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Viewing 1 to 30 of 4642
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0363
Karthik Ramaswamy, Vinay L. Virupaksha, Jeanne Polan, Biswajit Tripathy
EPP foams are most commonly used in automotive applications for pedestrian protection and to meet low speed bumper regulatory requirements. In today’s automotive world the design of vehicles are predominantly driven by CAE. This makes it necessary to have validated material model for EPP foams in order to simulate and predict performance under various loading conditions. Since most of the automotive OEMs depend on local material suppliers for their global vehicle applications it is necessary to understand the variation in mechanical properties of the EPP foams and their effect on performance predictions. In this paper, EPP foams from three suppliers across global regions are characterized to study the inter-supplier variation in mechanical properties. In order to understand the effect of inter-supplier variation on vehicle performance, LSDYNA rate dependent material model is developed and validated for low speed and pedestrian protection load cases.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1592
Jingdong Cai, Saurabh Kapoor, Tushita Sikder, Yuping He
In this paper, active aerodynamic wings are investigated using numerical simulation in order to improve vehicle handling performance under high-speed cornering maneuvers. Air foils are selected and analyzed to determine the basic features of aerodynamic wings. Built upon the airfoil analysis, the 3D aerodynamic wing model is developed using a commercial software package, Siemens NX®. Then the virtual aerodynamic wings are assembled with the 3D vehicle model designed also using Siemens NX®. The resulting 3-D geometry model is used for aerodynamic analysis based on numerical simulation using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package, ANSYS FLUENT®. The CFD-based simulation data and the multibody dynamic vehicle model generated CarSim®are combined to study the effects of active aerodynamic wings on handling performance of high-speed vehicles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1298
Kamlesh Yadav, Abhishek Sinha, Rajdeep Singh Khurana
Vehicle Hood being the face of a passenger car poses a challenge to meet the regulatory and aesthetic requirements. However, the urge to make a saleable product makes aesthetics a primary condition. This eventually makes the role of structure optimization much more important. A recent development in the Indian automotive industry, which is known for dynamics of cost competitive cars, has posed the challenge to make passenger cars meeting the regulation and having optimized cost. This work is application of structure optimization of Hood and design of peripheral parts for meeting pedestrian protection performance keeping the focus on having cost-effective solution. This paper discusses Headform compliance of the work done on one of the flagship model of Maruti Suzuki India Ltd., providing detailed analysis of the procedure followed from introduction stage of regulatory requirement in the project to final validation of the engineering intent.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1300
Raj Jayachandran, Bhimaraddi Alavandi, Matt Niesluchowski, Erika Low, Yafang Miao, Yi Zhang
An engine cooling system in an automotive vehicle comprises of heat exchangers such as a radiator, charge air cooler, and oil coolers along with engine cooling fans. Typical automotive engine-cooling fan assembly includes an electric motor mounted on to a shroud that encloses radiator core. Typically a fan shroud is made of plastic material and holds one or two motors and is supported at four corners. One of the main drivers of a fan shroud design is Noise, Vibration, and Harshness requirements, without compromising the main function - airflow requirement for cooling. Usually, stiffness requirement is not given adequate attention in arriving at optimal design of a fan shroud. Research Council for Automotive Repairs (RCAR), based in Europe, issues vehicle ratings on the basis of its performance in Low Speed Damageability (LSD) tests. One such test is a 15kph, 40% offset rigid wall impact to the front of the vehicle.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1310
Harihar T. Kulkarni, Yu Wang, James Alanoly
The perceived quality of automotive closures (flushness and margin) is strongly affected by flanging and hemming of the outer panels and assembly respectively. To improve the quality of closures, the traditional hardware approach needs significant amount of time and costly die re-cuts and trials with prototype panels. Thus, such approach may delay the vehicle program and increase the overall investment cost. The proposed CAE methodology approach provides upfront design guidance to dies and panels, reduces time and cost associated with flanging and hemming trials necessary to improve overall quality of the closures. In this approach, as a first step, analytical formulae and design of experiments (DOE) are followed to estimate magnitude of design parameters of panels and dies to provide upfront design guidance.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1303
