Criteria

Text:
Content:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 4062
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Luciano Lukacs, Mahendra Dassanayake, Iuri Pepe
Abstract Nighttime driving behavior differs from that during the day because of unique scenarios presented in a driver's field of vision. At night drivers have to rely on their vehicle headlamps to illuminate the road to be able to see the environment and road conditions in front of him. In recent decades car illumination systems have undergone considerable technological advances such as the use of a Light Emitting Diode (LED) in Adaptive Front-lighting Systems (AFS), a breakthrough in lighting technology. This is rapidly becoming one of the most important innovative technologies around the world within the lighting community. This paper discusses driver's needs given the environment and road conditions using a survey applied to compare the needs of both truck and car drivers under different road conditions. The results show the potential and suitability of the methodology proposed for controlling truck-related lighting in any emergent market.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kambiz Jahani, Sajjad Beigmoradi
The efficiency of the vehicle cooling system strongly depends on the air flow through the radiator core. The flow through the radiator core in turn depends on other panels that are in the vicinity of the radiator. In this study, the effect of geometrical change at vehicle front-end including the whole bonnet, grille and bumper area is investigated by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Numerical modeling is carried out by means of CAE tools. Simulations are performed for maximum power and maximum torque conditions, monitoring the mass flow rate through the radiator core and velocity contribution over the radiator face. To the velocity field of the airflow, the heat exchangers are represented as porous media and fan module is modeled utilizing Multiple Reference Frame (MRF) approach. The validity of the developed simulation capability is tested by successful comparison with the available experimental data for the base model at the given operating conditions. On studying the model with complete new front-end style, local modifications are applied incorporating adding airguide, flap and anti-recycler in order to enhance the flow distribution in the vicinity of radiator and increase the mass flow rate passing through it.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jianlei Wang, William Bartow, Andres Moreyra, Gregory Woyczynski, Alexis Lefebvre, Edward Carrington, Gecheng Zha
1 This paper introduces and proves a novel automotive mirror base drag reduction method using passive jet flow control. The new concept is to open an inlet at the front part of the mirror, introduces the airflow via a converging duct, and ejects the jet surrounding the mirror surface at an angle toward the center of the mirror. The jet harnesses the energy from the free stream by jet mixing with the main flow via large coherent structures, entrains the main flow to energize the base flow, reduces the wake size and turbulence fluctuation, and ultimately significantly decreases the drag. Above phenomena are proved by wind tunnel testing with PIV and drag force measurement and CFD large eddy simulation (LES) calculation. Two jet mirrors with different inlet areas are studied. The jet mirror tunnel 1 has a smaller inlet area, and the jet mirror tunnel 2 has a 4.7 times larger inlet area. The wind tunnel testing is only done for the baseline and jet mirror tunnel 1. LES is used to study all the three mirror configurations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yingchao Zhang, Wei Ding, Yu Zhang
Abstract Automobile industry is facing the great challenge of energy conservation and emission reduction. It's necessary to do some researches on some surface components of a car body to find out which of them may affect aerodynamic drag remarkably. This will help an aerodynamic engineer modify an initial car model more clearly. We also hope to reduce the cost during the process, including time and resources. In this paper, with the purpose of developing an aerodynamic shape optimization process and realizing its automation, a MIRA reference car model was studied and three commercial softwares were integrated-Altair HyperStudy, HyperMesh and CD-adapco STAR-CCM+. The optimization strategy in this paper was: firstly, a DOE (design of experiment) matrix, which contained four design factors and thirty levels was created. The baseline model was morphed according to the DOE matrix. Then the morphed model's aerodynamic drag coefficient (Cd) and lift coefficient (Cl) were calculated via CFD software.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yan Jiang, Jingyan Liu, Qiming Chi, Fang Lu, Bo Li, Amanda Learned, Rui Song, Heinz Friz
Abstract The recent facelift of the Chinese version of the VW Bora incorporated several changes of the styling of the upper body. In particular, front facia, A-Pillar and rear end were subject to design changes. As major effects on the aerodynamics performance were not expected, extensive wind tunnel testing for the upper body design changes was not included in the development plan except for final performance evaluation. Nevertheless, an aerodynamic study of the effects of the design changes was undertaken using a CFD based process. At the same time, the facelift offered the opportunity for reducing the aerodynamic drag by improving the underbody flow. The design of the engine undercover and the wheel spoilers were considered in this effort. For this purpose the CFD based aerodynamic study was extended to include respective design features. The whole study was carried out using a response surface method as a mathematical model to characterize and understand the effects of the design changes and their interactions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mark E. Gleason, Todd Lounsberry, Khaled Sbeih, Sreekanth Surapaneni
