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Viewing 1 to 30 of 4062
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Atsushi Mizutani
Abstract This paper describes the development of high efficiency and compact bumper recycling equipment for facilitating bumper recycling globally. Various equipment to remove paint coat from bumper has been developed since 90s', using mechanical, physical or chemical method. However, it is difficult to promote bumper recycling without realizing cost effective overall system from paint coat removal to pelletizing. Our company jointly developed method of mechanically removing paint coat and has committed to bumper recycling in the form of outsourcing since 2000. In 2010, a dedicated plant for recycling bumpers was launched on the premises of our Oppama Assembly Plant in Japan. In the future, promoting bumper recycling at other overseas assembly plants is necessary as vehicle production will expand globally. Having more compact and cost effective recycling system compared to the one at the Oppama plant is required since the scale of the system including bumper crushing, paint coat removal, and pelletizing has to match processing capacity at these plants rather than equipping large one like Oppama's.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Gaurav Gupta, Rituraj Gautam, Chetan Prakash Jain
Abstract Interior sound quality is one of the significant factors contributing to the comfort level of the occupants of a passenger car. One of the major reasons for the deterioration of interior sound quality is the booming noise. Booming noise is a low frequency (20Hz∼300Hz) structure borne noise which occurs mainly due to the powertrain excitations or road excitations. Several methods have been developed over time to identify and troubleshoot the causes of booming noise [1]. In this paper an attempt has been made to understand the booming noise by analyzing structural (panels) and acoustic (cavity) modes. Both the structural modes and the acoustic modes of the vehicle cabin were measured experimentally on a B-segment hatchback vehicle using a novel approach and the coupled modes were identified. Panels contributing to booming noise were identified and countermeasures were taken to modify these panels to achieve decoupling of structural and cavity modes which results in the reduction of cabin noise levels.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael Flannagan, Mitsuhiro Uchida, John Michael Sullivan, Mary Lynn Buonarosa
This study was designed to investigate how the spectral power distribution (SPD) of LED headlamps (including correlated color temperature, CCT) affects both objective driving performance and subjective responses of drivers. The results of this study are not intended to be the only considerations used in choosing SPD, but rather to be used along with results on how SPD affects other considerations, including visibility and glare. Twenty-five subjects each drove 5 different headlamps on each of 5 experimental vehicles. Subjects included both males and females, in older (64 to 85) and younger (20 to 32) groups. The 5 headlamps included current tungsten-halogen (TH) and high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps, along with three experimental LED lamps, with CCTs of approximately 4500, 5500, and 6500 K. Driving was done at night on public roads, over a 21.5-km route that was selected to include a variety of road types. Vehicle instrumentation was used to derive the measures of objective driving performance.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mehdi Safaei, Shahram Azadi, Arash Keshavarz, Meghdad Zahedi
Abstract The main end of this research is the optimization of engine sub-frame parameters in a passenger car to reduce the transmitted vibration to vehicle cabin through DOE method. First, the full vehicle model of passenger car including all its sub-systems such as engine, suspension and steering system is modeled in ADAMS/CAR and its accuracy is validated by exerting swept sine and step input. After that, the schematic geometry of sub-frame is modeled in CAD software and transferred to ADAMS/CAR. Hence, the efficiency of the sub-frame in terms of reducing the induced vibration to vehicle cabin is examined through the various road inputs e.g. swept sine, step and random road input type (B). The results will illustrate that the sub-frame has significant effect in reduction of transmitted vibration to occupants. In order to optimize the sub-frame parameters, the sensitivity analysis is performed to derive effective parameters of sub-frame using DOE method. In this regard, the parameters which have dominant effect on transmitted vibration (the stiffness of sub-frame bushing in vertical direction) are optimized via RSM (Response Surface Method) method.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jingsi Wu, Owusu Agyeman Badu, Yonchen Tai, Albert R. George
