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Viewing 1 to 30 of 4091
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0021
Kazuhiro Ito, Yoshitaka Tezuka, Atsushi Hoshino, Keita Sakurada
Abstract In this study, we developed a simulation method for rough road running condition to reproduce the behaviors of a vehicle body and to precisely estimate the input loads to the frame. We designed the simulation method focusing on a front fork model and a rider model optimized for this type of analysis. In the suspension model development, we conducted detailed measurement of the suspension characteristics on a test bench. Based on the yielded results, the friction force, as well as the spring reaction force and the damping force, was reproduced in the suspension model. The friction of the suspension varies depending on the magnitude of the reaction force associated with bending and this effect was also implemented in the model. Regarding the rider model, the actual behavior of a rider was investigated through the recorded motion video data and used to define the necessary degrees of freedom. Based on this investigation, the degree of freedom of three, i.e. vertical, longitudinal and forward leaning motions, was adopted to the rider model.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2411
Marc Auger, Larry Plourde, Melissa Trumbore, Terry Manuel
Abstract Design of body structures for commercial vehicles differs significantly from automotive due to government, design and usage requirements. Specifically, heavy truck doors are not required to meet side impact requirements due to their height off the ground as compared to automobiles. However, heavy truck doors are subjected to higher loads, longer life, and cannot experience permanent deformation from overload events. Aluminum has been used intensively in commercial vehicle doors and cab structures for over 50 years by several different manufacturers in North America. It has been only in the last few years that aluminum has appeared in automotive door structures other than in high-end luxury vehicles. Commercial vehicle customers are expecting the same features found in premium automobiles resulting in opportunities to learn from each other's designs. In order to optimize the strength and weight of a commercial vehicle door, a new aluminum intensive structure was developed. The new structure featured a unique architecture that was the first in the industry to use a multi-cavity aluminum extrusion joined to stamped sheet reinforcements in order to provide a direct load path between the hinges and the latch.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2446
Marc Ratzel, Warren Dias
Abstract This paper discusses the behavior of a flexible flap at the rear end of a generic car model under aerodynamic loads. A strong bidirectional coupling between the flap's deflection and the flow field exists which requires this system to be simulated in a coupled fluid-structure manner. A coupled transient aerodynamic and structural simulation is performed for a generic car model with a flexible/deformable flap at the rear end. An automatic workflow is established which generates new flap designs, derived from an initial flap design by applying a mesh deformation technology, and performs the coupled fluid-structure interaction analysis. For each shape variation, the flap's maximum displacement is monitored and used to classify the individual flap designs. This process allows for design of experiment (DOE) studies in an automated manner. Several shape variations of the flap and their impacts on the maximum deflection are investigated. Design changes causing a reduction in the maximum deflection are identified and used in an optimization loop to determine a flap design with minimum displacement.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2319
Iman Hazrati Ashtiani, Mehrnoosh Abedi
Abstract Road train vehicles have been applied as one of the common and efficient ways for transportation of goods, specifically hazardous liquid cargos, in different nations. These vehicles have a wide variety of lengths and towing systems such as the fifth wheel or the dolly draw-bar. Based upon specific regulations, they could be authorized to move on specific roads. In order to avoid hazard and danger in case of accidents, safety performance of a B-train vehicle as a specific type of road train vehicles is investigated in this paper. A Multi-Body Dynamic (MBD) model, which consists of a prime mover and two trailers coupled by fifth wheels, are simulated in the initial phase of the study. The developed dynamic model is capable of simulating required tests as well as the SAE lane change, along with a constant radius turn for the purpose of roll and yaw stability analysis and safety evaluation. The effects of variation of the fluid fill level are considered in this research. The trammel pendulum concept is adopted for simulation of fluid movements, known as sloshing, in two articulated tankers of the model.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2308
Zhigang Wei, Shengbin Lin, Limin Luo, Litang Gao
Road vibrations cause fatigue failures in vehicle components and systems. Therefore, reliable and accurate damage and life assessment is crucial to the durability and reliability performances of vehicles, especially at early design stages. However, durability and reliability assessment is difficult not only because of the unknown underlying damage mechanisms, such as crack initiation and crack growth, but also due to the large uncertainties introduced by many factors during operation. How to effectively and accurately assess the damage status and quantitatively measure the uncertainties in a damage evolution process is an important but still unsolved task in engineering probabilistic analysis. In this paper, a new procedure is developed to assess the durability and reliability performance, and characterize the uncertainties of damage evolution of components under constant amplitude loadings. The linear and two nonlinear probabilistic damage accumulation models are briefly described first.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2315