Nobuhisa Yasuda, Shinichi Nishizawa, Maiko Ikeda, Tadashi Sakai
The purpose of this study is to validate a reverse engineering based design method for automotive trunk lid torsion bars (TLTB) in order to determine a free shape that meets a target closed shape as well as a specified torque. A TLTB is a trunk lid component that uses torsional restoring force to facilitate the lifting open of a trunk lid, as well as to maintain the open position. Bend points and torque at a closed trunk position are specified by a car maker. Conventionally, a TLTB supplier determines bend points of the free shape by rotating the given bend points from a closed position around a certain axis to satisfy the specified torque at the closed position. Bend points of a deformed TLTB shape in the closed position often do not match the target bend points given by a car maker when designed by the conventional method, which can potentially cause interference issues with surrounding components.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1538
Jiaye Gan, Longxian Li, Gecheng Zha, Craig Czlapinski
This paper conducts numerical simulation and wind tunnel testing to study the passive jet boat tail(JBT) drag reduction flow control for a heavy duty truck rear view mirror. The JBT passive flow control technique is to introduce a flow jet by opening an inlet in the front of a bluff body, accelerate the jet via a converging duct and eject the jet at an angle toward the center of the base surface. The high speed jet flow entrains the free stream flow to energize the base flow, increase the base pressure, reduces the wake size, and thus reduce the drag. A baseline heavy duty truck rear view mirror is used as reference. The mirror is then redesigned to include the JBT feature without violating any of the variable mirror position geometric constraints and internal control system volume requirement. The wind tunnel testing was conducted at various flow speed and yaw angles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1304
Alejandro Rosas Vazquez, Fernando Paisano, Diego Santillan Gutierrez
For many years the use of in-mold fasteners has been avoided for various reasons including: not fully understand the load cases in the part, the fear for quality issues to occur, the need for servicing, or the lack of understanding the complexity of all failure modes. The most common solution has been the use of secondary operations to provide attachments, such as, screws, metal clips, heat staking, sonic welding or other methods which are ultimately a waste in the process and increase manufacturing costs. The purpose of this paper is to take the reader through a design process which allows for the design of in-molded attachment clips on plastic parts. The paper explores the design process for in-molded attachment clips starting with a design concept idea, testing the basic concept using a personal 3D printer, optimizing the design with physical tests and CAE analysis, and finally producing high resolution 3D prototypes for validation and tuning.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0443
Yong Hyun Nam, Gwansik Yoon
The sound induced by a closing door is determined by the various components like door latch, door module, door glass installed within the door area. The key components vibrate due to the force from the closing door, and the combined vibration caused by the components determines the sound from the door. In particular, when the door is closed with the door glass down, the vibration and noise of the door glass are louder than those of any other component; this is called door glass rattle - attributed to the loss of the door glass support point. This study not only evaluates the rattle influence level of a door glass support but also introduces an approach to reduce glass rattle noise by using sealing components. 1. Study on Minimization of Vibration A jig was constructed to evaluate the level of influence of the rattle of a door glass support.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0143
Neelakandan Kandasamy, Steve Whelan
During cabin warm-up, effective air distribution by vehicle climate control systems plays a vital role. For adequate visibility to the driver, major portion of the air is required to be delivered through the defrost center ducts to clear the windshield. Which results in thermal interaction between warm air delivered from the HVAC unit and the cold windshield. This creates thermal losses since the windshield acts as a heat sink, which delays the heating of passenger compartment causing delay in time to providing thermal comfort to the passenger. Thus it becomes essential to predict the effect of different windscreen defrost characteristics and its impact on occupant thermal comfort. In this paper, sensitivity analysis is carried for different windscreen defrosts characteristics like ambient conditions modes of operation; change in material properties along with occupant thermal comfort is predicted. An integrated 1D/3D CFD approach is proposed to evaluate the same.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0417