While many composite monocoque and semi-monocoque chassis have been built there is very little open literature on how to design one. This paper considers a variety of issues related to composite monocoque design of an automotive chassis with particular emphasis on designing a Formula SAE or other race car monocoque chassis. The main deformation modes and loads considered are longitudinal torsion, local bending around mounting points, and vertical bending. The paper first considers the design of elements of an isotropic material monocoque that has satisfactory torsional, hardpoint, and vertical bending stiffness. The isotropic analysis is used to gain insight and acquire knowledge about the behavior of shells and monocoque structures when subjected to a vehicle's applied loads. The isotropic modeling is then used to set initial design targets for a full anisotropic composite analysis. The flexibility in composite layout and core design coupled with the superior material properties of carbon fiber composites is used to design and move toward an optimized monocoque composite design and layup to obtain satisfactory torsional, hardpoint and bending stiffnesses with minimal weight.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Qiang Yi, Stanley Chien, David Good, Yaobin Chen, Rini Sherony
Abstract According to pedestrian crash data from 2010-2011 the U.S. General Estimates System (GES) and the Fatality Analysis Report System (FARS), more than 39% of pedestrian crash cases occurred at night and poor lighting conditions. The percentage of pedestrian fatalities in night conditions is over 77%. Therefore, evaluating the performance of pedestrian pre-collision systems (PCS) at night is an essential part of the pedestrian PCS performance evaluation. The Transportation Active Safety Institute (TASI) of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) is conducting research for the establishment of PCS test scenarios and procedures in collaboration with Toyota's Collaborative Safety Research Center. The objective of this paper is to describe the design and implementation of a reconfigurable road lighting system to support the pedestrian PCS performance evaluation for night road lighting conditions. First, the test conditions of the road lighting (light intensity and uniformity) are generated by combining recommendations from road lighting design standards and the average measured lighting levels at various crash locations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shweta Rawat, Soumya Kanta Das
Abstract With the ever increasing emphasis on vehicle occupant safety, the safety of pedestrians is getting obscured behind the A-pillars that are expanding in order to meet the federal roof crush standards. The serious issue of pillar blind spots poses threats to the pedestrians who easily disappear from driver's field of view. To recognize this blinding danger and design the car around the driver's eye, this paper proposes the implementation of Aluminum Oxynitride marked under name AlON by Surmet Corporation for fabrication of A-pillars that can allow more than 80% visibility through them. AlON is a polycrystalline ceramic with cubic spinel crystal structure and is composed of aluminum, oxygen and nitrogen. With hardness more than 85% than sapphire, its applications range from aerospace to defense purposes which qualify it in terms of strength and thus imply that it can be conveniently used as A-pillars in vehicles. Furthermore, it possesses characteristics of being bonded to metals as well.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Benoit Bidaine, Laurent Adam, Roger Assaker, Hanson Chang, Marc Duflot, Bender Kutub, Emmanuel Lacoste
Abstract In the steady quest for lightweighting solutions, continuous carbon fiber composites are becoming more approachable for design, now not only used in the aerospace but also the automotive industries. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) are now being integrated into car body structures, used for their high stiffness and strength and low weight. The material properties of continuous carbon fiber composites are much more complex than metal, especially with respect to failure; this is further complicated by the fact that a single part is typically made from stacks of several unidirectional plies, each with a different fiber orientation. Hence failure occurs because of various mechanisms taking place at the ply level (matrix cracking, fiber breakage, fiber-matrix debonding) or between the plies (delamination). These mechanisms remain not fully understood and are investigated through experimental and virtual testing. To predict composite failure, we have developed advanced simulation strategies combining finite element analysis (FEA) and nonlinear micromechanical material modeling.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Bhaskar Kusuma, Kaizhi Quan, Mingchao Guo, Ram Bhandarkar
Abstract In this paper, four possible CAE analysis methods for calculating critical buckling load and post-buckling permanent deformation after unloading for geometry imperfection sensitive thin shell structures under uniformly distributed loads have been investigated. The typical application is a vehicle roof panel under snow load. The methods include 1) nonlinear static stress analysis, 2) linear Eigen value buckling analysis 3) nonlinear static stress analysis using Riks method with consideration of imperfections, and 4) implicit quasi-static nonlinear stress analysis with consideration of imperfections. Advantage and disadvantage of each method have been discussed. Correlations between each of the method to a physical test are also conducted. Finally, the implicit quasi-static nonlinear stress analysis with consideration of geometry imperfections that are scaled mode shapes from linear Eigen value buckling analysis is preferred.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Paul R. Stibich, Yu Hsien Wu, Weidong Zhang, Michao Guo, Kumar Srinivasan, Sreekanth Surapaneni
