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Viewing 1 to 30 of 1204
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0780
Dongwei Wu, Baigang Sun, Qinghe Luo, Xi Wang, Yunshan Ge
Hydrogen internal combustion engine has advantages in many aspects compared with traditional internal combustion engine. E.g. hydrogen is renewable energy and its source is more widely and more easily, so it can alleviate the traditional energy crisis; the hydrogen internal combustion engine has the higher efficiency and the lower emissions. The structure of hydrogen internal combustion engine is highly consistent with the traditional internal combustion engine, so users do not need to change a lot when using hydrogen internal combustion engine. The combustion characteristics of hydrogen-air mixture are great significance for the performance and control of hydrogen internal combustion engine and it is also the theory and technical difficulties in the process of designing hydrogen internal combustion engine. The model that can accurately predict the mixture combustion velocity in cylinder is very important. The combustion velocity is an important parameter for mixture combustion.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0733
Mario Martins, Ivanir Fischer, Franciel Gusberti, Rafael Sari, Macklini Dalla Nora
Ethanol with high levels of hydration is a low cost fuel that has offers the potential to replace fossil fuels and lower atmospheric CO2 emissions. However, it can be of difficult ignition depending on the hydration levels. Combustion modes like HCCI have shown to be very tolerant to the water content in the fuel due to their non-flame propagating nature. Moreover, HCCI tends to increase engine efficiency while lowering emissions levels. This paper demonstrates the operation of a 3-cylinder generator engine in which one of the cylinders acts as a dedicated EGR producer for a dedicated ethanol cylinder operating with HCCI of wet ethanol. When the diesel cylinder is under low load, due to the excess air, it produces low combustion gases and becomes almost solely an air heater, Heat is then directly recycled back to the ethanol cylinder intake to promote autoignition of wet ethanol.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0764
Gabriele Di Blasio, Giacomo Belgiorno, Carlo Beatrice
The paper reports the results of a wide experimental campaign aimed to assess the effects of the geometric compression ratio variation on the performance of light-duty diesel engines operated in dual-fuel NG-diesel mode in terms of fuel consumption, NVH and pollutant emissions. The single-cylinder research engine employed in the experimental campaign had a combustion system is representatives of a 2L automotive diesel engine for passenger cars. The test methodology was defined in order to analyse carefully the effects of the compression ratio, injection parameters and air throttling on the global performances and emissions, also in terms of emitted carbonaceous particles. Three pistons with different bowl volumes corresponding to compression ratio (CR) values of 16.5, 15.5 and 14.5 were selected for the whole test campaign.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0933
Yunhua Zhang, Diming Lou, Piqiang Tan, Zhiyuan Hu, Qian Feng
Biodiesel as a renewable energy is becoming increasingly attractive due to the growing scarcity of conventional fossil fuels. Meanwhile, the development of after-treatment technologies for the diesel engine brings new insight concerning emissions especially the particulate matter pollutants. In order to study the coupling effects of biodiesel blend and CCRT (Catalyzed Continuously Regeneration Trap) on the particulate matter emissions, the particulate matter emissions from an urban bus operated under steady and transient conditions respectively on real road equipped with and without CCRT (the same bus) fuelled with biodiesel blends BD10 (90% pure diesel and 10% biodiesel by volume) and BD0 (100% pure diesel) was tested and analyzed using electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI). Results showed that the particulate number-size distribution of BD10 had two peaks in nuclei mode and accumulation mode respectively except the condition of high speed, which was similar to BD0.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0665
Hassan vafamehr, Alasdair Cairns, Mohammadmohsen Moslemin Koupaie
The experimental work was concerned with improving understanding of the effects of latent heat of vaporisation of different ethanol blends during heaving knocking combustion in modern spark ignition engines. The unique single cylinder engine employed included full bore overhead optical access capable of withstanding unusually high in-cylinder pressures. Heavy knock was deliberately induced under moderate loads using inlet air heating and a primary reference fuel blend of reduced octane rating. High-speed chemiluminescence imaging and simultaneous in-cylinder pressure data measurement were used to evaluate the combustion events. Under normal operation the engine was operated under port fuel injection with a stoichiometric air-fuel mixture. Multiple centred auto-ignition events were regularly observed, with knock intensities of up to ~40bar. Additional excess fuel was then introduced directly into the end-gas in short transient bursts.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1292
