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2016-07-01
Book
Joerg Schaeuffele, Thomas Zurawka
Since the early seventies, the development of the automobile has been characterized by a steady increase in the deploymnet of onboard electronics systems and software. This trend continues unabated and is driven by rising end-user demands and increasingly stringent environmental requirements. Today, almost every function onboard the modern vehicle is electronically controlled or monitored. The software-based implementation of vehicle functions provides for unparalleled freedoms of concept and design. However, automobile development calls for the accommodation of contrasting prerequisites – such as higher demands on safety and reliability vs. lower cost ceilings, longer product life cycles vs. shorter development times – along with growling proliferation of model variants. Automotive Software Engineering has established its position at the center of these seemingly conflicting opposites.
2016-07-01
Book
Eric Walter, Richard Walter
Modern vehicles have electronic control units (ECUs) to control various subsystems such as the engine, brakes, steering, air conditioning, and infotainment. These ECUs (or simply ‘controllers’) are networked together to share information, and output directly measured and calculated data to each other. This in-vehicle network is a data goldmine for improved maintenance, measuring vehicle performance and its subsystems, fleet management, warranty and legal issues, reliability, durability, and accident reconstruction. The focus of Data Acquisition from HD Vehicles Using J1939 CAN Bus is to guide the reader on how to acquire and correctly interpret data from the in-vehicle network of heavy-duty (HD) vehicles. The reader will learn how to convert messages to scaled engineering parameters, and how to determine the available parameters on HD vehicles, along with their accuracy and update rate. Written by two specialists in this field, Richard (Rick) P. Walter and Eric P.
2016-06-16
Standard
EIAEDIF2
This volume is the second in a series of monographs which will make the standard (ANSUEIA 548-1988) easier to understand. It is intended to be used as a companion to the EDIF Reference Manual Version 2.0.0, which is also published by the EL4 (ISBN 0-7908-0000-4). This volume gives an introduction to the concept of connectivity in the format. Concepts are explained in a general way; constructs, such as net, appear in italics throughout this volume. Whenever more detail is desired about a topic the italicized constructs should be consulted in the EDIF Reference Manual. The EDIF Reference Manual contains the official definition of the format and should always be taken as the authoritative source of information. Further application guides will be provided in later volumes of this series.
2016-06-16
Standard
EIAIS118
This document is intended to be used by anyone wishing to understand and/or use CDIF. This document provides a definition of a single subject area of the CDIF Integrated Meta-model. It is suitable for: -those evaluating CDIF -those who wish to understand the principles and concepts of a CDIF transfer -those developing importers and exporters.
2016-06-16
Standard
RS274D
This standard is intended to serve as a guidein the coordination of system design, to minimize the variety of program manuscripts required, to promote uniformity of programming techniques, and to foster interchangeability of input data between numerically controlled machines of the same classification by type, process function, size, and accuracy. It is intended that simple numerically controlled machines be programmed usinga simple format, which is systematically expandable for morec omplex machines.
2016-06-16
Standard
EIA408
This standard applies to the interconnection of data terminal equipment and numerical control equipment at the tape reader interface. The data terminal would typically be connected to a remote data source/sink such as a computer. This standard is applicable for the interchange of signals when used in conjunction with electronic equipment, each interchange circuit of which has a single return (signal ground) that can be interconnected at the interface point.
2016-06-16
Standard
J2284/4_201606
This SAE Recommended Practice will define the Physical Layer and portions of the Data Link Layer of the Open Systems Interconnection model (ISO 7498) for a 500 kbps arbitration bus with CAN FD Data at 2 Mbps High-Speed CAN (HSC) protocol implementation. Both ECU and media design requirements for networks will be specified. Requirements will primarily address the CAN physical layer implementation. Requirements will focus on a minimum standard level of performance from the HSC implementation. All ECUs and media shall be designed to meet certain component level requirements in order to ensure the HSC implementation system level performance at 500 kbps arbitration bus with CAN FD Data at 2 Mbps. The minimum performance level shall be specified by system level performance requirements or characteristics described in detail in Section 6 of this document.
2016-06-09
Standard
AS20708/4B
Scope is unavailable.
2016-06-09
Standard
AS20708/6B
Scope is unavailable.
2016-06-09
Standard
AS20708/8B
Scope is unavailable.
2016-06-09
Standard
AS20708/9B
Scope is unavailable.
2016-06-09
WIP Standard
J2284/1
This document will define the Physical Layer and portions of the Data Link Layer of the ISO model for a 125 Kbps High Speed CAN (HSC) protocol implementation. Both ECU and media design requirements for networks will be specified. Requirements will primarily address the CAN physical layer implementation. Requirements will focus on a minimum standard level of performance from the High Speed CAN (HSC) implementation. All ECUs and media shall be designed to meet certain component level requirements in order to ensure the HSC implementation system level performance at 125 Kbps. The minimum performance level shall be specified by system level performance requirements or characteristics described in detail in Section 6 of this document. This document is designed such that if the Electronic Control Unit requirements defined in Section 6 are met, then the system level attributes should be obtainable. This document will address only requirements which may be tested at the ECU and media level.