Abstract This paper describes a comprehensive methodology for the simulation of vehicle body panel buckling in an electrophoretic coat (electro-coat or e-coat) and/or paint oven environment. The simulation couples computational heat transfer analysis and structural analysis. Heat transfer analysis is used to predict temperature distribution throughout a vehicle body in curing ovens. The vehicle body temperature profile from the heat transfer analysis is applied as an input for a structural analysis to predict buckling. This study is focused on the radiant section of the curing ovens. The radiant section of the oven has the largest temperature gradients within the body structure. This methodology couples a fully transient thermal analysis to simulate the structure through the electro-coat and paint curing environments with a structural, buckling analysis. The ability to predict the buckling phenomenon using a virtual simulation will reduce the risk of late production changes to the vehicle class “A” surfaces.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yunkai Gao, Na Qiu, Jianguang Fang, Shanshan Wang
Abstract For achieving vehicle light weighting, the motion deviation is calculated for substitution of PMMA glazing for inorganic glass. In this paper, a test method is proposed to measure and calculate the motion deviation of the dual-curvature glass. To simulate the dual-curvature glass, the torus surface is fitted with least square method according to the window frame data, which are measured by Coordinate Measuring Machine. By using this method, the motion deviation of PMMA glazing and inorganic glass can be calculated, which can not only validate the effectiveness of motion simulation, but also compare the performances. The results demonstrate that the performance of PMMA glazing is better than that of inorganic glass and the simulation results is validated.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mohammed K Billal, B V Moorthy, Dan Aquilina, Steven Schenten
Abstract A snap-fit is a form-fitting joint, which is used to assemble plastic parts together. Snap-fits are available in different forms like a projecting clip, thicker section or legs in one part, and it is assembled to another part through holes, undercuts or recesses. The main function of the snap-fit is to hold the mating components, and it should withstand the vibration and durability loads. Snap-fits are easy to assemble, and should not fail during the assembling process. Based on the design, these joints may be separable or non-separable. The non- separable joints will withstand the loads till failure, while separable joints will withstand only for the design load. The insertion and the retention force calculation for the snaps are very essential for snap-fit design. The finite element analysis plays a very important role in finding the insertion and the retention force values, and also to predict the failure of the snaps and the mating components during this process. The snap insertion and retention simulation is highly non-linear, due to the non-linear material behavior and contact between the mating components.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Meng Huang
A 2 DOF nonlinear dynamic model of the automotive wiper system is established. Complex eigenvalues are calculated based on the complex modal theory, and the system stability as well as its dependence on wiping velocity is analyzed. Bifurcation characteristics of frictional self-excited vibration and stick-slip vibration relative to wiping velocity are studied through numerical analysis. Research of nonlinear vibration characteristics under various wiping velocities is conducted by means of phase trajectories, Poincaré map and frequency spectrum. The pervasive stick-slip vibration during wiping is confirmed, and its temporal and spatial distributions are analyzed by way of time history and contour map. Duty ratio of stick vibration and statistics of scraping residual are introduced as quantitative indexes for wiping effect evaluation. Results indicate that the negative slop of frictional-velocity characteristic is the root cause of system instability. As the wiping velocity decreases, the vibration state transforms from periodic to quasi-periodic and then to chaos in both high and low velocity ranges.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Masashi Terada, Takashi Kondo, Yukihiro Kunitake, Kunitomo Miyahara
Abstract In automobile development, steering vibrations caused by engine excitation force and suspension vibration input from the road surface are a problem. The conventional method of reducing vibrations and thereby securing marketability has been to dispose a dynamic damper inside the steering wheel. The resonance frequency of a steering system varies for each vehicle developed (as a result of the vehicle size, the arrangement of the stiff members of the vehicle body, and the like). As a result, the individual values of dynamic dampers that are used with vehicles must be adjusted for each developed vehicle type. To address this problem, we have developed a new structure in which, rather than using a conventional dynamic damper, we disposed a floating bush on the Supplemental Restraint System (SRS) module attachment section and used the SRS module itself as the weight for the dynamic damper. In this structure, the dynamic damper weight is approximately eight times greater than the conventional weight, the vibration reduction effect is enhanced, and the effective frequency range is widened.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Anthony Barkman, Kelvin Tan, Arin McIntosh, Peter Hylton, Wendy Otoupal-Hylton
