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2015-06-24
WIP Standard
J1939-90
SAE J1939 OBD Traceability Matrix defines the SAE J1939 messages that should be used to meet OBD standardization requirements which may include readiness, data stream, freeze frame, Test Results, In-Use Performance Ratio (IUPR), and vehicle inducements. J1939 messages used to comply with the California Air Resource Board (CARB), Environment Protection Agency (EPA), or European Union (EU) regulated OBD requirements are described.
2015-06-22
WIP Standard
J1939DA
This document is intended to supplement the J1939 documents by offering the J1939 information in a form that can be sorted and search for easier use. The J1939 Digital Annex, introduced in August 2013, offers key J1939 technical data in an Electronic Spreadsheet that can be easily searched, sorted, and adapted to other formats. J1939DA contains all of the SPNs (parameters), PGNs (messages), and other J1939 data previously published in the SAE J1939 top level document. J1939DA also contains all of the SLOTs, Manufacturer ID Codes, NAME Functions, and Preferred Addresses previously published in the SAE J1939 top level and the J1939-71 document. J1939DA contains the complete technical details for all of the SPNs and PGNs previously published in the SAE J1939-71 document. It also includes the supporting descriptions and figures previously published in the SAE J1939-71 document.
2015-06-12
WIP Standard
AIR6511
This document shall provide the fundamental safety considerations in pursuing the design of a 48/60 VDC aircraft electrical system. This departure from the current standard of 28 VDC will provide the benefits of reducing the operational weight and fuel consumption of the aircraft by increasing the DC system voltage level.
2015-06-10
Standard
J1939/71_201506
The SAE J1939 communications network is developed for use in heavy-duty environments and suitable for horizontally integrated vehicle industries. The SAE J1939 communications network is applicable for light-duty, medium-duty, and heavy- duty vehicles used on-road or off-road, and for appropriate stationary applications which use vehicle derived components (e.g., generator sets). Vehicles of interest include, but are not limited to, on-highway and off-highway trucks and their trailers, construction equipment, and agricultural equipment and implements.   SAE J1939-71 Vehicle Application Layer is the SAE J1939 reference document for the conventions and notations that specify parameter placement in PGN data fields, the conventions for ASCII parameters, and conventions for PGN transmission rates.
2015-06-04
Standard
J1939/82_201506
SAE J1939-82 Compliance describes the compliance tests and procedures to verify an SAE J1939 ECU will operate correctly on a SAE J1939 network. The purpose of these compliance procedures is to generate one or more test documents that outline the tests needed to assure that an ECU that is designed to operate as a node on a SAE J1939 network would do so correctly. SAE does not certify devices and these tests and their results do not constitute endorsement by SAE of any particular device. These tests are presented to allow testing of a device to determine self-compliance by the manufacturer of a device. The manufacturer can use its record of what procedures were run successfully to show the level of compliance with SAE J1939.
2015-05-26
WIP Standard
J2735
This SAE Standard specifies a message set, and its data frames and data elements specifically for use by applications intended to utilize the 5.9 GHz Dedicated Short Range Communications for Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments (DSRC/WAVE, referenced in this document simply as “DSRC”), communications systems. Although the scope of this Standard is focused on DSRC, this message set, and its data frames and data elements have been designed, to the extent possible, to also be of potential use for applications that may be deployed in conjunction with other wireless communications technologies. This Standard therefore specifies the definitive message structure and provides sufficient background information to allow readers to properly interpret the message definitions from the point of view of an application developer implementing the messages according to the DSRC Standards.
2015-05-20
Book
This is the electronic format of the Journal.
2015-05-12
Standard
J1939DA_201505
This document is intended to supplement the J1939 documents by offering the J1939 information in a form that can be sorted and search for easier use. The J1939 Digital Annex, introduced in August 2013, offers key J1939 technical data in an Electronic Spreadsheet that can be easily searched, sorted, and adapted to other formats. J1939DA contains all of the SPNs (parameters), PGNs (messages), and other J1939 data previously published in the SAE J1939 top level document. J1939DA also contains all of the SLOTs, Manufacturer ID Codes, NAME Functions, and Preferred Addresses previously published in the SAE J1939 top level and the J1939-71 document. J1939DA contains the complete technical details for all of the SPNs and PGNs previously published in the SAE J1939-71 document. It also includes the supporting descriptions and figures previously published in the SAE J1939-71 document.
