Criteria

Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 3388
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1924
Praveen Kumar, Vivek KV Shenoy, Nareen Kinthala, Srikanth Sudhir
Abstract Plenum is the part located between the front windshield and the bonnet of an automobile . It is primarily used as an air inlet to the HVAC during fresh air mode operation. It’s secondary functions include water drainage, aesthetic cover to hide the gap between windshield to bonnet, concealing wiper motors and mechanisms etc. The plenum consists mainly two sub parts viz. upper plenum and lower plenum. Conventional plenum design which is found in majority of global OEMs employ a plastic upper plenum and a metal lower plenum which spans across the entire width of engine compartment. This conventional lower plenum is bulky, consumes more packaging space and has more weight. In this paper, we propose a novel design for the plenum lower to overcome above mentioned limitations of the conventional design. This novel design employs a dry and wet box concept for its working and is made up of complete plastic material.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1966
Praveen Kumar, Nareen Kinthala, Sri Viknesh Mohan, Harshad Bornare
Abstract 3D Printing is a revolutionizing technology extensively used in automotive and aerospace industries. It is an additive layer manufacturing process by which a scale model is quickly fabricated from CAD data in just a matter of hours. In Automotive trims, 3D Printing technology is a boon. It is used: To simulate the ‘tooled up/production part’ in terms of assembly, defined function, limited CMF and fit & finish. To evaluate and capture early feedback from top management with respect to aesthetic, design, etc. For early prediction and plan of action towards improvement for craftsmanship. To reduce design iterations, interface concerns, product lifecycle time and cost. In this paper, we will discuss on the technical aspects of how the trims 3D printed models have been effectively put to use. We have covered case studies under door trims, floor console, tail gate trim, glove box latch, molded spare wheel cover, Instrumental panel duct and bumper mask-painting template.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1784
Guillaume Baudet
Abstract Wind noise in automobile is becoming more and more important as customer requirements increase. On the other hand great progress has been made on engine and road noises. Thus, for many vehicles, wind noise is the major acoustic source during road and motorway driving. As for other noises, automobile manufacturers must be able for a new car project to specify, calculate and measure each step of the acoustic cascading: Source Transfers, both solid and air borne In the case of automotive wind noise, the excitation source is the dynamic pressure on the vehicle’s panels. This part of the cascading is the one influenced by the exterior design. Even if many others components (panels, seals, cabin trims) have a big influence, the exterior design is a major issue for the wind noise. The wind noise level in the cabin can sometimes change significantly with only a small modification of the exterior design.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1807
Richard DeJong, Gordon Ebbitt
Abstract The SEA model of wind noise requires the quantification of both the acoustic as well as the turbulent flow contributions to the exterior pressure. The acoustic pressure is difficult to measure because it is usually much lower in amplitude than the turbulent pressure. However, the coupling of the acoustic pressure to the surface vibration is usually much stronger than the turbulent pressure, especially in the acoustic coincidence frequency range. The coupling is determined by the spatial matching between the pressure and the vibration which can be described by the wavenumber spectra. This paper uses measured vibration modes of a vehicle window to determine the coupling to both acoustic and turbulent pressure fields and compares these to the results from an SEA model. The interior acoustic intensity radiating from the window during road tests is also used to validate the results.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1814
Todd Tousignant, Kiran Govindswamy, Vikram Bhatia, Shivani Polasani, W Keith Fisher
Abstract The automotive industry continues to develop technologies for reducing vehicle fuel consumption. Specifically, vehicle lightweighting is expected to be a key enabler for achieving fleet CO2 reduction targets for 2025 and beyond. Hybrid glass laminates that incorporate fusion draw and ion exchange innovations are thinner and thereby, offer more than 30% weight reduction compared to conventional automotive laminates. These lightweight hybrid laminates provide additional benefits, including improved toughness and superior optics. However, glazing weight reduction leads to an increase in transmission of sound through the laminates for certain frequencies. This paper documents a study that uses a systematic test-based approach to understand the sensitivity of interior vehicle noise behavior to changes in acoustic attenuation driven by installation of lightweight glass.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1812
Steven Sorenson, Gordon Ebbitt, Scott Smith, Todd Remtema
Abstract In an effort to reduce mass, future automotive bodies will feature lower gage steel or lighter weight materials such as aluminum. An unfortunate side effect of lighter weight bodies is a reduction in sound transmission loss (TL). For barrier based systems, as the total system mass (including the sheet metal, decoupler, and barrier) goes down the transmission loss is reduced. If the reduced surface density from the sheet metal is added to the barrier, however, performance can be restored (though, of course, this eliminates the mass savings). In fact, if all of the saved mass from the sheet metal is added to the barrier, the TL performance may be improved over the original system. This is because the optimum performance for a barrier based system is achieved when the sheet metal and the barrier have equal surface densities. That is not the case for standard steel constructions where the surface density of the sheet metal is higher than the barrier.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1751