This paper discusses a project intended as a design study for a team of college students preparing for careers in motorsports. The project's objective was to conduct a design study on the possible redesign of the suspension for a dirt-track sprint car. The car examined was typical of those which race on one-quarter to one-half mile dirt oval tracks across the United States. The mission of this concept study was to develop a different configuration from the traditional torsion bar spring system, for the front end. The design included moving the dampers inboard with the addition of a rocker to relate the movement through the front suspension system. For the rear end, components were designed to allow the radius rod to be adjustable from the cockpit, thus providing the driver with adjustability to changing track conditions. The project goal was to design functional front end and rear end changes that could provide a positive impact on handling as well as keeping the system easy to replace in a short period of time.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Rajiv Mehta, Mark Hadley
With the ever increasing pressure to improve the fuel economy of vehicles, there has been a corresponding interest in reducing the mass and size of vehicles. While mass is easily quantifiable, vehicle size, particularly the notion of “interior space” as perceived by the customer, is not. This paper explores different ways in which vehicle spaciousness can be quantified and explores new metrics based on customer verbatims. A novel ‘spaciousness calculator’ combines individual metrics to provide a singular holistic rating for spaciousness, useful during vehicle development. Beyond spaciousness, the paper discusses techniques to quantify the ‘packaging efficiency’ of a vehicle; this allows engineers to maximize the interior space for a given exterior size.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Atishay Jain
Abstract One of the key aspects of designing a race car chassis is Torsion Stiffness (Roll stiffness). Designers strive to develop a chassis design with a high value of roll stiffness to counter the forces applied by the suspension during cornering while keeping the weight as low as possible. CAD and static analysis techniques are instrumental for virtual testing and validation in the initial stages of a project prior to experimental testing. This paper intends to encapsulate elementary analysis skills and their application in designing and developing tubular frame structures for amateur racing vehicles and simultaneously focusing on reducing the time for the design and development process. The objective of this paper is to calculate, analyze and optimize the torsion stiffness of a Formula SAE/ Formula Student chassis using an analysis model developed and optimized for quicker design iterations and to compare different design proposals based on certain key parameters in the nascent stage of project development.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Rahul Shashikant Patil
Abstract The tailgate is the fifth or the rearmost door of an SUV (Sports Utility Vehicle)[1]. It can be side opening or top opening. It is attached to the BIW (Body In White) with two hinge arrangement. The hinges are designed to take the cantilever load of a normal side opening tailgate along with the passenger ingress/egress load. This means that apart from the doors own weight, the hinges have to take the extra load which a passenger exerts on it by resting his/her forehand on the handle. The hinges are designed to take these loads and under normal circumstances, they do not fail for acceptable number of cycles of opening and closing of the tailgate. But in case of an armored vehicle side opening tailgate, it is quite a challenge for the normal hinges to take the heavy load of the tailgate along with passenger ingress / egress load. The normal hinges (Refer figure-1) obviously fail under such heavy loads either in their design or material configuration. To take this extra load, designers had to think of an innovative arrangement/concept that was simple yet convenient from retrofitting point of view on an armored vehicle configuration.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sangil Kim, Seungwoo Seo, ChungHwa Jung, SeungHyun Baek, ChangGi Ha, KiRyun Ahn, MunBae Tak
Abstract Recently, the demand for improving the merchantability of hood open system has been increasing. A novel concept hood open system was proposed by Hyundai Motor Company (HMC) in 2012, which was based on a two-step open latch mechanism. The new hood opening mechanism satisfies Safety laws and improves merchantability.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vignesh T Shekar, Sreedhar Reddy, Mukul Mitra, Anil Cherukuri
Abstract ‘To achieve more from less’ has been the oft-quoted phrase in auto industry for quite some time. This philosophy has many analogies like fuel efficiency, modularity, weight reduction, alternative fuels etc. Of these ‘modularity’ is seen as an effective tool, especially for automotive OEMs catering to a wide portfolio of similar products. This paper discusses the implications of modularization on a passenger bus OEM, by taking the ‘bus super structure’ as a test case. The modularized bus structure is compared with the conventional structure for design strength, safety, weight and more importantly manufacturing flexibility. The challenges faced in each of these aspects are discussed. From the study it was understood that the task of manufacturing body modules and interfaces is complex and it calls for a complete revamp of existing fixtures, material handling equipment and even the prescribed tolerances. Considering existing manufacturing processes, adopting modularity in manufacturing is not pragmatic, at least for bus body.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jaehyuk Jang