John Anderson
Abstract This paper describes the development and testing of a Dynamic Vibration Absorber to reduce frame beaming vibration in a highway tractor. Frame beaming occurs when the first vertical bending mode of the frame is excited by road or wheel-end inputs. It is primarily a problem for driver comfort. Up until now, few options were available to resolve this problem. The paper will review the phenomenon, design factors affecting a vehicle's sensitivity to frame beaming, and the principles of Dynamic Vibration Absorbers (AKA Tuned Mass Dampers). Finally, the paper will describe simulation and testing that led to the development of an effective vibration absorber as a field fix.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2186
Neno Novakovic
Abstract Since the early 1970s, when microprocessors became commercially available, they quickly became a common part of all aircraft control and indication systems. With an ever-increasing number of microprocessor-based airborne applications, safety regulations and software standards like RTCA DO-178 evolved, demanding rigorous requirements and processes for software development, testing, life cycle, and certification. Over the years, as development of aerospace software applications increased, engineering costs of development and product certification costs exponentially increased, having a significant impact on the market. Landing Gear Actuation system is one of many aircraft systems whose control functions are based on microprocessors and software application. Considering that Landing Gear Actuation control algorithm can be defined in a form of the State Machine, this article intends to demonstrate that such controller can be realized as wired logic hardware, without software implementation.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2151
Abdallah Ben Mosbah, Ruxandra Botez, Thien-my Dao
Abstract A new approach for the prediction of lift, drag and moment coefficients is presented. This approach is based on the Support Vector Machines methodology, and on a optimization algorithm, the Extended Great Deluge. The novelty of this approach is the combination between the SVM and the EGD algorithm. The EGD is used to optimize the SVM parameters to allow it to predict the aerodynamic coefficients of ATR 42 model. The training and validation of this new combination method is realized using the aerodynamic coefficients of an ATR-42 wing model with Xfoil software and experimental tests using the Price-Païdoussis wind tunnel. The results obtained with our approach are compared with the XFoil results, experimental results and XFLR5 software results for different flight cases, expressed as various combinations of angles of attack and Mach numbers. The main purpose of this methodology is to rapidly predict aircraft aerodynamic coefficients.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2237
Rainer Mueller, Matthias Vette, Andreas Ginschel, Ortwin Mailahn
Abstract The global competition challenges aircraft manufacturers in high wage countries. The assembly of large components happens manually in fixed position assembly. Especially the completion of the inner fuselage structure is done 100% manually. The shells have to be joined with rivets and several hundred clips have to be assembled to connect the shell to the frames. The poise of the worker is not ergonomic so a lot of physical stress is added to the worker and minimizes the working ability. Aircraft manufacturers need a lot of different production resources and qualified persons for the production, which provokes higher costs. Due to these high costs there is a demand for automated reconfigurable assembly systems, which offer a high flexibility and lower manufacturing costs. The research project “IProGro” deals with this challenge and develops innovative production systems for large parts. On one hand the flexibility is reached by a reconfigurable fixture for the components on the other hand it is achieved by assistance systems, which guide staff during assembly processes.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2261
Yvan Blanchard
Abstract Today, the design and optimization of complex 3D composites structures is managed by taking into account engineering and manufacturing constraints. If the manufacturing process is automated, especially using a robot, these constraints are particularly complex and a difficult compromise needs to be reached. Most of the technology available on the market, dedicated to automated processes offline programming, neglects some of these constraints, or can only highlight the manufacturing defects without any automatic or manual tools to solve the tape course programming issues. A new innovative approach has been developed to include engineering, material and process specifications, to help designers and NC programmers to optimize the final layup program in terms of structural properties and productivity rate. An aerospace case study using the automated fiber placement (AFP) process will be presented to highlights these offline programming capabilities.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2264
