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CURRENT
2016-02-24
Standard
AS1354
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) provides the minimum design and performance requirements for individual, inflatable life preservers, divided into six categories: “Adult,” “Adult-Child,” “Child,” “Infant-Small Child,” “Adult-Child-Infant-Small Child,” and “Demonstration.”
CURRENT
2015-11-24
Standard
J1038_201511
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the test procedures, performance requirements, and criteria necessary to evaluate minimum safety and reliability requirements of a children's snowmobile as identified in 1.2.
CURRENT
2015-03-27
Standard
J1819_201503
The scope of this SAE Recommended Practice is to promote compatibility between child restraint systems and vehicle seats and seat belts. Design guidelines are provided to vehicle manufacturers for certain characteristics of seats and seat belts, and to child restraint system (CRS) manufacturers for corresponding CRS features so that each can be made more compatible with the other. The Child Restraint System Accommodation Fixture, shown in Figure 1, is used to represent a CRS to the designers of both the vehicle interior and the CRS for evaluation of each product for compatibility with the other. The features of the accommodation fixture are described as each is used. A CRS accommodation template of transparent plastic, not shown, represents the side of the accommodation fixture for use in approximating its installed position on design drawings.
CURRENT
2015-02-03
Standard
J2862_201502
This user’s manual covers the small adult female Hybrid III test dummy. It is intended for technicians who work with this device. It covers the construction and clothing, disassembly and reassembly, available instrumentation, external dimensions and segment masses, as well as certification and inspection test procedures. It includes instructions for safe handling of the instrumented dummy, repairing dummy flesh, and adjusting the joints throughout the dummy.
CURRENT
2013-06-19
Standard
J2706_201306
This user’s manual covers the Hybrid III 6-year-old child test dummy, including changes specified in 49 CFR Part 572, Subpart N in the final rule dated December 9, 2010. It is intended for technicians who work with this device. It covers the construction and clothing, disassembly and reassembly, available instrumentation, external dimensions and segment masses, as well as certification and inspection test procedures. Appendix A contains guidelines for safe handling of instrumented dummies. Appendix B contains instructions for repairing dummy flesh. Appendix C includes procedures for adjusting the joints throughout the dummy.
CURRENT
2013-04-09
Standard
J2939_201304
CURRENT
2013-02-21
Standard
J1460_201302
While this report does not include a discussion of all of the available data defining human response or address all body areas, for those areas addressed it does utilize references generally judged by those in the field to be practical and meaningful guidelines for the development of human surrogates. This report is intended to be a “living” document that will be updated periodically. A number of problems need to be addressed in defining human impact response characteristics. There is the problem of human response variability from subject to subject in volunteer tests. There is the problem of extrapolating such volunteer data which are obtained at low impact severities to higher impact severities using human cadaver response data obtained at injurious levels of impacts. Live animal experiments have been conducted over the years in an attempt to define human impact response and tolerance.
CURRENT
2012-08-06
Standard
J1369_201208
This SAE Recommended Practice provides design guidelines to vehicle manufacturers by establishing the characteristics of top tether anchorage provisions required for securing child restraints so equipped in forward facing rearmost designated passenger seating positions of all passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, and trucks and buses of 4500 kg (10 000 lb) Gross Vehicle Weight Rating or less, accommodating six occupants or less. Further, it provides interface information to child restraint manufacturers.
CURRENT
2011-11-28
Standard
ARP4466A
This document provides guidance to promote dimensional compatibility between forward facing passenger seat systems in civil transport airplanes and child restraint systems developed primarily for use in automobiles.
CURRENT
2011-03-22
Standard
J2857_201103
This user’s manual covers the Hybrid III 3-year old child test dummy. The manual is intended for use by technicians who work with this test device. It covers the construction and clothing, assembly and disassembly, available instrumentation, external dimensions and segment masses, as well as certification and inspection test procedures. It includes guidelines for handling accelerometers, guidelines for flesh repair, and joint adjustment procedures. Finally, it includes drawings for some of the test equipment that is unique to this dummy.
CURRENT
2011-02-24
Standard
J1606_201102
This SAE Information Report should be used as a supplement to SAE J1383 (Reference 2.1.1). It is intended to provide additional information which is important to the automotive designer and engineer in the process of designing, developing, and engineering the headlamps of motor vehicles which will take into account the effects of the aging process on the driver.
CURRENT
2011-02-24
Standard
J2189_201102
This SAE Information Report prescribes dummies, procedures, and configurations that can be used for investigating the interactions that might occur between a deploying airbag and a child restrained by a child restraint system (CRS). During the inflation process, airbags generate a considerable amount of kinetic energy which can result in substantial forces being applied to a child who is restrained in a CRS in the front seat of a vehicle. Field data collected by the special crash investigation team of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) indicate that fatal forces can be developed. In response to these field data, NHTSA added a series of airbag/child interaction tests and limits to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR 571.208) that deal with occupant protection, commonly known as Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS 208).
