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2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2257
Ki-Chang Kim, Sang-Woo Lee, Seok-Gil Hong, Jay Kim, Gil-Jun Lee, Jae Min Choi, Yong-Jin Kim
Abstract Squeak and rattle (S&R) problems in body structure and trim parts have become serious issues for automakers because of their influence on the initial quality perception of consumers. In this study, various CAE and experimental methods developed by Hyundai Motors for squeak and rattle analysis of door systems are reported. Friction-induced vibration and noise generation mechanisms of a door system are studied by an intelligent combination of experimental and numerical methods. It is shown that the effect of degradation of plastics used in door trims can be estimated by a numerical model using the properties obtained experimentally. Effects of changes in material properties such as Young's modulus and loss factor due to the material degradation as well as statistical variations are predicted for several door system configurations. As a new concept, the rattle and squeak index is proposed, which can be used to guide the design.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2267
Youngha Kim, Choonhyu Kim, Jaewoong Lee, Sunggi Kim
Abstract This paper describes a structure-borne noise reduction process that was developed using a combination of experimental and analytical methods. First, the major noise paths were identified using experimental Transfer Path Analysis (TPA). Next, FEA-Experimental modeling and forced response simulation were conducted using the Hybrid FEA-Experimental FRF method. The Hybrid FEA-Experimental FRF-Based Substructuring (FBS) model was used along with Operational Deflection Shape (ODS) and Modal Analysis. The Hybrid FEA-Experimental model consisted of an experimental FRF representation of the body and a finite element model of a sub-frame. The finite element of the sub-frame was created by using Altair HyperMesh from CATIA images and the dynamic analysis was carried out by using MSC Nastran. The natural frequency and frequency response function of the finite element sub-frame model were compared with that of a real sub-frame to determine the validity of applying the Hybrid FBS method.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2302
Yuksel Gur, Jian Pan, David Wagner
Lightweighting of vehicle panels enclosing vehicle cabin causes NVH degradation since engine, road, and wind noise acoustic sources propagate to the vehicle interior through these panels. In order to reduce this NVH degradation, there is a need to develop new NVH sound package materials and designs for use in lightweight vehicle design. Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) model can be an effective CAE design tool to develop NVH sound packages for use in lightweight vehicle design. Using SEA can help engineers recover the NVH deficiency created due to sheet metal lightweighting actions. Full vehicle SEA model was developed to evaluate the high frequency NVH performance of “Vehicle A” in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 10 kHz. This correlated SEA model was used for the vehicle sound package optimization studies. Full vehicle level NVH laboratory tests for engine and tire patch noise reduction were also conducted to demonstrate the performance of sound package designs on “Vehicle A”.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2290
Sivanandi Rajadurai, Guru Prasad Mani, Kavin Raja, Sundaravadivelu Mohan
Abstract Bending moment is one of the strongest pursuits in resonator's structural validation. Eigen problems play a key role in the stability and forced vibration analysis of structures. This paper explains the methodology to determine the weak points in the resonator assembly considering the additional effects of the installation forces and temperature impacts. Using strain energy plots, weakest part of the product is identified in the initial stage. The solution comes in unique way of utilizing the worst case scenarios possible. As a consequence, the stress generated by these analyses will prove to be critical in concerning the durability issue of the system. These conditions are evaluated by a finite element model through linear approaches and results are summarized.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2321
Nicholas Oettle, Andrew Bissell, Sivapalan Senthooran, Mohammed Meskine
Abstract For the automotive industry, the quality and level of the wind noise contribution has a growing importance and therefore should be addressed as early as possible in the development process. Each component of the vehicle is designed to meet its individual noise target to ensure the wind noise passenger comfort level inside the vehicle is met. Sunroof broadband noise is generated by the turbulent flow developed over the roof opening. A strong shear layer and vortices impacting on the trailing edge of the sunroof are typical mechanisms related to the noise production. Sunroof designs are tested to meet broadband noise targets. Experimentally testing designs and making changes to meet these design targets typically involves high cost prototypes, expensive wind tunnel sessions and potentially late design changes.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2103
Christian Bartels, Julien Cliquet, Carlos Bautista