Nicolas Schaefer, Bart Bergen, Tomas Keppens, Wim Desmet
Abstract The continuous pursuit for lighter, more affordable and more silent cars, has pushed OEMs into optimizing the design of car components. The different panels surrounding the car interior cavity such as firewall, door or floor panels are of key importance to the NV performance. The design of the sound packages for high-frequency airborne input is well established. However, the design for the mid-frequency range is more difficult, because of the complex inputs involved, the lack of representative performance metrics and its high computational cost. In order to make early decisions for package design, performance maps based on the different design parameters are desired for mid-frequencies. This paper presents a framework to retrieve the response surface, from a numerical design space of finite-element frequency sweeps. This response surface describes the performance of a sound package against the different design variables.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1760
Weimin Thor, J. Stuart Bolton
Abstract Due the increasing concern with the acoustic environment within automotive vehicles, there is an interest in measuring the acoustical properties of automotive door seals. These systems play an important role in blocking external noise sources, such as aerodynamic noise and tire noise, from entering the passenger compartment. Thus, it is important to be able to conveniently measure their acoustic performance. Previous methods of measuring the ability of seals to block sound required the use of either a reverberation chamber, or a wind tunnel with a special purpose chamber attached to it. That is, these methods required the use of large and expensive facilities. A simpler and more economical desktop procedure is thus needed to allow easy and fast acoustic measurement of automotive door seals.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1886
Siwen Zhang, Jian Pang, Jun Zhang, Zhuangzhuang Ma, Xiaoxuan Zhang, Congguang Liu, Lihui Deng
Abstract A subjective evaluation method for the air-borne sound insulation of vehicle body in reverberation room is developed and the correlation between the subjective preference and objective noise reduction level (NRL) is investigated in this paper. The stationary vehicle's interior noise is recorded by using a digital artificial head under a given white noise excitation in the reverberation room, which demonstrates more credible than those in traditional road test methods. The recorded noises of six different vehicles are replayed and evaluated subjectively by 22 appraisers in a sound quality room. The paired comparison scoring method is employed and the check and statistic methods for the subjective scores are introduced. The subjective preference is introduced and calculated by the statistics and normalization of the effective scores, which can indicate an overall preference ranking of all the six vehicles numerically.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1859
Filip Franek, Jungu Kang, Jeon Uk, Sunguk Choi
Abstract Structure-born vibrations are often required to be localized in a complex structure, but in such dispersive medium, the vibration wave propagates with speed dependent on frequency. This property of solid materials causes an adverse effect for localization of vibrational events. The cause behind such phenomenon is that the propagating wave envelope changes its phase delay and amplitude in time and space as it travels in dispersive medium. This problem was previously approached by filtering a signal to focus on frequencies of the wave propagating with a similar speed, with improved accuracy of cross-correlation results. However, application of this technique has not been researched for localization of vibrational sources. In this work we take advantage of filtering prior to cross-correlation calculation while using multiple sensors to indicate an approximate location of vibration sources.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1855
Ramakanta Routaray
Abstract The basic function of a motorcycle frame is somewhat similar to that of the skeleton in the human body, i.e. to hold together the different parts in one rigid structure. One of the major benefits (for a motorcycle enthusiast) of using an advanced frame design lies in the sporty handling characteristics of the bike. A well designed frame can add to the joy of riding a motorcycle as the bike would feel more stable, effortless, and confident around corners, in straight lines and while braking. A well approved modeling [2] techniques or adequate guide line principles have to be followed while designing the body and chassis in order to achieve the vibration within control. This paper depicts a methodological right approach (guide lines) while designing the body and chassis of a two wheeler in order to control noise and vibration of the body and chassis.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1849
Laurent Gagliardini, Romain Leneveu, Aurélien Cloix, Alexandre Durr
Abstract The door response to audio excitation contributes to the overall performance of the audio system on several items. First, acting as a cabinet, it influences the loudspeaker response. Second, due to the door trim inner panel radiation, the radiated power is disturbed. A third effect is the regular occurrence of squeak and rattle, that will not be considered at this stage. Design issues regarding these attributes are numerous, from the loudspeaker design to door structure and trim definition. Modeling then appears as an unavoidable tool to handle the acoustic response of the loudspeaker in its actual surrounding.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1842
Akin Oktav, Cetin Yilmaz, Gunay Anlas