Saiful Bari, Idris Saad
Diesel engine can be run with biodiesel which has the potential to supplement the receding supply of crude oil. As biodiesel possess similar physiochemical properties to diesel, most diesel engines can run with biodiesel with minimum modifications. However, the viscosity of biodiesel is higher, and the calorific value is lower than diesel. Therefore, when biodiesel is used in diesel engines, it is usually blended with diesel at different proportions. Use of 100% biodiesel in diesel engines shows inferior performance of having lower power and torque. Improving in-cylinder airflow characteristic to break down higher viscous biodiesel and to improve air-fuel mixing are the aims of this research. Therefore, guide vanes in the intake runner were used in this research to improve the performance of diesel engine run with biodiesel.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0727
Ida Truedsson, Christine Rousselle, Fabrice Foucher
The transportation sector adds to the greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. One way to decrease this impact from transportation is by using renewable fuels. Ethanol is a readily available blend component which can be produced from bio blend-stock, today used in low concentrations in gasoline internationally. One some markets fuel containing up to 85 vol% ethanol is used. This study focuses on gasoline blended with 50vol% ethanol. The high ethanol blended gasoline was used in a direct injection light duty engine, originally designed for diesel combustion. Due to the high ignition resistance of the fuel, it required high intake temperatures of 180°C to achieve stable combustion at low load operation. To enable combustion with the lower intake temperatures more commonly used in commercial vehicles, ozone was injected with the intake air. Experiments were performed at intake air temperatures from 100°C to 170°C, at an engine speed of 1500 rpm.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0872
Sunil Kumar Pathak, Vineet sood, Yograj Singh, Shubham Gupta, Salim Abbasbhai Channiwala
In this study, A Gasoline Passenger car (Euro IV) was experimentally investigated for performance and emissions on three different fuels i.e. Gasoline, (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) and DME (Di-methyl ether) blend with concentration of 20% by mass in LPG (DME20). In particular, emission characteristics (including Hydrocarbon, CO, NOx and CO2) over the Modified Indian Driving Cycle (MIDC) and fuel economy were investigated at the Vehicle Emission Laboratory (VEL) at the CSIR- Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehardun, India. The experimental results showed that Vehicle comply with Euro IV legislation on gasoline and LPG fuel showed higher NOx Emissions on DME 20 fuel. LPG kit was reconfigured for DME and LPG blend to bring down the emissions within the specified emission limits. The Emission values observed for DME20 were 0.635 g/km (CO), 0.044 g/km (THC), and 0.014 g/km (NOx) against the Euro IV limits of 1.0 g/km, 0.1 g/km and 0.08 g/km, respectively.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1069
Igor Trevas, Adm José baeta, Charles Pimenta, Heder Fernandes, Matheus Carvalho, Raphael Montemor
Variable Valve Actuation system (VVA) is a technology developed for improving fuel economy, reducing emissions, and enhancing engine performance mainly by reducing pumping losses. Many automakers have used VVA in their engine projects with excellent results. Usually, VVA systems are built to control the valve events in four different ways: changing the amplitude of the valve lift, the valve open angle, the valve close angle or a combination of those modes. A special attention at the calibration activity is needed to reach the optimum performance of this system, beyond this, it was necessary to develop a different way to calibrate, much more focused in the development of the combustion and the gas exchange process requiring an intense use of a pressure indicating system. This work presents a comparison between different way of actuation in combustion analysis of a VVA system on a spark ignition engine.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0738
Akhilendra Pratap Singh, Avinash Kumar Agarwal
Premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion has the potential to utilise alternative fuels such as alcohols. PCCI combustion emits significantly lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) and resulted thermal efficiency similar to conventional CI engines. However, PCCI combustion cannot be used in production grade engines due to its incapability to operate at high engine loads. This study focussed on development of hybrid combustion engine, which can operate in both combustion modes such as CI combustion as well as PCCI combustion mode. Hybrid combustion system was controlled by an open ECU, which varied the fuel injection parameters for mode switching between CI and PCCI combustion modes. At low-to-medium engine loads, engine was operated in PCCI combustion mode and at higher engine loads ECU automatically switched the engine operation in CI combustion mode.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0482