CURRENT
2011-02-21
Standard
J1980_201102
An airbag generates a considerable amount of kinetic energy during its inflation process. As a result substantial forces can be developed between the deploying airbag and the out-of-position occupant. Accident data and laboratory test results have indicated a potential for head, neck, chest, abdominal, and leg injuries from these forces. This suggests that mitigating such forces should be considered in the design of airbag restraint systems. This document outlines a comprehensive set of test guidelines that can be used for investigating the interactions that occur between the deploying airbag and the occupant who is near the module at the time of deployment. Static and dynamic tests to investigate driver and passenger systems are given. Static tests may be used to sort designs on a comparative basis. Designs that make it through the static sorting procedure may be subjected to the appropriate dynamic tests.
CURRENT
2011-02-21
Standard
J885_201102
This report reviews current1 quantitative data on human tolerance levels without recommending specific limits. Data developed on humans (including cadavers) are presented where available; however, in many cases animal data are provided where no suitable human results have been reported. This report confines itself, as much as possible, to information of direct use to the automotive designer and tester. Data of only academic interest are largely omitted; therefore, J885 should not be considered as a complete summary of all available biomechanical data. Most of the data cited in this report applies to adult males since little information is available on women or children. The summary data provided in the tables should be considered in conjunction with the accompanying descriptive test. This material explains the manner in which the data were obtained and provides an insight as to their limitations.
CURRENT
2010-10-14
Standard
J2782_201010
While it is recognized that collisions involve pedestrians of all sizes, this Information Report addresses performance specifications for a midsize adult male research dummy. This approach stems from the greater knowledge of biomechanics and existing dummy technologies for the midsize male relative to other adult sizes and children. While not the initial objective, it is envisioned that additional performance specifications for other sizes of pedestrian research dummies will be developed in the future based on accepted scaling procedures. The specific requirements for the pedestrian dummy have been based on a collective assessment of pedestrian injury, response, and anthropometry priorities from the experimental, epidemiologic, and computational literature. In general, the objective was to specify performance specifications based on human characteristics and the impact response of post-mortem human subjects rather than to specify the design of a particular physical device.
CURRENT
2010-03-16
Standard
J941_201003
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the location of drivers’ eyes inside a vehicle. Elliptical (eyellipse) models in three dimensions are used to represent tangent cutoff percentiles of driver eye locations. Procedures are provided to construct 95th and 99th percentile tangent cutoff eyellipses for a 50/50 gender mix, adult user population. Neck pivot (P) points are defined in Section 6 to establish specific left and right eye points for direct and indirect viewing tasks described in SAE J1050. These P points are defined only for the adjustable seat eyellipses defined in Section 4. This document applies to Class A Vehicles (Passenger Cars, Multipurpose Passenger Vehicles, and Light Trucks) as defined in SAE J1100. It also applies to Class B vehicles (Heavy Trucks), although these eyellipses have not been updated from previous versions of SAE J941. The appendices are provided for information only and are not a requirement of this document.
CURRENT
2009-12-18
Standard
AIR4771A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) contains information that can be used by the air transportation industry to provide passengers in forward facing seats, using lap belt restraints only, with consistent 'brace for impact' positions. This information is intended to reduce the potential confusion passengers may experience upon being presented with different 'brace for impact' positions as they travel on different aircraft or on different carriers. This document does not address child restraint, situations where adult passengers are seated behind fixed tables, or who are using upper-torso restraint, or where passengers are not seated in forward facing seats.
CURRENT
2009-12-03
Standard
J1368_200912
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to provide design guidelines to vehicle manufacturers by establishing characteristics of anchorages and attachment hardware provisions at the passenger front seat outboard seating location for securing a child seating system in vehicles equipped with automatic (passive) restraint systems that are not suitable for use with a child seating system. Further, it is intended to provide interface information to child restraint manufacturers. The anchorage and hardware configuration and location as well as interface parameters are described along with performance and identification requirements.
HISTORICAL
2008-10-23
Standard
J941_200810
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the location of drivers' eyes inside a vehicle. Elliptical (eyellipse) models in three dimensions are used to represent tangent cutoff percentiles of driver eye locations. Procedures are provided to construct 95th and 99th percentile tangent cutoff eyellipses for a 50/50 gender mix, adult user population. Neck pivot (P) points are defined in Section 6 to establish specific left and right eye points for direct and indirect viewing tasks described in SAE J1050. These P points are defined only for the adjustable seat eyellipses defined in Section 4. This document applies to Class A Vehicles (Passenger Cars, Multipurpose Passenger Vehicles, and Light Trucks) as defined in SAE J1100. It also applies to Class B vehicles (Heavy Trucks), although these eyellipses have not been updated from previous versions of SAE J941. The appendices are provided for information only and are not a requirement of this document.