Abstract To prevent trunk lid slam noise, reactive openings are used in the trunk cavities of passenger vehicles. In sedans, the trunk cavity and the cabin cavity are coupled acoustically through the discontinuities on the parcel shelf and/or the rear seat. In such a case, these openings behave as necks of a Helmholtz resonator, which in turn change the acoustic response of the system. In this study, the Helmholtz resonator effect of the trunk cavity is discussed analytically through a simplified cavity model. A case study, where the acoustic response of a sedan is analyzed through a computational model considering the resonator effect is also given. Sound pressure levels show that instant pressure drops and damping effects observed in the acoustic response can be explained with the resonator effect. Results obtained from the computational model of the sedan are verified with the track test measurements.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1788
Kishore Chand Ulli, Upender Rao Gade
Abstract Automotive window buffeting is a source of vehicle occupant’s discomfort and annoyance. Original equipment manufacturers (OEM) are using both experimental and numerical methods to address this issue. With major advances in computational power and numerical modelling, it is now possible to model complex aero acoustic problems using numerical tools like CFD. Although the direct turbulence model LES is preferred to simulate aero-acoustic problems, it is computationally expensive for many industrial applications. Hybrid turbulence models can be used to model aero acoustic problems for industrial applications. In this paper, the numerical modelling of side window buffeting in a generic passenger car is presented. The numerical modelling is performed with the hybrid turbulence model Scale Adaptive Simulation (SAS) using a commercial CFD code.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1765
Albert Allen, Noah Schiller, Jerry Rouse
Abstract Corrugated-core sandwich structures with integrated acoustic resonator arrays have been of recent interest for launch vehicle noise control applications. Previous tests and analyses have demonstrated the ability of this concept to increase sound absorption and reduce sound transmission at low frequencies. However, commercial aircraft manufacturers often require fibrous or foam blanket treatments for broadband noise control and thermal insulation. Consequently, it is of interest to further explore the noise control benefit and trade-offs of structurally integrated resonators when combined with various degrees of blanket noise treatment in an aircraft-representative cylindrical fuselage system. In this study, numerical models were developed to predict the effect of broadband and multi-tone structurally integrated resonator arrays on the interior noise level of cylindrical vibroacoustic systems.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1813
James M. Jonza, Thomas Herdtle, Jeffrey Kalish, Ronald Gerdes, Taewook Yoo, Georg Eichhorn
Abstract The aerospace industry has employed sandwich composite panels (stiff skins and lightweight cores) for over fifty years. It is a very efficient structure for rigidity per unit weight. For the automobile industry, we have developed novel thermoplastic composite panels that may be heated and shaped by compression molding or thermoforming with cycle times commensurate with automotive manufacturing line build rates. These panels are also readily recycled at the end of their service life. As vehicles become lighter to meet carbon dioxide emission targets, it becomes more challenging to maintain the same level of quietness in the vehicle interior. Panels with interconnected honeycomb cells and perforations in one skin have been developed to absorb specific noise frequencies. The absorption results from a combination and interaction of Helmholtz and quarter wave resonators.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1830
Thomas Haase, Henning Bühmann, Martin Radestock, Hans Peter Monner
Abstract Due to the strengthened CO2 and NOx regulations, future vehicles have to be lightweight and efficient. But, lightweight structures are prone to vibrations and radiate sound efficiently. Therefore, many active control approaches are studied to lower noise radiation besides the passive methods. One active approach for reducing sound radiation from structures is the active structural acoustic control (ASAC). Since the early 90’s, several theoretical studies regarding ASAC systems were presented, but only very little experimental investigations can be found for this alternative to passive damping solutions. The theoretical simulations show promising results of ASAC systems compared to active vibration control approaches. So, for that reason in this paper an experiment is conducted to investigate the performance of an ASAC system in the frequency range up to 600 Hz.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1806
Laurent Gagliardini
Abstract The input mobility is a crucial structural parameter regarding vibro-acoustic design of industrial objects. Whatever the frequency range, the vibrational power input into a structure -and consequently the average structural-acoustic response- is governed by the input mobility. When packaging structure-borne noise sources, the knowledge of the input mobility at the source connection points is mandatory for noise control. The input mobility is classically computed at the required points as a specific Frequency Response Function (FRF). During an industrial design process, the choice of connection points requires an a priori knowledge of the input mobility at every possible location of the studied structure-borne source, i.e. a mapping of the input mobility. The classical FRF computation at every Degree Of Freedom (DOF) of the considered structure would lead to consider millions of load cases which is beyond current computational limits.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1775
Mark A. Gehringer, Robert Considine, David Schankin
