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Viewing 1 to 19 of 19
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1504
Monica Lynn Haumann Jones, Sheila Ebert-Hamilton, Matthew Reed
Abstract Law enforcement officers (LEO) make extensive use of vehicles to perform their jobs, often spending large portions of a shift behind the wheel. Few LEO vehicles are purpose-built; the vast majority are modified civilian vehicles. Data from the field indicate that LEO suffer from relatively high levels musculoskeletal injury that may be due in part to poor accommodation provided by their vehicles. LEO are also exposed to elevated crash injury risk, which may be exacerbated by a compromise in the performance of the occupant restraint systems due to body-borne equipment. A pilot study was conducted to demonstrate the application of three-dimensional anthropometric scanning and measurement technology to address critical concerns related to vehicle design. Detailed posture and belt fit data were gathered from five law enforcement officers as they sat in the patrol vehicles that they regularly used and in a mockup of a mid-sized vehicle.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1357
Junyi Chen, Bangshui Jiang, Shutao Song, Hongyan Wang, Xuguang Wang
Abstract Driving posture study is essential for the evaluation of the occupant packaging. This paper presents a method of reconstructing driver’s postures in a real vehicle using a 3D laser scanner and Human Builder (HB), the digital human modeling tool under CATIA. The scanning data was at first converted into the format readable by CATIA, and then a personalized HB manikin was generated mainly using stature, sitting height and weight. Its pelvis position and joint angles were manually adjusted so as to match the manikin with the scan envelop. If needed, a fine adjustment of some anthropometric dimensions was also preceded. Finally the personalized manikin was put in the vehicle coordinate system, and joint angels and joint positions were extracted for further analysis.
2015-11-09
Technical Paper
2015-22-0013
Erwan Jolivet, Yoann Lafon, Philippe Petit, Philippe Beillas
Finite Element Human Body Models (HBM) have become powerful tools to study the response to impact. However, they are typically only developed for a limited number of sizes and ages. Various approaches driven by control points have been reported in the literature for the non-linear scaling of these HBM into models with different geometrical characteristics. The purpose of this study is to compare the performances of commonly used control points based interpolation methods in different usage scenarios. Performance metrics include the respect of target, the mesh quality and the runability. For this study, the Kriging and Moving Least square interpolation approaches were compared in three test cases. The first two cases correspond to changes of anthropometric dimensions of (1) a child model (from 6 to 1.5 years old) and (2) the GHBMC M50 model (Global Human Body Models Consortium, from 50th to 5th percentile female).
2014-11-10
Technical Paper
2014-22-0013
Nicholas A. Vavalle, Samantha L. Schoell, Ashley A. Weaver, Joel D. Stitzel, F. Scott Gayzik
Human body finite element models (FEMs) are a valuable tool in the study of injury biomechanics. However, the traditional model development process can be time-consuming. Scaling and morphing an existing FEM is an attractive alternative for generating morphologically distinct models for further study. The objective of this work is to use a radial basis function to morph the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) average male model (M50) to the body habitus of a 95th percentile male (M95) and to perform validation tests on the resulting model. The GHBMC M50 model (v. 4.3) was created using anthropometric and imaging data from a living subject representing a 50th percentile male. A similar dataset was collected from a 95th percentile male (22,067 total images) and was used in the morphing process. Homologous landmarks on the reference (M50) and target (M95) geometries, with the existing FE node locations (M50 model), were inputs to the morphing algorithm.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0488
Peter Kempf
Abstract Discuss the basics of posturing and positioning of the full range of occupants necessary to cover the required anthropometric demographics in combat vehicles, both ground and air, since there are similarities to both and that they are both very different than the traditional automotive packaging scenarios. It is based on the Eye Reference Point and the Design Eye Point. Discuss the three Reach Zones: Primary, Secondary and Tertiary. Discuss Vision Zones and potentially ground intercepts. Discuss body clearances, both static and dynamic. Discuss the basic effects of packaging occupants with body armor with respect to SRP's and MSRP's.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0456
Se Jin Park, Seung Nam Min, Murali Subramaniyam, Dong-Hoon Lee, Heeran Lee, Dong Gyun Kim
Abstract Seating comfort is one of the most important indicators of the performance of automotive seats. The objective and subjective evaluation of seating comfort plays an important role in the development of seating systems. Objective methods are primarily based on evaluating the influence of vibrations on the driver's seat and assessing the seat pressure ratio. The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the comfort of two car seats (sedan and compact) by comparing a subjective technique with an objective technique like body pressure ratio for a sample of 12 subjects. The results show that the pressure ratio for IT (ischial tuberosity) and L4/L5 were significantly greater for the seat of a compact car than the seat of a sedan car. The subjective comfort was significantly greater for the seat of the sedan car and females than the seat of the compact car and males, respectively.
