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2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2892
Carlos A. Pereira, Max Morton, Claire Martin, Geert-Jan Schellekens
The current trend towards energy efficient commercial vehicles requires a substantial improvement in their aerodynamic performance. The two largest contributions to the drag of a tractor-trailer combination are the wake at the rear of the trailer and the turbulent in-flow at the trailer gap. By integrating into the design of the roof fairing ducts that divert and speed-up air flow it is possible to obtain a reduction of drag in the trailer gap and alter the trailer wake favorably. The resulting decrease in yaw-averaged overall drag coefficient is of 5.8%. This translates into an improvement in fuel efficiency of 3% when compared to the baseline . The design optimization was performed using parametric variation of a computational fluid dynamic model at zero and six degree yaw.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2867
Sanket Pawar
Abstract Work lights with high power rating consume high current. Since the battery voltage is fixed, high currents are needed to generate the necessary power (wattage). This makes it difficult to manage the load on the Electronic Control Unit (ECU) responsible for controlling the work lights and also on the entire electrical system of the vehicle. It is possible to prevent the system from getting over loaded by employing effective means of work light control techniques. These techniques differ based on the type of work lights connected on the vehicle. There are three types of work lights available in the market. Halogen work lights, High Intensity Discharge (HID) work lights and Light Emitting Diode (LED) work lights. HIDs are not preferred by most customers due to their high warm up times & cost/unit. The other two types of lights, i.e. LED & Halogen, are comparatively less expensive. They also need negligible warm up times which are not objectionable to the vehicle operators.
2015-09-29
Journal Article
2015-01-2894
Marius-Dorin Surcel, Mithun Shetty
Abstract The performance of several aerodynamic technologies and approaches, such as trailer skirts, trailer boat tails, gap reduction, was evaluated using track testing, model wind tunnel testing, and CFD simulation, in order to assess the influence of the design, position and combination of various aerodynamic devices. The track test procedure followed the SAE J1321 SAE Fuel Consumption Test Procedure - Type II. Scale model wind tunnel tests were conducted to have direct performance comparisons among several possible configurations. The wind tunnel tests were conducted on a 1/8 scale model of a tractor in combination with a 53-foot semi-trailer. Among others, the wind tunnel tests and CFD simulations confirmed the influences of trailer skirts' length observed during the track tests and that the wider skirt closer to the ground offer better results.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2504
Christian Meiners, Weidong Zhu, Yinglin Ke
The joining and assembly of barrel sections of large aircraft is always cumbersome. Any means to ease this task are welcome. In recent years The Boeing Co. has invented and licensed their “Flex-Track” system. But however flexible this approach may be, double curved surfaces, large variations of cross-section radius and issues with vacuum cup fixture are problems to be dealt with. Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China has developed a new, innovative circumferential splicing system in cooperation with Broetje-Automation, Germany. This paper will describe design and features. There is a unique, time-saving setup technology and self-stepping actuation for a one up 360° splicing operation. The process endeffector is based on standard, state of the art components in use for large fastening systems.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2493
Dan Vaughan, David Branson, Otto Jan Bakker, Svetan Ratchev
Abstract The aim of this work was to develop a new assembly process in conjunction with an adaptive fixturing system to improve the assembly process capability of specific aircraft wing assembly processes. The inherently complex aerospace industry requires a step change in its capability to achieve the production ramp up required to meet the global demand. This paper evaluates the capability of adaptive fixtures to identify their suitability for implementation into aircraft wing manufacturing and assembly. To understand the potential benefits of these fixtures, an examination of the current academic practices and an evaluation of the existing industrial solutions is highlighted. The proposed adaptive assembly process was developed to account for the manufacturing induced dimensional variation that causes significant issues in aircraft wing assembly.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2503
Thomas Dr. Schneider
Abstract This paper presents an innovative approach for modular and flexible positioning systems for large aircraft assembly, for instance the manufacturing of the fuselage sections from shell panels and floor grids, the alignment of the sections to build the fuselage, and the joining of wings and tail units to the fuselage. The positioning system features a modular, reconfigurable, and versatile solution for various aircraft dimensions and different applications. This includes the positioning units, the controls, the measurement interface and the product supports. It provides the customer with a holistic solution that considers the specific positioning task taking into account high absolute positioning accuracy, repeatability and synchronization of the motion for all manipulators that constitute the positioning system. Various tools and method which were used during the development process are introduced and the developed standardized Positioning Technology is briefly explained.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2499
