Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 167
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1842
Akin Oktav, Cetin Yilmaz, Gunay Anlas
As a countermeasure to trunk lid slam noise, reactive openings are used in the trunk cavities of passenger vehicles. In sedans trunk and cabin cavities are coupled acoustically through discontinuities on the parcel shelf and/or the rear seat. In such a case, these openings behave as if necks of a Helmholtz resonator, which in turn change the acoustic response of the system, accordingly. The Helmholtz resonator effect of the trunk cavity is discussed analytically through a simplified cavity model. A case study is also given, where the acoustic response of a sedan is analyzed through the computational model that considers the resonator effect. Sound pressure level results show that instant pressure drops and damping effects observed in the acoustic response can be explained with the resonator effect. Results obtained from the computational model of the sedan are verified by road test measurements
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1785
Paul Bremner, Scott Clifton, Chris Todter
Measurements of interior wind noise sound pressure level have shown that dBA and Loudness are not adequate metrics of wind noise sound quality due to non-stationary characteristics such as temporal modulation and impulse. A surface microphone array with high spatio-temporal resolution has been used to observe the corresponding non-stationary characteristics of the exterior aero-acoustic loading. Wavenumber filtering is used to observe the unsteady character of the low wavenumber aero-acoustic loading components capable of exciting glass vibration and transmitting sound.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1781
Joshua Wheeler
Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and Hands Free Communication (HFC) capabilities have become prominent in the automotive industry, with over 50% of new vehicle sales equipped with some level of ASR system. With the common use of mobile personal assistants and smartphones with Bluetooth capability, customer expectations for built in ASR and HFC systems have increased significantly. The performance of these ASR and HFC systems are highly dependent on the level of background or “masking” noise that competes with the speech engine’s ability to correctly convert the driver’s speech to actionable commands. HVAC noise provides high amplitudes of broadband frequency content that affects the signal to noise ratio (SNR) within the vehicle cabin, and works to mask the user’s speech. Furthermore, when the airflow from the panel or defroster vents are directed toward the vehicle microphone, a mechanical “buffeting” phenomenon occurs that distresses the ASR system even further.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1864
Joshua Wheeler
Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and Hands Free Communication (HFC) capabilities have become prominent in the automotive industry, with over 50% of new vehicle sales equipped with some level of ASR system. With the common use of mobile personal assistants and smartphones with Bluetooth capability, customer expectations for built in ASR and HFC systems have increased significantly. The performance of these ASR and HFC systems are highly dependent on the level of background or “masking” noise that competes with the speech engine’s ability to correctly convert the driver’s speech to actionable commands. HVAC noise and environmental noise (like road and wind noise) provide high amplitudes of broadband frequency content that affects the signal to noise ratio (SNR) within the vehicle cabin, and work to mask the user’s speech. Managing this noise is a vital key to building a vehicle that meets the customer’s expectations for ASR and HFC performance.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1878
Kevin Verdiere, Raymond Panneton, Noureddine Atalla, Saïd Elkoun
A poroelastic characterization of open-cell porous materials using an impedance tube is proposed in this paper. Commonly, porous materials are modeled using Biot’s theory. However, this theory requires several parameters which can be difficult to obtain by different methods (direct, indirect or inverse measurements). The proposed method retrieves all the Biot’s parameters with one absorption measurement in an impedance tube for isotropic poroelastic materials following the Johnson-Champoux-Allard’s model (for the fluid phase). The sample is a cylinder bonded to the rigid termination of the tube with a diameter smaller than the tube’s one. In that case, a lateral air gap is voluntary induced to prevent lateral clamping. Using this setup, the absorption curve exhibits a characteristic elastic resonance (quarter wavelength resonance) and the repeatability is ensured by controlling boundary and mounting conditions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1815
Pranab Saha, Satyajeet P. Deshpande
