Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 126
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1226
Nurani Chandrasekhar, Chun Tang, Natee Limsuwan, Joel Hetrick, Jacob Krizan, Zhichun Ma, Wei Wu
Abstract Noise and Vibration (NVH) characteristic of an electric machine (e-Machine) is the outcome of complex interaction between source level disturbances and the surrounding structure to which the e-Machine is attached. Key e-Machine metrics that objectively quantify source level disturbance include torque ripple and radial electro-magnetic forces. These disturbances can radiate directly from the e-Machine housing (air-borne component) and also can be transmitted through the structural attachments like stator bolts, stator ring, powertrain mounts etc. (structure-borne component). In the e-machine driven by PWM switching inverter, current is not perfectly sinusoidal but contain different level of harmonics. Current harmonics impact Torque ripple, which in turn would translate into undesirable noise and vibration. There is very limited literature referencing the influence of current harmonics on torque ripple and e-machine NVH.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1634
Hui Sung Lee
Abstract When customers use a tailgate (or trunk), some systems such as power tailgate and smart tailgate have been introduced and implemented for improving convenience. However, they still have some problems in some use cases. Some people have to search for the outside button to open the tailgate, or they should take out the key and push a button. In some cases, they should move their leg or wait a few seconds which makes some people feel that it is a long time. In addition, they have to push the small button which is located on the inner trim in order to close the tailgate. This paper proposes a new tailgate control technology and systems based on acoustic patterns in order to solve some inconvenience. An acoustic user interaction (AUI) is a technology which responds to human’s rubbing and tapping on a specific part analyzing the acoustic patterns. The AUI has been recently spotlighted in the automotive industry as well as home appliances, mobile devices, musical instruments, etc.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0206
Muthukumar Arunachalam, Sankarasubramanian Thirukkotti, S Arunkumar, Abdul Haiyum
Abstract Modern day customer awareness on noise and comfort is extremely increasing, which demands OEM manufacturers to focus on NVH attributes and to meet environmental legislative requirements. Noise generation mechanism in Air Intake System (AIS) is one of the major sources for vehicle interior noise and it occurs mainly because of air column oscillation by sharp pressure pulsation from opening and closing of valves in engine cylinders. Air intake system designer has immense challenges to attenuate intake noise during design stage, in order to meet the vehicle interior noise requirements by using multiple resonators to tune the desired broad band frequencies and to choose the optimum number of resonators. The placement of resonator on both the clean duct and dirty sides is also a key challenge for better noise reduction from air intake system.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0188
Prasad Yadav, Harshal Bankar, Nagesh Voderahobli Karanth
Abstract Diesel powered electric generators are used in a variety of applications, such as emergency back-up power, temporary primary power at industrial facilities, etc. As regulatory and customer requirements demand quieter designs, special attention is given to the design of acoustic enclosures to balance the need of noise control with other performance criteria like ventilation and physical protection. In the present work, Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) approach augmented by experimental inputs is used to carry out Vibro-acoustic analysis of an enclosure for higher capacity Diesel generator set. The exterior sound radiated from an enclosed generator is predicted and further enclosure is optimized for an improved sound-suppression. The airborne sources such as engine, alternator, radiator fan and exhaust are modelled explicitly using experimental noise source characterization. Structure borne inputs are also captured in the test for improving modelling accuracy.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0213
Michael Thivant, Pascal Bouvet
Abstract In the context of the upcoming reduction of Pass-By-Noise limits in the EU regulations, automotive manufacturers need to implement new concepts of shielding package. ECOBEX is a French funded research project aiming at reducing the powertrain noise contribution of the vehicle, whilst restricting additional mass and cost. Bringing together OEM, raw materials suppliers, shielding manufacturers, universities and specialized consultants in this research program enabled innovations in materials, design, tests and computational methods. This paper will focus on a new procedure for the optimization of the shielding package, based on a precise 3D localization and quantification of the acoustic sources of the powertrain and on their implementation in an Energy Boundary Element model, computing the acoustic propagation. Intensity maps emphasized the dominant acoustic paths and highlighted mitigation opportunities in terms of absorption and insulation.