Peter B. Zieve, Osman Emre Celek, John Fenty
Abstract The E7000 riveting machine installs NAS1097KE5-5.5 rivets into A320 Section 18 fuselage side panels. For the thinnest stacks where the panel skin is under 2mm (2024) and the stringer is under 2mm (7075), the normal process of riveting will cause deformation of the panel or dimpling. The authors found a solution to this problem by forming the rivet with the upper pressure foot extended, and it has been tested and approved for production.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2137
Fabrizio Re
Abstract Demonstrators and research projects about electric aircraft taxi systems testify the current interest in low- or zero-emission ground propulsion technologies to lower the overall fuel consumption and emissions of commercial flights. Electric motors fitted in the main landing gears are one of the most promising layouts for these systems especially for narrow-body commercial aircraft. From a control theory point of view, the aircraft on ground becomes an over-actuated plant through adoption of this technology, i.e. a commanded ground trajectory can be reached through different combinations of actuator efforts. A strategy is required to choose the most suitable of these combinations in order to reach the best efficiency. This work aims to investigate a strategy for an optimal control allocation during path-following of prescribed ground trajectories. While the most obvious contributor to the optimizing cost function is energy efficiency, other aspects need to be considered such as the thermal behavior of the electric motors, the availability of energy storage systems resulting in a certain possible amount of regenerative braking, and other technical and normative constraints.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2112
Jay Wilhelm, Joseph Close
Uneven wing deployment of a Hybrid Projectile (HP), an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) that is ballistically launched and then transforms, was investigated to determine the amount of roll and pitch produced during wing deployment. During testing of an HP prototype, it was noticed that sometimes the projectile began to slightly roll after the wings were deployed shortly after apogee. In this study, an analytical investigation was done to determine how the projectile body dynamics would be affected by the wings being deployed improperly. Improper and uneven wing deployment situations were investigated throughout the course of this study. The first analyzed was a single wing delaying to open. The second was if only one wing was to lock into a positive angle of incidence. The roll characteristics when both wings were deployed but only one was locked into an angle of incidence resulted in a steady state roll rate of 4.5 degrees per second. It is imperative to ensure that an HP wing deployment mechanism must be designed to deploy as evenly as possible.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2249
Thomas G. Jefferson, Svetan Ratchev, Richard Crossley
Abstract Aerospace assembly systems comprise a vast array of interrelated elements interacting in a myriad of ways. Consequently, aerospace assembly system design is a deeply complex process that requires a multi-disciplined team of engineers. Recent trends to improve manufacturing agility suggest reconfigurability as a solution to the increasing demand for improved flexibility, time-to-market and overall reduction in non-recurring costs. Yet, adding reconfigurability to assembly systems further increases operational complexity and design complexity. Despite the increase in complexity for reconfigurable assembly, few formal methodologies or frameworks exist specifically to support the design of Reconfigurable Assembly Systems (RAS). This paper presents a novel reconfigurable assembly system design framework (RASDF) that can be applied to wing structure assembly as well as many other RAS design problems. The framework is a holistic, hierarchical approach to system design incorporating reconfigurability principles, Axiomatic Design and Design Structure Matrices.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2266
Helen Lockett, Sarah Fletcher, Nicolas Luquet
Abstract The installation of essential systems into aircraft wings involves numerous labour-intensive processes. Many human operators are required to perform complex manual tasks over long periods of time in very challenging physical positions due to the limited access and confined space. This level of human activity in poor ergonomic conditions directly impacts on speed and quality of production but also, in the longer term, can cause costly human resource problems from operators' cumulative development of musculoskeletal injuries. These problems are exacerbated in areas of the wing which house multiple systems components because the volume of manual work and number of operators is higher but the available space is reduced. To improve the efficiency of manual work processes which cannot yet be automated we therefore need to consider how we might redesign systems installations in the enclosed wing environment to better enable operator access and reduce production time. This paper describes a recent study that applied design for assembly and maintainability principles and CATIA v5 computer aided design software to identify small design changes for wing systems installation tasks.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2265
Lutz Neugebauer