Abstract This paper describes recently developed test methods and instrumentation to address the specific noise and vibration measurement challenges posed by large-diameter single-piece tubular aluminum propeller (prop) shafts with high modal density. The prop shaft application described in this paper is a light duty truck, although the methods described are applicable to any rotating shaft with similar dynamic properties. To provide a practical example of the newly developed methods and instrumentation, impact FRF data were acquired in-situ for two typical prop shafts of significantly different diameter, in both rotating and stationary conditions. The example data exhibit features that are uniquely characteristic of large diameter single-piece tubular shafts with high modal density, including the particular effect of shaft rotation on the measurements.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1876
Weiyun Liu, David W. Herrin, Emanuele Bianchini
Abstract Microperforated panel absorbers are best considered as the combination of the perforate and the backing cavity. They are sometimes likened to Helmholtz resonators. This analogy is true in the sense that they are most effective at the resonant frequencies of the panel-cavity combination when the particle velocity is high in the perforations. However, unlike traditional Helmholtz resonators, microperforated absorbers are broader band and the attenuation mechanism is dissipative rather than reactive. It is well known that the cavity depth governs the frequency bands of high absorption. The work presented here focuses on the development, modeling and testing of novel configurations of backing constructions and materials. These configurations are aimed at both dialing in the absorption properties at specific frequencies of interest and creating broadband sound absorbers. In this work, several backing cavity strategies are considered and evaluated.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1852
Satyajeet P. Deshpande, Pranab Saha, Kerry Cone
Abstract Most of NVH related issues start from the vibration of structures where often the vibration near resonance frequencies radiates the energy in terms of sound. This phenomenon is more problematic at lower frequencies by structureborne excitation from powertrain or related components. This paper discusses a laboratory based case study where different visco-elastic materials were evaluated on a bench study and then carried on to a system level evaluation. A body panel with a glazing system was used to study both airborne and structureborne noise radiation. System level studies were carried out using experimental modal analysis to shift and tune the mode shapes of the structure using visco-elastic materials with appropriate damping properties to increase the sound transmission loss. This paper discusses the findings of the study where the mode shapes of the panel were shifted and resulted in an increase in sound transmission loss.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1825
Takenori Miyamoto, Hiroshi Yokoyama, Akiyoshi Iida
Abstract Intense aeroacoustic feedback noises may radiate from flow around an airfoil, rearview mirror with small gaps and so on. Reductions of these noises are important issues in the development of industrial application. The intense noise from a bonnet of the automobile is one of the typical problems of acoustic feedback noise. In order to reduce this noise, plasma actuator (PA) was utilized to control flow and acoustic fields. The aim of this investigation is to clarify the effects of flow control by the PA on noise reduction and the noise reduction mechanism. Wind tunnel experiments were conducted with a half scale bonnet model and a low noise wind tunnel. Simultaneous measurements of flow and noise fields were conducted to understand the generation mechanism of the bonnet noise. Coherent output power (COP) of the velocity fluctuations with reference to far-field sound pressure was measured to visualize noise source distribution.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1468
Do Hoi KIm
Previous work identified a relationship between vehicle drop and dummy injury under the high-speed frontal impact condition [1]. The results showed that vehicle drop greater than 60mm made the dummy injury worse. Moreover, that work identified the front side member as the crucial part affecting the vehicle drop. In this study, the body structure mechanism was studied to reduce vehicle drop by controlling the front side member, shotgun, and A-pillar. By analyzing full vehicles, it was recognized that the arch shape of the front side member was very important. Furthermore, if the top of the arch shape of front side member, shotgun, and A-pillar were connected well, then the body deformation energy could lift the lower part of A-pillar, effectively reducing vehicle drop. This structure design concept is named “Body Lift Structure” (BLS). The BLS was applied to B and C segment platforms. Additionally, a “Ring” shape was defined by the front side member, dash panel, and A-pillar.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1725
Tanawat Tessathan, Chutiphon Thammasiri, Prabhath De Silva, Rehan Hussain, Nuksit Noomwongs
Abstract It is common for users of commuting passenger cars in Thailand to use the vehicle’s HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning) system predominantly in recirculation (REC) mode. This minimizes the compressor work, thereby saving fuel, and reduces dust and odor infiltration into the vehicle cabin. The car windows are rarely opened for ventilation purposes, except for exchanges at service stations such as garage entrances and tollway booths. As such, there are few opportunities for fresh air to enter the cabin with the consequent accumulation of CO2 in vehicle cabins due to occupants’ exhalations being well documented. Field experiments conducted showed that the in-vehicle CO2 concentrations could reach up to 15 times that of the ambient concentration level during typical city commutes. Preliminary experiments were also conducted to quantify the air exchanges between the cabin and the ambient when the doors are opened for occupant egression.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1737