Abstract In order to comply with applicable certification regulations, airframers have to demonstrate safe operation of their aircraft in icing conditions. Part of this demonstration is often a numerical prediction of the potential ice accretion on unprotected surfaces. The software ONICE2D, originally developed at the Office National d'Études et de Recherche Aérospatial (ONERA), is used at Airbus for predicting ice accretions on wing-like geometries. The original version of the software uses a flow solution of the 2D full-potential equation on a structured C-grid as basis for an ice accretion prediction. Because of known limitations of this approach, an interface was added between ONICE2D and TAU [6], a hybrid flow solver for the Navier-Stokes equations. The paper first details the approach selected to implement the interface to the hybrid flow solver TAU.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2102
Guilin Lei, Wei Dong, Jianjun Zhu, Mei Zheng
Abstract The numerical simulation of ice melting process on an iced helicopter rotor blade is presented. The ice melting model uses an enthalpy-porosity formulation, and treats the liquid-solid mushy zone as a porous zone with porosity equal to the liquid fraction. The ice shape on the blade section is obtained by the icing code with a dynamic mesh module. Both of the temperature change and the ice-melting process on the rotor blade section surface are analyzed. The phenomenon of ice melting is analyzed through the change of temperature and liquid fraction on the abrasion/ice interface. The liquid fraction change as with time on the abrasion/ice surface is observed, which describes the ice-melting process well. The numerical results show that the ice melting process can be simulated effectively by the melting model. The de-icing process can be monitored by observing the change of the liquid fraction of the area around the abrasion/ice interface.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2121
Yong Chen, Liang Fu
Abstract In helicopter, the icing rotor blades will decrease the effectiveness of the helicopter and endanger the lives of the pilots. The asymmetrical ice break-up and shedding could also lead to severe vibrations of the rotor blade. Ice break-up from the main rotor may strike the fuselage and tail rotor, even worse, find its way into the engine, which may cause serious aircraft accidents. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for ice shedding process is necessary in order to optimize the helicopter rotor blade design and de-icing system to avoid hazardous ice shedding. In this paper, the ice shedding model is improved by introducing a bilinear cohesive zone model (CZM) to simulate the initiation and propagation of ice/blade interface crack. A maximum stress criterion is used to describe the failure occurred in the ice.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1340
Yoichi Toyooka, Kiyoshi Hasegawa
Abstract Automotive outer panels may be distorted during heat treatments for curing of structural adhesives and mastic sealers. Distortion occurs due to residual stress between the adhesive and the panel following the curing process of the adhesive. The research discussed in this paper therefore considered a simulation technique of distortion and measuring method using curvature as the evaluative indicator. Curvature refers to the change of gradient of the curved surface, and the difference in curvature between the standard shape of the panel and the distortion section closely resembles the results of visual evaluations. Test panels were manufactured and measurements of their curvature were conducted. A study of the correlation of measurement results with the results of visual evaluations showed a good match.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1330
Yoshiyuki Tosa, Hiroyuki Mae
Abstract The objective of this study is to accurately predict the dynamic strain on the windshield caused by the deployment of the airbag in a short term without vehicle tests. The following assumption is made as to the dynamic pressure distribution on the windshield: The deployment of the airbag is fast enough to ignore spatial difference in the patterns of the pressure time histories. Given this assumption, significant parameters of the dynamic pressure distribution are as follows: 1) the distribution of the maximum pressure during contact between the airbag and the windshield, and 2) the characteristic of the force time histories applied to the windshield by the deploying airbag. In this study, the prediction method consists of a simplified airbag deployment test and an FE simulation. The simple deployment test was conducted to measure the peak pressure distribution between the airbag and a flat panel simulating the windshield.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1324
Guangtian Gavin Song, Chin-An Tan
Abstract Nowadays, as an irreplaceable means alongside CAD and testing, CAE is more and more widely applied with advanced material modeling and simulation methods continuously being explored, so as to get more accurate result as testing. In vehicle product development process, door slam durability evaluation is an important measurement for body closure structure. So far numerous effort has been taken to develop more mature methods to well define door slam simulation in stress and fatigue life analysis. Overall all methods ever being applied can be summarized as two categories, linear stress based method and nonlinear stress based method. The methodologies, such as inertia relief method, direct transient response solution, or local strain approach, can be included in linear stress based method with linear material properties as symbol in CAE model. In local strain approach, contact surface could be defined in the necessary area with consideration for more realistic load transfer.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1321
Shigetaka Kameyama, Shigeo Fujita, Shinichi Kaji