2013-11-11
Technical Paper
2013-22-0002
Matthew P. Reed, Sheila M. Ebert, Jason J. Hallman
A laboratory study of posture and belt fit was conducted with 46 men and 51 women, 61% of whom were age 60 years or older and 32% age 70 years or older. In addition, 28% of the 97 participants were obese, defined as body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2. A mockup of a passenger vehicle driver's station was created and five belt anchorage configurations were produced by moving the buckle, outboard-upper (D-ring), and outboard-lower anchorages. An investigator recorded the three-dimensional locations of landmarks on the belt and the participant's body using a coordinate measurement machine. The location of the belt with respect to the underlying skeletal structures was analyzed, along with the length of belt webbing. Using linear regression models, an increase in age from 20 to 80 years resulted in the lap belt positioned 18 mm further forward relative to the pelvis, 26 mm greater lap belt webbing length, and 19 mm greater shoulder belt length.
2013-11-11
Technical Paper
2013-22-0003
David Poulard, François Bermond, Karine Bruyère
Thoracic injuries are a major cause of mortality in frontal collisions, especially for elderly female and obese people. Car occupant individual characteristics like age, gender and Body Mass Index (BMI) are known to influence human vulnerability tolerance in crashes. The objective of the this study was to perform in vivo test experiments to quantify the influence of subject characteristics in terms of age, gender and anthropometry and on thorax mechanical response variability under belt loading. Thirty-nine relaxed volunteers of different anthropometries, genders and age were submitted to non-injurious sled tests (4 g, 8 km/h) with a sled buck representing the environment of a front passenger restrained by a 3-point belt. A resulting shoulder belt force FRes was computed using the external and internal shoulder belt loads and considering shoulder belt geometry.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0085
Jun Huang, Bingbing Nie, Long Zeng, Yong Xia, Qing Zhou
The issue of car-to-pedestrian impact safety has received more and more attention. For leg protection, a legform impactor with 2 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) proposed by EEVC is required in current regulations for injury assessment, and the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association Inc. (JAMA) and Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI) have developed a more biofidelic pedestrian legform since 2000. However, studies show that those existing legforms may not be able to cover some car-to-pedestrian impact situations. This paper documents the development of a new pedestrian legform with 4 DOFs at the knee-joint. It can better represent the kinematics characteristics of human knee-joint, especially under loading conditions in omni-direction impacts. The design challenge is to solve the packaging problem, including design of the knee-joint mechanisms and layout of all the sensors in a limited space of the legform.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0521
Landon Onyebueke, Akindeji Ojetola, Edward Winkler
This paper presents a PC based mathematical and rapid prototyping technique for anthropometric accommodation in a maintenance environment using the principle of simulation based design. The developed technique is capable of analyzing anthropometric data using multivariate (Principal component Analysis) approach to describe the body size variability of any given population. A number of body size representative cases are established which, when used properly within the constraints of the maintenance environments, will ensure the accommodation of a desired percentage of a population. This technique evaluates the percentage accommodation of a given population for the environment using the specific manikin cases as boundary conditions. In the case where any member of a maintenance crew cannot be accommodated, the technique has the capability of informing the designer of the environment why the member(s) is/are not accommodated.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0256
Anoop Chawla, Sudipto Mukherjee, Ratnakar Marathe, Rajesh Malhotra
Many research groups are developing Human Body FE Models (FE-HBM) as a tool to be used in safety research. The FE-HBM's currently available are in certain fixed postures. Repositioning of model in alternate postures is needed for use in out of position (OOP) occupant simulations and different pedestrian posture simulations. Postural change in upper extremity can be split two processes, viz, repositioning of spinal vertebra and repositioning of the soft tissue associated with the spine. The objective of this study is to establish a methodology to regenerate pelvis flesh with change in spine/pelvis position. The outer profile of the pelvis flesh should ideally be parametrically described with respect to the associated hard tissues which is not the case in existing FE-HBM's. The affine invariant (Farin, 1990) property of cubic Bezier curves is used in this study.