Piyapong Premvaranon, Jenwit Soparat, Apichart Teralapsuwan, Sutee Olarnrithinun
Abstract Beyond the modern design and illumination quality of automotive lamps, thermal management plays a crucial role and must be fulfilled in the early stages of the design process. An excessive thermal radiation from incandescent bulb can cause a severe thermal degradation of plastic parts such as housing or optical lens. Hence, to assess such impact of heat on the plastic parts, thermal analysis of a license plate lamp was investigated by a proposed technique combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and ray tracing mapping method. Then, the accuracy and computational cost of the method were compared with thermal results obtained by a thermal radiation model using Monte Carlo (MC) technique for calculating radiation effect coupled with CFD in heat transfer analysis. Finally, a comparison of temperature results from both techniques were validated with practical thermal measurements of license plate lamp prototype.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1529
Nicholas Simmonds, John Pitman, Panagiotis Tsoutsanis, Karl Jenkins, Adrian Gaylard, Wilko Jansen
Abstract Cooling drag, typically known as the difference in drag coefficient between open and closed cooling configurations, has traditionally proven to be a difficult flow phenomenon to predict using computational fluid dynamics. It was seen as an academic yardstick before the advent of grille shutter systems. However, their introduction has increased the need to accurately predict the drag of a vehicle in a variety of different cooling configurations during vehicle development. This currently represents one of the greatest predictive challenges to the automotive industry due to being the net effect of many flow field changes around the vehicle. A comprehensive study is presented in the paper to discuss the notion of defining cooling drag as a number and to explore its effect on three automotive models with different cooling drag deltas using the commercial CFD solvers; STARCCM+ and Exa PowerFLOW.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1531
Keiichi Taniguchi, Akiyoshi Shibata, Mikako Murakami, Munehiko Oshima
Abstract This paper describes a study of drag reduction devices for production pick-up trucks with a body-on-frame structure using full-scale wind tunnel testing and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. First, the flow structure around a pick-up truck was investigated and studied, focusing in particular on the flow structure between the cabin and tailgate. It was found that the flow structure around the tailgate was closely related to aerodynamic drag. A low drag flow structure was found by flow analysis, and the separation angle at the roof end was identified as being important to achieve the flow structure. While proceeding with the development of a new production model, a technical issue of the flow structure involving sensitivity to the vehicle velocity was identified in connection with optimization of the roof end shape. (1)A tailgate spoiler was examined for solving this issue.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1538
Jiaye Gan, Longxian Li, Gecheng Zha, Craig Czlapinski
Abstract This paper conducts numerical simulation and wind tunnel testing to demonstrate the passive flow control jet boat tail (JBT) drag reduction technique for a heavy duty truck rear view mirror. The JBT passive flow control technique is to introduce a flow jet by opening an inlet in the front of a bluff body, accelerate the jet via a converging duct and eject the jet at an angle toward the center of the base surface. The high speed jet flow entrains the free stream flow to energize the base flow, increase the base pressure, reduces the wake size, and thus reduce the drag. A baseline heavy duty truck rear view mirror is used as reference. The mirror is then redesigned to include the JBT feature without violating any of the variable mirror position geometric constraints and internal control system volume requirement. The wind tunnel testing was conducted at various flow speed and yaw angles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1341
Alok Kumar, Sandeep Sharma
Abstract Public conveyance such as a bus is a major contributor to socio - economic development of any geography. The international market for passenger bus needed to be made viable in terms of passenger comfort, minimum operational costs of the fleet by reduced fuel consumption through light weighting and yet robust enough to meet stringent safety requirements. Optimized design of bus body superstructure plays vital role in overall performance and safety, which necessitates to evaluate bus structure accurately during initial phase of design. This paper presents a robust methodology in numerical simulation for enhancing the structural characteristics of a bus body with simultaneous reduction in the weight by multi-material optimization while supplemented with sensitivity and robustness analysis. This approach ensures significant reduction in vehicle curb weight with promising design stiffness.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1342
Nicolas Zagorski, Eric Nelson, Ari Caliskan, Allen Li
Abstract The use of structural optimization in the design of automotive structures is increasingly common. However, it is often challenging to apply these methods simultaneously for different requirements or model configurations. Multi-model optimization (MMO) aims to simplify the iterative design process associated with optimizing multiple parts or configurations with common design variables especially when conflicting requirements exist. In this paper, the use of MMO is demonstrated to evaluate the feasibility of an automotive door concept using an alternative material.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 3388

Filter