Cristiano Grings Herbert, Luiz Rogério De Andrade Lima, Cristiane Gonçalves
Phthalates have been extensively used in rubbers formulation as plasticizer additive for PVC and NBR promoting processing parameters or reducing cost. The most commonly used plasticizer in PVC compounds was di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) currently not recommend due toxicity. In many studies it is described that DEHP is liable of producing toxic and adverse effects and able to act as potential carcinogenic agent. Therefore it is listed as prohibited to the Global Automotive Declarable Substance List (GADSL). Phthalates alternatives are already available but the compatibility in automotive fuel system with biodiesel was not extensively understood. This aspect is important since plasticizer may migrate and change rubber properties. Tri-2-ethylhexyl trimellitate (TOTM) and di-2-ethylhexyl terephthalate (DEHT) plasticizers have been studied the carcinogenicity and chronic toxicity potential and the migration to blood in medical devices.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0759
Rasmus Pettinen, Ossi Kaario, Martti Larmi
Unstable oil markets combined with the alarming statistics of continuously growing emission problems causes anxiety among many nations. The greatest dilemma lies in the answer about how to rationally overcome the dependency of fossil based energy sources. The truth seems to be found on utilizing renewable energy generating low emissions. Methane is suggested as one of the worthwhile solutions for substituting crude-oil based fuels. Methane as a fuel combined with modern engine technology seems to open possibilities solving the above mentioned problems. Charge air mixed methane combined with a compression ignition engine utilizing a small diesel pilot injection seems to form a profitable compromise between good engine efficiency and low emission outcome. Problems concerning dual-fuel technology profitableness seems to be related to fully control the combustion in relation to lean conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0734
Eshan Singh, Muhammad Waqas, Bengt Johansson, Mani Sarathy
The blending of ethanol with primary reference fuel (PRF) mixtures, comprising n-heptane and iso-octane, is known to exhibit non-linear octane response. However, the underlying chemistry and intermolecular interactions are poorly understood. Well-designed experiments and numerical simulations are required to understand these blending effects and the chemical kinetic phenomenon responsible for them. To this end, HCCI engine experiments were previously performed at four different conditions of intake temperature and engine speed for various PRF/ethanol mixtures. Transfer functions were developed in the HCCI engine to relate PRF mixture composition to autoignition tendency at various compression ratios. The HCCI blending octane number (BON) was determined for mixtures of 2-15 vol% ethanol with each of PRF70 and PRF84. In the present work, the experimental conditions were utilized to perform zero-dimensional HCCI engine simulations with detailed chemical kinetics for ethanol/PRF blends.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0726
Muhammad Waqas, Nimal Naser, Mani Sarathy, Jeroen Feijs, Kai Morganti, Gustav Nyrenstedt, Bengt Johansson
Alcohol based fuels such as ethanol and methanol that have high RON and enthalpy of vaporization have emerged to be potential additives for fossil-based fuels. The concept of using iso-stoichiometric ternary blends: gasoline (G), ethanol (E) and methanol (M) can be used to replace ethanol based fuel such as E85. This is mainly due to the biomass limit with ethanol production and the cheaper production costs associated with methanol. Ethanol and methanol with a RON 107 and 109 respectively was selected as the high RON fuel and three low octane fuels were used as base fuels. These were FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) fuels, more specifically FACE I, J and A, in addition primary reference fuels (PRF, iso-octane/n-heptane) were also used. A CFR engine was used to conduct the experiments. For SI combustion the CFR was operated at RON conditions that correspond to engine speed of 600 rpm and air inlet temperature of 52 oC.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0817
Remi Konagaya, Ken Naitoh, Kohta TSURU, Yasuo Takagi, Yuji Mihara
Hydrogen will be used more from now in energy systems such as fuel cell systems, hydrogen tanks, chemical plants, rockets, and combustion engines. Hydrogen is supplied as gas jets for many cases of the energy systems. There are important experimental reports of penetration length and longitudinal coverage of various gas jets [Hamamoto et al. Trans. of Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1987]. However, the mixing process of hydrogen gas and air (or oxygen) is still mysterious on penetration length and longitudinal coverage, i.e., diffusion speed to the direction normal to the jet axis for various conditions. This is because, unfortunately, numerical simulations at the level of large eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) for gases of multi-components and their experimental visualizations are not performed very much, whereas studies for liquid sprays of fossil fuels have been done extremely frequently until now.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0758