Abstract Recently, the Two-Measurement correction method that yields a wake distortion adjustment for open jet wind tunnels has shown promise of being able to adjust for many of the effects of non-ideal static pressure gradients on bluff automotive bodies. Utilization of this adjustment has shown that a consistent drag results when the vehicle is subjected to the various gradients generated in open jet wind tunnels. What has been lacking is whether this consistent result is independent of the other tunnel interference effects. The studies presented here are intended to fill that gap and add more realistic model and wind tunnel conditions to the evaluations of the performance of the two-measurement technique. The subject CFD studies are designed to greatly reduce all wind tunnel interference effects except for the variation of the non-linear static pressure gradients. A zero gradient condition is generated by simulating a solid wall test section with a blockage ratio of 0.1%. The non-linear gradients are simulated using a semi-open jet test section with a very large 40 square meter nozzle exit and a variable length test section.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Adrian P. Gaylard, John Pitman, Jonathan Jilesen, Adriano Gagliardi, Bradley Duncan, John Wanderer, Alex Konstantinov
Contamination of vehicle rear surfaces is a significant issue for customers. Along with being unsightly, it can degrade the performance of rear camera systems and lighting, prematurely wear rear screens and wipers, and transfer soil to customers moving goods through the rear tailgate. Countermeasures, such as rear camera wash or automated deployment add expense and complexity for OEMs. This paper presents a rear surface contamination model for a fully detailed SUV based on the use of a highly-resolved time-accurate aerodynamic simulation realised through the use of a commercial Lattice-Boltzmann solver, combined with Lagrangian Particle Tracking to simulate droplet advection and surface water dynamics via a thin film model. Droplet break-up due to aerodynamic shear is included, along with splash and stripping from the surface film. The effect of two-way momentum coupling is included in a sub-set of simulations. The simulations are qualitatively validated in terms of surface contamination distribution against full scale (climatic) wind tunnel experiments using a UV fluorescent dye in water introduced onto dynamometer rollers.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Daichi Katoh, Kensuke Koremoto, Munetsugu Kaneko, Yoshimitsu Hashizume
An air-dam spoiler is commonly used to reduce aerodynamic drag in production vehicles. However, it inexplicably tends to show different performances between wind tunnel and coast-down tests. Neither the reason nor the mechanism has been clarified. We previously reported that an air-dam spoiler contributed to a change in the wake structure behind a vehicle. In this study, to clarify the mechanism, we investigated the coefficient of aerodynamic drag CD reduction effect, wake structure, and underflow under different boundary layer conditions by conducting wind tunnel tests with a rolling road system and constant speed on-road tests. We found that the air-dam spoiler changed the wake structure by deceleration of the underflow under stationary floor conditions. Accordingly, the base pressure was recovered by approximately 30% and, the CD value reduction effect was approximately 10%. The ratio of the base pressure recovery to the CD value reduction effect was approximately 90%, suggesting that the main mechanism is the base pressure recovery produced by changing the wake structure.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
L.A.Raghu Mutnuri, Sivapalan Senthooran, Robert Powell, Zen Sugiyama, David Freed
Abstract A computational approach to evaluate rear-view mirror performance on wind noise in cars is presented in this paper. As a comfort metric at high speeds, wind noise needs to be addressed, for it dominates interior noise at mid-high frequencies. The impetus on rear-view mirror design arises from its crucial role in the flow field and the resulting pressure fluctuations on the greenhouse panels. The motivation to adopt a computational approach arises from the need to evaluate mirror designs early in vehicle design process and thus in conjunction with different vehicle shapes. The current study uses a Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) based computational fluid dynamics(CFD) solver to predict the transient flow field and a statistical energy analysis(SEA) solver to predict interior noise contribution from the greenhouse panels. The accuracy of this computational procedure has been validated and published in the past. Realistic car geometry is chosen and the transient flow field around the vehicle resulting from mounting two different rear-view mirror designs is analyzed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Bingbing Nie, Qing Zhou, Yong Xia, Jisi Tang