Perla Maiolino, Richard A. J. Woolley, Atanas Popov, Svetan Ratchev
Abstract The assembly and manufacture of aerospace structures, in particular legacy products, relies in many cases on the skill, or rather the craftsmanship, of a human operator. Compounded by low volume rates, the implementation of a fully automated production facility may not be cost effective. A more efficient solution may be a mixture of both manual and automated operations but herein lies an issue of human error when stepping through the build from a manual operation to an automated one. Hence the requirement for an advanced automated assembly system to contain functionality for inline structural quality checking. Machine vision, used most extensively in manufacturing, is an obvious choice, but existing solutions tend to be application specific with a closed software development architecture.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2402
Yucheng Liu
Abstract Differential equations play a prominent role in aerospace engineering by modeling aerospace structures, describing important phenomena, and simulating mathematical behavior of aerospace dynamical systems. Presently, aerospace systems have become more complex, space vehicle missions require more hours of simulation time to complete a maneuver, and high-performance missiles require more logical decisions in there phases of flight. Because of these conditions, a computationally efficient algorithm for solving these differential equations is highly demanded to significantly reduce the computing time.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2565
Nhan Nguyen, Sonia Lebofsky, Eric Ting, Upender Kaul, Daniel Chaparro, James Urnes
Abstract This paper summarizes the recent development of an adaptive aeroelastic wing shaping control technology called variable camber continuous trailing edge flap (VCCTEF). As wing flexibility increases, aeroelastic interactions with aerodynamic forces and moments become an increasingly important consideration in aircraft design and aerodynamic performance. Furthermore, aeroelastic interactions with flight dynamics can result in issues with vehicle stability and control. The initial VCCTEF concept was developed in 2010 by NASA under a NASA Innovation Fund study entitled “Elastically Shaped Future Air Vehicle Concept,” which showed that highly flexible wing aerodynamic surfaces can be elastically shaped in-flight by active control of wing twist and bending deflection in order to optimize the spanwise lift distribution for drag reduction.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2570
Brandon Liberi, Praditukrit Kijjakarn, Narayanan Komerath
Abstract Loads slung under aircraft can go into divergent oscillations coupling multiple degrees of freedom. Predicting the highest safe flight speed for a vehicle-load combination is a critical challenge, both for military missions over hostile areas, and for evacuation/rescue operations. The primary difficulty was that of obtaining well-resolved airload maps covering the arbitrary attitudes that a slung load may take. High speed rotorcraft using tilting rotors and co-axial rotors can fly at speeds that imply high dynamic pressure, making aerodynamic loads significant even on very dense loads such as armored vehicles, artillery weapons, and ammunition. The Continuous Rotation method demonstrated in our prior work enables routine prediction of divergence speeds. We build on prior work to explore the prediction of divergence speed for practical configurations such as military vehicles, which often have complex bluff body shapes.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2461
Enrico Troiani, Maria Pia Falaschetti, Sara Taddia, Alessandro Ceruti
Abstract The high number of hull losses is a main concern in the UAV field, mostly due to the high cost of on-board equipment. A crashworthiness design can be helpful to control the extent and position of crash impact damage, minimizing equipment losses. However, the wide use of composite materials has recently put the accent on the lack of data about the behavior of these structures under operative loads, such as the crash conditions. This paper presents the outcome of a set of tests carried out to achieve a controlled crush of UAV structures, and to maximize the Specific Energy Absorption. In this work, a small-scale experimental test able to characterize the energy absorption of a Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under compression was developed introducing self-supporting sinusoidal shape specimens, which avoid the need for complex anti-buckling devices.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2463
Giacomo Frulla, Enrico Cestino, Piero Gili, Michele Visone, Domenico Scozzola
Abstract The problem of wing shape modification under loads in order to enhance the aircraft performance and control is continuously improving by researchers. This requirement is in contrast to the airworthiness regulations that constraint stiffness and stress of the structure in order to maintain structural integrity under operative flight conditions. The lifting surface modification is more stringent in those cases, such as UAV configurations, where the installed power is limited but the variety of operative scenario is wider than in conventional aircraft. A possible solution for adaptive wing configuration can be found in the VENTURAS Project idea. The VENTURAS Project is a funded project with the aim of improve the wind turbine efficiency by means of introducing a twisting capability for the blade sections according to the best situation in any wind condition. The blade structure is composed by two parts: 1) internal supporting element, 2) external deformable envelope.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2513