Abstract Oil canning and initial stiffness of the automotive roofs and panels are considered to be sensitive customer ‘perceived quality’ issues. In an effort to develop more accurate objective requirements, respective simulation methods are continuously being developed throughout automotive industries. This paper discusses a latest development on oil canning predictions using LS-DYNA® Implicit, including BNDOUT request, MORTAR contact option and with the stamping process involved, which resulted in excellent correlations especially when it comes to measurements at immediate locations to the feature lines of the vehicle outer panels. Furthermore, in pursuit of light-weighting vehicles with thinner roofs, a new CAE method was recently developed to simulate severe noise conditions exhibited on some of developmental properties while going through a car wash. This paper introduces such a method to discuss Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) approach using an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation in LS-DYNA® for vehicle roof car wash boom noise prediction.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Takanobu Saito, Jiro Hiramoto, Toshiaki Urabe
Abstract A new topology analysis method was developed to optimize part shapes and the configuration of automotive components. Only solid elements are used in the conventional topology optimization method. The key point of the new method is to embed solid elements in a model made of shell elements. In this study, stiffness optimizations were carried out for a simple cylindrical model, automotive floor model and full vehicle model. Specifically, optimized automotive components were a center tunnel, a side-sill and a joint linking a side-member and a cross-member, which are made of steel sheets and have rectangular cross sections. The results show that the newly-developed topology optimization method is valuable in the optimization of automotive components which are made of steel sheets and have rectangular cross sections.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Timothy W. Brooks, Don Gramlich
Abstract A new method to package “inorganic” light emitting diode (LED) chips has been developed that creates a lamp that allows new design concepts for automotive lighting. The lamp is a flexible, very thin LED lamp that can be powered directly from a vehicle's 12 volt system. The technology is a laminated light of inorganic LEDs. This paper provides a background, the capability and example applications of this new technology as it relates to the vehicle transportation market. The unique benefits of a laminated LED lamp will be presented with reliability and performance results.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mohamed Sithik, Rama Vallurupalli, Barry (Baizhong) Lin, Subash Sudalaimuthu
Abstract In recent trend, there is a huge demand for lightweight chassis frame, which improves fuel efficiency and reduces cost of the vehicle. Stiffness based optimization process is simple and straightforward while durability (life) based optimizations are relatively complex, time consuming due to a two-step (Stress then life) virtual engineering process and complicated loading history. However, durability performances are critical in chassis design, so a process of optimization with simplified approach has been developed. This study talks about the process of chassis frame weight optimization without affecting current durability performance where complex durability load cases are converted to equivalent static loadcases and life targets are cascaded down to simple stress target. Sheet metal gauges and lightening holes are the parameters for optimization studies. The optimization design space is constrained to chassis unique parts. The optimized design is verified for detailed load case and life target.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nicholas P. Skinner, John D. Bullough
Abstract Rear automotive lighting systems employing dynamic features such as sweeping or flashing are not commonly used on vehicles in North America, in part because they are not clearly addressed in vehicle lighting regulations. Nor is there abundant evidence suggesting they have a substantial role to play in driver safety. The results of a human factors investigation of the potential impacts of dynamic rear lighting systems on driver responses are summarized and discussed in the context of safety, visual effectiveness and the present regulatory context.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Luciano Lukacs, Mahendra Dassanayake, Iuri Pepe
