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WIP Standard
2014-07-11
The purpose of this SAE Standard is to offer simplified and prioritized guidelines for collecting and preserving on-scene data related to motor vehicle accidents. It is intended that these guidelines improve the effectiveness of data collection, which will assist subsequent analysis and reconstruction of a particular incident. The document is to guide early data collectors whose objectives include documenting information related to the incident. it may be used by law enforcement personnel, safety officials, insurance adjusters and other interested parties. The document identifies categories of scene physical features that deteriorate relatively quickly and recomends documentation task priorities. Detailed methods of collecting data are not part of this document. However, some widely used methods are described in the references in Seciton 2.
WIP Standard
2014-07-02
This SAE Recommended Practice provides guidelines for procedures and practices used to obtain and record measurements and to analyze and present results of frictional drag tests of a vehicle with its brakes fully applied at a given roadway location. It is for use at accident sites and test sites and is applicable to straight-line stopping of vehicles such as passenger cars, light trucks and vans under fully braked conditions including locked-wheel skids for vehicles with a conventional braking system and for vehicles with full or partial antilock braking systems (ABS). The average deceleration resulting from a given series of tests is intended to be representative of a frictional drag factor for the conditions under which the test was conducted such as the type of vehicle, type and condition of tires, roadway material and roadway surface conditions. The frictional drag factor is intended to conform to use with the stopping distance formula (Fricke, 1990) as stated in Equation 1. Two methods are included: Stopping Distance Method (measurement of the distance required to bring a vehicle to a complete stop from a known initial speed) and Average Acceleration Measurement (using acceleration measuring devices and data analysis to determine the average drag factor).
Standard
2014-06-26
This SAE Recommended Practice defines, for vehicle manufacturers and collision information and equipment providers, the types of vehicle dimensional data needed by the collision repair industry and aftermarket equipment modifiers to properly perform high-quality repairs to damaged vehicles. Both bodyframe and unitized vehicles, including passenger cars and light trucks, are addressed.
WIP Standard
2014-06-11
This SAE Recommended Practice provides guidelines for procedures and practices used to obtain and record measurements and to analyze the results of the critical speed method. It is for use at accident sites using manual or electronic measurements. The method allows for many unique factors and the recommended procedure will permit a consistent use of the method in order to reduce errors and uncertainty in the results. The results from the critical speed formula should always, when possible, be compared to other accident reconstruction methodologies. When different accident reconstruction methods are used, the uncertainty of each method should be analyzed and presented.
Technical Paper
2014-05-09
Kazumoto Morita, Michiaki Sekine
The number of elderly drivers is increasing in Japan and ensuring the safety of elderly drivers is becoming an important issue. The authors previously conducted an analysis of the characteristics of accidents and traffic violations by elderly drivers based on the number of accidents in which they were rear-ended. This method was used in order to exclude the influence of driving frequency. As a result of that analysis, it was found that the likelihood of violations committed by elderly drivers was not particularly higher than in other age groups, while the likelihood of accidents caused by them was higher. The risk of causing an accident was judged to be about two times higher in elderly drivers than in the 35-44 year age group. However, the methodology presupposed that collisions in which a driver is rear-ended are accidents that occur randomly, and that they occur with the same probability in each age group. To verify the results of that study, we attempted a new analytical method that uses the number of stop sign violations, which are considered to occur with the same probability among age groups, as an indicator of driving frequency in place of accidents in which a driver is hit from behind (rear-end collisions).
Standard
2014-05-08
This recommended practice describes common definitions and operational elements of Event Data Recorders. The SAE J1698 series of documents consists of the following: • SAE J1698-1 - Event Data Recorder - Output Data Definition; Provides common data output formats and definitions for a variety of data elements that may be useful for analyzing vehicle crash and crash-like events that meet specified trigger criteria. • SAE J1698-2 - Event Data Recorder - Retrieval Tool Protocol; Utilizes existing industry standards to identify a common physical interface and define the protocols necessary to retrieve records stored by light duty vehicle Event Data Recorders (EDRs). • SAE J1698-3 - Event Data Recorder - Compliance Assessment; Defines procedures that may be used to validate that relevant EDR output records conform with the reporting requirements specified in Part 563, Table 1 during the course of FMVSS-208, FMVSS-214 and other applicable vehicle level crash testing.
Technical Paper
2014-05-07
Marcos R. Gali, Renan R. M. Ozelo, Argemiro L. A. Costa, José Maria C. Dos Santos
Abstract This paper aims to discuss technically the global trend of labeling legislation and the reflections of governmental programs, such as Inovar Auto, on auto parts industry, in special, about ecolabel intended for tires, focusing advances on rolling resistance analyses and its influence on the fuel consumption of motor vehicles. It will be presented analytical models and theirs respective predicted results to support tire development and researches regarding fuel consumption.