Hans-Juergen Borchers, Kadir Akkuş
New Aircraft drilling installations show a tendency to use Robotic concepts for the positioning of the end effector. At the same time demands of fulfilling the continually increasing customer requirements forces suppliers to improve their system solutions to match the specifications. This paper will discuss the process of drilling large diameter holes within high quality requirements using a Robot positioning concept with a High speed spindle End effector. This Robot End effector system provides flexibility to handle different aircraft sections due to its Robot arm design. The material configuration that will discussed in this paper is a mixed material stack of CFRP and Aluminum. The diameter range is from 7.9 mm to 15.9 mm. This paper will focus on the large diameter holes. What are the process forces that have to be handled and what are the solutions.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2462
Claudia Bruni, Enrico Cestino, Giacomo Frulla, Piergiovanni Marzocca
Abstract The innovative highly flexible wings made of extremely light structures, yet still capable of carrying a considerable amount of non- structural weights, requires significant effort in structural simulations. The complexity involved in such design demands for simplified mathematical tools based on appropriate nonlinear structural schemes combined with reduced order models capable of predicting accurately their aero-structural behaviour. The model presented in this paper is based on a consistent nonlinear beam-wise scheme, capable of simulating the unconventional aeroelastic behaviour of flexible composite wings. The partial differential equations describing the wing dynamics are expanded up to the third order and can be used to explore the effect of static deflection imposed by external trim, the effect of gust loads and the one of nonlinear aerodynamic stall.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2514
Scott Tomchick, Joshua Elrod, Dave Eckstein, James Sample, Dan Sherick
Abstract A new automated production system for installation of Lightweight Groove Proportioned (LGP) and Hi-Lock bolts in wing panels has been implemented in the Boeing 737 wing manufacturing facility in Renton, Washington. The system inserts LGP and Hi-Lok bolts into interference holes using a ball screw mechanical squeeze process supported by a back side rod-locked pneumatic clamp cylinder. Collars are fed and loaded onto a swage die retaining pin, and swaging is performed through ball screw mechanical squeeze. Offset and straight collar tools allow the machine to access 99.9% of fasteners in 3/16″, ¼″ and 5/16″ diameters. Collar stripping forces are resolved using a dynamic ram inertial technique that reduces the pull on the work piece. Titanium TN nuts are fed and loaded into a socket with a retaining spring, and installed on Hi-Loks Hi-Lok with a Bosch right angle nut runner.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2515
Adlai Felser, Peter B. Zieve, Bryan Ernsdorff
Abstract A new style of rivet injector is in production use on a variety of fastening machines used by major aircraft manufacturers. In this injector the opposing sides of the rivet guide blocks are attached to the arms of a parallel gripper. We have implemented the parallel gripper in both vertical axis and horizontal axis riveting applications. It is equally effective in both orientations. We have implemented the parallel gripper rivet injector on headed rivets, threaded bolts, ribbed swage bolts and unheaded (slug) rivets.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2491
Paul Haworth, Donald Peterson, Curtis Hayes
Abstract A new high speed forming process for fatigue rated index head rivets used in wing panel assembly using ball-screw based servo squeeze actuation has been developed. The new process is achieved using a combination of force and position control and is capable of forming to 40,000 lbs at rates of up to 200,000 lbs/second whilst holding the part location to within +/− 10 thousandths of an inch. Multi-axis riveting machines often have positioning axes that are also used for fastener upset. It is often the case that while a CNC is used for positioning control, another secondary controller is used to perform the fastener upset. In the new process, it has been possible to combine the control of the upset process with the machine CNC, thus eliminating any separate controllers. The fastener upset force profile is controlled throughout the forming of the rivet by using a closed loop force control system that has a load cell mounted directly behind the stringer side forming tool.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2613
Douglas Leicht, Kirk Olsen
Abstract 15-5PH is a precipitation-hardening, martensitic stainless steel used for primary structural elements such as engine mounts where corrosion resistance, high strength, good fatigue and fracture toughness is required. The material composition is defined in AMS5659M. This alloy can be either Type 1 - vacuum arc remelt (VAR) or Type 2 - electro slag remelt (ESR) and is most commonly heat treated per SAE AMS-H-6875 or AMS2759/3 to condition H1025 (an ultimate tensile strength of 155 ksi [1070 MPa] minimum). Typically material handbooks have limited fatigue data and most data is only for Type 1. Therefore, the fatigue properties of 15-5PH H1025 stainless steel for both Type 1 and Type 2 were determined. The objective of the fatigue testing was to generate a family of S-N curves (maximum stress versus number of cycles to failure) for a series of stress ratios across the entire range of cycles to failure.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2614
Hideki Okada, Kenichi Kamimuki, Syuhei Yoshikawa, Shintaro Fukada
