of test conditions, disc material transfer to the pad surface increases, which results in increased friction and brake squeal. Also a good method to detect disc variability (disc to disc, within a disc) is discussed.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2486
Axel Stenkamp, Michael Schorn
Abstract Starting in the late '90s, a new and innovative brake disk technology entered the high performance passenger car market. Approx. 2 years later, small volume production of carbon-ceramic brake disks started. In the past ten years the number of cars equipped with the new generation of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) brake disks has continuously increased, with main usage in low volume, high horse power applications. The goal of this paper is to give an overview of the system specific boundary conditions as well as today's and tomorrow's targets and aspects of friction material development used in CMC-disk based brake systems. Starting with a description of the system component properties, a comparison of typical CMC vs. standard gray cast iron disk (GCI) applications will be made. The impact of the component properties, especially the disk as friction counterpart to the pad, will be shown by comparing industry standard test scenarios.
2014-09-28
Journal Article
2014-01-2502
Toshikazu Okamura
Abstract There are various processes for finishing the friction surfaces of a brake disc, which affect the braking effectiveness of a vehicle in the early stages of use in some cases. To examine the interaction between the disc surface texture, rotational direction, and friction material, a series of experiments on a tribotester using small-scale specimens was conducted. In a previous paper (2013-01-2056), the results from the first series of experiments, which involved of thirty disc surface textures and a less aggressive non-asbestos organic (NAO) friction material in on-brake-drag conditions combining constant speed and normal-load, was reported. Disc surfaces were finished by the following finishing processes in two rotational directions: turning under four cutting conditions, roller burnishing after turning, turning with a wiper insert, and grinding with two stones. Contact-pressure dependency of friction and wear was confirmed.
2014-09-28
Journal Article
2014-01-2525
Tomasz Grabiec
Abstract Wear and friction behavior of disc brakes are important properties of disc brake systems and are mainly addressed by appropriate selection and tuning of friction material. Disc material composition is often considered as “given”. The most common material used for brake discs is grey cast iron which can have carbon content between 2.5 to 4.2 percent. It is difficult to find in literature investigations related to the influence of cast iron material in combination with modern low-met friction material on wear and friction performance of disc brakes. In this work, the author will try to analyze impact of brake disc material properties on wear and friction performance.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2510
Jung Hoon Woo, Jeongkyu Kim, Kwang Yun Kim, Daekyung Ko
Abstract Creep groan noise occurs in a just moving vehicle by the simultaneous application of torque to the wheel and the gradual release of brake pressure in-vehicle. It is the low frequency noise giving the driver a very uncomfortable feeling. It is caused by the stick-sleep phenomenon at the lining and disc interface. Recently, the field claim of low frequency creep groan has increased. There are a lot of efforts to improve creep groan noise by means of modification of lining material. In this paper, Transfer path of creep groan noise was analyzed through ODS and TPA. Additionally the correlation between Source (Brake torque variation, Brake vibration) and Creep Groan Sound level was discussed. Finally countermeasure to Creep Groan noise was suggested.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2493
Juan Carlos Martinez Laurent, Adrian Jordan, Francisco Canales
Abstract The brake system and components are essential active safety systems for users of motor vehicles, one common NVH phenomenon known as Brake Disc Thermal Coning creates a perception of poor braking system performance. Although Brake Disc Thermal Coning does not deteriorate the braking distance or the vehicle performance, is a concern for the customer who identifies any undesired vibration as a potential performance loss resulting in complaints and warranty claims. In order to increase the quality, and reliability of the products, Automotive OEMs have created processes and tests, today incorporating the ones based in computational solutions, to identify, prevent and correct potential issues before its present in the final product.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1009
Yoon Cheol Kim, Seong Jin Kim, Jaeyoung Lee, Jeongkyu Kim, SooHyuk Lee, Kyoungdon Yi, KiJeong Kim