Yaopeng Li, Ming Jia, Yachao Chang, Guangfu Xu
Multi-dimensional models coupled with a detailed chemical mechanism were used to investigate the effect of fuel property on the exergy destruction due to chemical reaction in a reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) engine. It is found that the exergy destruction due to the chemical reaction of methanol/diesel RCCI is lower than that of gasoline/diesel RCCI at the same combustion phasing. Since methanol addition has a negative effect on the low temperature heat release (LTHR) of diesel, the exergy destruction accumulation from LTHR to high temperature heat release (HTHR) in gasoline/diesel RCCI can be avoided in methanol/diesel RCCI resulted from the lower exergy destruction. Moreover, the combustion temperature in methanol/diesel RCCI is higher compared to gasoline/diesel RCCI, which is also beneficial to the lower exergy destruction.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0855
Rakesh Kale, R. Banerjee
Use of bio fuels in a regular spark ignition engine is becoming common in many countries to reduce the overall green house emissions. Alcohols such as methanol and ethanol are blended with gasoline when SI engines are considered. Advanced direct injection stratified charge engine technology has gained lot of interest due to its merits over conventional port fuel injection engine. Since the technology is significantly spray controlled, fuel injection and spray behavior under different thermodynamic conditions plays a very important role in successful engine operation. Present work was carried out to understand the spray behavior of isooctane and three alcohols under engine-like pressure and temperature conditions. Selected alcohols were ethanol, iso-butanol and n-butanol.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0932
Nehemiah S I Alozie, George Fern, David Peirce, Lionel Ganippa
ABSTRACT The use of diesel particulate filter (DPF) has become a standard after treatment technology in modern diesel engine however; pressure drop develops across the filter as PM accumulates. This requires quick periodic burn-out without incurring thermal runaway temperatures that could compromise DPF integrity in operation. Adequate understanding of soot oxidation is central to design and manufacture of efficient filter traps suitable for the engine system. In this study, we have examined the oxidation of PM generated from a high speed direct injection (HSDI) diesel engine, ran with 20% and 40% blends of two biodiesel fuels. The PM samples were collected on a Pall Tissuquartz filter during constant engine load and oxidised non-isothermally in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA). Then results obtained are compared with PM oxidation data obtained from pure petrodiesel.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1288
Noriko Shisa, Shinsuke Ishihara, Yougui Huang, Mikio Asai, Katsuhiko Ariga
Despite methanol is toxic to human health and causes serious damage to automobile engine and components in fuel system, there are increasing distribution of methanol-containing gasoline in some area. Methanol demonstrates similar chemical properties to ethanol (which is established as an additive to gasoline), so that it is challenging to identify methanol-containing gasoline without performing proper chemical analysis (e.g., GC-MS). In this study, we aim to develop low-cost, portable, and easy-operation sensor that selectively changes its color (from red purple to blue purple) in response to methanol-containing gasoline. The colorimetric sensor will be useful for automobile users to avoid unexpected refueling of methanol-containing gasolines. Our methanol sensor is a thin film of clay mineral (layered double hydroxide, LDH) embedded with dye molecules (oxoporphyrinogen, OxP).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1019
Bentolhoda Torkashvand, Andreas Gremminger, Simone Valchera, Maria Casapu, Jan-Dierk Grunwaldt, Olaf Deutschmann
Abstract The required gas temperature for complete oxidation of methane to water and CO2 over conventional exhaust catalysts is above 450°C which is higher than the exhaust gas temperature. For lean-burn turbocharged engines, a solution to this problem is positioning the catalyst upstream of the turbine to take advantage of higher temperatures closer to the engine resulting in faster kinetics over the catalyst. Pre-turbine placement of the catalyst will also result in higher pressures depending on engine design and operation point. An increase in pressure leads to a longer residence time of the exhaust gas stream inside the catalyst. Consequently, a pre-turbine catalyst placement can lead to higher conversion levels if the catalytic reaction is in the kinetically controlled regime.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1282