2011-01-19
Technical Paper
2011-26-0108
Dileep Kulkarni, Ranjan S, Vivek Chitodkar, Varada Gurjar, C. V. Ghaisas, A. V. Mannikar
Anthropometric data of a country is vital database for automotive design and other design applications. It is also an important parameter in population studies. Most developed countries have invested resources over the years to develop such a database and this information is accessed by many OEMs and major Design Houses. However, an updated and comprehensive Anthropometry of Indian Population is largely unknown. In the past, a few institutions have done projects to bring out a picture of the Indian Anthropometry. However, keeping in view the rapid industrialization and increase of India-specific designs which require an access to latest Anthropometric database, the project “SIZE INDIA” has been initiated. For the first time in India, a state of the art 3D Whole body scanner technology has been used and thereby large volume of data has been generated in a very short span of time.
2007-10-29
Technical Paper
2007-22-0012
Lynne E. Bilston, Nipun Sagar
The objective of this study was to evaluate the geometry of a wide range of restraints (child restraints, booster seats and rear seats) used by children, and how these match their anthropometry, and to determine limitations to restraint size for the population of children using them. The study is motivated by the widespread premature graduation from one restraint type to another, which parents often attribute to children outgrowing their previous restraint. Currently, recommended transitions are based on a small sample of vehicles and children. Outboard rear seat and seat belt geometry (anchorage locations, sash belt angles) from 50 current model vehicles were measured using a custom-developed measuring jig. For 17 child restraints, a 3-dimensional measuring arm was used to measure the geometry of the restraint including interior size and strap slot locations (where relevant).
2006-11-06
Technical Paper
2006-22-0015
Suzanne Tylko, Dominique Charlebois, Alain Bussières, Dainius Dalmotas
Two manufacturers, Denton ATD and FTSS, currently produce the Hybrid III 5th percentile female dummy. In response to concerns raised by industry that differences in the anthropometry of the molded breasts between the two manufacturers may influence chest responses, Transport Canada conducted a comparative testing program. Thorax biofidelity tests were conducted to compare force-deflection characteristics; full-frontal, rigid-barrier tests were conducted at 40, 48 and 56 km/h to compare chest responses, and out-of-position chest on module static airbag deployment tests were conducted to compare peak chest deflections of the Denton and FTSS dummy jackets and of a prototype jacket without breasts. Differences in force-deflection characteristics were observed during biofidelity pendulum impacts of the two dummies, with much of the differences attributed to the different chest jackets.
2002-11-11
Technical Paper
2002-22-0020
Christopher E. Hilker, Narayan Yoganandan, Frank A. Pintar
The purpose of this study was to determine scale factors for small, mid-size and large adults using a caprine model. In a previous study conducted in our lab, scaling relationships were developed to define cervical spine tolerance values of children using caprine specimens. In that study, tolerances were normalized with respect to an average adult. Because airbag-related injuries are associated with out-of-position children and small adult females, additional experimental data are needed to better estimate human tolerance. In the present study, cervical spine radiographs from the 5th, 50th and 95th percentile human adults were used to determine vertebral body heights for small, mid-size and large anthropometries. Mean human vertebral body heights were computed for each anthropometry and were normalized with respect to mid-size anthropometry.