Abstract Recently vehicle development timeline is becoming shorter, so there is an urgent need to be able to develop vehicles with limited resources. This means the efficiency of the body structure development process must be improved. Specifically it is important to reduce the amount of design re-work required to meet performance targets as this can have a large influence on the body development time. In order to reduce the afore mentioned design re-work, we developed simple calculation models to apply a “V-Flow Development Process” to the preliminary stage design of the automobile body structure. The “V-Flow” advantages are as follows: (1) simple and easy to use, (2) defects are found at early stage, (3) avoids the downward flow of the defects. The advantage of preliminary stage design is that there is design flexibility since not many specifications have been determined yet.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1313
Donald Jasurda
Abstract The effects of thermal expansion and gravity on assembly processes in automotive manufacturing can and often do cause unexpected variation. Not only do these effects cause assembly issues, they can also create non-conformance and warranty problems later in the product lifecycle. Using 3D CAD models, advances in simulation allow engineers to design out these influences through a combination of tooling, process and tolerance changes to reduce costs. This whitepaper examines the process of simulating the effect of both thermal expansion and gravity on automotive structures. Using real life examples, a number of solutions were determined and tested in a simulated environment to reduce product variation and account for unavoidable environmental variation.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1316
Hwawon Lee, Parvath Police, Lisa Koch, Rajmouli Komarivelli, Brice Willis
Abstract Spot weld separation in vehicle development stage is one of the critical phenomena in structural analyses regarding quasi-static test condition, like roof strength or seat/belt pull. It directly reduces structural performance by losing connected load path and occasionally introduces tearing on surrounding sheet metals. Traditionally many efforts have been attempted to capture parent metal ductile fracture, but not applied to spot weld separations in automotive FEA simulations. [1,2,3] This paper introduces how to develop FFLD failure criteria from a series of parametric study on ultra high strength sheet steel and deals with failure criteria around spot weld and parent metal. Once the fracture strains for sheet steels are determined, those developed values were applied to traditional spot weld coupon FEA simulations and tests. Full vehicle level roof strength FEA simulations on a typical automotive body structure were performed and verified to the physical tests.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1318
Mohammad Muneer, Yogesh Sharma
The door performance of an automobile is gauged not only by its function but also the “feel” of operating a door which majorly depends upon opening/closing force and closing speed. This feel is in direct relation to the soundness of design and the build quality which the customer experiences even before driving the vehicle. Several studies have been conducted for door open/close performance for a conventional swing door, however little has been done in direction of sliding door. In this paper an analysis of closing speed of manually operated sliding door in purview of various parameters affecting them and their individual and combined contribution at vehicle level is presented. As the closing locus of sliding door is different from a swing door, a special experimental setup is used to measure the closing speed of sliding door.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1311
Leland Decker, James Truskin
Abstract As CAFE requirements increase, automotive OEMs are pursuing innovative methods to lightweight their Body In Whites (BIWs). Within FCA US, this lightweighting research and development activity often occurs through Decoupled Innovation projects. A Decoupled Innovation team comprised of engineers from the BIW Structures Group, in collaboration with Tier 1 supplier Magna Exteriors, sought to re-design a loadbearing component on the BIW that would offer significant weight savings when the current steel component was replaced with a carbon fiber composite. This paper describes the design, development, physical validation and partnership that resulted in a composite Rear Package Shelf Assembly solution for a high-volume production vehicle. As the CAFE requirements loom closer and closer, these innovation-driven engineering activities are imperative to the successful lightweighting of FCA US vehicles.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1312
MyoungKwon Je
Abstract The power sliding door system(PSD) is being equipped in the MPV(Multi-Purpose Vehicle/minivans) vehicle for convenience in the door operation. This study will focus on package space optimization for interior design and overall vehicle packaging for the vehicles equipped with PSD. To optimize the package, investigation for PSD's structure need to be done and the examples of other vehicle maker will be investigated and compared. The study that considers performance and package requirements resulted in a unique PSD design. And finally, this study will show the result vehicle in which the optimized mechanism is applied.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1304
G Karthik, K V Balaji, Rao Venkateshwara, Bagul Rahul