This paper discusses the importance of dissipative sound package system in the automotive industry and how it works. Although this is not a new technique at this stage, it is challenging to meet the subsystem target levels that were originally developed for parts based on barrier decoupler concept. This paper reviews the typical construction of a dissipative system and then emphasizes the importance of different layers of materials that are used in the construction, including what they can do and cannot do. The paper also discusses the importance of proper manufacturing of the part.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1812
Steven Sorenson, Gordon Ebbitt, Scott Smith, Todd Remtema
In an effort to reduce mass, future automotive bodies will feature lower gage steel or lighter weight materials such as aluminum. An unfortunate side effect of lighter weight bodies is a reduction in acoustic transmission loss (TL). For barrier based systems, as the total system mass (including the sheet metal, decoupler, and barrier) goes down the transmission loss is reduced. If the reduced surface density from the sheet metal is added to the barrier, however, performance can be restored (though, of course, this eliminates the mass savings). In fact, if all of the saved mass from the sheet metal is added to the barrier, the TL performance may be improved over the original system. This is because the optimum performance for a barrier based system is achieved when the sheet metal and the barrier have equal surface densities. That is not the case for standard steel constructions where the surface density of the sheet metal is higher than the barrier.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1839
Edward T. Lee
It is common for automotive manufacturers and off-highway machinery manufacturers to gain an insight of the system structural dynamics by evaluating the system inertance functions near the mount locations. The acoustic response at the operator’s ears is a function of the vibro-acoustic characteristics of the system structural dynamics interacting with the cavity, with the actual load applied at the mount locations. The overall vibro-acoustic characteristics can be influenced by the change in local stiffness. To analyze the response of a system, it is necessary to go beyond analyzing its transfer functions. The actual load needs to be understood and be applied towards the transfer function set. Finite element (FE) based analysis provides a good foundation for deterministic solutions. However finite element method suffers in accuracy as the frequency increases. Many NVH problems happen to be at the mid frequency range where solving the problem with the FE-only approach falls short.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1827
Michael J. Santora, Cyril Gbenga Ige, Jeff Otto, David Egolf
A muffler attached to an engine attenuates sound over a dedicated frequency range. This research involves the development of an active muffler that is keyed to the revolutions per minute (rpm) of the engine and suppresses the fundamental frequency being exhausted through the tailpipe. The active muffler consists of a tracking side-branch resonator terminated with a composite piezoelectric transducer. The use of an exponential horn as a resonating cavity and terminated with a composite piezoelectric transducer is presented. This would create Electromechanical Active Helmholtz Resonator (EMAHR) with a notch that can be moved between 100-1000 Hz. The use of acoustical-to-mechanical, mechanical-to-electrical, and analog-to-digital transformations to develop a system model for the active muffler are presented. These transforms will be presented as two-port network parameters. The use of two-port networks to model the electroacoustic system are a defining factor in the analysis.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1787
Jan Biermann, Adrien Mann, Barbara Neuhierl, Min-Suk Kim
Over the past decades, noise sources such as wind noise or engine noise have been significantly reduced leveraging improvements of both the overall vehicle designs and of sound packages. Consequently, noise sources originating from HVAC systems (Heat Ventilation and Air Conditioning), fans or exhaust systems are now becoming Tier-1 problems affecting quality and passenger comfort. Furthermore, existing experimental techniques are not adapted to internal flows and fail at identifying the location of noise sources, as well as corresponding design changes to reduce noise. This study focuses on HVAC systems and discusses a Flow-Induced Noise Detection Contributions (FIND Contributions) numerical method enabling the identification of the flow-induced noise sources inside HVAC systems. Moreover, this method provides the contribution of each source at the passenger’s ear locations considering the propagation of the noise through the system.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1887
Antoine Minard, Christophe Lambourg, Patrick Boussard, Olivier Cheriaux
