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2016-12-01
Magazine
Editorial: What's old (and revered) is new again Toyota sticking with measured, 'Teammate' approach to autonomous development Straight-sixes are back (with electrification) at Mercedes-Benz McLaren faces the electrified and autonomous future Can low-volume supercars survive amid stringent CO2 regs and robot cars? McLaren is betting £1 billion on a speedy, powerful-and independent-sports-car future. New Peugeot SUVs jump to modular platform, increase composites use Mercedes EQ concept previews 2019 electric SUV 2017 Nissan Rogue adds hybrid system with EV-only mode Renault's kids' racer
CURRENT
2016-12-01
Standard
J1939/14_201612
CAN controllers are now available which support the Flexible Data Rate Frame Format. These controllers, when used on SAE J1939-14 networks, must be restricted to use only the Classical Frame Format compliant to ISO 11898-1:2015. This SAE Recommended Practice is intended for light- and heavy-duty vehicles on- or off-road as well as appropriate stationary applications which use vehicle derived components (e.g., generator sets). Vehicles of interest include but are not limited to: on- and off-highway trucks and their trailers; construction equipment; and agricultural equipment and implements.
CURRENT
2016-11-29
Standard
J2284/3_201611
This SAE Recommended Practice will define the Physical Layer and portions of the Data Link Layer of the Open Systems Interconnection model (ISO 7498) for a 500 kbps High-Speed CAN (HSC) protocol implementation. Both ECU and media design requirements for networks will be specified. Requirements will primarily address the CAN physical layer implementation. Requirements will focus on a minimum standard level of performance from the HSC implementation. All ECUs and media shall be designed to meet certain component level requirements in order to ensure the HSC implementation system level performance at 500 kbps. The minimum performance level shall be specified by system level performance requirements or characteristics described in detail in Section 5 of this document. This document is designed such that if the Electronic Control Unit (ECU) requirements defined in Section 6 are met, then the system level attributes should be obtainable.
2016-11-28
WIP Standard
J1939/81
SAE J1939-81 Network Management defines the processes and messages associated with managing the source addresses of applications communicating on an SAE J1939 network. Network management is concerned with the management of source addresses and the association of those addresses with an actual function and with the detection and reporting of network related errors. Due to the nature of management of source addresses, network management also specifies initialization processes, requirements for reaction to brief power outages and minimum requirements for ECUs on the network.
2016-11-28
WIP Standard
J1939DA
This document is intended to supplement the J1939 documents by offering the J1939 information in a form that can be sorted and search for easier use. The J1939 Digital Annex, introduced in August 2013, offers key J1939 technical data in an Electronic Spreadsheet that can be easily searched, sorted, and adapted to other formats. J1939DA contains all of the SPNs (parameters), PGNs (messages), and other J1939 data previously published in the SAE J1939 top level document. J1939DA also contains all of the SLOTs, Manufacturer ID Codes, NAME Functions, and Preferred Addresses previously published in the SAE J1939 top level and the J1939-71 document. J1939DA contains the complete technical details for all of the SPNs and PGNs previously published in the SAE J1939-71 document. It also includes the supporting descriptions and figures previously published in the SAE J1939-71 document.
CURRENT
2016-11-22
Standard
J2284/2_201611
This SAE Recommended Practice will define the Physical Layer and portions of the Data Link Layer of the Open Systems Interconnection model (ISO 7498) for a 250 kbps High Speed CAN (HSC) protocol implementation. Both ECU and media design requirements for networks will be specified. Requirements will primarily address the CAN physical layer implementation. Requirements will focus on a minimum standard level of performance from the High Speed CAN (HSC) implementation. All ECUs and media shall be designed to meet certain component level requirements in order to ensure the HSC implementation system level performance at 250 kbps. The minimum performance level shall be specified by system level performance requirements or characteristics described in detail in Section 5 of this document. This document is designed such that if the Electronic Control Unit (ECU) requirements defined in Section 6 are met, then the system level attributes should be obtainable.