2015-05-11
WIP Standard
J1939/13
SAE J1939-13 specifies the diagnostic connectors used for off-board connection to a vehicle’s SAE J1939 communication links. The defined diagnostic connectors support connection to the twisted shielded pair media (SAE J1939-11), the Reduced Physical Layer unshielded twisted pair (SAE J1939-15), the unshielded twisted pair of SAE J1939-14, as well as the twisted unshielded quad media (ISO 11783-2).
2015-05-11
WIP Standard
J2286
The interface document SAE J2286 revises the requirements for file formats as described in SAE J1924. This document describes Interface 1 (I/F 1) in SAE J2214, SAE J1708. This document does not imply the use of a specific hardware interface, but may be used with other hardware interfaces such as SAE J1939. The requirements of SAE J2286 supersede the requirements defined by SAE J1924.
2015-04-30
Standard
J2735_201504
This SAE Standard specifies a message set, and its data frames and data elements specifically for use by applications intended to utilize the 5.9 GHz Dedicated Short Range Communications for Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments (DSRC/WAVE, referenced in this document simply as “DSRC”), communications systems. Although the scope of this Standard is focused on DSRC, this message set, and its data frames and data elements have been designed, to the extent possible, to also be of potential use for applications that may be deployed in conjunction with other wireless communications technologies. This Standard therefore specifies the definitive message structure and provides sufficient background information to allow readers to properly interpret the message definitions from the point of view of an application developer implementing the messages according to the DSRC Standards.
2015-04-30
Standard
J1939/21_201504
The SAE J1939 documents are intended for light, medium, and heavy-duty vehicles used on or off road as well as appropriate stationary applications which use vehicle derived components (e.g., generator sets). Vehicles of interest include, but are not limited to, on- and off-highway trucks and their trailers, construction equipment, and agricultural equipment and implements. The purpose of these documents is to provide an open interconnect system for electronic systems. It is the intention of these documents to allow Electronic Control Units to communicate with each other by providing a standard architecture. This particular document, SAE J1939-21, describes the data link layer using the CAN protocol with 29-bit Identifiers. For SAE J1939 no alternative data link layers are permitted.
2015-04-23
WIP Standard
J1939/15
This document describes a physical layer utilizing Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) cable with extended stub lengths for flexibility in ECU placement and network topology. Also, connectors are not specified. CAN controllers are now available which support the newly introduced CAN Flexible Data Rate Frame format (known as “CAN FD”). These controllers, when used on SAE J1939-15 networks, must be restricted to use only the Classical Frame format compliant to ISO 11989-1 (2003). These SAE Recommended Practices are intended for light- and heavy-duty vehicles on- or off-road as well as appropriate stationary applications which use vehicle derived components (e.g., generator sets). Vehicles of interest include but are not limited to: on- and off-highway trucks and their trailers; construction equipment; and agricultural equipment and implements.
2015-04-15
WIP Standard
AS4805A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers the general requirements for the design, manufacture, and test of Solid State Power Controllers (SSPCs) of both dc and ac ratings for use in electrical power systems. SSPCs conforming to this standard are intended for use in controlling the making and breaking of power circuits for electrically operated equipment and devices, and for providing overload and short-circuit protection.
2015-04-15
WIP Standard
J1939/14
This document defines a physical layer having a higher bandwidth capacity than other physical layers defined for SAE J1939. Newer transceiver technologies are utilized to minimize EMI. This SAE Recommended Practice is intended for light- and heavy-duty vehicles on- or off-road as well as appropriate stationary applications which use vehicle derived components (e.g., generator sets). Vehicles of interest include but are not limited to: on- and off-highway trucks and their trailers; construction equipment; and agricultural equipment and implements.
2015-04-15
Book
“Spotlight on Design” features video interviews and case study segments, focusing on the latest technology breakthroughs. Viewers are virtually taken to labs and research centers to learn how design engineers are enhancing product performance/reliability, reducing cost, improving quality, safety or environmental impact, and achieving regulatory compliance. In the episode “Automated Vehicles: Sensors and Future Technologies” (24:31), highly automated driving is looked at in detail as the culmination of years of research in automotive technology, sensors, infrastructure, software, and systems integration. Real-life case studies show how organizations are actually developing solutions to the challenge of making cars safer with less driver intervention. IAV Automotive Engineering demonstrates how a highly automated vehicle capable of lane changing was created.
2015-04-15
WIP Standard
J1939/11
This document defines a physical layer having a robust immunity to EMI and physical properties suitable for harsh environments. These SAE Recommended Practices are intended for light- and heavy-duty vehicles on- or off-road as well as appropriate stationary applications which use vehicle derived components (e.g., generator sets). Vehicles of interest include but are not limited to: on- and off-highway trucks and their trailers; construction equipment; and agricultural equipment and implements.