Yingjun Li, Yunkai Gao, Gangan Ma, Qianqian Du, Yabin Wan
To solve the problem of serious roller wear and improve the smoothness of the sliding door motion process, the rigid-flexible coupling multi-body model of the vehicle sliding door was built in ADAMS. Force boundary conditions of the model were determined to meet the speed requirement of monitoring point and time requirement of opening-closing process according to the bench test specification. The results of dynamic simulation agreed well with that of test so the practicability and credibility of the model was verified. In the optimization of the ride comfort of the sliding door, the shape parameters of the middle guide and the position of arm-shafts were selected as design variables while the impact load of rollers, the curvature of the trajectory and angular acceleration of the sliding door centroid were taken as optimization objectives.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1529
Nicholas Simmonds, John Pitman, Panagiotis Tsoutsanis, Karl Jenkins, Adrian Gaylard, Wilko Jansen
Cooling drag has traditionally proven to be a difficult flow phenomenon to predict using computational fluid dynamics. With the advent of grille shutter systems, the need to accurately pre-dict this quantity during vehicle development has become more pressing. A comprehensive study is presented in the paper of three automotive models with different cool-ing drag deltas using the commercial CFD solver STARCCM+. The notchback DrivAer model with under-hood cooling provides a popular academic benchmark alongside two fully-engineered production cars; a large saloon (Jaguar XJ) and an SUV (Land Rover Range Rover). Previous studies detail the differences in the flow field; highlighting the interaction between the exiting under-hood cooling flow, and the wheel and base wakes for open and closed grilles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1309
S. M. Akbar Berry, Hoda ElMaraghy, Johnathan Line, Marc Kondrad
Modularity in product architecture and its importance in product development has become a critical discussion topic in the last few decades. Several Product Modularity definitions and prospects were discussed by many researchers, however, most of the definitions and concepts are proliferated such that it is difficult to apply one universal definition to every modular product architecture and in product development. Automotive seat modular design and key factors for consideration towards modular seat design and assemblies are the main objectives of this work. The primary objectives are focused around the most “natural segmentation” of the seat elements (i.e., cushions, backs, trims, plastics, head restraints, etc.) to enable the greatest ease of final assembly and greatest flexibility for scalable feature offerings around common assembly “hard-points.”
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1451
Jan Vychytil, Jan Spicka, Ludek Hyncik, Jaroslav Manas, Petr Pavlata, Radim Striegler, Tomas Moser, Radek Valasek
In this paper a novel approach in developing a simplified model of a vehicle front-end is presented. Its surface is segmented to form an MBS model with hundreds of rigid bodies connected via translational joints to a base body. Local stiffness of each joint is calibrated using a headform or a legform impactor corresponding to the EuroNCAP mapping. Hence, the distribution of stiffness of the front-end is taken into account. The model of the front-end is embedded in a whole model of a small car in a simulation of a real accident. The VIRTHUMAN model is scaled in height, weight and age to represent precisely the pedestrian involved. Injury risk predicted by simulation is in correlation with data from real accident. Namely, injuries of head, chest and lower extremities are confirmed. Finally, mechanical response of developed vehicle model is compared to an FE model of the same vehicle in a pedestrian impact scenario.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1531
Keiichi Taniguchi, Akiyoshi Shibata, Mikako Murakami, Munehiko Oshima
This paper describes a study of drag reduction devices for production pick-up trucks with a frame structure. First, the flow structure around a pick-up truck was investigated and studied, focusing in particular on the flow between the cabin and tailgate. It was found that flow structure around the tailgate was closely related with aerodynamic drag. The low drag flow structure was found by flow analysis and the separation angle at the roof end was important to realize the flow structure. While proceeding with the development of new production model, a technical issue of the flow structure involving sensitivity to the vehicle velocity was identified concerning optimization at the roof end shape. A tailgate spoiler was examined for solving this issue. It was shown to be effective on real roads where there are corners and crosswinds by measurement of yaw dependence of drag reduction by the spoiler.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1366