CURRENT
2016-11-21
Standard
J2284/1_201611
This SAE Recommended Practice will define the Physical Layer and portions of the Data Link Layer of the Open Systems Interconnection model (ISO 7498) for a 125 kbps High Speed CAN (HSC) protocol implementation. Both ECU and media design requirements for networks will be specified. Requirements will primarily address the CAN physical layer implementation. Requirements will focus on a minimum standard level of performance from the High Speed CAN (HSC) implementation. All ECUs and media shall be designed to meet certain component level requirements in order to ensure the HSC implementation system level performance at 125 kbps. The minimum performance level shall be specified by system level performance requirements or characteristics described in detail in Section 5 of this document. This document is designed such that if the Electronic Control Unit requirements defined in Section 6 are met, then the system level attributes should be obtainable.
2016-11-16
Magazine
Focus on advanced safety systems and human-factor interventions The impact of REACH on the aviation sector Considered the most comprehensive chemical-regulation legislation to date, REACH presents serious ramifications for the aircraft industry. Lightweighting: What's Next? Experts weigh in on the challenges and future enablers in the battle to reduce vehicle mass. The best of COMVEC 2016 Autonomous vehicles and improved fuel efficiency via advanced powertrain solutions are pressing topics detailed in this select group of technical papers from the SAE Commercial Vehicle Engineering Congress. Optimizing waste heat recovery for long-haul trucks Autonomous solutions in agriculture Downsizing a HD diesel engine for off-highway applications Zero-emissions electric aircraft: Theory vs. reality
CURRENT
2016-11-08
Standard
J2561_201611
This SAE Information Report defines the functionality of typical Bluetooth applications used for remotely accessing in-vehicle automotive installations of electronic devices. Remote access may be achieved directly with on-board Bluetooth modules, or indirectly via a custom designed gateway that communicates with Bluetooth and non-Bluetooth modules alike. Access to the vehicle, in the form of two-way communications, may be made via a single master port, or via multiple ports on the vehicle. The Bluetooth technology may also be used in conjunction with other types of off-board wireless technology. This report recommends using a message strategy that is already defined in one or more of the documents listed in 2.1.1, 2.1.4, 2.1.5, and 2.1.6. Those strategies may be used for some of the typical remote communications with a vehicle. It is recognized, however, that there may be specific applications requiring a unique message strategy or structure.
CURRENT
2016-11-03
Standard
J1939DA_201611
This document is intended to supplement the J1939 documents by offering the J1939 information in a form that can be sorted and search for easier use. The J1939 Digital Annex, introduced in August 2013, offers key J1939 technical data in an Electronic Spreadsheet that can be easily searched, sorted, and adapted to other formats. J1939DA contains all of the SPNs (parameters), PGNs (messages), and other J1939 data previously published in the SAE J1939 top level document. J1939DA also contains all of the SLOTs, Manufacturer ID Codes, NAME Functions, and Preferred Addresses previously published in the SAE J1939 top level and the J1939-71 document. J1939DA contains the complete technical details for all of the SPNs and PGNs previously published in the SAE J1939-71 document. It also includes the supporting descriptions and figures previously published in the SAE J1939-71 document.
CURRENT
2016-10-25
Standard
J1939/71_201610
The SAE J1939 communications network is developed for use in heavy-duty environments and suitable for horizontally integrated vehicle industries. The SAE J1939 communications network is applicable for light-duty, medium-duty, and heavy- duty vehicles used on-road or off-road, and for appropriate stationary applications which use vehicle derived components (e.g., generator sets). Vehicles of interest include, but are not limited to, on-highway and off-highway trucks and their trailers, construction equipment, and agricultural equipment and implements. SAE J1939-71 Vehicle Application Layer is the SAE J1939 reference document for the conventions and notations that specify parameter placement in PGN data fields, the conventions for ASCII parameters, and conventions for PGN transmission rates. This document previously contained the majority of the SAE J1939 data parameters and messages for information exchange between the ECU applications connected to the SAE J1939 communications network.