2017-01-10
Journal Article
2017-26-0190
M L Munjal, Vikas Kumar
Abstract High insertion loss is desirable and can be achieved by using plug-muffler elements which consist of two cross-flow perforated sections. However, the plug-mufflers have an inherent disadvantage of high back-pressure which may affect the engine performance adversely. In this paper, a novel structural modifications has been introduced to the plug-muffler to obtain better acoustic performance as well as low back-pressure. Three configurations have been analyzed here including the classical plug-muffler configuration. Back-pressure has been calculated using the lumped flow-resistance network theory for all three configurations and compared. To evaluate the transmission loss, the 1-D (plane wave) analysis has been carried out using the Integrated Transfer Matrix (ITM) method and the results so obtained are validated against 3-D FEM using a commercial software.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0039
Andrea Fioravanti, Giovanni Vichi, Isacco Stiaccini, Giovanni Ferrara, Lorenzo Ferrari
Abstract In recent years, the motorcycle muffler design is moving to dissipative silencer architectures. Due to the increased of restrictions on noise emissions, both dissipative and coupled reactive-dissipative mufflers have substituted the most widely used reactive silencers. This led to higher noise efficiency of the muffler and size reduction. A dissipative muffler is composed by a perforated pipe that crosses a cavity volume filled by a fibrous porous material. The acoustic performance of this kind of muffler are strictly dependent on the porosity of the perforated pipe and the flow resistivity characteristic of the porous material. However, while the acoustic performance of a reactive muffler is almost independent from the presence of a mean flow for typical Mach numbers of exhaust gases, in a dissipative muffler the acoustic behaviour is strictly linked to the mass flow rate intensity.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8051
Jixiu Zhang, Shuming Chen, Dengfeng Wang
Abstract In order to predict the interior noise of a commercial vehicle cab, a finite element model of a heavy commercial vehicle cab was established. An acoustic-structure coupling model of the cab was built based on experimentally validated structure model and acoustic model of a commercial vehicle cab. Moreover, based on the platform of Virtual. Lab, the acoustic field modes of the acoustic model of the commercial vehicle cab and the coupled modes of the acoustic-structure coupling model were analyzed by using the acoustic-structure coupling analysis technique. The excitation of the vehicle cab was tested at an average speed on an asphalt road. Then, the interior noise of the heavy commercial vehicle cab was predicted based on FEM-FEM method and FEM-BEM method with all the parameters and excitation. Furthermore, the predicted interior noise of the commercial vehicle cab was compared with the tested interior noise.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1849
Arnaud Caillet, Luca Alimonti, Anton Golota
Abstract The need for the industry to simulate and optimize the acoustic trim parts has increased during the last decade. There are many approaches to integrate the effect of an acoustic trim in a finite element model. These approaches can be very simple and empirical like the classical non-structural mass (NSM) combined to a high acoustic damping value in the receiver cavity to much more detailed and complex approach like the Poro-Elastic Materials (PEM) method using the Biot parameters. The objective of this paper is to identify which approach is the most appropriate in given situations. This article will first make a review of the theory behind the different methods (NSM, Impedances, Transfer Matrix Method, PEM). Each of them will be investigated for the different typical trim families used in the automotive industry: absorber, spring/mass, spring/mass/absorber.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1836
Sylvestre Lecuru, Pascal Bouvet, Jean-Louis Jouvray, Shanjin Wang
Abstract The recent use of electric motors for vehicle propulsion has stimulated the development of numerical methodologies to predict their noise and vibration behavior. These simulations generally use models based on an ideal electric motor. But sometimes acceleration and noise measurements on electric motors show unexpected harmonics that can generate acoustic issues. These harmonics are mainly due to the deviation of the manufactured parts from the nominal dimensions of the ideal machine. The rotor eccentricities are one of these deviations with an impact on acoustics of electric motors. Thus, the measurement of the rotor eccentricity becomes relevant to understand the phenomenon, quantify the deviation and then to use this data as an input in the numerical models. An innovative measurement method of rotor eccentricities using fiber optic displacement sensors is proposed.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1830