Jeffrey Muttart, Swaroop Dinakar, Jeffrey Suway, Michael Kuzel, Timothy Maloney, Wayne Biever, Toby Terpstra, Tilo Voitel, David Cavanaugh, T.J. Harms
More than half all pedestrian fatalities occur at night. To address this problem, in the 1950s through 1970s Blackwell conducted considerable research that showed that a way to account for the limitations related to drivers’ expectancies at night would be to limit a driver’s time to view the forward roadway. The reduced information during the limited exposure time became a surrogate for the limited information available to on-road drivers at night. With the release of the SHRP-2 naturalistic database, we are able to see how drivers responded to in-road obstacles at night such as animals, bicyclists, pedestrians, and tree limbs. Using the naturalistic response data as a baseline, safe closed road recognition methodology was developed. The closed road study built upon the early nighttime recognition work by Blackwell, the observers were allowed to view the forward roadway for 1 or ¼ second.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0395
Xin Xie, Danielle Zeng, Boyang Zhang, Junrui Li, Liping Yan, Lianxiang Yang
Vehicle front panel is an interior part which have a major impact on the consumers’ experience of the vehicles. To keep a good appearance during long time aging period, most of the front panel is designed as a rough surface. Some types of surface defects on the rough surface can only be observed under the exposure of certain angled sun light. This brings great difficulties in finding surface defects on the production line. This paper introduces a novel polarized laser light based surface quality inspection method for the rough surfaces on the vehicle front panel. By using the novel surface quality inspection system, the surface defects can be detected real-timely even without the exposure under certain angled sun light. The optical fundamentals, theory derivation, experiment setup and testing result are shown in detail in this paper.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1453
Sudip Sankar Bhattacharjee, Shahuraj Mane, Harsha Kusnoorkar, Sean Hwang, Matt Niesluchowski
Pedestrian protection assessment methods require multiple head impact tests on a vehicle’s hood and other front end parts. Assessment methods become more complicated for vehicles equipped with pyrotechnic deployment systems, that are typically used to lift up the hood surface for creating more deformation space prior to pedestrian head impact. Estimation of pedestrian head impact time, thus, becomes a critical requirement for performance validation of deployable hood systems. In absence of standardized physical pedestrian models, Euro-NCAP recommends a list of virtual pedestrian models that could be used by vehicle manufacturers, with vehicle FEA models, to predict the potential head impact time along the vehicle front end profile. FEA simulated contact time is used as target for performance validation of sensor and pyrotechnic deployable systems.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0507
Christian K. Riener, Anna-Elisabeth Raab, Gerald Luckeneder, Martin Rosner
In the last decade a new Zinc-Magnesium-Aluminium coating (ZM-coating) for HDG steel sheet was developed at voestalpine. Unlike the well-established ZnAlMg-coatings from Japan which have significant higher alloying contents (for building applications), this ZincMagnesium coating (ZM) is also specifically designed to meet the requirements of car manufacturers. voestalpine's ZM-coating (corrender) is already approved by many OEMs and is currently used in the car body as a substitute for GI. Typical applications are structural as well as exposed parts. The ZM-coating introduced by voestalpine is in the upper range of ZM-alloying compositions, which was set by SAE and VDA (German Association of the Automotive Industry) to be within 1.0 to 2.0 wt% Mg and 1.0 to 3.0 wt% Al. The properties of these “European” Zinc-Magnesium coatings are well comparable within this range.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1368
Jeffrey Aaron Suway, Steven Suway
Mapping the luminance values of a visual scene is of broad interest to accident reconstructionists, human factors professionals, and lighting experts. Such mappings are useful for a variety of purposes, including determining the effectiveness and appropriateness of lighting installations, and performing visibility analyses for accident case studies. One of the most common methods for mapping luminance is to use a spot type luminance meter. This requires individual measurements of all objects of interest and can be extremely time consuming. Luminance cameras can also be used to create a luminance map. While luminance cameras will map a scene’s luminance values more quickly than a spot luminance meter, commercially available luminance cameras typically require long capture times during low illuminance (up to 30 seconds). Previous work has shown that pixel intensity captured by consumer-grade digital still cameras can be calibrated to measure luminance.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0275