CURRENT
2016-10-21
Standard
AS4074/3B
This slash sheet specifies the operational parameters and characteristics of a particular implementation of the SAE Linear, Token Passing Bus (LTPB) Interface Unit. This slash sheet defines the following: a. the physical media interface: this slash sheet specifies the characteristics of the optical interface to the physical bus media; b the minimum and maximum timing requirements for operation of this implementation of the LTPB; c. the data coding used to encode and decode the data for transmission; and d. the default values to be loaded into the timers of the LTPB interface at power-up prior to intervention by the host processor.
CURRENT
2016-10-21
Standard
AS4074/1B
This slash sheet specifies the operational parameters and characteristics of a particular implementation of the SAE Linear, Token Passing Bus (LTPB) Interface Unit. This slash sheet defines the following: a. the physical media interface: this slash sheet specifies the characteristics of the optical interface to the physical bus media; b. the minimum and maximum timing requirements for operation of this implementation of the LTPB; c. the data coding used to encode and decode the data for transmission; and d. the default values to be loaded into the timers of the LTPB interface at power-up prior to intervention by the host processor.
CURRENT
2016-10-21
Standard
AS4074/2B
This slash sheet specifies the operational parameters and characteristics of a particular implementation of the SAE Linear, Token Passing Bus (LTPB) Interface Unit. This slash sheet defines the following: a. the physical media interface: this slash sheet specifies the characteristics of the optical interface to the physical bus media; b. the minimum and maximum timing requirements for operation of this implementation of the LTPB; c. the data coding used to encode and decode the data for transmission; and d. the default values to be loaded into the timers of the LTPB interface at power-up prior to intervention by the host processor.
CURRENT
2016-10-21
Standard
AIR4271A
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) has been prepared by the Systems Applications and Requirements Subcommittee of SAE Committee AS-2. It is intended to provide guidance primarily, but not exclusively, for specifiers and designers of data communication systems for real time military avionics applications within a platform. The subject of high speed data transmission is addressed from two standpoints 1) the influence of developments in technology on avionics architectures as a whole and 2) the way in which specific problems, such as video, voice, closed loop control, and security may be handled. While the material has been prepared against a background of experience within SAE AS-2 relating to the development of a family of high speed interconnect standards, reference to specific standards and interconnect systems is minimized.
CURRENT
2016-10-21
Standard
AIR4295A
This document contains guidance for using SAE publications, AS 4112 through AS 4117 (MIL-STD-1553 related Test Plans). Included herein are the referenced test plan paragraphs numbers and titles, the purpose of the test, the associated MIL-STD-1553 paragraph, commentary concerning test methods and rationale, and instrumentation requirements.
CURRENT
2016-10-21
Standard
AIR5683A
MIL-STD-1553 establishes requirements for digital command/response time division multiplexing (TDM) techniques on military vehicles, especially aircraft. The existing MIL-STD-1553 network operates at a baud rate of 1 Mbps and is limited by the protocol to a maximum data payload capacity of approximately 700 kilobits per second. The limited capacity of MIL-STD-1553 buses coupled with emering data rich applications for avionics platforms plus the expense involved with changing or adding wires to thousands of aircraft in the fleet has driven the need for expanding the data carrying capacity of the existing MIL-STD-1553 infrastructure.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2217
Alex K. Gibson, John Corn, Jeremy Walker
Abstract This paper describes the bench testing procedures for a series-parallel, plug-in hybrid electric vehicle architecture used in its charge depleting mode. This architecture will be integrated into a 2016 Chevrolet Camaro by the Mississippi State University EcoCAR 3 Team. Our bench testing goals are to determine the accuracy of our current vehicle model components, if our current controller algorithms are efficient, and if our powertrain is properly integrated. Three torque control strategies using two UQM motors will be evaluated. Initial findings in this paper will be used to prepare the MSU EcoCAR 3 team for vehicle optimization and further integration work during the year three portion of the EcoCAR 3 competition. Three charge depleting motor control strategies are evaluated for drivetrain torque loss and energy consumption. The control strategies were tested using a Nissan Frontier chassis as the bench testing frame (or mule) on a chassis dynamometer.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2154