The demand of fulfilling increasing Prime Customer requirements forces Tier 1 suppliers to continually improve their system solutions. Typically, this will involve integration of “state of the art” tools to afford the Tier 1 supplier a throughput and cost advantage. The subject “Production Optimization Approach” addresses the machine and process optimization of automated fastening machines in operation at customer factories. The paper will describe and focus on the main aspects of production optimization of existing machines to meet and exceed the required customer production and reporting criteria. Furthermore, the paper will present existing examples based on use of the established diagnostic tools
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2252
Lucas Irving, Svetan Ratchev, Atanas Popov, Marcus Rafla
Abstract The replacement for the current single-aisle aircraft will need to be manufactured at a rate significantly higher that of current production. One way that production rate can be increased is by reducing the processing time for assembly operations. This paper presents research that was applied to the build philosophy of the leading edge of a laminar flow European wing demonstrator. The paper describes the implementation of determinate assembly for the rib to bracket assembly interface. By optimising the diametric and the positional tolerances of the holes on the two bracket types and ribs, determinate assembly was successfully implemented. The bracket to rib interface is now secured with no tooling or post processes other than inserting and tightening the fastener. This will reduce the tooling costs and eliminates the need for local drilling, de-burring and re-assembly of the bracket to rib interface, reducing the cycle time of the operation. Ultimately, self-indexing components mean that the there is more flexibility as to what point in production the bracket can be attached to the rib.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2263
Eric Barton, Dan Hasley, Joey Jackson
Abstract The following is a unique case study expounding on automatic fastening technology designed and engineered to ramp up a Tier 2 supplier that had no experience with automatic fastening, to efficiently produce a large volume of fuselage panel assemblies with demanding process requirements in a very short amount of time. The automation technology integrated for the skin to stringer & skin to window frame fastening were two GEMCOR G12 five-axis CNC All-Electric fastening systems coupled with a Cenit offline part programming system. This joint solution served as a launch vehicle for Center Industries to efficiently supply the full rate of fuselage panel assemblies for a large volume commercial aircraft program without having any automatic riveting experience. The aero structure sourced to Center Industries has tight manufacturing tolerances & quality requirements without room for error or scrap whereby Drivmatic® fastening with CNC positioning and offline part programming was the feasible approach.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2052
Denis Blanchet, Anton Golota, Nicolas Zerbib, Lassen Mebarek
Abstract Recent developments in the prediction of the contribution of wind noise to the interior SPL have opened a realm of new possibilities in terms of i) how the convective and acoustic sources terms can be identified, ii) how the interaction between the source terms and the side glass can be described and finally iii) how the transfer path from the sources to the interior of the vehicle can be modelled. This paper discusses in detail these three aspects of wind noise simulation and recommends appropriate methods to deliver required results at the right time based on i) simulation and experimental data availability, ii) design stage and iii) time available to deliver these results. Several simulation methods are used to represent the physical phenomena involved such as CFD, FEM, BEM, FE/SEA Coupled and SEA. Furthermore, a 1D and 2D wavenumber transformation is used to extract key parameters such as the convective and the acoustic component of the turbulent flow from CFD and/or experimental data whenever available.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2051
Barbara Neuhierl, David Schroeck, Sivapalan Senthooran, Philippe Moron
Abstract This paper presents an approach to numerically simulate greenhouse windnoise. The term “greenhouse windnoise” here describes the sound transferred to the interior through the glass panels of a series vehicle. Different panels, e.g. the windshield or sideglass, are contributing to the overall noise level. Attached parts as mirrors or wipers are affecting the flow around the vehicle and thus the pressure fluctuations which are acting as loads onto the panels. Especially the wiper influence and the effect of different wiper positions onto the windshield contribution is examined and set in context with the overall noise levels and other contributors. In addition, the effect of different flow yaw angles on the windnoise level in general and the wiper contributions in particular are demonstrated. As computational aeroacoustics requires accurate, highly resolved simulation of transient and compressible flow, a Lattice-Boltzmann approach is used. The noise transmission through the interior is then modeled by statistical energy analysis (SEA), representing the vehicle cabin and the panels excited by the flow.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2083
Arnaud Caillet, Antoine Guellec, Denis Blanchet, Thomas Roy