Denis Blanchet, Luca Alimonti, Anton Golota
Abstract This paper presents new advances in predicting wind noise contribution to interior SPL in the framework of the Wind Noise German Working Group composed of Audi, Daimler, Porsche and VW. In particular, a new approach was developed that allows to fully describe the wind noise source using CFD generated surface pressure distribution and its cross-correlation function and apply this source on an SEA side glass. This new method removes the need to use a diffuse acoustic field or several plane waves with various incidence angle to approximate the correct acoustics source character to apply on the SEA side glass. This new approach results are compared with results previously published which use more deterministic methods to represent the side glass and the interior of a vehicle.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1791
Noé F. Melo, Claus Claeys, Elke Deckers, Bert Pluymers, Wim Desmet
Abstract The NVH performance of conventional panels and structures is mainly driven by their mass. Silence often requires heavy constructions, which conflicts with the emerging trend towards lightweight design. To face the challenging and often conflicting task of merging NVH and lightweight requirements, novel low mass and compact volume NVH solutions are required. Vibro-acoustic metamaterials with stopband behavior come to the fore as possible novel NVH solutions combining lightweight requirements with superior noise and vibration insulation, be it at least in some targeted and tunable frequency ranges, referred to as stopbands. Metamaterials are artificial materials or structures engineered from conventional materials to exhibit some targeted performance that clearly exceeds that of conventional materials. They consist typically of (often periodic) assemblies of unit cells of non-homogeneous material composition and/or topology.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0613
Fabrizio Ponti, Vittorio Ravaglioli, Federico Stola, Matteo De Cesare
The need for strategies that allow managing combustion in an adaptive way has recently widely increased. Especially Diesel engines aimed for clean combustion require a precise control of the combustion outputs. Acoustic emission of internal combustion engines contains a lot of information related to engine behavior and working conditions. Mechanical noise and combustion noise are usually the main contributions to the noise produced by an engine. Combustion noise in particular can be used as an indicator of the combustion that is taking place inside the combustion chamber and therefore as a reference for the control strategy. This work discusses the correlations existing between in cylinder combustion and the acoustic emission radiated by the engine and presents a possible approach to use this signal in the engine management system for control purposes.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1316
Vincent Rovedatti, Jacob Milhorn, Richard DeJong, Gordon Ebbitt
Abstract A 1/4 scale model vehicle profile has been tested in a wind tunnel with speeds up to 360 km/h. In order to simulate the free field flow over the vehicle, the top surface of the wind tunnel is contoured. A CFD simulation of the free field flow at various speeds is used to identify the desired top streamline. Then the boundary layer growth on the top surface is calculated and the top contour is adjusted accordingly. Since this contour changes very little with flow speeds of interest, an average contour is used for a fixed top surface of the wind tunnel. Pressure drop measurements are used to verify the flow similarity to the CFD model. Wind noise measurements using surface mounted pressure transducer arrays are used to determine the acoustic loads on the vehicle surfaces.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0639
Brian C. Kaul, Benjamin Lawler, Akram Zahdeh
Abstract Engine acoustics measured by microphones near the engine have been used in controlled laboratory settings for combustion feedback and even combustion phasing control, but the use of these techniques in a vehicle where many other noise sources exist is problematic. In this study, surface-mounted acoustic emissions sensors are embedded in the block of a 2.0L turbocharged GDI engine, and the signal is analyzed to identify useful feedback features. The use of acoustic emissions sensors, which have a very high frequency response and are commonly used for detecting material failures for health monitoring, including detecting gear pitting and ring scuffing on test stands, enables detection of acoustics both within the range of human hearing and in the ultrasonic spectrum. The high-speed acoustic time-domain data are synchronized with the crank-angle-domain combustion data to investigate the acoustic emissions response caused by various engine events.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0704
Jacob McKenzie, Wai K. Cheng