Ary Armando Alvarez, Eufemio Muñoz
Abstract The EcoCAR3 team of California State University, Los Angeles designed a Parallel Post Transmission Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PPT PHEV) that will maintain consumer acceptability in the areas of performance, utility and safety with the end-goal of reducing Well-to-Wheel Green House Gas (WTW GHG) emissions and Well-to-Wheel Petroleum Energy Use (WTW PEU). The team utilizes the 2016 Chevrolet Camaro platform with modifications such as 2.4L Ecotec engine, a 134 HP electric motor and a 12.6 KW/h battery pack. The vehicle is estimated to have a fuel economy of 58.7 miles per gallon gasoline equivalent (mpgge). This paper presents the vehicle’s two main operating modes, Electric Vehicle (EV) and Hybrid-Electric Vehicle (HEV) while performing Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified drive cycles: 505, HWFET, US06 City and US06 HWY.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2153
Hubertus Ulmer, Ansgar Heilig, Matthias Rühl, Boris Löw
Abstract This paper presents an innovative method for the calibration of internal combustion engines. While common calibration strategies and optimizations are usually based on stationary operation points, this new method uses quasi-stationary engine experiments. On the one hand, the time necessary for establishing a steady state of the engine can thus be omitted. Consequently, the duration of calibration runs can be reduced. On the other hand, an enhanced approach generates validated data from the transient or quasi-stationary test runs in order to complete the various engine maps. First validations of the method using a numeric engine model were carried out. Compared to a conventional steady state calibration and depending on the optimization parameter, the duration could be decreased by up to 74% from 350 hours to approximately 91 hours with constant quality of the measurement data.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2157
Huiyan Zhang, Lei Shi, Yi Cui, Kangyao Deng, Yuehua Qian, Baiqi Huo, Lin Hua
Abstract Three-phase sequential turbocharging system with two unequal-size turbochargers is developed to improve fuel economy performance and reduce emission of the automotive diesel engine, which satisfies wide range of intake flow demand. However, it results in complicated transient control strategies under frequently changing operating conditions. The present work aims to optimize the control scheme of boost system and fuel injection and evaluate their contributions to the improvement of transient performance. A mean value model for diesel engine was built up in SIMULINK environment and verified by experiment for transient study. Then a mathematical model of optimization issue was established. Strategies of control valves and fuel injection for typical acceleration and loading processes are obtained by coupled calculating of the simulation model and optimization algorithm.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2156
Christian Friedrich, Matthias Auer, Gunnar Stiesch
Abstract Due to the increasing number of engine setting parameters to be optimized, model based calibration techniques have been introduced to medium speed engine testing to keep the number of engine tests low. Polynomials in combination with d-optimal test plans have been proven to be a good choice for modeling the stationary behavior of selected engine outputs. Model approaches like artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been rarely used for medium speed purposes since they require quite high amounts of testing data for model training. To evaluate the potential of these model approaches radial basis function networks, a subclass of neural networks, as well as Gaussian processes have been investigated as alternatives to polynomials. A manageable amount of tests according to an adapted d-optimal test plan was carried out at a test bench.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2155
Ivan Rot, Stephan Rinderknecht
Abstract In this investigation an innovative signal generator will be introduced, which enables the generation of transient control signals for the gearshift process. The signals are generated merely depending on scalar transmission control unit (TCU) calibration parameters. The signal generator replaces the comprehensive TCU software within the simulation environment. Thus no extensive residual bus simulation is required. Multiple experimental models represent the core part of the signal generator. To predict the system behavior of the underlying system, the models are trained using measured data from a powertrain with automatic transmission mounted on a test rig. The results demonstrate that the introduced signal generator is suitable to predict transient control signals for the gearshift operation accurately. In combination with an additional powertrain model it is possible to simulate the gearshift process and subsequently to evaluate the gearshift comfort.