2001-07-09
Technical Paper
2001-01-2186
Jordi Elvira, Albert Catalán, Xantal Borràs, Albert Tomàs, Miquel Pastor, José Manuel González de Suso, Antonio Turmo, Xavier Balius
NTE is developing a system for neuromuscular research (MARES: Muscular Atrophy Research and Exercise System). This system is an ergometer to be flown and installed in the International Space Station in the year 2004 and is consisting of a motor, an HRS (Human Restraint System) and a control electronics that controls the motor. The subject is connected to the motor by means of the restraining system HRS. This ergometer can be used for 11 movements (wrist flexion/extension, pronation/supination and radial/ulnar deviation, trunk flexion/extension, arm pull/press, leg pull/press, elbow flexion/extension, Shoulder flexion/extension, hip flexion/extension, knee flexion/extension and ankle dorsal/plantar flexion). MARES is a research tool for physiologists, but also interesting for human factors people. It is a tool to quantitatively measure the physical condition of a person before performing a physically demanding task (e.g.
2001-07-09
Technical Paper
2001-01-2185
Michael W. Lee, Cesar G. Lizarazo, Sharath Rao, Lawrence J.H. Schulze
In this paper, an anthropometric study was undertaken in order to evaluate civilian office workers from a multinational petrochemical company. The purpose of the assessment was to generate a description of the workforce and compare civilian body dimensions to those of a reference population of astronauts and astronaut applicants from 1985 to 1991. In this paper, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was performed to determine whether the anthropometric dimensions of the civilian workers are normally distributed. Our results show that of the eleven dimensions tested on the population as a whole and within the male population, only one parameter, hand length, was not normally distributed. Within the female population, only shoulder breadth was not normally distributed. Additionally, a t-test comparison of our database to the reference population found that when comparing the whole population, only height could be considered statistically comparable.
2001-06-04
Technical Paper
2001-06-0182
Richard Kent, Edwin Sieveka, Jeff Crandall
This paper presents a computational study of the effects of three parameters on the resulting thoracic injury criteria in side impacts. The parameters evaluated are a) door velocity-time (V-t) profile, b) door interior padding modulus, and c) initial door-to-occupant offset. Regardless of pad modulus, initial offset, or the criterion used to assess injury, higher peak door velocity is shown to correspond with more severe injury. Injury outcome is not, however, found to be sensitive to the door velocity at the time of first occupant contact. A larger initial offset generally is found to result in lower injury, even when the larger offset results in a higher door velocity at occupant contact, because the increased offset results in contact later in the door V-t profile - closer to the point at which the door velocity begins to decrease. Cases of contradictory injury criteria trends are identified, particularly in response to changes in the pad modulus.
2000-11-01
Technical Paper
2000-01-SC01
Keith A. Seyer, Craig Newland
This paper reports on a cooperative research project between the Australian Department of Transport and Regional Services and Transport Canada. This project was a parametric study aimed at better understanding the effects on side impact injury risk of: trolley mass; barrier stiffness; barrier stiffness distribution; barrier face height above ground; crabbed or perpendicular impact; and impact Speed. The following observations on injury risk can be made from the tests: the 2 largest effects for the driver are increasing the height of the barrier face (mainly thoracic) and test speed (all body regions). Increasing the trolley mass, with a bullet / target mass ratio less than 1, has the effect of increasing only the pubic force. Doubling the barrier stiffness increases injury risk in only the pelvic area. The custom high and stiff element (attempting to replicate an SUV) increases both pelvic and abdominal loading.
Viewing 1 to 19 of 19

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