Abstract The combustion process after auto-ignition is investigated. Depending on the non-uniformity of the end gas, auto-ignition could initiate a flame, produce pressure waves that excite the engine structure (acoustic knock), or result in detonation (normal or developing). For the “acoustic knock” mode, a knock intensity (KI) is defined as the pressure oscillation amplitude. The KI values over different cycles under a fixed operating condition are observed to have a log-normal distribution. When the operating condition is changed (over different values of λ, EGR, and spark timing), the mean (μ) of log (KI/GIMEP) decreases linearly with the correlation-based ignition delay calculated using the knock-point end gas condition of the mean cycle. The standard deviation σ of log(KI/GIMEP) is approximately a constant, at 0.63. The values of μ and σ thus allow a statistical description of knock from the deterministic calculation of the ignition delay using the mean cycle properties
2015-11-17
Technical Paper
2015-32-0740
Christian Hubmann, Hubert Friedl, Stefan Gruber, Nigel Foxhall
The automotive trend towards increased levels of electrification is showing a clear direction for hybrid technologies. Nowadays Mild- and plug-in-hybrids open a very wide area of future developments whereas battery electric vehicles (BEV) are still evident but still perceived as niche products with limited production volumes. Nevertheless, major OEMs are working on these kinds of vehicles and have also brought such EV concepts into series production. All of these designs show a clear trend that, beside the topic of electric traction motor and energy storage systems, the internal combustion engine (ICE) is also coming into focus again. In many of these vehicles the range extender (RE) unit is foreseen as an emergency unit to recharge the batteries if the state of charge (SOC) is too low. One of the major advantages of a BEV over other designs is the very good acoustic behavior, so the NVH performance becomes the most challenging topic for RE development.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2453
Danilo Andreoli, Mario Cassaro, Manuela Battipede, Goodarz Ahmadi, Piergiovanni Marzocca
Abstract Flow control over aerodynamic shapes in order to achieve performance enhancements has been a lively research area for last two decades. Synthetic Jet Actuators (SJAs) are devices able to interact actively with the flow around their hosting structure by providing ejection and suction of fluid from the enclosed cavity containing a piezo-electric oscillating membrane through dedicated orifices. The research presented in this paper concerns the implementation of zero-net-mass-flux SJAs airflow control system on a NACA0015, low aspect ratio wing section prototype. Two arrays with each 10 custom-made SJAs, installed at 10% and 65% of the chord length, make up the actuation system. The sensing system consists of eleven acoustic pressure transducers distributed in the wing upper surface and on the flap, an accelerometer placed in proximity of the wing c.g. and a six-axis force balance for integral load measurement.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2475
Francesco Cappello, Roberto Sabatini, Subramanian Ramasamy
Abstract Accurate and robust tracking of objects is of growing interest amongst the computer vision scientific community. The ability of a multi-sensor system to detect and track objects, and accurately predict their future trajectory is critical in the context of mission- and safety-critical applications. Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) are currently not equipped to routinely access all classes of airspace since certified Detect-and-Avoid (DAA) systems are yet to be developed. Such capabilities can be achieved by incorporating both cooperative and non-cooperative DAA functions, as well as providing enhanced communications, navigation and surveillance (CNS) services. DAA is highly dependent on the performance of CNS systems for Detection, Tacking and avoiding (DTA) tasks and maneuvers.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2345
Arnaud Duval, Valérie Marcel, Ludovic Dejaeger, Francis Lhuillier, Moussa Khalfallah
Abstract The Flaxpreg is a green and light very long flax fibers thermoset reinforced sandwich, which can be effectively used as multi-position trunk loadfloor or structural floor in the passenger compartment of a vehicle. The prepreg FlaxTapes of about 120 g/m2 constituting the skins of the sandwich, are unidirectionally aligned flax fibers tapes, with acrylic resin here, easily manipulable without requiring any spinning or weaving step and thus without any negative out of plane crimping of the almost continuous flax fibers. Thanks to their very low 1.45 kg/dm3 density combined with an adaptive 0°/90°/0° orientation of the FlaxTapes (for each skin) depending on the loading boundary conditions, the resulting excellent mechanical properties allow a - 35% weight reduction compared to petro-sourced Glass mat/PUR sandwich solutions (like the Baypreg).