N. Obuli Karthikeyan, N. Prajitha, P. Sethu Madhavan
As the technology gets upgraded every day, automotive manufacturers are also paying more attention towards delivering a highly reliable product which performs its intended function throughout its useful life without any failure. To develop a reliable product, functional and durability testing is not only sufficient rather it should undergo various types of stresses at different levels, to identify its potential modes of failure. By reliability testing, most of the failure modes of a component can be analyzed and eliminated in the design stage itself, prior to production. In this paper, electrical relay of a commercial vehicle was taken up for study to analyze the causes for field failure and to estimate its reliable life in the customer operating conditions. Few of the field failure samples were tested for its performance characteristics with typical testing protocol and strip out experiment was carried out to analyze the various failure modes.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0504
Anthony Berejka, Dan Montoney, Dan Dispenza, Len Poveromo, Rick Galloway, Mark Driscoll, Marshall Cleland
Having demonstrated the feasibility of using X-rays derived from high current industrial electron beam accelerators to cure the matrices of carbon fiber composites and then scaled this up to cure large sized, non-structural automobile components, performance car hoods, the New York State Vehicle Composites Program had a chassis designed, a cured epoxy mold made and then the chassis matrix cured using X-rays with a formulated radiation responsive matrix material. The feasibility study showed how X-rays could cure through materials embedded within the composite layers, such as metal inserts that could be used for mechanical fastening without fracturing the composite. In producing X-ray cured hoods, the power consumption for X-ray curing was found to be more than 20% lower than that needed for autoclave curing the same sized hoods using conventional thermosetting pre-pregs. More significant was the time-to-cure.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1272
Nick Parson, Jerome Fourmann, Jean-Francois Beland
One of the main applications for extrusions in the automotive sector is crash structures including crash rails, crash cans, bumpers, and structural body components. The objective is usually to optimize the energy absorption capability for a given structure weight. The ability to extrude thin wall multi-void extrusions contributes to this goal. However, the alloy used also plays a significant role in terms of the ability to produce the required geometry, strength which to a large extent controls the energy absorption capability, and the “ductility” or fracture behavior which controls the strain that can be applied locally during crush deformation before cracking. This paper describes results of a test program to examine the crush behavior of a range of alloys supplied by Rio Tinto Aluminium for automotive applications, as a function of processing parameters including artificial aging and quench rate.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0423
Lei Yang, Qiang Li, Chuxuan Wang, Yunqing Zhang
Abstract This paper focuses on dynamic analysis and frame optimization of a FSAE racing car frame. Firstly, a Multi-Body Dynamic (MBD) model of the racing car is established using ADAMS/Car. The forces and torques of the mechanical joints between the frame and suspensions are calculated in various extreme working conditions. Secondly, the strength, stiffness and free vibration modes of the frame are analyzed using Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The extracted forces and torques in the first step are used as boundary conditions in FEA. The FEA results suggest that the size of the frame may be not reasonable. Thirdly, the size of the frame is optimized to achieve minimized weight. Meanwhile the strength and stiffness of the frame are constrained. The optimization results reveal that the optimization methodology is powerful in lightweight design of the frame.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0441
Zhenyu Wang, Mei Zhuang
Abstract A numerical study on sunroof noise reduction is carried out. One of the strategies to suppress the noise is to break down the strong vortices impinging upon the trailing edge of the sunroof into smaller eddies. In the current study, a serrated sunroof trailing edge with sinusoidal profiles of wavelengths is investigated for the buffeting noise reduction. A number of combinations of wavelengths and amplitudes of sinusoidal profiles is employed to examine the effects of trailing edge serrations on the noise reduction. A generic vehicle model is used in the study and a straight trailing edge is considered as a baseline. The results indicate that the trailing edge serration has a significant impact on the sound pressure level (SPL) in the vehicle cabin and it can reduce the SPL by up to 10~15 dB for the buffeting frequency.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1308