Abstract This paper describes the suitability of recycled polyethylene terephthalate (RPET) material for canopy strip in a commercial vehicle. The material described in this paper is a PET compound recycled from used PET bottles and reinforced with glass fibers so as to meet the product's functional requirements. The application described in this paper is a Canopy strip which is a structural exterior plastic part. Canopy strip acts as a structural frame to hold the Vinyl canopy in both sides of the vehicle. Functionally, the part demands a material with adequate mechanical and thermal properties. Generally, PET bottles are thrown after use thereby creating land pollution. PET being inert takes an extremely long time to degrade thereby occupying huge amount of space in landfills and directly affecting rain water percolation. This work focused on recycling the PET bottles and compounding them suitably so as convert them into useful automotive parts.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1703
John D. Bullough
Abstract Assessing the safety impacts of vehicle forward lighting is a challenge because crash data do not always contain details necessary to ascertain the role, if any, of lighting in crashes. The present paper describes several approaches to evaluating the safety impacts of lighting using naturalistic driving data. Driving behavioral data and descriptive narratives of crashes and near-miss incidents might provide new opportunities to understand how forward lighting improves traffic safety.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1702
Alex Wang, Jung Hsien Yen
Abstract This paper presents a novel technology to achieve very power (4W, 3.2W LED+0.8W driver) FOG lamp by single LED design which is much enhanced than the existing 2-3 LEDs solutions. This design saves 92.7% energy than conventional Halogen lamp (55W) and saves 38.4% than existing LED FOG lamp (6.5W). The optical design adopts the optimized multifaceted reflector, with precise and unique optimization design scheme, we are able to generate a very sharp cut-off line with a 3.2W LED to enable stronger light penetration in low vision weather condition. The efficiency of multifaceted reflector optics in this study is 50.9% which is 27% higher than the existing reflector design. Design details, anti-block skills and the manufacturing tolerance control are analyzed in this paper. The total light output of the LED fog lamp is 210lm; the L6-line minimal is 4200cd above the ECE R19 requirement of 2700cd.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1701
Luciano Lukacs
Abstract The challenges around global products have been lately one of the key challenges for the lighting community. This paper will present a survey which was held with costumers from China, India, Europe and Brazil understanding the difference and similarities regarding the lighting attributes. It brings also a discussion how to develop a lamp globally that fulfils everyone's needs and addresses potential trade-offs in design and performance.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1362
Chao Li, Il Yong Kim
Abstract A bumper system plays a significant role in absorbing impact energy and buffering the impact force. Important performance measures of an automotive bumper system include the maximum intrusions, the maximum absorbed energy, and the peak impact force. Finite element analysis (FEA) of crashworthiness involve geometry-nonlinearity, material-nonlinearity, and contact-nonlinearity. The computational cost would be prohibitively expensive if structural optimization directly perform on these highly nonlinear FE models. Solving crashworthiness optimization problems based on a surrogate model would be a cost-effective way. This paper presents a design optimization of an automotive rear bumper system based on the test scenarios from the Research Council for Automobile Repairs (RCAR) of Europe. Three different mainstream surrogate models, Response Surface Method (RSM), Kriging method, and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) method were compared.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1128
Amrut A. Patki
Abstract Several critical factors influence the conventional practice of defining driveline propeller shafts. One of these is the location of the center bearing bracket mounting. This in-turn depends on the frame ladder's crossmember. It has been observed that this dependence results in more number of joints and propeller shafts. “Driveline optimization by mini crossmember” is one of the solutions that offers flexibility in regards to the location of the center bearing bracket. Also this helps in achieving optimization.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1528
Kenichi Hirose, Rina Nakagawa, Yukitaka Ura, Hideyuki Kawamata, Hisashi Tanaka, Munehiko Oshima
Abstract It is considered that door mirror drag is composed of not only profile drag but also interference drag that is generated by the mixing of airflow streamlines between door mirrors and vehicle body. However, the generation mechanism of interference drag remained unexplained, so elucidating mechanism for countermeasures reducing drag have been needed. In this study, the prediction formulas for door mirror drag expressed by functions in relation to velocities around the vehicle body were derived and verified by wind tunnel test. The predicted values calculated by formulas were compared with the measured values and an excellent agreement was found. In summary, new prediction formulas made it possible to examine low drag mirror including profile and interference drag.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1532
Nicholas Oettle, Mohammed Meskine, Sivapalan Senthooran, Andrew Bissell, Gana Balasubramanian, Robert Powell