While electric and hybrid vehicles are becoming increasingly common, the issue of engine noise is becoming less important, because it does not dominate the overall noise perceived in the passenger compartment in such vehicles anymore. However, at the same time, other sound sources such as air conditioning, start to emerge, which can also cause annoyance. The CEVAS project, involving VALEO, CETIM, University of Technology of Compiègne, ESI GROUP and GENESIS, deals with the acoustic simulation and perception of automotive air-conditioning (HVAC) and electric battery cooling (BTM) systems. While the other partners focused their work on the aeroacoustic characterization, modeling and simulation, GENESIS’ part in the project is dedicated to HVAC sound synthesis and perception. In order to do the synthesis of the acoustic spectra provided by the partners of the project, an additive model was used.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1869
Glenn Pietila, Gang Yin, Branton Dennis IV
During the development of an automotive acoustic package valuable information can be gained by visualizing the acoustic energy flow through the Front-of-Dash (FOD) when a sound source is placed in the engine compartment. Two of the commonly used methods for generating the visual map of the acoustic field include sound intensity measurements and array technologies. An alternative method is to use a tracked 3-dimensional acoustic probe to scan and visualize the FOD in real-time when the sound source is injecting noise into the engine compartment. The scan is used focus the development of the FOD acoustic package on the weakest areas by identifying acoustic leaks and locations with low Transmission Loss. This paper provides a brief discussion of the capabilities of the tracked 3-D acoustic probe, and presents examples of the implementation of the probe during the development of the FOD acoustic package for two mid-sized sedans.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1791
David Neihguk, Shreyas Fulkar
Parametric model of a production hybrid (made up of reactive and dissipative elements) muffler for tractor engine is developed to compute the acoustic Transmission Loss (TL). The objective is to simplify complex muffler acoustic simulations without any loss of accuracy, robustness and usability so that it is accessible to all product development engineers and designers. The parametric model is a 3D Finite Element Method (FEM) based built in COMSOL model builder which is then converted into a user-friendly application (App) using COMSOL App builder. The uniqueness of the App lies in its ability to handle not only wide range of parametric variations but also variations in the physics and boundary conditions. This enables designers to explore various design options in the early design phase without the need to have deep expertise in a specific simulation tool nor in numerical acoustic modeling.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1880
Guojian Zhou, Xiujie Tian, Keda Zhu, Wei Huang, Richard E. Wentzel, Melvyn J. Care, Kaixuan Mao, Jiu Hui Wu
A flexible membrane-type acoustic metamaterial, is proposed, with improved sound transmission loss (STL) performance at low frequency. It is composed of a flexible, light-weight membrane material and a sheet material - Ethylene Vinyl Acetate Copolymer (EVA) with an arrangement of periodic holes. The STL was analyzed by using both computer aided engineering (CAE) calculations and experimental verifications, which depict good results in the consistency between both. An obvious sound insulation peak exists in the low frequency band, and the STL peak mechanism is the rebound-effect of the membrane surface, which is proved through finite element analysis (FEA) under single frequency excitation. Then the variation of the peak is studied by changing the structure parameters and material parameters of the metamaterial, providing a method to design sound insulation metamaterials in a specified frequency range.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1854
John T. Anton, Jason Ley, Ikpreet S. Grover, David Stotera
Liquid-applied sound deadener (LASD) is a light-weight, targeted vibration damping treatment traditionally used in the automotive market for body-in-white (BIW) panels. Water-based LASDs may cure over a wide range of conditions from room temperature to over 200°C. However, curing conditions commonly affect change in the damping characteristics. A thorough understanding of the relationship between curing conditions and subsequent damping performances will inform the material selection process and may allow pre-manufacturing designs to be adjusted with limited impact during validation. This paper aims to strengthen the quantitative understanding of the role LASD curing conditions have on damping performance by observing the effects of variations in thickness and cure temperature as measured by the Oberst method.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1751
Nicolas Schaefer, Bart Bergen, Tomas Keppens, Wim Desmet