Vehicle hood styling has significant influence on headform kinematics in assessment tests of pedestrian impact protection performance. Pedestrian headform kinematics on vehicle front-end models with different hood styling characteristics is analyzed based on finite element modeling. More elevated feature lines near hood boundary and the following continuous hood surface towards fender will result in a different headform motion. It can lead to larger deformation space, more rotation and earlier rebound of the headform impactor, which will benefit the head impact protection performance. In addition, hood geometry characteristics such as hood angle and curvature have effects on structural stiffness. Therefore, inclusion of considerations on pedestrian head protection into the vehicle hood styling design stage may lead to a more effective and efficient engineering design process on headform impact analysis.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dinesh Pahuja, Arpit Kapila, Sanjay Haldar, Sandeep Raina
Interiors of past vehicles were created to satisfy specific functions with appearance being a secondary consideration, but in the present & future market with ever increasing vehicle luxury, decoration of vehicle has become a prime focus in automobile industry along with the safety & economy. Automotive interiors have evolved over the years from a collection of trims covering bare sheet metal panels to add quality & richness of interior cabin, ultimately delivering greater value to customers. One such area in interiors is Side door trims serving the dual purpose of functionality and creating a pleasing environment too. The aesthetic appeal to the Side door trim is added usually through a Door trim insert having a decorative skin pasted on to the plastic base. And the selection of pasting technique for pasting decorative film on to the plastic base insert is a challenge for an automotive interior designer. The objective of this paper will be to review technologies available for manufacturing Door trim inserts with decorative skins, and discuss a direction toward selecting an appropriate pasting technique with cost effectiveness.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Enrique Bonugli, Jeffrey Wirth, James Funk, Joseph Cormier, Herbert Guzman, Lisa Gwin, Mark Freund
This paper reports on 76 quasi-static tests conducted to investigate the behavior of road vehicle bumper systems. The tests are a quasi-static replication of real world low speed collisions. The tests represented front to rear impacts between various vehicles. Force and deflection were captured in order to quantify the stiffness characteristics of the bumper-to-bumper system. A specialized test apparatus was constructed to position and load bumper systems into each other. The purpose was to replicate or exceed damage that occurred in actual collisions. The fixture is capable of positioning the bumpers in various orientations and generates forces up to 50 kips. Various bumper-to-bumper alignments were tested including full overlap, lateral offset, and override/underride configurations. Force and displacement were recorded and the data was analyzed to develop system stiffness and crush parameters. These parameters can be used in a collision-based model to calculate vehicle delta-v (ΔV) and acceleration.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nia R. Harrison, S. George Luckey
This work demonstrates the feasibility of hot stamping a B-pillar outer panel from aluminum alloy 7075. AA7075 is characterized by a high strength to weight ratio with yield strengths comparable to those of DP and TRIP advanced high strength steels. Applications using AA7075 have typically been limited to the aerospace industry due to the high variable cost associated with forming and joining of these materials. A primary key to implementation in the automotive industry is the development of metal forming methods that produce non-compromised stamped parts at automotive manufacturing volumes and costs. This work explores the feasibility of die quenching a hot blank within a cold die as a means of delivering high strength aluminum sheet parts. A die made from kirksite was used to evaluate the hot stamping process for a B-pillar outer. After the forming/quenching operation, the parts were subjected to an artificial aging process to regain the properties of the T6-temper. The results show that hot stamping, followed by an adequate artificial aging treatment, produces a high strength component with material properties equivalent to the as-received T6 properties delivered by the material sheet supplier.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mohamed Sithik, Rama Vallurupalli, Barry (Baizhong) Lin, Subash Sudalaimuthu
Abstract In recent trend, there is a huge demand for lightweight chassis frame, which improves fuel efficiency and reduces cost of the vehicle. Stiffness based optimization process is simple and straightforward while durability (life) based optimizations are relatively complex, time consuming due to a two-step (Stress then life) virtual engineering process and complicated loading history. However, durability performances are critical in chassis design, so a process of optimization with simplified approach has been developed. This study talks about the process of chassis frame weight optimization without affecting current durability performance where complex durability load cases are converted to equivalent static loadcases and life targets are cascaded down to simple stress target. Sheet metal gauges and lightening holes are the parameters for optimization studies. The optimization design space is constrained to chassis unique parts. The optimized design is verified for detailed load case and life target.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Takanobu Saito, Jiro Hiramoto, Toshiaki Urabe