CURRENT
2008-08-13
Standard
ARP4771
This document contains information that can be used by the air transportation industry to provide passengers with consistent "Brace for Impact" positions in passenger safety information and briefings. This information is intended to reduce the potential confusion passengers may experience upon being presented with different "Brace for Impact" positions as they travel on different aircraft or on different carriers. This document does not address child restraint or situations where adult passengers are seated behind fixed tables.
HISTORICAL
2008-06-17
Standard
J1980_200806
An airbag generates a considerable amount of kinetic energy during its inflation process. As a result substantial forces can be developed between the deploying airbag and the out-of-position occupant. Accident data and laboratory test results have indicated a potential for head, neck, chest, abdominal, and leg injuries from these forces. This suggests that mitigating such forces should be considered in the design of airbag restraint systems. This document outlines a comprehensive set of test guidelines that can be used for investigating the interactions that occur between the deploying airbag and the occupant who is near the module at the time of deployment. Static and dynamic tests to investigate driver and passenger systems are given. Static tests may be used to sort designs on a comparative basis. Designs that make it through the static sorting procedure may be subjected to the appropriate dynamic tests.
CURRENT
2008-04-21
Standard
J1062_200804
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to give information to engineers and designers in order that access to a passenger handgrip, when used, is easily obtained and that such handgrips offer maximum safety for a person at least as large as a 95th percentile adult male during snowmobile operation.
HISTORICAL
2008-01-23
Standard
J941_200801
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the location of drivers' eyes inside a vehicle. Elliptical (eyellipse) models in three dimensions are used to represent tangent cutoff percentiles of driver eye locations. Procedures are provided to construct 95th and 99th percentile tangent cutoff eyellipses for a 50/50 gender mix, adult user population. Neck pivot (P) points are defined in Section 6 to establish specific left and right eye points for direct and indirect viewing tasks described in SAE J1050. These P points are defined only for the adjustable seat eyellipses defined in Section 4. This document applies to Class A Vehicles (Passenger Cars, Multipurpose Passenger Vehicles, and Light Trucks) as defined in SAE J1100. It also applies to Class B vehicles (Heavy Trucks), although these eyellipses have not been updated from previous versions of SAE J941. The appendices are provided for information only and are not a requirement of this document.
HISTORICAL
2007-08-21
Standard
J2706_200708
The purpose of this document is to provide the user with the procedures needed to properly assemble and disassemble the H-III6C dummy, certify its components and to verify its mass and dimensions. Also within this manual are guidelines for handling accelerometers, repairing flesh and setting joints.
HISTORICAL
2007-03-16
Standard
J1038_200703
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the test procedures, performance requirements, and criteria necessary to evaluate minimum safety and reliability requirements of a children's snowmobile as identified in 1.2.
HISTORICAL
2006-10-06
Standard
J1062_200610
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to give information to engineers and designers in order that access to a passenger handgrip, when used, is easily obtained and that such handgrips offer maximum safety for a person at least as large as a 95th percentile adult male during snowmobile operation.
HISTORICAL
2003-12-01
Standard
J885_200312
This report reviews current quantitative data on human tolerance levels without recommending specific limits. Data developed on humans (including cadavers) are presented where available; however, in many cases animal data are provided where no suitable human results have been reported. This report confines itself, as much as possible, to information of direct use to the automotive designer and tester. Data of only academic interest are largely omitted; therefore, J885 should not be considered as a complete summary of all available biomechanical data. Most of the data cited in this report applies to adult males since little information is available on women or children. The summary data provided in the tables should be considered with the accompanying descriptive test.
CURRENT
2002-12-16
Standard
ARP1469
HISTORICAL
2001-12-27
Standard
J1980_200112
An airbag generates a considerable amount of kinetic energy during its inflation process. As a result substantial forces can be developed between the deploying airbag and the out-of-position occupant. Accident data and laboratory test results have indicated a potential for head, neck, chest, abdominal, and leg injuries from these forces. This suggests that mitigating such forces should be considered in the design of airbag restraint systems. This document outlines a comprehensive set of test guidelines that can be used for investigating the interactions that occur between the deploying airbag and the occupant who is near the module at the time of deployment. Static and dynamic tests to investigate driver and passenger systems are given. Static tests may be used to sort designs on a comparative basis. Designs that make it through the static sorting procedure may be subjected to the appropriate dynamic tests.
HISTORICAL
2001-12-27
Standard
J2189_200112
This SAE Information Report prescribes dummies, procedures, and configurations that can be used for investigating the interactions that might occur between a deploying airbag and a child restrained by a child restraint system (CRS). During the inflation process, airbags generate a considerable amount of kinetic energy which can result in substantial forces being applied to a child who is restrained in a CRS in the front seat of a vehicle. Field data collected by the special crash investigation team of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) indicate that fatal forces can be developed. In response to these field data, NHTSA added a series of airbag/child interaction tests and limits to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR 571.208) that deal with occupant protection, commonly known as Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS 208).
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