Abstract Reducing unsprung mass of the car is a representative method to enhance the ride & handling performance and fuel efficiency. In this study, brake disc weight is reduced 15∼20% using a hybrid type material. The basis for this study is the separation of the friction surface and HAT(mounting part). Aluminum material is applied in the HAT for a light weight effect. Gray iron is applied in the friction surface section to maintain braking performance. Two types of joining between aluminum and cast iron are developed. One is the aluminum casting method utilizing a gray iron insert and the other is a bolted assembly method. Detailed structure, process and material are optimized using try-out & dynamometer experiments. The Reliability of this development is proved through durability (dynamometer and vehicle) testing.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-0869
Guangqiang Wu, Shuyi Jin
During a car launch, the driving torque from driveline acts on brake disk, and may lead the pad to slip against the disk. Especially with slow brake pedal release, there is still brake torque applies on the disk, which will retard the rotation of disk, and under certain conditions, the disk and pad may stick again, so the reciprocated stick and slip can induce the noise and vibration, which can be transmitted to a passenger by both tactile and aural paths, this phenomenon is defined as brake groan. In this paper, we propose a nonlinear dynamics model of brake for bidirectional, and with 7 Degrees of Freedom (DOFs), and phase locus and Lyapunov Second Method are utilized to study the mechanism of groan. Time-frequency analysis method then is adopted to analyze the simulation results, meanwhile a test car is operated under corresponding conditions, and the test signals are sampled and then processed to acquire the features.
2013-09-30
Technical Paper
2013-01-2056
Toshikazu Okamura
The surface texture of a brake disc in some cases affects the braking effectiveness of a vehicle in the early stages of use. Brake discs usually turn in one rotational direction during their finishing process but are turn in two directions on a vehicle. This causes a difference in friction or wear between two wheels. Directional surface textures of brake discs finished by turning or roller burnishing may cause this interaction to become more severe than those finished by grinding. Full-scale tests using actual friction pairs are effective for estimating the total braking performance of a full vehicle or its corners. However, they are exposed to various factors and different brake-disc locations creating different friction and wear histories. The author, therefore, concluded that fundamental experiments using small-scale specimens are necessary to examine the details of the interaction between the disc surface texture, rotational direction, and friction material.
2013-09-30
Journal Article
2013-01-2053
SeongJoo Lee, ShinWook Kim, ShinWan Kim, SeongKwan Rhee
Two sets of OE quality brake discs were evaluated for their equivalence in friction and wear under a humidity controlled condition in order to avoid the influence of humidity on friction and wear. These discs were received from two different suppliers located in two different countries. Small differences were found in disc chemistry and microstructure, which resulted in differences in disc properties, and friction and wear characteristics. It is recommended that extreme care must be exercised in determining the performance equivalence of one disc from one supplier against another disc from a second supplier.
2013-09-30
Journal Article
2013-01-2039
David B. Antanaitis
Driving on the race track is an especially grueling situation for the automotive brake system. Temperatures can exceed the phase transition temperature of the disc material, wear rates of friction material can be orders of magnitude higher than during street use, and hydraulic pressures and mechanical stresses on components can approach their design limits. It is a given that friction material under these conditions will wear unevenly - causing taper and cupping wear - and an associated set of performance degradations will occur, including an increase in fluid consumption (pedal travel increase) and loss of mechanical efficiency (pedal force increase).
2013-07-15
Journal Article
2013-01-9116
Ali Belhocine, Mostefa Bouchetara
The main purpose of this study is to analyze the thermomechanical behavior of the dry contact between the brake disc and pads during the braking phase. The simulation strategy is based on computer code ANSYS11. The modeling of transient temperature in the disc is actually used to identify the factor of geometric design of the disc to install the ventilation system in vehicles. The thermal-structural analysis is then used with coupling to determine the deformation and the Von Mises stress established in the disk, the contact pressure distribution in pads. The results are satisfactory when compared to those of the specialized literature.
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