Abstract A new topology analysis method was developed to optimize part shapes and the configuration of automotive components. Only solid elements are used in the conventional topology optimization method. The key point of the new method is to embed solid elements in a model made of shell elements. In this study, stiffness optimizations were carried out for a simple cylindrical model, automotive floor model and full vehicle model. Specifically, optimized automotive components were a center tunnel, a side-sill and a joint linking a side-member and a cross-member, which are made of steel sheets and have rectangular cross sections. The results show that the newly-developed topology optimization method is valuable in the optimization of automotive components which are made of steel sheets and have rectangular cross sections.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Aleksandar Jemcov, Darrin Stephens, Chris Sideroff
Abstract Adjoint equations for the incompressible turbulent Navier-Stokes equations are presented. The main characteristic of this adjoint formulation is that it is time symmetry preserving thus kinetic energy conservative. The newly formulated equations were applied to the computation of surface shape sensitivities of an Australian V8 supercar. Three cases for the shape sensitivity were considered: sensitivity of the body, mirror, and the rear wing of the vehicle. Shape derivatives indicated that regions of large curvature, sudden changes and sharp features are responsible for the majority of the surface force sensitivity. Vector plots show the direction of change in shape required to increase the surface force. In addition, examining the rear wing shape derivatives reveal a close correlation to the flow features.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Thomas Liebetrau, Roland Fiederling, Maximilian Vogl, Dieter Stephan Parth
Abstract Glare-free high beams are a consistent enhancement of adaptive headlight systems for vehicles with advanced driver assist systems. A prerequisite for these are camera-based systems with the ability to recognize and classify objects such as vehicles in front or oncoming vehicles when driving at night. These objects can then be dynamically masked out of the high beam of the specially designed headlights. Since we are talking about moving objects, it is essential for the high beam to be continuously and dynamically adapted. This paper describes a modular LED matrix system for dynamically adjusting a glare-free and continuously active high beam. The main focus was on the modularity of the system and the optimization of the thermal properties of an LED matrix in order to ensure that operation was reliable under the harsh environmental conditions inside a headlight. Specific control electronics and different interconnection methods were examined. The results were worked out within the scope of a development project funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), which is part of the European SEEL (Solutions for Energy Efficient Lighting) research project within the joint CATRENE project (CA502).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nicholas P. Skinner, John D. Bullough
Abstract Rear automotive lighting systems employing dynamic features such as sweeping or flashing are not commonly used on vehicles in North America, in part because they are not clearly addressed in vehicle lighting regulations. Nor is there abundant evidence suggesting they have a substantial role to play in driver safety. The results of a human factors investigation of the potential impacts of dynamic rear lighting systems on driver responses are summarized and discussed in the context of safety, visual effectiveness and the present regulatory context.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Rainer Neumann
Abstract Since 2012, adaptive driving beam (ADB) was homologated first in the ECE world (ECE 123). The idea behind is a camera based lighting system, which enables the driver to achieve at night nearly high beam visibility without glaring oncoming or proceeding vehicles and road users. Once the presence of other vehicles is detected the headlamps change the light pattern and block the light where the oncoming or proceeding vehicles are located. Light sources are typically High Intensity Discharge (HID) bulbs, but today also first LED applications are visible. For SAE, the definition of the parameters and the requested regulation changes to allow such systems are in progress. The paper reports about an extensive study executed in Germany at TU Darmstadt to investigate not only the improvement in visibility for the driver with such systems, but also evaluate the disability and discomfort glare for other road users. The results are demonstrating clearly, that the existing ADB systems do not cause additional glare for the road users and also do not lead to an increased subjective discomfort glare rating.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Timothy W. Brooks, Don Gramlich
Abstract A new method to package “inorganic” light emitting diode (LED) chips has been developed that creates a lamp that allows new design concepts for automotive lighting. The lamp is a flexible, very thin LED lamp that can be powered directly from a vehicle's 12 volt system. The technology is a laminated light of inorganic LEDs. This paper provides a background, the capability and example applications of this new technology as it relates to the vehicle transportation market. The unique benefits of a laminated LED lamp will be presented with reliability and performance results.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
John D. Bullough