2016-06-09
WIP Standard
J2284/2
This document will define the Physical Layer and portions of the Data Link Layer of the ISO model for a 250 Kbps High Speed CAN (HSC) protocol implementation. Both ECU and media design requirements for networks will be specified. Requirements will primarily address the CAN physical layer implementation. Requirements will focus on a minimum standard level of performance from the High Speed CAN (HSC) implementation. All ECUs and media shall be designed to meet certain component level requirements in order to ensure the HSC implementation system level performance at 250 Kbps. The minimum performance level shall be specified by system level performance requirements or characteristics described in detail in Section 6 of this document. This document is designed such that if the Electronic Control Unit requirements defined in Section 6 are met, then the system level attributes should be obtainable. This document will address only requirements which may be tested at the ECU and media level.
2016-06-08
WIP Standard
AS20708/21B
No Scope Available
2016-06-08
WIP Standard
AS20708/28B
No Scope Available
2016-06-08
WIP Standard
AS20708/23B
No Scope Available
2016-06-08
WIP Standard
AS20708/20B
No Scope Available
2016-06-08
WIP Standard
AS20708/22B
No Scope Available
2016-06-08
WIP Standard
AS20708/15B
No Scope Available
2016-06-08
WIP Standard
AS20708/16B
No Scope Available
2016-06-08
WIP Standard
AS20708/25B
This specification covers the detail requirements for control transformer synchro, type 16CTB4b, 90 volt, 400 cycle.
2016-06-08
WIP Standard
AS20708/19B
No Scope Available
2016-06-08
WIP Standard
AS20708/17B
No Scope Available
2016-05-17
Magazine
Base-engine value engineering for higher fuel efficiency and enhanced performance Continuous improvement in existing engines can be efficiently achieved with a value engineering approach. The integration of product development with value engineering ensures the achievement of specified targets in a systematic manner and within a defined timeframe. Integrated system engineering for valvetrain design and development of a high-speed diesel engine The lead time for engine development has reduced significantly with the advent of advanced simulation techniques. Cars poised to become 'a thing' Making automobiles part of the Internet of Things brings both risks and rewards. Agility training for cars Chassis component suppliers refine vehicle dynamics at the high end and entry level with four-wheel steering and adaptive damping.
2016-05-10
WIP Standard
AS20708/7B
No Scope Available
2016-05-05
WIP Standard
AS6523
This data dictionary provides a mathematically coherent set of definitions for quantity types used in data models for unmanned systems. In this data dictionary, a quantity is defined as a property of a phenomenon, substance, or body whose value has magnitude.
2016-05-05
Magazine
New dawn at Honda R&D President Yoshiyuki Matsumoto aims to invigorate Honda's technology and product-development organization with 'full soul.' Automated driving meets regulation: NHTSA and the next 50 years The challenges and opportunities on the road to 'zero deaths' demand a new level of federal automotive safety technical standards, and a new safety-defect reporting and recall system. NHTSA and the U.S. Congress must act boldly and quickly to make it happen. Autonomous driving meets regulation: Hands off, eyes off, brain off Euro NCAP'S president warns that without coherent policies, the growing availability of automated technologies may result in piecemeal technology development-and unintentional consequences. Designer yin meets engineer yang Efficient and effective vehicle development means even closer collaboration between the two former sparring partners.
2016-05-03
WIP Standard
J1939/71
The SAE J1939 communications network is developed for use in heavy-duty environments and suitable for horizontally integrated vehicle industries. The SAE J1939 communications network is applicable for light-duty, medium-duty, and heavy- duty vehicles used on-road or off-road, and for appropriate stationary applications which use vehicle derived components (e.g., generator sets). Vehicles of interest include, but are not limited to, on-highway and off-highway trucks and their trailers, construction equipment, and agricultural equipment and implements.   SAE J1939-71 Vehicle Application Layer is the SAE J1939 reference document for the conventions and notations that specify parameter placement in PGN data fields, the conventions for ASCII parameters, and conventions for PGN transmission rates.
2016-05-03
WIP Standard
J1939DA
This document is intended to supplement the J1939 documents by offering the J1939 information in a form that can be sorted and search for easier use. The J1939 Digital Annex, introduced in August 2013, offers key J1939 technical data in an Electronic Spreadsheet that can be easily searched, sorted, and adapted to other formats. J1939DA contains all of the SPNs (parameters), PGNs (messages), and other J1939 data previously published in the SAE J1939 top level document. J1939DA also contains all of the SLOTs, Manufacturer ID Codes, NAME Functions, and Preferred Addresses previously published in the SAE J1939 top level and the J1939-71 document. J1939DA contains the complete technical details for all of the SPNs and PGNs previously published in the SAE J1939-71 document. It also includes the supporting descriptions and figures previously published in the SAE J1939-71 document.
2016-05-01
Journal Article
2015-01-9132
Husain Kanchwala, Harutoshi Ogai
Abstract Japan is suffering from the problem of an ageing society. In Kitakyushu city more than a quarter of people are aged above 65 years. The roads in this region are narrow with steep gradient and vulnerable roadbed. A big ratio of elderly people are living on their own. These characteristics make driving unsuitable. The problem is magnified by infrequent public transportation. A need-assessment survey for an autonomous vehicle at a community event suggested the applicability of small electric vehicle Toyota COMS. The vehicle is then equipped with features like automatic driving and platooning. The autonomous drive system is built to develop an intelligent transport system (ITS) using various sensors and actuators. Stereo camera and ultrasonic sensors were used to get a judgment of obstacle. Google earth and GPS were used to generate the target path using the Bezier curve method and optimized route is chosen.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 1714

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