Abstract Car manufacturers put large efforts into reducing wind noise to improve the comfort level of their cars. Each component of the vehicle is designed to meet its individual noise target to ensure the wind noise passenger comfort level inside the vehicle is met. Sunroof designs are tested to meet low-frequency buffeting (also known as boom) targets and broadband noise targets for the fully open sunroof with deflector and for the sunroof in vent position. Experimentally testing designs and making changes to meet these design targets typically involves high cost prototypes, expensive wind tunnel sessions, and potentially late design changes. To reduce the associated costs as well as development times, there is strong motivation for the use of a reliable numerical prediction capability early in the vehicle design process.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1558
Amir Kharazi, Edward Duell, Austin Kimbrell, Ann Boh
Abstract Unsteady flow over automotive side-view mirrors may cause flow-induced vibrations of the mirror assembly which can result in blurred rear-view images, adversely affecting marketability through customer comfort and quality perception. Prior research has identified two mechanisms by which aerodynamically induced vibrations are introduced in the mirror. The first mechanism is unsteady pressure loading on the mirror face due to the unsteady wake, causing direct vibration of the mirror glass. The second mechanism, and the focus of this study, is a fluctuating loading on the mirror housing caused by an unsteady separation zone on the outer portion of the housing. A time-dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology was developed to correctly model mirror wake behavior, and thereby predict flow-induced mirror vibration to improve performance estimations.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1544
Sunil Patil, Robert Lietz, Sudesh Woodiga, Hojun Ahn, Levon Larson, Ronald Gin, Michael Elmore, Alexander Simpson
Abstract One of the passive methods to reduce drag on the unshielded underbody of a passenger road vehicle is to use a vertical deflectors commonly called air dams or chin spoilers. These deflectors reduce the flow rate through the non-streamlined underbody and thus reduce the drag caused by underbody components protruding in to the high speed underbody flow. Air dams or chin spoilers have traditionally been manufactured from hard plastics which could break upon impact with a curb or any solid object on the road. To alleviate this failure mode vehicle manufacturers are resorting to using soft plastics which deflect and deform under aerodynamic loading or when hit against a solid object without breaking in most cases. This report is on predicting the deflection of soft chin spoiler under aerodynamic loads. The aerodynamic loads deflect the chin spoiler and the deflected chin spoiler changes the fluid pressure field resulting in a drag change.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1542
Masaaki Arai, Keitaro Tone, Keiichi Taniguchi, Mikako Murakami, Munehiko Oshima
Abstract The new Murano was developed with special emphasis on improving aerodynamics in order to achieve fuel economy superior to that of competitor models. This paper describes the measures developed to attain a drag coefficient (CD) that is overwhelmingly lower than that of other similar models. Special attention was paid to optimizing the rear end shape so as to minimize rear end drag, which contributes markedly to the CD of sport utility vehicles (SUVs). A lower grille shutter was adopted from the early stage of the development process. When open, the shutter allows sufficient inward airflow to ensure satisfactory engine cooling; when closed, the blocked airflow is actively directed upward over the body. The final rear end shape was tuned so as to obtain the maximum aerodynamic benefit from this airflow. In addition, a large front spoiler was adopted to suppress airflow toward the underbody as much as possible.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1549
Jonathan Jilesen, Adrian Gaylard, Iwo Spruss, Timo Kuthada, Jochen Wiedemann
Abstract Driving when it is raining can be a stressful experience. Having a clear unobstructed view of the vehicles and road around you under these conditions is especially important. Heavy rain conditions can however overwhelm water management devices resulting in water rivulets flowing over the vehicle's side glass. These rivulets can significantly impair the driver's ability to see the door mirror, and laterally onto junctions. Designing water management features for vehicles is a challenging venture as testing is not normally possible until late in the design phase. Additionally traditional water management features such as grooves and channels have both undesirable design and wind noise implications. Having the ability to detect water management issues such as A-pillar overflow earlier in the design cycle is desirable to minimize the negative impact of water management features. Numerical simulation of windscreen water management is desirable for this reason.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1493
Vinay L. Virupaksha, Stuart Brown
Abstract Research Council for Automotive Repairs (RCAR) has developed a bumper test at 10 km/h to assess the damageability and repairing cost during a low speed collusion. For minimum damage and minimum repairing cost during low speed collusion it is necessary to design a bumper beam which provides structural stiffness and reduced deflection. Often it is challenging to design a front bumper beam to meet all safety requirements including, RCAR, high speed offset barrier and pedestrian protection, since these requirements are not necessarily compatible with each other. Design changes in rails and packaging constraints add to this challenge. In this study, design of six sigma (DFSS) and finite element analysis are used to study the parameters that affect the stiffness and deflection of the front bumper beam.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 4667