The continuous pursuit for lighter, more affordable and more silent cars, has pushed OEMs into optimizing the design of car components. The different panels surrounding the car interior cavity such as firewall, door or floor panels are of key importance to the NV performance. The design of the sound packages for high-frequency airborne input is well established. However, the design for the mid-frequency range is more difficult, because of the complex inputs involved, the lack of representative performance metrics and its high computational cost. In order to make early decisions for package design, performance maps based on the different design parameters are desired for mid-frequencies. This paper presents a framework to retrieve the response surface, from a numerical design space of finite-element frequency sweeps. This response surface describes the performance of a sound package against the different design variables.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1760
Weimin Thor, J. Stuart Bolton
Due the increasing concern with the acoustic environment within an automotive vehicle, there is an interest in measuring the acoustic properties of automotive door seals. These systems play an important role in blocking external noise sources, such as aerodynamic noise and tire noise, from entering the passenger compartment. Thus, it is important to be able to conveniently measure their acoustic performance. Previous methods of measuring the ability of seals to block sound required the use of either a reverberation chamber or a wind tunnel with a special purpose chamber attached to it. That is, these methods required the use of large and expensive facilities. A simpler and more economical desktop procedure is thus needed to allow easy and fast acoustic measurement of automotive door seals.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1807
Richard DeJong, Gordon Ebbitt
The SEA model of wind noise requires the quantification of both the acoustic as well as the turbulent flow contributions to the exterior pressure. The acoustic pressure is difficult to measure because it is usually much lower in amplitude than the turbulent pressure. However, the coupling of the acoustic pressure to the surface vibration is usually much stronger than the turbulent pressure, especially in the acoustic coincidence frequency range. The coupling is determined by the spatial matching between the pressure and the vibration which can be described by the wavenumber spectra. This paper uses measured vibration modes of a vehicle window to determine the coupling to both acoustic and turbulent pressure fields and compares these to the results from an SEA model. The interior acoustic intensity radiating from the window during road tests is also used to validate the results.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1761
Daniel Fernandez Comesana, Graciano Carrillo Pousa, Emiel Tijs
The automotive industry is currently increasing noise and vibration requirements of vehicle components. A detailed vibro-acoustic assessment of every supplied element is commonly enforced by most vehicle manufacturers. Traditional End-of-line (EOL) solutions often encounter difficulties adapting from controlled environments to industrial production lines due the presence of high levels of noise and vibrations generated by the surrounding machinery. In contrast, particle velocity measurements performed near a rigid radiating surface are less affected by background noise and they can potentially be used to address noise problems even in such conditions. The vector nature of particle velocity, an intrinsic dependency upon surface displacement and sensor directivity are the main advantages over conventional solutions. As a result, quantitative measurements describing the vibro-acoustic behaviour of a device can be performed at the final stage of the manufacturing process.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1824
Reza Kashani, Karthik S. Jayakumar, Neville Bugli, Jeff Lapp
Passive, tuned acoustic absorbers, such as Helmholtz resonators (HR) or quarter-wave tubes, are commonly used solutions for abating the low-frequency tonal noise in air induction systems. Since absorption at multiple frequencies is required, multiple absorbers tuned to different frequencies are commonly used. Typically, the large size and multiple numbers of these devices under the hood is a packaging challenge. Also, the lack of acoustic damping narrows their effective bandwidth and creates undesirable side lobes. Active noise control could address all of the above-mentioned issues. Most active noise control systems use feed-forward adaptive algorithms as their controllers. These complex algorithms need fast, powerful digital signal processors to run. To ensure the convergence of the adaptation algorithm, the rate of adaptation should be made slow.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1844
Jiawei Liu, Yangfan Liu, J. Stuart Bolton