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2262
Tom Knechten, Marius-Cristian Morariu, PJG van der Linden
Abstract Structural and vibro-acoustic transfer functions still form an essential part of NVH data in vehicle development programs. Excitation in the three DOFs at all body interface connection locations to target responses gives information on local dynamics stiffness and the body sensitivity for that specific path in an efficient manner. However, vehicles become more compact for fuel efficiency, production costs and to meet the market demand for urban vehicles. Alternative driveline concepts increase the electronic content and new mount locations. To achieve the optimum on road noise NVH, handling performance while conserving interior space and trunk volume requires a complex suspension layout. On top of that, customers put weight on safety and comfort systems which result to a higher packaging density. These trends imply ever limiting accessibility of the interface connections on the body structure.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2303
Katherine Tao, Alan Parrett, David Nielubowicz
Abstract The headliner system in a vehicle is an important element in vehicle noise control. In order to predict the performance of the headliner, it is necessary to develop an understanding of the substrate performance, the effect of air gaps, and the contribution from any acoustic pads in the system. Current Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) models for predicting absorption performance of acoustic absorbers are based on material Biot properties. However, the resources for material Biot property testing are limited and cost is high. In this paper, modeling parameters for the headliner substrate are identified from a set of standard absorption measurements on substrates, using curve fitting and optimization techniques. The parameters are then used together with thickness/design information in a SEA model to predict the vehicle headliner system absorption performance.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2183
Thomas Wellmann, Kiran Govindswamy, Jeff Orzechowski, Sudharsan Srinivasan
Abstract Integration of automatic engine Stop/Start systems in “conventional” drivetrains with 12V starters is a relatively cost-effective measure to reduce fuel consumption. Therefore, automatic engine Stop/Start systems are becoming more prevalent and increasing market share of such systems is predicted. A quick, reliable and consistent engine start behavior is essential for customer acceptance of these systems. The launch of the vehicle should not be compromised by the Stop/Start system, which implies that the engine start time and transmission readiness for transmitting torque should occur within the time the driver releases the brake pedal and de-presses the accelerator pedal. Comfort and NVH aspects will continue to play an important role for customer acceptance of these systems. Hence, the engine stop and re-start behavior should be imperceptible to the driver from both a tactile and acoustic standpoint.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0835
Glenn A. Lucachick, David Kittelson, William Northrop
Abstract Diesel low temperature combustion (LTC) is an operational strategy that effectively limits soot and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions in-cylinder. Unfortunately, LTC results in increased hydrocarbon emissions as compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Previous work has shown that exhaust conditions resulting from LTC inhibit oxidation of HC within a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC). Further, these elevated HC emissions result in engine-out particulate matter (PM) that primarily consists of semi-volatile organic material. The current work shows that a DOC incompletely oxidizes this PM forming material. These results investigated the effectiveness of both a DOC and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) in reducing particle emissions for LTC. In this work, engine-out, DOC-out, and DPF-out exhaust were sampled using a micro-dilution system. Particle distributions were determined with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS).
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0702
Bita Ghaffari, Jonathan Dekam, Kevin Haddix, Kimberly Lazarz, Sergey Titov, Roman Maev
Abstract Adhesive bonding technology has gained ever-increasing significance in automotive industry, especially with the growing use of aluminum (Al) alloy body structures. The variability in thicknesses of the metal and adhesive layers, as well as in joint geometry, of automotive components has presented challenges in nondestructive evaluation of adhesive joints. Though these challenges were recently overcome for steel-adhesive joints using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, the difference in acoustic impedances of steel and Al leads to a lack of robustness in utilizing the same algorithm for Al-adhesive joints. Here, we present the results from using a modified version of this technique to inspect Al-adhesive joints in both laboratory and production environments. A 15-MHz, 52-pixel, 10 mm × 10 mm matrix array of ultrasonic transducers was used to obtain ultrasonic pulse echoes from joint interfaces, analysis of which produced C-scan images of the adhesive bead.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1717
Li-Chun Chien, Matthew Younkins, Mark Wilcutts
Abstract Dynamic skip fire is a control method for internal combustion engines in which engine cylinders are selectively fired or skipped to meet driver torque demand. In this type of engine operation, fueling, and possibly intake and exhaust valves of each cylinder are actuated on an individual firing opportunity basis. The ability to operate each cylinder at or near its best thermal efficiency, and to achieve flexible control of acoustic and vibrational excitations has been described in previous publications. Due to intermittent induction and exhaust events, air induction and torque production in a DSF engine can vary more than conventional engines on a cycle-to-cycle basis. This paper describes engine thermofluid modeling for this type of operation for purposes of air flow and torque prediction.