Ashish Jaiswal, Tarun Mehra, Monis Alam, Jatin Agarwal, Harshil Kathpalia
Dependency and increase in use of fossil fuels is leading to its depletion and raises serious environmental concerns. There are international obligations to reduce emissions and requirements to strengthen security of fuel supply which is pressurizing the automobile industry to use cleaner and more sustainable fuels. Hydrogen fits these criteria as it is not just an abundant alternative but also a clean propellant and Hydrogen engines represent an economic alternative to fuel cells. In the present investigation, EGR has been used on hydrogen boosted SI engine running on gasoline-methanol and ethanol-gasoline blends to determine the additional advantages of the same compared to pure gasoline operation and gasoline-methanol and ethanol-gasoline blends without EGR.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1003
Ye Liu, Gang Lv, Chenyang Fan, Na Li, Xiaowei Wang
Abstract The evolution of surface functional groups (SFGs) and the graphitization degree of soot generated in premixed methane flames are studied and the correlation between them is discussed. Test soot samples were obtained from an optimized thermophoretic sampling system and probe sampling system. The SFGs of soot were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) after removing the soluble impurities from the soot samples, while the graphitization degree of soot was characterized by Raman spectrum and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The results reveal that the number of aliphatic C-H groups and C=O groups shows an initial increase and then decrease in the sooting history. The large amount of aliphatic C-H groups and small amount of aromatic C-H groups in the early stage of the soot mass growth process indicate that aliphatic C-H groups make a major contribution to the early stage of soot mass growth.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0776
Ulrich Kramer, Thomas Lorenz, Christian Hofmann, Helmut Ruhland, Rolf Klein, Carsten Weber
Because of new extraction methods and therefore expanded availability, compressed natural gas (CNG) has recently been discussed as a serious alternative to petroleum fuels. CNG is a promising future fuel and could be a game changer in the future fuel market, since it is widely available, very affordable and it significantly reduces tank-to-wheel CO2 emissions due to its favorable H/C-ratio. Further it can be blended up to 100% with sustainable methane (bio-methane and also power-to-gas-methane) and thus is a potential energy carrier for the future. Furthermore Downsizing of SI engines is a mega trend in the automotive industry aiming at reduc-tion of CO2 emissions and fuel consumption while providing fun to drive at attractive cost of owner-ship. Downsizing offers increased efficiency potential when combined with alternative fuels like compressed natural gas (CNG), since CNG basically can be a very knock resistant fuel, when not diluted with knock sensitive components.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0568
Valentina Fraioli, Carlo Beatrice, Gabriele Di Blasio, Giacomo Belgiorno, Marianna Migliaccio
Abstract The adoption of gaseous fuels for Light Duty (LD) engines is considered a promising solution to efficiently reduce greenhouse gases emissions and diversify fuels supplies, while keeping pollutants production within the limits. In this respect, the Dual Fuel (DF) concept has already proven to be, generally speaking, a viable solution, industrially implemented for several applications in the Heavy-Duty (HD) engines category. Despite this, some issues still require a technological solution, preventing the commercialization of DF engines in wider automotive fields, including the release of high amounts of unburned species, possibility of engine knock, chance of thermal efficiency reduction. In this framework, numerical simulation can be a useful tool, not only to better understand specific characteristics of DF combustion, but also to explore specific geometrical modifications and engine calibrations capable to adapt current LD architectures to this concept.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0863
Bader Almansour, Sami Alawadhi, Subith Vasu
One of the most promising platforms for cellulosic biofuel generation is to harness the metabolic processes of endophytic fungi that directly convert lignocellulosic material into a variety of volatile organic compounds. The biofuel co-development framework was initiated at Sandia National Labs. Here, the synthetic biologists develop and engineer a new platform for drop-in fuel production from lignocellulosic biomass, using several endophytic fungi including Hypoxylon CI-4A, CO27-A, and Daldinia EC-12. Hence this process has the potential advantage that expensive pretreatment and fuel refining stages can be optimized thereby allowing scalability and cost reduction-two major considerations for widespread biofuel utilization. Large concentrations of ketones along with other volatile organic compounds (VOC’s) were produced by Hypoxylon CO27-A grown over swtichgrass media.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1289