Abstract Since the last decade, the automotive industry has expressed the need to better understand how the different trim parts interact together in a complete car up to 400 Hz for structureborne excitations. Classical FE methods in which the acoustic trim is represented as non-structural masses (NSM) and high damping or surface absorbers on the acoustic cavity can only be used at lower frequencies and do not provide insights into the interactions of the acoustic trims with the structure and the acoustic volume. It was demonstrated in several papers that modelling the acoustic components using the poroelastic finite element method (PEM) can yield accurate vibro-acoustic response such as transmission loss of a car component [1,2,3]. The increase of performance of today's computers and the further optimization of commercial simulation codes allow computations on full vehicle level [4,5,6] with adequate accuracy and computation times, which is essential for a car OEM. This paper presents a study of a fully trimmed vehicle excited by structureborne excitations with almost all acoustic trims such as seats, dash insulator, instrument panel, headliner… which are modelled as poroelastic finite element (PEM) parts.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2079
Gregor Tanner, David J. Chappell, Dominik Löchel, Niels Søndergaard
Abstract Modelling the vibro-acoustic properties of mechanical built-up structures is a challenging task, especially in the mid to high frequency regime, even with the computational resources available today. Standard modelling tools for complex vehicle parts include finite and boundary element methods (FEM and BEM), as well as Multi-Body Simulations (MBS). These methods are, however, robust only in the low frequency regime. In particular, FEM is not scalable to higher frequencies due to the prohibitive increase in model size. We have recently developed a new method called Discrete Flow Mapping (DFM), which extends existing high frequency methods, such as Statistical Energy Analysis or the so-called Dynamical Energy Analysis (DEA), to work on meshed structures. It provides for the first time detailed spatial information about the vibrational energy of a whole built-up structure of arbitrary complexity in this frequency range. The response of small-scale features and coupling coefficients between sub-components are obtained through local FEM models integrated in the global DFM treatment.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2080
Ze Zhou, Jonathan Jacqmot, Gai Vo Thi, ChanHee Jeong, Kang-Duck Ih
Abstract The NVH study of trimmed vehicle body is essential in improving the passenger comfort and optimizing the vehicle weight. Efficient modal finite-element approaches are widely used in the automotive industry for investigating the frequency response of large vibro-acoustic systems involving a body structure coupled to an acoustic cavity. In order to accurately account for the localized and frequency-dependant damping mechanism of the trim components, a direct physical approach is however preferred. Thus, a hybrid modal-physical approach combines both efficiency and accuracy for large trimmed body analysis. Dynamic loads and exterior acoustic loads can then be applied on the trimmed body model in order to evaluate the transfer functions between these loads and the acoustic response in the car compartment. The scenario study of installing different trim components into the vehicle provides information on the acoustic absorption and dynamic damping with regard to added vehicle weight by the trim.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2081
Rainer Stelzer, Theophane Courtois, Ki-Sang Chae, Daewon SEO, Seok-Gil Hong
Abstract The assessment of the Transmission Loss (TL) of vehicle components at Low-Mid Frequencies generally raises difficulties associated to the physical mechanisms of the noise transmission through the automotive panel. As far as testing is concerned, it is common in the automotive industry to perform double room TL measurements of component baffled cut-outs, while numerical methods are rather applied when prototype or hardware variants are not available. Indeed, in the context of recent efforts for reduction of vehicle prototypes, the use of simulation is constantly challenged to deliver reliable means of decision during virtual design phase. While the Transfer matrix method is commonly and conveniently used at Mid-High frequencies for the calculation of a trimmed panel, the simulation of energy transfer at low frequencies must take into account modal interactions between the vehicle component and the acoustic environment. After providing a brief review of the established approaches for TL simulation at LF, the article will present a new FE methodology for TL simulation and introduce the advantages of “in-situ” TL simulations by means of fluid-structure FE calculation.
2014-05-07
Technical Paper
2014-36-0008
Torbjörn Narström
Abstract The use of modern quenched and tempered steels in dumper bodies to reduce weight to increase the payload and reduce the fuel consumption is briefly discussed. Modern quenched and tempered steels in combination with adopted design concept will further increase weight savings of the dumper body. Use of these materials may lead to 4 times longer wear life than ordinary steels. One of the main load cases for a dumper body is impact of an object, i.e. boulders and rocks, into the body. A well-proven test setup is used to develop a model to predict failure and depth of the dent after the impact. A material model with damage mechanic was utilized to predict fracture. The developed model was used to study the effect of the geometry of the impacting object, thickness of the plate and unconstrained plate field. The model was also implemented in larger model and compared with a full scale test of dumper body. It was found that the most sensitive parameter is the geometry of the falling object.