2014-11-11
Journal Article
2014-32-0119
Diego Copiello, Ze Zhou, Gregory Lielens
Abstract This paper addresses the numerical simulation of motorcycle exhaust system noise using a transfer matrix method (TMM) supporting high order analytical acoustic modes representation combined with finite element method (FEM) included in the Actran software, R15. In the state-of-the-art of hybrid TMM/FEM approach the main assumption consists in a 1D plane wave acoustic propagation in the components connections which is intrinsically limiting the maximum frequency of the analysis. In motorcycle exhaust systems this limitation is even stronger because typical geometries exhibit strong curvatures and bends causing the scattering of the acoustic wave into higher order modes. Therefore, results might be erroneous even at frequencies at which only the plane wave is expected to be propagating. The improved transfer matrix method presented in this paper overcomes this limitation allowing to increase the range of applicability of this method.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2350
Zhiguo Zhao, Guanyu Zheng, Fengshuang Wang, Suying Zhang, Jianhua Zhang
In order to satisfy China IV emissions regulations, a unique design concept was proposed with injector closely coupled with Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system outer body. The benefit of this design is significant in cost reduction and installation convenience. One paper was published to describe the vertical inlet layout [1]; this work is the second part describing applications of this concept to horizontal inlet configurations. For horizontal inlet pipe, two mixing pipe designs were proposed to avoid urea deposit and meet EU IV emission regulations. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique was used to evaluate two design concepts; experiments were performed to validate both designs. CFD computations and experiments give the same direction on ranking of the two decomposition tubes. With the straight decomposition pipe design and unique perforated baffle design, no urea deposits were found; in addition, the emission level satisfied EU IV regulations.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2352
Guanyu Zheng, Fengshuang Wang, Sheng Wang, Wei Gao, Zhiguo Zhao, Jian Liu, Lin Wang, Lin Wu, Hongyu Wang
The introduction of stringent EPA 2015 regulations for locomotive / marine engines and IMO 2016 Tier III marine engines initiates the need to develop large diesel engine aftertreatment systems to drastically reduce emissions such as SOx, PM, NOx, unburned HC and CO. In essence, the aftertreatment systems must satisfy a comprehensive set of performance criteria with respect to back pressure, emission reduction efficiency, mixing, urea deposits, packaging, durability, cost and others. For on-road and off-road vehicles, urea-based SCR has been the mainstream technology to reduce NOx emissions. For category II marine engines with single cylinder displacement volumes between 7 liters and 30 liters, IMO III (Tier IV) emission regulations dictate approximately 80% reduction of NOx emissions vs. Tier II emission regulations [1]. Urea / ammonia SCR is being considered as an enabling technology to achieve IMO III regulations without significant impacts on engine performance and fuel economy.
2014-09-28
Journal Article
2014-01-2484
Kazuho Mizuta, Yukio Nishizawa, Koji Sugimoto, Katsuya Okayama, Alan Hase
Abstract Brake pads are composite materials made from dozens of ingredients intended to simultaneously satisfy various performances such as brake effectiveness, wear, noise and vibrations. For this reason, the friction phenomena that occur during braking are complicated. It is important to clarify the friction phenomena, but that is not easy because the associated complexities as mentioned above. We looked to acoustic emission (AE) as an online evaluation method of friction phenomena. AE is a non-destructive testing method that measures elastic stress waves caused by the deformation and fracturing of materials. In fact, it has been reported that the difference between abrasive wear and adhesive wear of a metal can be identified from the change in the frequency spectrum of AE signals. In this study, we verify whether differences in the friction phenomena of brake pads are detectable by the AE method. Three kinds of brake pads were used in the experiments.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 126

Filter