Criteria

Text:
Content:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 75
CURRENT
2017-10-04
Standard
J1297_201710
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
2017-09-28
WIP Standard
J2600
SAE J2600 applies to the design and testing of Compressed Hydrogen Surface Vehicle (CHSV) fueling connectors, nozzles, and receptacles. Connectors, nozzles, and receptacles must meet all SAE J2600 requirements and pass all SAE J2600 testing to be considered as SAE J2600 compliant. This document applies to devices which have Pressure Classes of H11, H25, H35, H50 or H70. 1.1 Purpose SAE J2600 is intended to: • Prevent vehicles from being fueled with a Pressure Class greater than the vehicle Pressure Class; • Allow vehicles to be fueled with Pressure Class equal to or less than the vehicle Pressure Class, • Prevent vehicles from being fueled by other compressed gases dispensing stations; • Prevent other gaseous fueled vehicles from being fueled by hydrogen dispensing stations.
CURRENT
2017-03-06
Standard
J1616_201703
Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is a practical automotive fuel, with advantages and disadvantages when compared to gasoline. Large quantities of natural gas are available in North America. It has a higher octane number rating, produces low exhaust emissions, no evaporative emissions and can cost less on an equivalent energy basis than other fuels. Natural gas is normally compressed from 20 684 to 24 821 kPa (3000 to 3600 psig) to increase its energy density thereby reducing its on-board vehicle storage volume for a given range and payload. CNG can also be made from liquefied natural gas by elevating its pressure and vaporizing it to a gas. Once converted it is referred to LCNG.
HISTORICAL
2016-05-12
Standard
J1616_201605
Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is a practical automotive fuel, with advantages and disadvantages when compared to gasoline. Large quantities of natural gas are available in North America. It has a higher octane number rating, produces low exhaust emissions, no evaporative emissions and can cost less on an equivalent energy basis than other fuels. Natural gas is normally compressed from 20 684 to 24 821 kPa (3000 to 3600 psig) to increase its energy density thereby reducing its on-board vehicle storage volume for a given range and payload. CNG can also be made from liquefied natural gas by elevating its pressure and vaporizing it to a gas. Once converted it is referred to LCNG.
CURRENT
2015-11-11
Standard
J2719_201511
This Standard provides background information and a hydrogen fuel quality standard for commercial proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell vehicles. This Report also provides background information on how this standard was developed by the Hydrogen Quality Task Force (HQTF) of the Interface Working Group (IWG) of the SAE Fuel Cell Standards Committee.
CURRENT
2015-10-21
Standard
J2600_201510
SAE J2600 applies to the design and testing of Compressed Hydrogen Surface Vehicle (CHSV) fueling connectors, nozzles, and receptacles. Connectors, nozzles, and receptacles must meet all SAE J2600 requirements and pass all SAE J2600 testing to be considered as SAE J2600 compliant. This document applies to devices which have Pressure Classes of H11, H25, H35, H50 or H70.
2015-02-13
WIP Standard
ARP4955B
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is to establish guidelines for the measurement of static and dynamic characteristic properties of aircraft tires. It is intended as a general guide toward standard practice, but may be subject to frequent changes to keep pace with experience and technical advances.
CURRENT
2014-12-11
Standard
J3050_201412
CURRENT
2014-09-24
Standard
J2601/2_201409
The purpose of this document is to provide performance requirements for hydrogen dispensing systems used for fueling 35 MPa heavy duty hydrogen transit buses and vehicles (other pressures are optional). This document establishes the boundary conditions for safe heavy duty hydrogen surface vehicle fueling, such as safety limits and performance requirements for gaseous hydrogen fuel dispensers used to fuel hydrogen transit buses. For fueling light-duty vehicles SAE J2601 should be used. SAE J2601-2 is a performance based protocol document that also provides guidance to fueling system builders, manufacturers of gaseous hydrogen powered heavy duty transit buses, and operators of the hydrogen powered vehicle fleet(s). This fueling protocol is suitable for heavy duty vehicles with a combined vehicle CHSS capacity larger than 10 kilograms aiming to support all practical capacities of transit buses.
CURRENT
2014-08-26
Standard
J2578_201408
This SAE Recommended Practice identifies and defines requirements relating to the safe integration of the fuel cell system, the hydrogen fuel storage and handling systems (as defined and specified in SAE J2579) and high voltage electrical systems into the overall Fuel Cell Vehicle. The document may also be applied to hydrogen vehicles with internal combustion engines. This document relates to the overall design, construction, operation and maintenance of fuel cell vehicles.
HISTORICAL
2014-07-15
Standard
J2601_201407
SAE J2601 establishes the protocol and process limits for hydrogen fueling of light duty vehicles. These process limits (including fuel temperature, the maximum fuel flow rate, and rate of pressure increase and end pressure) are affected by factors such as ambient temperature, fuel delivery temperature and initial pressure in the vehicle’s compressed hydrogen storage system. SAE J2601-2014 establishes standard fueling protocols based on a look-up table approach with performance targets. The current standard is table-based and provides concise performance targets for both communications and non-communications fueling as described in Sections 7 through 10. An important factor in the performance of hydrogen fueling is the station’s dispensing equipment cooling capability and the resultant fuel delivery temperature “T” rating. SAE J2601 has a reference fueling target of 3 minutes with 95-100% SOC (with communications) with a T40 rated dispenser as specified in section 6.1.