Abstract Present standards for vehicle forward lighting specify two headlamp beam patterns: a low beam when driving in the presence of other nearby vehicles, and a high beam when there is not a concern for producing glare to other drivers. Adaptive lighting technologies such as curve lighting systems with steerable headlamps may be related to increments in safety according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, but isolating the effects of lighting is difficult. Recent analyses suggest that visibility improvements from adaptive curve lighting systems might reduce nighttime crashes along curves by 2%-3%. More advanced systems such as adaptive high-beam systems that reduce high-beam headlamp intensity toward oncoming drivers are not presently allowed in the U.S. The purpose of the present study is to analyze visual performance benefits and quantify potential safety benefits from adaptive high-beam headlamp systems. Before adaptive high-beam systems could be permitted on U.S. roadways, it is necessary to have data describing their potential for crash reductions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mitsuhiro Uchida, Yasushi Kita, Takako Minoda(Kimura), Ryuji Ueki, Shoko Kawanobe
Abstract LEDs offer great advantages such as low power consumption and compact size. In addition to the physical benefits, however, they also boast 1.2times the feeling of brightness compared with halogen bulbs, as shown in previous research, and the colors of LED sources have been shown to stand out better than other sources (halogen and HID) used for traffic signs, offering superior perceived Clarity and sharpness. As well as traffic signs, it is essential to be able to see pavement markings clearly when driving an automobile. In this study, tests were carried out on public roadways using automobiles installed with halogen, HID and LED-based headlamps. It was found that the LED sources were found to provide the clearest illumination of the white lines. White lines on an actual road surface were also illuminated with halogen, HID and LED lamps in order to compare the effects of these sources on the visibility of the white lines by static evaluation. The results indicate that the LED sources provided a greater improvement in the visibility of the white lines than the other (halogen and HID) sources.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
James Funk, Enrique Bonugli, Herbert Guzman, Mark Freund
It has been proposed that low speed collisions in which the damage is isolated to the bumper systems can be reconstructed using data from customized quasistatic testing of the bumper systems of the involved vehicles. In this study, 10 quasistatic bumper tests were conducted on 7 vehicle pairs involved in front-to-rear collisions. The data from the quasistatic bumper tests were used to predict peak bumper force, vehicle accelerations, velocity changes, dynamic combined crush, restitution, and crash pulse time for a given impact velocity. These predictions were compared to the results measured by vehicle accelerometers in 12 dynamic crash tests at impact velocities of 2 - 10 mph. The average differences between the predictions using the quasistatic bumper data and the dynamic crash test accelerometer data were within 5% for bumper force, peak acceleration, and velocity change, indicating that the quasistatic bumper testing method had no systematic bias compared to dynamic crash testing.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vesna Savic, Matthew Pawlicki, Paul Krajewski, Mark Voss, Louis Hector, Keith Snavely
Abstract Global regulations intended to enhance pedestrian protection in a vehicle collision, thereby reducing the severity of pedestrian injuries, are presenting significant challenges to vehicle designers. Vehicle hoods, for example, must absorb a significant amount of energy over a small area while precluding impact with a hard engine compartment component. In this paper, a simple passive approach for pedestrian protection is introduced in which thin metal alloy sheets are bent to follow a C-shaped cross-sectional profile thereby giving them energy absorbing capacity during impact when affixed to the underside of a hood. Materials considered were aluminum (6111-T4, 5182-O) and magnesium (AZ31-O, AZ61-O, ZEK100) alloys. To evaluate the material effect on the head injury criterion (HIC) score without a hood, each C-channel absorber was crushed in a drop tower test using a small dart. Two high speed cameras captured dart image data before and during impact from which HIC scores were computed with stereo digital image correlation (DIC).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Simon B. Albrodt, Fadi Tahan, Kennerly Digges
Abstract Different roof strength methods are applied on the 2003 Ford Explorer finite element (FE) model to achieve the current Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 216 requirements. Two different modification approaches are utilized. Additionally, the best design of each approach is tested dynamically, in rollover and side impact simulations. In the first approach, several roll cage designs are integrated in all pillars, roof cross-members, and in the side roof rails. A roll cage design with a strength-to-weight ratio (SWR) of 3.58 and 3.40 for driver and passenger sides, respectively, with a weight penalty of 18.54 kg is selected for dynamic test assessments. The second approach investigates different localized reinforcements to achieve a more reasonable weight penalty. A localized reinforcement of the B-pillar alone with a tube meets the new FMVSS 216 requirements with a weight penalty of 4.52 kg and is selected for dynamic analyses. The two selected reinforcement designs are tested in a dynamic unconstrained rollover crash under different pitch angles while using common rollover initial conditions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Madhav Khadilkar