In modern engine design, downsizing and reducing weight while still providing an increased amount of power has been a general trend in the past decades. Traditionally, an engine design with superior NVH performance usually comes with a heavier, thus sturdier structure. Therefore, modern engine design requires that NVH be considered in the very early design stage to avoid modifications of engine structure at the last minute, when very few changes can be made. NVH design optimization of engine components has become more practical due to the development of computer software and hardware. However, there is still a need for smarter algorithms to draw a direct relationship between the design and the radiated sound power. At the moment, techniques based on modal acoustic transfer vectors (MATVs) have gained popularity in design optimization for its performance in sound pressure prediction.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1845
Jon Furlich, Jason Blough, Darrell Robinette
When subjected to high speeds and high torques, a vehicle driveshaft and other powertrain components experience an increase in stored potential energy. When the engine and driveshaft are decoupled during an up or down shift, the potential energy is released causing clutch clatter during the shift event. A smooth shift is desired by the customer thus reduction of the clutch clatter will improve customer experience and satisfaction. In this study, a six speed MT, RWD passenger car was used to experimentally capture acoustic and vibration data during the clutch clatter event. To successfully replicate the in-situ results additional data was collected and analyzed for powertrain component roll, and pitch from the test vehicle. These boundary conditions were applied to a reduced car model in a lab environment to successfully replicate the clutch clatter event on a stationary test stand.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1871
Nobutaka Tsujiuchi, Masahiro Akei, Akihito Ito, Daisuke Kubota, Koichi Osamura
This paper describes new method for selecting optimal field points in Inverse-Numerical Acoustic analysis (INA), and an application to construction of sound source model for diesel engine. INA is a method that identifies surface vibration of the sound source by using acoustic transfer functions and actual sound pressures which are measured at field points located near the sound source. In the INA, for measuring sound pressures, it is necessary to determine the arrangement of field points. The increase of field points leads to longer test and analysis time. Therefore, guidelines for deciding field point arrangement are needed to conduct INA efficiently. The authors focused on the standard deviations of distance between sound source elements and field points, and proposed new guideline for optimal selection of the field points, in a past study. In the past study, the effectiveness of this guideline was verified using a simple plate model.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1862
Rajesh Babu Channamaneni, P. Kannan, Karal Marx R
New legislation's, competition from global players and change in customer perception related to comfort parameters are key factors demanding manufactures to design and manufacture vehicles with very low saloon noise levels. The main causes for higher noise levels at passenger saloon compartment can be attributed to source noises (Powertrain, Driveline, Intake and Exhaust etc.), acoustic isolation and structural sensitivity of the body. Out of all above parameters, powertrain noise and acoustic isolation are two critical parameters effecting interior noise performance. This paper constitutes an attempt to explain acoustic source contribution analysis through transfer function measurement in a passenger vehicle. Acoustic transfer function between engine bay and passenger ear level was measured using reciprocity technique (reciprocal method) with reference source placed at various locations inside the vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1872
Masao Nagamatsu
The almost current sound localization methods do not have enough resolution in low frequency sound localization. To overcome this disadvantage, I am now developing a new sound localization method, Double Nearfield Acoustic Holography (DNAH) method. This method is a converted method of conventional Nearfield Acoustic Holography (NAH) method. In this proposing method, the resolution of low frequency sound localization is improved by using sound propagation information on doubled measurement planes. To prove the performance of proposing method, the basic experiments with variable conditions are conducted. In these experiments, the small speakers are used as sound sources. In this paper, to discuss the ability to apply to actual industry, the effect of measurement distance from sound source is explained. Some experimental results with changing measurement distance are shown in this paper.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1874
Tongyang Shi, Yangfan Liu, J Stuart Bolton, Frank Eberhardt, Warner Frazer
