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Viewing 4651 to 4662 of 4662
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210010
CHARLES A. HEERGEIST
Automobile body building derives its origin from carriage body building, which was highly developed before automobiles were thought of. The introduction of automobile bodies fitted to a metal frame changed body builders' rules and calculations. The influence of the metal frame is discussed briefly and the limiting sizes of body members are considered also. According to the ideas expressed, the weight of bodies can be reduced if the metal frame is designed so as to support the weight of the passengers and the body. The dead-weight also can be reduced if the frame is built in proportion to the amount of weight carried, the number of passengers and the style of bodies being considered. But in the construction of enclosed bodies, as in sedans, coaches and broughams, very little weight can be saved if stability, durability and lasting quality are to be retained.
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210007
KINGSTON FORBES
The field of body engineering is broader than it is ordinarily considered to be; the author's intention is to bring to the attention of the automotive industry the breadth and scope of body engineering and outline the way this side of the industry can be considered and developed. After describing the body engineer's position, the author then discusses at some length the conflict between art and economy in this connection. He classifies a body-engineering department under the six main divisions of body construction, open and closed; sheet metal, body metal, fenders, hood, radiators and the like; trimming; top building; general hardware; painting and enameling, and comments upon each. Following this he elaborates the reasons for need of attention to details in body designing and mentions the opportunity there is at present for bringing the materials used in body construction to definite standards.
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210041
P E STONE
The paper is devoted more especially to enclosed body construction, with the object of creating a closer relation between the chassis and the body designer, from the viewpoint of an automotive body constructor. After enumerating what are probably the most important materials that enter into enclosed-body construction, inclusive of glue, the author outlines what constitutes the proper seasoning of wood, this being very important because very little all-metal or steel construction has been developed as yet for enclosed bodies, owing to the fact that many parts are required that necessitate using wood. Chassis deflection is discussed in its relation to enclosed-body construction and an outline is presented of body-construction development in general. The author believes that body construction will not be changed radically until either the basic type of design or shape is transformed or there is a firmer foundation to build upon.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200003
WILLIAM BREWSTER
The author first considers the style and arrangement of the seats, the position of the rear axle as affecting the rear kick-up in the chassis frame, and the position of the rear wheels as determining the distance from the back of the front seat to a point where the curve of the rear fender cuts across the top edge of the chassis frame. The location of the driver's seat and of the steering-wheel are next considered, the discussion then passing to the requirements that affect the height of the body, the width of the rear seat, and the general shape. The evolution of the windshield is reviewed and present practice stated. Structural changes are then considered in relation to the artistic requirements, as regards the various effects obtained by varying the size or location of such details as windows, doors, moldings, panels, pillars, belt lines, etc., and the general lines necessary to produce an effect in keeping with the character of the car.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200074
GEORGE J MERCER
The author presents the practical side of the body designer's work and refers to him as being between the office and the shop, the one who stands in the way of the impatient man that wants action without preparation. The development of the body designer and body designing is reviewed and the position and duties of the designer are stated at some length. The design factors are considered in detail and the making and utilization of wax models are described, followed by a lengthy consideration of curved-surface bodies, wood body frames, style and body types. The fittings and minor design details are discussed and future designs predicted from present indications. The author explains the body designing business in detail to refute the suspicion that the working methods of body designers are different from those employed by the other members of an engineering force because body designing is different and distinct from the other branches of motor-car engineering work.
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170011
F. W. PAWLOWSKI
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160044
WILLIAM B. STOUT
The automobile of to-day has been developed mechanically to such a high point that the art of building them, according to the author, is gradually becoming a studio task. The paper outlines the rules of appeal in body design and shows how former types of bodies have lost their appeal because they were not based on correct principles. The author gives the ways in which power, body width, mass, comfort and other car qualities can be suggested by proportions of the body or by its color. He states that the automobile of the future will take every advantage of art knowledge to build up an appeal consistent with its mechanical performance.
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150043
A. P. BRUSH
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150012
H. JAY HAYES
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140047
HINSDALE SMITH
1912-01-01
Technical Paper
120030
C. M. Hall
1910-01-01
Technical Paper
100014
L. R. Smith
Viewing 4651 to 4662 of 4662