CURRENT
2014-06-16
Standard
J1892_201406
This SAE Recommended Practice describes the basic content requirements, bar-code specifications, and functional test specifications of a vehicle emission configuration (VEC) label. On the vehicle, the VEC label is to be mounted under the hood in a readily accessible location for use of a bar-code scanning device. This document specifies a permanent vehicle emission configuration label that can be automatically identified through a bar-coded format.
CURRENT
2014-02-21
Standard
J2191_201402
This SAE document defines a recommended practice for implementing circuit identification for electrical power and signal distribution systems of the Class 8 trucks and tractors. This document provides a description of a supplemental circuit identifier that shall be utilized in conjunction with the original equipment manufacturer’s primary circuit identification as used in wire harnesses but does not include electrical or electronic devices which have pigtails. The supplemental circuit identifier is cross-referenced to a specified subsystem of the power and signal distribution system identified in Section 5.
CURRENT
2013-11-05
Standard
J2847/1_201311
This document describes the details of the Smart Energy Profile 2.0 (SEP2.0) communication used to implement the functionality described in the SAE J2836/1™ use cases. Each use case subsection includes a description of the function provided, client device requirements, and sequence diagrams with description of the steps. Implementers are encouraged to consult the SEP2.0 Schema and Application Specification for further details. Where relevant, this document notes, but does formally specify, interactions between the vehicle and vehicle operator.
CURRENT
2013-05-14
Standard
J1747_201305
This SAE Recommended Practice presents standardized test methods developed for use in testing with hydrocarbon fuels or their surrogates and those same fuels when blended with oxygenated fuel additives. Hydrocarbon fuels include Gasoline and Diesel fuel or their surrogates described in SAE J1681. Oxygenated additives include Ethanol, Methanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) and Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAME or Biodiesel).
2013-04-02
WIP Standard
J2579
The purpose of this document is to define design, construction, operational, and maintenance requirements for hydrogen fuel storage and handling systems in on-road vehicles. Performance-based requirements for verification of design prototype and production hydrogen storage and handling systems are also defined in this document. Complementary test protocols (for use in type approval or self-certification) to qualify designs (and/or production) as meeting the specified performance requirements are described. Crashworthiness of hydrogen storage and handling systems is beyond the scope of this document. SAE J2578 includes requirements relating to crashworthiness and vehicle integration for fuel cell vehicles. It defines recommended practices related to the integration of hydrogen storage and handling systems, fuel cell system, and electrical systems into the overall Fuel Cell Vehicle.
CURRENT
2013-03-28
Standard
J2579_201303
The purpose of this document is to define design, construction, operational, and maintenance requirements for hydrogen fuel storage and handling systems in on-road vehicles. Performance-based requirements for verification of design prototype and production hydrogen storage and handling systems are also defined in this document. Complementary test protocols (for use in type approval or self-certification) to qualify designs (and/or production) as meeting the specified performance requirements are described. Crashworthiness of hydrogen storage and handling systems is beyond the scope of this document. SAE J2578 includes requirements relating to crashworthiness and vehicle integration for fuel cell vehicles. It defines recommended practices related to the integration of hydrogen storage and handling systems, fuel cell system, and electrical systems into the overall Fuel Cell Vehicle.
HISTORICAL
2012-11-19
Standard
J2600_201211
SAE J2600 applies to the design and testing of Compressed Hydrogen Surface Vehicle (CHSV) fueling connectors, nozzles, and receptacles. Connectors, nozzles, and receptacles must meet all SAE J2600 requirements and pass all SAE J2600 testing to be considered as SAE J2600 compliant. This document applies to devices which have Pressure Classes of H11, H25, H35, H50 or H70.
HISTORICAL
2011-09-20
Standard
J2594_201109
While there are various types of Fuel Cell architectures being developed, the focus of this document is on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell stacks and ancillary components for automotive propulsion applications. Within the boundaries of this document are the: Fuel Supply and Storage, Fuel Processor, Fuel Cell Stack, and Balance of Plant, as shown in Figure 1.
CURRENT
2011-09-06
Standard
J1151_201109
This SAE Recommended Practice describes instrumentation for determining the amount of methane in air and exhaust gas.
CURRENT
2011-09-06
Standard
J1515_201109
The guidelines in this SAE Information Report are directed at laboratory engine dynamometer test procedures with alternative fuels, and they are applicable to four-stroke and two-stroke cycle spark ignition (SI) and diesel (CI) engines (naturally aspirated or pressure charged, with or without charge air cooling). A brief overview of investigations with some alternative fuels can be found in SAE J1297. Other SAE documents covering vehicle, engine, or component testing may be affected by use of alternative fuels. Some of the documents that may be affected can be found in Appendix A. Guidelines are provided for the engine power test code (SAE J1349) in Appendix D. The principles of these guidelines may apply to other procedures and codes, but the effects have not been investigated. The report is organized into four technical sections, each dealing with an important aspect of testing or reporting of results when using alternative fuels.