In the recent aircraft manufacturing, the cost reduction, the manufacturing time redaction and the weight saving of aircraft are strongly demanded. Refill Friction Spot Joining (FSJ, other word FSSW, Friction Stir Spot Welding) , which is one of innovative joining process based on friction stir welding, is a promising technology as the replacement for rivet and fastener, and this technology is expected to realize cost reduction and weight saving. Because Refill FSSW uses no additional materials such as Rivet, which contributes to reduce the weight. Also it needs no drilling and deburring process. It means easy to realize a high rate manufacturing, easy to use automation. Additionally, it helps to flexible designing of structures since it allows the closer joint pitch/edge distance than Rivet. In a previous report, the higher shear strength in comparison with Resistance spot welding was shown as well as it was comparable to Rivet.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2594
Thomas G. Jefferson, Panorios Benardos, Svetan Ratchev
Current assembly systems that deal with large, complex structures present a number of challenges with regard to improving operational performance. Specifically, aerospace assembly systems comprise a vast array of interrelated elements interacting in a myriad of ways, resulting in a deeply complex process that requires a multi-disciplined team of engineers. The current approach to ramp-up production rate involves building additional main assembly fixtures which require large investment and lead times up to 24 months. Within Airbus Operations Ltd there is a requirement to improve the capacity and flexibility of assembly systems, thereby reducing non-recurring costs and time-to-market. Recent trends to improve manufacturing agility advocate Reconfigurable Assembly Systems (RAS) as a viable solution. Yet, adding reconfigurability to assembly systems further increases both the operational and design complexity.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2615
Donald Jasurda
The aerospace industry is continually becoming more competitive. With an aircraft’s large number of components, and the large supplier base used to fabricate these components, it can be a daunting task to manage the quality status of all these parts in an accurate, timely and actionable manner. This paper focuses on an aircraft door assembly case study monitoring the process capability of machined parts at an aircraft OEM and their supply chain. Through the use of standardized measurement plans and statistical analysis of the measured output, the paper will illustrate how stakeholders can understand the process performance details at a workcell level, as well as overall line or plant performance in real time, in addition to automating standardized reporting. This ideal process begins in the product engineering phase using simulation to analyze the tolerance specifications and assembly process strategy, with one of the outputs being a production measurement plan.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2577
Alessandro Ceruti, Piergiovanni Marzocca, Vitaly Voloshin
Abstract The aim of this paper is to develop a new concept of unconventional airship based on morphing a lenticular shape while preserving the volumetric dimension. Lenticular shape is known to have relatively poor aerodynamic characteristics. It is also well known to have poor static and dynamic stability after the certain critical speed. The new shape presented in this paper is obtained by extending one and reducing the other direction of the original lenticular shape. The volume is kept constant through the morphing process. To improve the airship performance, four steps of morphing, starting from the lenticular shape, were obtained and compared in terms of aerodynamic characteristics, including drag, lift and pitching moment, and stability characteristics for two different operational scenarios. The comparison of the stability was carried out based on necessary deflection angle of the part of tail surface.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2578
Alessandro Ceruti, Piergiovanni Marzocca
Abstract The flight simulation of airships and hot air balloons usually considers the envelope geometry as a fixed shape, whose volume is eventually reduced by ballonets. However, the dynamic pressure or helium leaks in airships, and the release of air to allow descent in hot air balloons can significantly change the shape of the envelope leading to potential dangerous situations. In fact, in case of semi-rigid and non-rigid airships a reduction in envelope internal pressure can reduce the envelope bending stiffness leading to the loss of the typical axial-symmetric shape. For hot air balloons thing goes even worse since the lost of internal pressure can lead to the collapsing of the balloon shape to a sort of vertically stretched geometry (similar to a torch) which is not able to sustain the attached basket and its payload.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2208
David Stotera, Scott Bombard
Abstract Both vehicle roof systems and vehicle door systems typically have viscoelastic material between the beams and the outer panel. These materials have the propensity to affect the vibration decay time and the vibration level of the panel with their damping and stiffening properties. Decay time relates to how pleasant a vehicle door sounds upon closing, and vibration level relates to how loud a roof boom noise may be perceived to be by vehicle occupants. If a surrogate panel could be used to evaluate decay time and vibration level, then a design of experiments (DOE) could be used to compare the effects of different factors on the system. The purpose of this paper is to show the effect of varying test factors on decay time and vibration level on a panel-beam system with viscoelastic material applied. The results were calculated using DOE software, and they were used to construct optimized systems for validation testing.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2228