Abhishek Softa, Anuj Shami, Rajdeep Singh Khurana
Abstract The fuel efficiency of a vehicle depends on multiple factors such as engine efficiency, type of fuel, aerodynamic drag, and tire friction and vehicle weight. Analysis of weight and functionality was done, to develop a lightweight and low-cost Roof rack rail. The Roof rack rail is made up of a lightweight material with thin cross section and has the design that allows the fitment of luggage carrier or luggage rack on the car roof. In starting this paper describes the design and weight contribution by standard Roof rack rail and its related parts. Secondly, the selection of material within different proposed options studied and a comparison of manufacturing and design-related factors. Thirdly, it has a description of the design of Roof rack rail to accommodate the luggage carrier fitment on the car roof. Moreover, optimizations of Roof rack rail design by continuous change in position, shape, and parts used.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0290
Veera Aditya Yerra, Srikanth Pilla
The advancements in automation, big data computing and high bandwidth networking has expedited the realization of Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). IIoT has made inroads into many sectors including automotive, semiconductors, electronics, etc. Particularly, it has created numerous opportunities in the automotive manufacturing sector to realize the new aura of platform concepts such as smart polylemma of production technologies. The stringent CAFE standards set forth by the Obama administration has pushed the automotive industry to radically revolutionize and design lightweight systems using advanced materials such as composites. Despite several outstanding benefits, advanced materials often come with additional costs. Minimizing physical infrastructure and improving efficiency will make the use of these materials affordable. This paper provides a thought provoking application of IIoT in automotive composites body shop.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0508
Gabor Kiss, Yuya Ando, Martin Schifko
After the e-coating the paint on the surface is like a sponge and carry liquid which slowly drains off. The retain water carries about 5-10 liter for 100mm² BIW surface area. When the retain water drains off, residual liquids may areas at areas nobody is expecting. These liquids are potential causers in the oven either to destroy the corrosion protection mainly caused by boiling or may lead to bake drips. The density of the residual liquid is changing during the heating process in the oven. Depending on the evaporation of residual puddles and density change the total volume may increase although the weight is getting less. This is the critical situation which may lead to bake drips. In this talk we would outline our technology which allows to predict retain water behavior and the arising of bake drips successfully
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1511
Anton Kabanovs, Graham Hodgson, Andrew Garmory, Martin Passmore, Adrian Gaylard
The motivation for this paper is to consider the effect of rear end geometry on rear soiling using a representative generic SUV body. In particular the effect of varying the top slant angle is considered using both experiment and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Previous work has shown that slant angle has a significant effect on wake shape and drag and here we extend this to investigate the effect on rear soiling. It is hoped that this work can provide an insight into the likely effect of such geometry changes on the soiling of similarly shaped road vehicles. To increase the generality of results, and to allow comparison with previously obtained aerodynamic data, a 25% scale generic SUV model is used in the Loughborough University Large Wind Tunnel. UV doped water is sprayed from a position located at the bottom of the left rear tire to simulate the creation of spray from this tire.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1513
Young-Chang Cho, Chin-Wei Chang, Andrea Shestopalov, Edward Tate
The airflow into the engine bay of a passenger car is used for cooling down essential components of the vehicle, such as powertrain, air-conditioning compressor, intake charge air, batteries, and brake systems, before it returns back to the external flow. When the intake ram pressure becomes high enough to supply surplus cooling air flow, this flow can be actively regulated by using arrays of grille shutters, namely active grille shutters (AGS), in order to reduce the drag penalty due to excessive cooling. In this study, the operation of AGS for a generic SUV-type model vehicle is optimized for improved fuel economy on a highway drive cycle by using surrogate models. Both vehicle aerodynamic power consumption and under-hood cooling performance are assessed by using PowerFLOW, a high-fidelity flow solver that is fully coupled with powertrain heat exchanger models.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 4642