Zinong Zuo, Yiqiang Pei, Jing Qin, Ruoyu Jia, Xiang Li, Zhang Song ZHAN, Bin Liu, Tie Gang Hu, Jing Zhong
This research presents an experimental study of the laminar burning ,combustion and emission characteristics of premixed methane -dissociated methanol-air mixtures in a constant volume combustion chamber. All experiments were conducted at 3 bar initial pressure and 373K initial temperature. The dissociated methanol fractions were from 20% to 80% with 20% intervals, and the equivalence ratio varied from 0.6 to 1.8 with 0.2 intervals. The images of flame propagation were visualized by using a schlieren system. The combustion pressure data were measured and exhaust emissions were sampled with a portable exhaust gas analyzer. The results show that the unstretched laminar burning velocities increased significantly with dissociated methanol enrichment. The markstein length decreased with increasing dissociated methanol fraction and decreasing equivalence ratio.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0581
Stephen C. Burke, Matthew Ratcliff, Robert McCormick, Robert Rhoads, Bret Windom
Abstract In some studies, a relationship has been observed between increasing ethanol content in gasoline and increased particulate matter (PM) emissions from vehicles equipped with spark ignition engines. The fundamental cause of the PM increase seen for moderate ethanol concentrations is not well understood. Ethanol features a greater heat of vaporization (HOV) than gasoline and also influences vaporization by altering the liquid and vapor composition throughout the distillation process. A droplet vaporization model was developed to explore ethanol’s effect on the evaporation of aromatic compounds known to be PM precursors. The evolving droplet composition is modeled as a distillation process, with non-ideal interactions between oxygenates and hydrocarbons accounted for using UNIFAC group contribution theory. Predicted composition and distillation curves were validated by experiments.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0539
Duc-Khanh Nguyen, Sebastian Verhelst
Methanol fueled spark ignition (SI) engines have the potential for very high efficiency using an advanced heat recovery system for fuel reforming. In order to allow simulation of such an engine system, several sub-models are needed. This paper reports the development of two laminar burning velocity correlations, corresponding to two reforming concepts, one in which the reformer uses water from an extra tank to produce hydrogen rich gas (syngas) and another that employs the water vapor in the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) stream to produce reformed-EGR (R-EGR). This work uses a one-dimensional (1D) flame simulation tool with a comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanism to predict the laminar burning velocities of methanol/syngas blends and correlate it. The syngas is a mixture of H2/CO/CO2 with a CO selectivity of 6.5% to simulate the methanol steam reforming products over a Cu-Mn/Al catalyst.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0041
Santosh Trimbake, Dileep Malkhede, Pandurang Devkate
Abstract Worldwide IC engine fuels are increasingly blended with oxygenate fuels to reduce the dependency on the conventional petroleum reserves. Among these fuels, biomass-derived ethanol is very popular for SI engine operation as it is not only economical and renewable source of energy, but it also allows increasing the engine performance. High latent heat of vaporization of ethanol combined with its high octane number make the engine less sensitive to knock. However, the real potential of ethanol blended fuels still has to be explored and their impact on engine combustion characterization has to be investigated. The objective of this study is to extend predictive fractal combustion model for ethanol/gasoline blends and assess the influence of ethanol addition to gasoline in a Port Fuel Injection (PFI) engine. Quasi dimensional simulation is carried out using AVL Boost under wide open throttle condition at 1500 and 3000 rpm.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0072
Moqtik Bawase, M R Saraf
Abstract Utilization of higher ethanol blends, 20% ethanol in gasoline (E20), as an alternate fuel can provide apparent benefits like higher octane number leading to improved anti-knocking properties, higher oxygen content resulting in complete combustion. Apart from technical benefits, use of ethanol blends offer certain widespread socioeconomic benefits including option of renewable source of energy, value addition to agriculture feedstock resulting in increase in farm income, creation of more jobs in rural sector and creating job at local levels. Use of higher blends of ethanol can reduce dependence on foreign crude leading to substantial savings in cost of petroleum import. The impact of higher Gasoline-Ethanol blend (E20), on the fuel system components of gasoline vehicles must be known for assessment of whether the fuel system will be able to perform as intended for the complete design life of the system.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 1204