Abstract The purpose of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 216 is to reduce fatalities and serious injuries when vehicle roof crushes into occupant compartment during rollover crash. Upgraded roof crush resistance standard (571.216a Standard No. 216a) requires vehicle to achieve maximum applied force of 3.0 times unloaded vehicle weight (UVW) on both driver and passenger sides of the roof. (For vehicles with gross vehicle weight rating ≤ 6,000 lb.) This paper provides an overview of current approach for dual side roof strength Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and its limitations. It also proposes a new approach based on powerful features available in virtual tools. In the current approach, passenger side loading follows driver side loading and requires two separate analyses before arriving at final assessment. In the proposed approach only one analysis suffices as driver and passenger side loadings are combined in a single analysis. This is achieved by using sensors to control loadings, resulting in reduced consumption of CPU time (for computer simulation) and disk space utilization without compromising accuracy of current approach.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Santosh Uttam Bhise, Meyyappan Valliappan
Abstract This paper highlights a simplified CAE model technique, which can simulate and predict door crush strength performance quickly. Such quick models can be used for DFSS and Design change studies. The proposed method suggests an equivalent sub model technique using only the door beam with tuned stiffness end springs to predict FMVSS214S full vehicle crush performance. Such models can be solved in minutes and hence very useful for DFSS studies during product design. The proposed method can be used to finalize door beam design for identical size of vehicle doors to meet required FMVSS214S crush performance. The paper highlights the door beam end springs tuning for identical size of cars and SUVs. Four vehicles were considered for the study. A single spring F-D (force -displacement) is tuned which correlated well for frond door of all the four vehicles. A separate unique spring F-D was needed which correlated well for rear door of all the 4 vehicles.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
James Nelsen, Chang Su Seo
Abstract This paper outlines an improved methodology to perform calculations to verify the compliance of automotive door latch systems to minimum legal requirements as well as to perform additional due diligence calculations necessary to comprehend special cases such as roll over crashes and locally high inertial loadings. This methodology builds on the calculation method recommended by SAE J839 and provides a robust and clear approach for application of this method to cable release systems, which were not prevalent at the time J839 was originally drafted. This method is useful in and of itself but its utility is further increased by the application of the method to a Computer Aided Design (CAD) template (in this case for Catia V5), that allows some automation of the calculation process for a given latch type. This will result in a savings of time, fewer errors and allows for an iterative concurrent analysis during the design process.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Cornelius Pfeifer
Abstract Automotive manufacturers are looking for ways to reduce the CO2 emissions of their vehicle fleet. Increasingly, OEMs are focusing on intelligent air flap systems, which enable high cooling capacity through maximum air flow when they are in an open position. In a closed position, they reduce drag and the time necessary to bring the engine up to operating temperatures. Electric vehicles like the Tesla S benefit from Röchling's Active Grille Shutters (AGS) with a total of four independently controlled flap systems and the new generation of actuators. The module extends the driving range through improved aerodynamics and ensures optimized battery cooling and temperature control. Maximum benefit can be achieved if the controlled air flap systems are mounted right in the front to optimize aerodynamics. While adaptive air flap systems are increasingly used to improve aerodynamics today, they can be a key component of a future thermoacoustic engine encapsulation. This presentation is giving an overview about the current active grille shutter systems as well as a prospect for further CO2 reduction when integrated into a thermoacoustic engine encapsulation.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Asya Gabbasa, Badih Jawad, Liping Liu, Selin Arslan, Andrew Gerhart
Abstract This work studies an optimization tool for 2D and 3D a multi-element airfoil which utilizes the power of CFD solver of a Shape Optimizer package to find the most optimal shape of multi-element airfoil as per designer's requirement. The optimization system coupled with Fluent increases the utilization and the importance of CFD solver. This work focuses on combining the high fidelity commercial CFD tools (Fluent) with numerical optimization techniques to morph high lift system. In this work strategy we performed morphing (grid deformation) directly inside the Fluent code without rebuilding geometry and the mesh with an external tool. Direct search method algorithms such as the Simplex, Compass, and Torczon are used; Navier-Stokes equations were solved for turbulent, incompressible flow using k-epsilon model and SIMPLE algorithm using the commercial code ANSYS Fluent. Detailed studies are done on take-off/landing flight conditions; a number of different built-in optimization algorithms and the way to best employ them are investigated.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 4062

Filter