2015-04-14
WIP Standard
AS6509
Fibre Channel is the primary avionics bus on many modern military aircraft. It is also the defined High-Speed bus for MIL-STD-1760E weapons applications. Profiled Ethernet networks are the primary avionics bus in many commercial aircraft and Commercial Ethernet is an ever increasing presence in modern military aircraft as well. This network standard is a convergence of Fibre Channel and Ethernet into a unified network standard which will provide a seamless approach to integrating end systems from either technology into a merged network structure. This work is based upon the commercial data storage market industry’s work on the Converged Data Storage Network or FCoE (Fibre Channel over Ethernet). This effort will look at profiling the FCoE work done in the commercial industry and adding information where necessary to affect a networking standard that will seamlessly integrate end systems from Commercial Ethernet, Fibre Channel, or FCoE enhanced devices.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0239
Markus Ernst, Markus Heuermann
Abstract Due to the development towards automated or even autonomous driving, an increasing number of assistance systems and inherent networks of data and power will be required in vehicles. The main challenge for this development is the coordination of these functions and the securing of functionalities in terms of failure. Living organisms are capable of efficiently coordinating a large number of paths to transmit information and energy. They dispose of tested mechanisms as well as structures which offer certain robustness and fault tolerance. Prudent redundancy in energy supply, communication and safeguarding of function ensures that the system as a whole remains capable of operating even when there are disruptions. Vehicles, which are being fitted with ever more assistance systems, must perform comparably. The transformation of these structures and functional principles from nature into technical solutions is combined within the keyword ‘bionic’.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0229
Zhongwen Zhu, Xu Wang, Wei Huang, Jinfeng Gong
Abstract Pure electric vehicles are recognized as one of the most important new energy vehicle types to meet the increasingly stringent standards in energy saving and environment protection. To meet the control demands, China Automotive Technology & Research Center(CATARC) plan to develop an advanced Vehicle Control Platform(VCP) for pure electric vehicles. The developed VCP is well structured on both hardware and software and can be adapted to different pure electric vehicles easily. This paper describes the design of the hardware, the software architecture, the base software and the control strategy applied in the VCP in detail. A matching method is proposed to configure the VCP to a real VCU for the specific application by modifying the hardware channel definition and the control parameters. The paper shows successful application of the VCP on several types of pure electric vehicles.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0234
Vincenzo Sacco, Mathieu Poezart, Gael F. Close
Abstract This paper presents the engineering aspects of an integrated, monolithic, angular position sensor to be developed as Safety Element out of Context (SEooC) in accordance with ISO-26262[1]. The sensor is a Hall-effect-based angular sensor, used in a wide range of automotive, safety-critical applications such as accelerator pedal position, throttle-valve position, or any other application requiring the accurate measurement of the angular position of a mechanical part. The assumed safety requirements allocated to this sensor have to be developed according to ASIL-C. The mapping between technical safety requirements and architecture elements, as conveyed by the technical safety concept, will be first presented. Failure mode effect and Diagnostic Analysis (FMEDA)[2], supporting the safety mechanism specification will be discussed next; here a safety mechanism selection guide is also proposed.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0236
Matthias Lenhart-Rydzek, Markus Rau, Matthias Ebert
Abstract Improving the energy balance of vehicles is an effective way of lowering CO2 emissions. Among other things, this does entail mounting demands on the power wiring system. The intention is, for instance, to adapt the drive train to facilitate such functions as more efficient recuperation, e-boost and sailing with the aid of a 48V starter generator and a 48V battery. In addition, it is a matter of electrifying mechanical components with the aim of energy-efficient demand management to save fuel. The 48V power wiring system as an addition to the 12V system is a promising option where the task is to make the low-voltage wiring system of vehicles in the mass-market segment more powerful. Raising system voltage to 48V has the effect of fundamentally improving the efficiency of electricity generation and power distribution in the vehicle because of the reduced current and therefore the diminished ohmic losses.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0273
Helmut Martin, Martin Krammer, Bernhard Winkler, Christian Schwarzl
Abstract Although the ISO 26262 provides requirements and recommendations for an automotive functional safety lifecycle, practical guidance on how to handle these safety activities and safety artifacts is still lacking. This paper provides an overview of a semi-formal safety engineering approach based on SysML for specifying the relevant safety artifacts in the concept phase. Using specific diagram types, different views of the available data can be provided that reflects the specific needs of the stakeholders involved. One objective of this work is to improve the common understanding of the relevant safety aspects during the system design. The approach, which is demonstrated here from the perspective of a Tier1 supplier for an automotive battery system, covers different breakdown levels of a vehicle. The safety workflow presented here supports engineers' efforts to meet the safety standard ISO 26262 in a systematic way.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0268