2016-10-03
Magazine
Achieving Performance Advantages in Unmanned Systems Unmanned Vehicle Systems (UVS) are reaching new levels of functionality and performance, and it's not just for air vehicles either. COTS Embedded Systems and Link Budgets The days of proprietary embedded computing systems in military systems are numbered. Custom Designing Enclosures Using 3-D CAD Modeling Due to the advancement of 3-D computer-aided design software, enclosure manufacturing is not what it used to be. Technology advances industry. Fiber Optic Multi-Sensing Platforms Enabling Innovation Across Aerospace Organizations RECAT Wake Turbulence Recategorization New Concept for Improving the Performance of Electrically Small Antennas Microwave Radiometer for Advanced Nanosatellite Control Systems Secret Sharing Schemes and Advanced Encryption Standard SIPHER: Scalable Implementation of Primitives for Homomorphic Encryption Using Mathematics to Make Computing on Encrypted Data Secure and Practical
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8111
Hiral Haria, Monika Ivantysynova
Abstract With the need for improvement in the fuel economy along with reduction in emissions due to stringent regulations, powertrain hybridization has become the focal point of research for the automotive sector. Hydraulic hybrids have progressively gained acceptance due to their high power density and low component costs relative to their electric counterpart and many different architectures have been proposed and implemented on both on and off-highway applications. The most commonly used architecture is the series hybrid which offers great flexibility for implementation of power management strategies. But the direct connection of the high pressure accumulator to the system often results in operation of the hydraulic units in high pressure and low displacement mode. However, in this operating mode the hydraulic units are highly inefficient. Also, the accumulator renders the system highly compliant and makes the response of the transmission sluggish.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8009
Michael Brown, Purser Sturgeon
Abstract While initial Connected Vehicle research in the United States was focusing almost exclusively on passenger vehicles, a program was envisioned that would enhance highway safety, mobility, and operational efficiencies through the application of the technology to commercial vehicles. This program was realized in 2009 by funding from the I-95 Corridor Coalition, led by the New York State Department of Transportation, and called the Commercial Vehicle Infrastructure Integration (CVII) program. The CVII program focuses on developing, testing and deploying Connected Vehicle technology for heavy vehicles. Since its inception, the CVII program has developed numerous Vehicle-to-Vehicle and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure applications for trucks that leverage communication with roadside infrastructure and other light and heavy duty vehicles to meet the objectives of the program.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8130
Giorgio Malaguti, Massimiliano Ruggeri, Luca Dariz, Michele Selvatici
Abstract Automotive industry compartment is undertaking a massive technology revolution. ADAS systems and infotainment promise to change the way that customers mean travel and transportation radically, through several use cases. The key enabling technologies for this trend are Ethernet and its newly standardized physical layer, IEEE 802.3bw 100BASE-T1 (a.k.a. BroadR-Reach). From an architectural point of view, the evolution of the applications that rely on Automotive Ethernet resembles in many ways the evolution that the IT has had in the last decades. In the IT world, increased throughput and computational power to the end-user enabled technologies like multimedia streaming; scalability and availability requirements, together with the increased complexity of IT infrastructure, led to the “Anything as a Service” paradigm and Software Defined Networks.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1991
Syed J. Khalid
Abstract Aircraft subsystems essential for flight safety and airworthiness, including flight controls, environmental control system (ECS), anti-icing, electricity generation, and starting, require engine bleed and power extraction. Predictions of the resulting impacts on maximum altitude net thrust(>8%), range, and fuel burn, and quantification of turbofan performance sensitivities with compressor bleed, and with both high pressure(HP) rotor power extraction and low pressure(LP) rotor power extraction were obtained from simulation. These sensitivities indicated the judicious extraction options which would result in the least impact. The “No Bleed” system in Boeing 787 was a major step forward toward More Electric Aircraft (MEA) and analysis in this paper substantiates the claimed benefits.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2015
Rory Telford, Catherine Jones, Patrick Norman, Graeme Burt
Abstract Mass and efficiency are key performance indicators for the development and design of future electric power systems (EPS) for more-electric aircraft (MEA). However, to enable consideration of high-level EPS architecture design trades, there is a requirement for modelling and simulation based analysis to support this activity. The predominant focus to date has been towards the more detailed aspects of analysis, however there is also a significant requirement to be able to perform rapid high-level trades of candidate architectures and technologies. Such a capability facilitates a better appreciation of the conflicting desires to maximize availability and efficiency in candidate MEA architectures, whilst minimizing the overall system mass. It also provides a highly valuable and quantitative assessment of the systemic impact of new enabling technologies being considered for MEA applications.
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