Wideband Acoustical Holography, which is a monopole-based equivalent source procedure (J. Hald, “Wideband Acoustical Holography”, INTER-NOISE 2014), have been proven to offer an accurate noise source holography result in experiments with a simple noise source: e..g., a loudspeaker (T. Shi, Y. Liu, J. Bolton, ”The Use of Wideband Holography for Noise Source Visualization”, NOISE-CON 2016). From a previous study, it was found that the advantage of this procedure is the ability to optimize the solution in the case of an under-determined system: i.e., when the number of measurements is less than the number of parameters that must be estimated in the model. In the present work, a diesel engine noise source was measured by using one set of measurements from a thirty six channel irregular array placed in front of the diesel engine.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1888
Rasheed Khan, Mahdi Ali, Eric C. Frank
Vehicle voice recognition systems have become an essential tool for hands free communication. As such, it has become more and more important to have reliable, consistent voice recognition in a vehicle. Vehicle voice recognition system performance is based on a variety of factors, including the speakers' gender & background noise. Male and female voice characteristics are inherently different, and some of these variations are investigated in this work. In this work, three vehicles have been tested during five different steady state road conditions (70 mph, 45 mph, Idle HVAC off, Idle HVAC on, vehicle off). Twelve speakers (six male and six female) were recorded announcing twenty mono- and multi-syllable call commands. Each speaker was recorded three times for repeatability, along with the vehicle voice recognition system response. Based on the resulting success rates, the least-recognized commands were synthesized to resemble the best detected commands from the different genders.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1886
Siwen Zhang, Jian Pang, Jun Zhang, Zhuangzhuang Ma, Xiaoxuan Zhang, Congguang Liu, Lihui Deng
In this paper, the subjective evaluation method for the air-borne sound insulation performance of vehicle body in reverberation room is developed and investigated. To improve the credibility of the traditional subjective evaluation methods for the air-borne sound insulation, the test vehicles are placed in the reverberation room and exposed in the homogeneous reverberation sound field. The stationary vehicle's interior noise is recorded by using a digital artificial head. The noise testing method in reverberation room demonstrates more credible than the traditional methods based on the standard deviation analysis of vehicle external fields. With paired comparison scoring method, the recorded interior noises of six different vehicles are replayed and evaluated subjectively by 22 appraisers in the sound quality room. Kendall's correlation coefficient and circular error rates are introduced to check the consistency and correctness of the appraisers' evaluation scores.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1875
Martino Pigozzi, Flavio Faccioli, Carlo Ubertino, Davide Allegro, Daniel Zeni
Within recent years, passenger comfort has become a main focus for the automotive industry. The topic is directly connected to acoustics, since sounds and noises have a major impact on the well-being of vehicle occupants. The so-called “noise control” focuses on directly optimizing acoustic comfort by implementing innovative materials or geometries for automotive components and systems. One possibility to optimize the acoustics within a vehicle is connected to the phenomenon of sloshing in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) tanks. Sloshing is a noise which is generated during normal driving situations by the motion of the liquid in the tank. Until now, no valid procedure for measuring the sloshing noise in SCR tanks, or a specific acoustic target which the SCR tanks need to fulfill has been defined. For this reason, It's been developed a reproducible laboratory-based methodology to measure the sound generated by the tank to compare it with a defined sound pressure level target.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1825
Takenori Miyamoto, Hiroshi Yokoyama, Akiyoshi Iida
Intense tonal noise often radiates from flows around a trailing edge with an upstream kink shape such as found in an automobile bonnet, where fluid-acoustic interactions occur. It was clarified that the tonal sound became intense at a specific angle of the kink. Moreover, in order to reduce this noise, the flow was controlled by a dielectric barrier discharged plasma actuator (PA), which was attached around the kink shape. The flow and sound pressure were measured by a hot-wire anemometer and a microphone in a low-noise wind tunnel. In the flow around the model without control by the PA, vortices are shed in a separated flow between the kink and the trailing edge, and acoustic waves are radiating due to the interference of vortices with the wall. Measured coherent output power (COP) based on the simultaneous measurement of velocity fluctuations and far-field sound pressure shows that the velocity fluctuations near the trailing edge are related with the tonal acoustic radiation.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 167

Filter