Abstract Nighttime driving behavior differs from that during the day because of unique scenarios presented in a driver's field of vision. At night drivers have to rely on their vehicle headlamps to illuminate the road to be able to see the environment and road conditions in front of him. In recent decades car illumination systems have undergone considerable technological advances such as the use of a Light Emitting Diode (LED) in Adaptive Front-lighting Systems (AFS), a breakthrough in lighting technology. This is rapidly becoming one of the most important innovative technologies around the world within the lighting community. This paper discusses driver's needs given the environment and road conditions using a survey applied to compare the needs of both truck and car drivers under different road conditions. The results show the potential and suitability of the methodology proposed for controlling truck-related lighting in any emergent market.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
John D. Bullough
Abstract Present standards for vehicle forward lighting specify two headlamp beam patterns: a low beam when driving in the presence of other nearby vehicles, and a high beam when there is not a concern for producing glare to other drivers. Adaptive lighting technologies such as curve lighting systems with steerable headlamps may be related to increments in safety according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, but isolating the effects of lighting is difficult. Recent analyses suggest that visibility improvements from adaptive curve lighting systems might reduce nighttime crashes along curves by 2%-3%. More advanced systems such as adaptive high-beam systems that reduce high-beam headlamp intensity toward oncoming drivers are not presently allowed in the U.S. The purpose of the present study is to analyze visual performance benefits and quantify potential safety benefits from adaptive high-beam headlamp systems. Before adaptive high-beam systems could be permitted on U.S. roadways, it is necessary to have data describing their potential for crash reductions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Thomas Liebetrau, Roland Fiederling, Maximilian Vogl, Dieter Stephan Parth
Abstract Glare-free high beams are a consistent enhancement of adaptive headlight systems for vehicles with advanced driver assist systems. A prerequisite for these are camera-based systems with the ability to recognize and classify objects such as vehicles in front or oncoming vehicles when driving at night. These objects can then be dynamically masked out of the high beam of the specially designed headlights. Since we are talking about moving objects, it is essential for the high beam to be continuously and dynamically adapted. This paper describes a modular LED matrix system for dynamically adjusting a glare-free and continuously active high beam. The main focus was on the modularity of the system and the optimization of the thermal properties of an LED matrix in order to ensure that operation was reliable under the harsh environmental conditions inside a headlight. Specific control electronics and different interconnection methods were examined. The results were worked out within the scope of a development project funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), which is part of the European SEEL (Solutions for Energy Efficient Lighting) research project within the joint CATRENE project (CA502).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vesna Savic, Matthew Pawlicki, Paul Krajewski, Mark Voss, Louis Hector, Keith Snavely
Abstract Global regulations intended to enhance pedestrian protection in a vehicle collision, thereby reducing the severity of pedestrian injuries, are presenting significant challenges to vehicle designers. Vehicle hoods, for example, must absorb a significant amount of energy over a small area while precluding impact with a hard engine compartment component. In this paper, a simple passive approach for pedestrian protection is introduced in which thin metal alloy sheets are bent to follow a C-shaped cross-sectional profile thereby giving them energy absorbing capacity during impact when affixed to the underside of a hood. Materials considered were aluminum (6111-T4, 5182-O) and magnesium (AZ31-O, AZ61-O, ZEK100) alloys. To evaluate the material effect on the head injury criterion (HIC) score without a hood, each C-channel absorber was crushed in a drop tower test using a small dart. Two high speed cameras captured dart image data before and during impact from which HIC scores were computed with stereo digital image correlation (DIC).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Madhav Khadilkar
Abstract The purpose of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 216 is to reduce fatalities and serious injuries when vehicle roof crushes into occupant compartment during rollover crash. Upgraded roof crush resistance standard (571.216a Standard No. 216a) requires vehicle to achieve maximum applied force of 3.0 times unloaded vehicle weight (UVW) on both driver and passenger sides of the roof. (For vehicles with gross vehicle weight rating ≤ 6,000 lb.) This paper provides an overview of current approach for dual side roof strength Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and its limitations. It also proposes a new approach based on powerful features available in virtual tools. In the current approach, passenger side loading follows driver side loading and requires two separate analyses before arriving at final assessment. In the proposed approach only one analysis suffices as driver and passenger side loadings are combined in a single analysis. This is achieved by using sensors to control loadings, resulting in reduced consumption of CPU time (for computer simulation) and disk space utilization without compromising accuracy of current approach.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 4062

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