Kalyan Chakravarthy Addepalli, Natalie Remisoski, Anthony Sleath, Shyiping Liu
Abstract Drivelines used in modern pickup trucks commonly employ universal joints. This type of joint is responsible for second driveshaft order vibrations in the vehicle. Large displacements of the joint connecting the driveline and the rear axle have a detrimental effect on vehicle NVH. As leaf springs are critical energy absorbing elements that connect to the powertrain, they are used to restrain large axle windup angles. One of the most common types of leaf springs in use today is the multi-stage parabolic leaf spring. A simple SAE 3-link approximation is adequate for preliminary studies but it has been found to be inadequate to study axle windup. A vast body of literature exists on modeling leaf springs using nonlinear FEA and multibody simulations. However, these methods require significant amount of component level detail and measured data. As such, these techniques are not applicable for quick sensitivity studies at design conception stage.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2079
Colin Hatch, Jason Moller, Eleftherios Kalochristianakis, Ian Roberts
Abstract The introduction of ice-phobic coatings promises to allow passive ice protection systems to be developed particularly for rotating systems such as propellers. The centrifugal force field combined with reduced adhesive strength can produce a self-shed capability limiting the amount of ice build-up. The size and shed time of ice shed from a propeller is predicted using a process that determines ice shape, ice growth rate and both internal and ice-structure interface stresses. A simple failure model is used to predict the onset of local failure and to propagate damage in the ice until local ice shedding is obtained. Recommendations are made on developing the model further.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2102
Guilin Lei, Wei Dong, Jianjun Zhu, Mei Zheng
Abstract The numerical simulation of ice melting process on an iced helicopter rotor blade is presented. The ice melting model uses an enthalpy-porosity formulation, and treats the liquid-solid mushy zone as a porous zone with porosity equal to the liquid fraction. The ice shape on the blade section is obtained by the icing code with a dynamic mesh module. Both of the temperature change and the ice-melting process on the rotor blade section surface are analyzed. The phenomenon of ice melting is analyzed through the change of temperature and liquid fraction on the abrasion/ice interface. The liquid fraction change as with time on the abrasion/ice surface is observed, which describes the ice-melting process well. The numerical results show that the ice melting process can be simulated effectively by the melting model. The de-icing process can be monitored by observing the change of the liquid fraction of the area around the abrasion/ice interface.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2103
Christian Bartels, Julien Cliquet, Carlos Bautista
Abstract In order to comply with applicable certification regulations, airframers have to demonstrate safe operation of their aircraft in icing conditions. Part of this demonstration is often a numerical prediction of the potential ice accretion on unprotected surfaces. The software ONICE2D, originally developed at the Office National d'Études et de Recherche Aérospatial (ONERA), is used at Airbus for predicting ice accretions on wing-like geometries. The original version of the software uses a flow solution of the 2D full-potential equation on a structured C-grid as basis for an ice accretion prediction. Because of known limitations of this approach, an interface was added between ONICE2D and TAU [6], a hybrid flow solver for the Navier-Stokes equations. The paper first details the approach selected to implement the interface to the hybrid flow solver TAU.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2121
Yong Chen, Liang Fu
Abstract In helicopter, the icing rotor blades will decrease the effectiveness of the helicopter and endanger the lives of the pilots. The asymmetrical ice break-up and shedding could also lead to severe vibrations of the rotor blade. Ice break-up from the main rotor may strike the fuselage and tail rotor, even worse, find its way into the engine, which may cause serious aircraft accidents. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for ice shedding process is necessary in order to optimize the helicopter rotor blade design and de-icing system to avoid hazardous ice shedding. In this paper, the ice shedding model is improved by introducing a bilinear cohesive zone model (CZM) to simulate the initiation and propagation of ice/blade interface crack. A maximum stress criterion is used to describe the failure occurred in the ice.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2163
Caio Fuzaro Rafael, Diogo Mendes Pio, Guilherme A. Lima da Silva
Abstract The present paper presents a validation of momentum boundary-layer integral solution and finite-volume Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results for skin friction around airfoils NACA 8H12 and MMB-V2 as well as heat transfer around an isothermal cylinder with rough surface. The objective is to propose a two-equation integral model and compare its predictions to results from a robust CFD tool, to experimental data and to results from a one-equation integral solution. The latter is the mathematical model used by classic 2D icing codes. All proposed model predictions are compared to CFD results for verification and, whenever possible, to experimental data for validation. The code-to-code verification brings reliability to both the proposed code and the CFD tool when there is no test data available.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 4240