Pablo Oliveira Antonino, Mario Trapp, Ashwin Venugopal
Abstract Evidence has shown that the lack of traceability between safety requirements and both architecture and failure propagation models is a key reason for the incompleteness and inconsistency of safety requirements, and, consequently, a root cause of safety incidents. In this regard, this paper presents checks for the automatic detection of incompleteness and inconsistency of safety requirements with respect to failure propagation models and architecture. First, the notion of safety requirements completeness and consistency was decomposed into small manageable pieces called Safety Requirement Completeness and Consistency Criteria. Breaking the complex notions of completeness and consistency into finer grains was important to allow systematic and precise elaboration of the completeness and consistency checks.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0290
Amin Tahmasbi-Sarvestani, Hadi Kazemi, Yaser P. Fallah, Mohammad Naserian, Allan Lewis
Abstract Pedestrians account for a significant ratio of traffic fatalities; as a result, research on methods of reducing vehicle-pedestrian crashes is of importance. In this paper, we describe a system architecture that allows the use of vehicle-to-pedestrian (V2P) communication as a means of generating situational awareness and eventually predicting hazards and warning drivers and pedestrians. In contrast, vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication for safety applications, V2P has not received much attention. One major reason for this lack of attention had been the unavailability of communication mechanisms between pedestrians and vehicles. Recent advances in enabling Wi-Fi and dedicated short range communication (DSRC) based communication using smart-phones is changing this picture. As a result, V2P communication can be considered as a possible solution.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0286
Radovan Miucic, David Weber
Abstract Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) for vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) cooperative applications for advanced safety is becoming a reality. Many automotive manufactures are entering advanced research phases or even planning deployments of such applications in the near future. However, the success of most V2V applications requires full or near-full deployment of the DSRC devices in new and existing vehicles, which will take many years to accomplish. In the meantime, use of autonomous sensors in combination with V2V can augment this deployment transitional period. In this paper we propose a hybrid approach that uses autonomous sensors to rebroadcast information about unequipped neighboring vehicles. In addition to messages that a host vehicle sends about its own state (such as position, speed, and direction), additional sensing capabilities also allow sending information about neighboring vehicles.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0288
Virendra Kumar, William Whyte
Abstract IEEE Standard 1609.2-2013, Security Services for Applications and Management Messages for Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments (WAVE), specifies its data structures and encoding using a proprietary language based on that used in the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)'s Transport Layer Security (TLS) specification. This approach is believed to allow fast encoding and decoding, but is non-standard, is not proved to be complete, lacks automatic tools for generation of codecs, and is difficult to extend. For these reasons, the 1609 Working Group approved the use of Abstract Syntax Notation 1 (ASN.1) for future versions of 1609.2, so long as ASN.1 did not significantly degrade performance. This paper is the first publication of the results of a performance analysis carried out to determine whether ASN.1-based encoding was in fact acceptable.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0283
Allan Lewis, Mohammad Naserian
Abstract Pedestrians A method of locating a charging target device (vehicle) in a parking lot scenario by the evaluation of Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) of the Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) signal and Global Positioning System (GPS) data is proposed in this paper. A metric call Location Image (LI) is defined based on the RSSI received from each charger and the physical location of the parking associated to that charger. The central parking lot processor logs the GPS coordinates and LI received from the vehicle. Each pairing attempt by a vehicle loads a new LI into the central processor's database. Utilizing the LI and the proposed methods the vehicle will achieve expedited charger to system pairing while in the company of multiple chargers.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0603
Robert A. Smith, Mikel Petty
Abstract Poly(butylene terephthalate) stock with 0, 15, and 30% glass fiber filler, used in the housings of electrical connectors on hybrid and electric vehicles, was examined by creep and stress relaxation for viscous deformation and modulus loss at 25, 75, 125, and 150°C. Sets of virgin and aged samples were examined within each set then compared to each other. Both the virgin and aged samples showed little viscous deformation or modulus reduction at 25°C, which was below the Tg of 40°C. Thermoplastic creep and stress relaxation was observed at the temperatures above Tg with, expectedly, more sample distortion and stiffness loss observed at higher test temperatures and lower filler contents both in virgin and unaged samples. Aged samples became stiffer, and more resistant to irrecoverable strain and stress relaxation than virgin samples indicating connectors to have a “self-healing” aspect through in-service use at elevated temperatures.
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