CURRENT
2011-08-12
Standard
J2616_201108
This recommended practice is intended to serve as a design verification procedure and not a product qualification procedure. It may be used to verify design specifications or vendor claims. Test procedures, methods and definitions for the performance of the fuel processor subsystem (FPS) of a fuel cell system (FCS) are provided. Fuel processor subsystems (FPS) include all components required in the conversion of input fuel and oxidizer into a hydrogen-rich product gas stream suitable for use in fuel cells. Performance of the fuel processor subsystem includes evaluating system energy inputs and useful outputs to determine fuel conversion efficiency and where applicable the overall thermal effectiveness. Each of these performance characterizations will be determined to an uncertainty of less than ± 2% of the value. The method allows for the evaluation of fuel processor subsystems for two general cases.
CURRENT
2011-08-12
Standard
J2617_201108
This recommended practice is intended to serve as a procedure to verify the functional performance, design specifications or vendor claims of any PEM (Proton Exchange Membrane) type fuel cell stack sub-system for automotive applications. In this document, definitions, specifications, and methods for the functional performance characterization of the fuel cell stack sub-system are provided. The functional performance characterization includes evaluating electrical outputs and controlling fluid inputs and outputs based on the test boundary defined in this document. In this document, a fuel cell stack sub-system is defined to include the following: Fuel cell stack(s) – An assembly of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA), current collectors, separator plates, cooling plates, manifolds, and a supporting structure. Connections for conducting fuels, oxidants, cooling media, inert gases and exhausts. Electrical connections for the power delivered by the stack sub-system.
CURRENT
2011-07-08
Standard
J2699_201107
This SAE Information Report applies to liquefied natural gas used as vehicle fuel and requires LNG producers to provide the required information on the fuel composition and its “dispense by” date.
HISTORICAL
2011-05-09
Standard
J2847/1_201105
This SAE Recommended Practice SAE J2847/1 establishes requirements and specifications for communication between plug-in electric vehicles and the electric power grid, for energy transfer and other applications. Where relevant, this document notes, but does formally specify, interactions between the vehicle and vehicle operator.
HISTORICAL
2011-05-02
Standard
J1555_201105
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to all portions of the vehicle, but design efforts should focus on components and systems with the highest contribution to the overall average repair cost (see 3.7). The costs to be minimized include not only insurance premiums, but also out-of-pocket costs incurred by the owner. Damageability, repairability, serviceability and diagnostics are inter-related. Some repairability, serviceability and diagnostics operations may be required for collision or comprehensive loss-related causes only, some operations for non-collision-related causes only (warranty, scheduled maintenance, non-scheduled maintenance, etc.), and some for both causes. The scope of this document deals with only those operations that involve collision and comprehensive insurance loss repairs.
CURRENT
2010-08-04
Standard
AIR5373A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is intended as a source of comparative information and is subject to change to keep pace with experience and technical advances. This document describes currently used fuels and fuels which may be used in the future. Conventional gasoline and diesel fuels are intentionally omitted from this document.
HISTORICAL
2010-06-16
Standard
J2847/1_201006
This SAE Recommended Practice J2847 establishes requirements and specifications for communication between plug-in electric vehicles and the electric power grid, for energy transfer and other applications. Where relevant, this document notes, but does formally specify, interactions between the vehicle and vehicle operator.
HISTORICAL
2010-03-16
Standard
J2601_201003
SAE TIR J2601 establishes safety limits and performance requirements for gaseous hydrogen fuel dispensers. The criteria include maximum fuel temperature at the dispenser nozzle, the maximum fuel flow rate, the maximum rate of pressure increase and other performance criteria based on the cooling capability of the station’s dispenser. This document establishes fueling guidelines for “non-communication fueling” in the absence of vehicle communication and guidelines for “communication fueling” when specified information is transmitted from the vehicle and verified at the dispenser. The process by which fueling is optimized using vehicle-transmitted information is specified. This document provides details of the communication data transmission protocol. The mechanical connector geometry is not covered in this document. SAE J2600 defines the connector requirements for fueling vehicles operating with a nominal working pressure of 35 MPa.
HISTORICAL
2010-01-07
Standard
J2191_201001
This SAE document defines a recommended practice for implementing circuit identification for electrical power and signal distribution systems of the Class 8 trucks and tractors. This document provides a description of a supplemental circuit identifier that shall be utilized in conjunction with the original equipment manufacturer’s primary circuit identification as used in wire harnesses but does not include electrical or electronic devices which have pigtails. The supplemental circuit identifier is cross-referenced to a specified subsystem of the power and signal distribution system identified in Section 5.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 75

Filter

  • Standard
    75