2014-05-07
Technical Paper
2014-36-0031
Timo Björk, Ilkka Valkonen, Jukka Kömi, Hannu Indren
Abstract The development of weldable high-strength and wear-resistant steels have made modern structures such as booms and mobile equipment possible. These sorts of novel and effective designs could not be constructed with traditional mild steel. Unfortunately, the use of these novel steels requires proper design, and there is no practical design code for these novel steels. This paper addresses stability issues, which are important considerations for designs with high-strength steels, and the properties of the heat-affected zone, which may require special attention. Fatigue design is also discussed in this paper, and the importance of the weld quality is highlighted, along with discussions on which details in the weld are the most important. By comparing the test results with the classical load limit solution, it is determined that full plastic capacity is reached and that the samples display good strain properties. Additionally, the reliability of the classical formulas is shown by comparing them to a recently proposed, novel formula.
2014-04-28
Technical Paper
2014-28-0024
Swapnil Pawar, Sandip Patil, Suhas Joshi, Rajkumar Singh
Abstract Tapping is an important process in assembly of aircraft structures because on an average one millions of tapped holes are made on an aircraft structure. However, sudden breakage of the tap is the most undesirable event frequently encountered during the tapping process. In particular, this can mostly occur when small diameter internal threads are made in a ‘difficult-to-cut’ material like titanium. For this reason, it has been a topic of industrial interest in the manufacturing sector for many years. The ultrasonic vibrations assisted tapping (UVAT) is a novel manufacturing technology, where ultrasonic vibrations are provided to the work piece in the axial direction. The present work is a comprehensive study involving experimental characterization. The experimentation shows that UVAT reduces the torque during tapping as compared to that of in conventional process. There is a 19.1% reduction in torque and about 20.3% reduction in cutting temperature in UVAT over that of in CT. The experimental analysis of UVAT process also shows that the superior surface and better machinability in UVAT over that of in CT.
2014-04-28
Technical Paper
2014-28-0008
Kuldeepak Mahto, K.V. Balaji, A. Zainulabedin
Abstract The present paper discusses about a glossy polypropylene composition which can replace ABS and PC-ABS in the aesthetic interior and exterior bezels of a car with good stiffness and high flow. High Melt flow index of this composition minimizes the number of gate locations thereby drastically improving the aesthetics. Usage of Special Additives, and High Aspect ratio talc reduced the density of this composition as compared to a conventional PP compound. The combined benefits of lower weight, adequate stiffness, good gloss, scratch resistance and weathering resistance in the unpainted form makes this composition attractive for Interior and exterior aesthetic bezels. Again, this composition is cost-effective thereby reducing the part costs of interior and exterior bezels significantly.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0989
Daniel Branagan, Andrew Frerichs, Brian Meacham, Longzhou Ma, Igor Yakubtsov, Sheng Cheng, Alla Sergueeva
Abstract Due to its affordability, excellent stiffness-to-density ratio, and predictable forming characteristics, steel has historically dominated the material selection for vehicle body structures. As light-weighting has gained momentum due to more stringent vehicle emissions standards, the usage of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) has proliferated during the past two decades. In the last decade, significant efforts have been made in developing the “third generation” of AHSS with strength-ductility combinations significantly better than in the first generation AHSS. A paradigm changing nanostructured 3rd Generation AHSS has been developed by NanoSteel that will be described with a focus on the new mechanisms, enabling structures, and resulting mechanical properties. New mechanisms include nanoscale structure formation through a Static Nanophase Refinement mechanism at high temperatures and the ability to strain harden during cold deformation with formation of nanoscale precipitates through a Dynamic Nanophase Strengthening mechanism.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1001
Yunkai Gao, Na Qiu, Jianguang Fang, Shanshan Wang
Abstract For achieving vehicle light weighting, the motion deviation is calculated for substitution of PMMA glazing for inorganic glass. In this paper, a test method is proposed to measure and calculate the motion deviation of the dual-curvature glass. To simulate the dual-curvature glass, the torus surface is fitted with least square method according to the window frame data, which are measured by Coordinate Measuring Machine. By using this method, the motion deviation of PMMA glazing and inorganic glass can be calculated, which can not only validate the effectiveness of motion simulation, but also compare the performances. The results demonstrate that the performance of PMMA glazing is better than that of inorganic glass and the simulation results is validated.
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