Technical Paper
2014-05-07
Frederico A. A. Barbieri, Vinicius de Almeida Lima, Leandro Garbin, Joel Boaretto
Abstract Brazil presents a very diverse road and traffic conditions and due to several factors the number of truck accidents is very high. Inside truck accidents group, the one that causes the highest number of losses and fatalities is the rollover crash and understanding rollover dynamics is very important to prevent such events. The diversity of cargo vehicles arrangements requires a detailed study regarding the dynamic behavior these vehicle combinations in order to increase operation safety. The same tractor unit can be used with different types and numbers of trailers and/or semi-trailers, each one with different suspension configurations. These truck combinations have distinct dynamic performances that need evaluation. In this sense, this work presents a first phase study on the dynamic behavior of different types of cargo vehicle configuration. A 6×2 tractor is combined with a two distinct grain semi-trailer with different types of suspension: pneumatic and leaf spring. The study is conducted in order to verify the difference in dynamic behavior and the resulting stability of the two configurations in different conditions of speed and maneuvers.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Flaura Winston, Catherine McDonald, Venk Kandadai, Zachary Winston, Thomas Seacrist
Abstract Driving simulators offer a safe alternative to on-road driving for the evaluation of performance. In addition, simulated drives allow for controlled manipulations of traffic situations producing a more consistent and objective assessment experience and outcome measure of crash risk. Yet, few simulator protocols have been validated for their ability to assess driving performance under conditions that result in actual collisions. This paper presents results from a new Simulated Driving Assessment (SDA), a 35- to-40-minute simulated assessment delivered on a Real-Time® simulator. The SDA was developed to represent typical scenarios in which teens crash, based on analyses from the National Motor Vehicle Crash Causation Survey (NMVCCS). A new metric, failure to brake, was calculated for the 7 potential rear-end scenarios included in the SDA and examined according two constructs: experience and skill. The study included an inexperienced group (n=21): 16-17 year olds with 90 days or fewer of provisional licensure, and an experienced group (n=17): 25-50 year olds with at least 5 years of PA licensure, at least 100 miles driven per week and no self-reported collisions in the previous 3 years.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mindy Heading, Douglas Stein, Jeff Dix
Abstract Ejection Mitigation testing is now required by the U.S. government through FMVSS 226 [1]. FMVSS 226 contains the requirement of using a linear guided headform in a horizontal impact test into the inflated curtain, or other ejection mitigation countermeasure that deploys in the event of a rollover. The specification provides dimensions for a featureless headform [2] but there are limited specifications for the headform skin surface condition. In the “Response to Petitions” of the 2011 Final Rule for FMVSS 226 [3], the NHTSA declined the option to include a headform cleaning procedure. This research presents a case study to quantify the effect of changes in the friction between the headform and curtain on the measured excursion. The study presented here shows that a change in friction between the headform and curtain can affect excursion values by up to 135 millimeters (mm).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Richard Young
This study reanalyzes the data from a recent experimental report from the University of Utah investigating the effect on driving performance of auditory-vocal secondary tasks (such as cell phone and passenger conversations, speech-to-text, and a complex artificial cognitive task). The current objective is to estimate the relative risk of crashes associated with such auditory-vocal tasks. Contrary to the Utah study's assumption of an increase in crash risk from the attentional effects of cognitive load, a deeper analysis of the Utah data shows that driver self-regulation provides an effective countermeasure that offsets possible increases in crash risk. For example, drivers self-regulated their following distances to compensate for the slight increases in brake response time while performing auditory-vocal tasks. This new finding is supported by naturalistic driving data showing that cell phone conversation does not increase crash risk above that of normal baseline driving. The Utah data are next compared to those from a larger study that included visual-manual as well as auditory-vocal tasks.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Madhav Khadilkar
Abstract The purpose of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 216 is to reduce fatalities and serious injuries when vehicle roof crushes into occupant compartment during rollover crash. Upgraded roof crush resistance standard (571.216a Standard No. 216a) requires vehicle to achieve maximum applied force of 3.0 times unloaded vehicle weight (UVW) on both driver and passenger sides of the roof. (For vehicles with gross vehicle weight rating ≤ 6,000 lb.) This paper provides an overview of current approach for dual side roof strength Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and its limitations. It also proposes a new approach based on powerful features available in virtual tools. In the current approach, passenger side loading follows driver side loading and requires two separate analyses before arriving at final assessment. In the proposed approach only one analysis suffices as driver and passenger side loadings are combined in a single analysis. This is achieved by using sensors to control loadings, resulting in reduced consumption of CPU time (for computer simulation) and disk space utilization without compromising accuracy of current approach.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sheryl Janca, Kurt Shanks, Janet Brelin-Fornari, Ravi Tangirala, Massoud Tavakoli
Abstract A near-side, rear seat side impact component test, was conducted and validated utilizing a SIDIIs anthropomorphic test device (ATD). The test fixture consisted of the rear seat structure, side door, interior trim, and side airbag curtain module. Test parameters were determined from full scale tests including impact speed, angle of impact, and depth of door intrusion. A comparative assessment was conducted between the full scale test and the deceleration sled test including ATD contact with the vehicle interior, contact duration, sequential timing of ATD contact, and dummy injury measures. Validation was achieved so that the deceleration sled test procedure could be utilized for further evaluations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Baeyoung Kim, Kangwook Lee, Jeong Keun Lee, June-Young Song
Abstract The role of CAB is protecting the passenger's head during rollover and side crash accidents. However, the performance of HIC and ejection mitigation has trade-off relation, so analytical method to satisfy the HIC and ejection mitigation performance are required. In this study, 3 types of CAB were used for ejection mitigation analysis, drop tower analysis and SINCAP MDB analysis. Impactor which has 18kg mass is impacting the CAB as 20KPH velocity at six impact positions for ejection mitigation analysis. In drop tower analysis, impactor which has 9kg mass is impacting the CAB as 17.7KPH velocity. Acceleration value was derived by drop tower analysis and the tendency of HIC was estimated. Motion data of a vehicle structure was inserted to substructure model and the SID-IIS 5%ile female dummy was used for SINCAP MDB analysis. As a result, HIC and acceleration values were derived by MDB analysis. As a result of ejection mitigation analysis, the impactor was ejected in type 1 of the CAB but the impactor was not ejected in type 2 and type 3.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Bingbing Nie, Qing Zhou, Yong Xia, Jisi Tang
Vehicle hood styling has significant influence on headform kinematics in assessment tests of pedestrian impact protection performance. Pedestrian headform kinematics on vehicle front-end models with different hood styling characteristics is analyzed based on finite element modeling. More elevated feature lines near hood boundary and the following continuous hood surface towards fender will result in a different headform motion. It can lead to larger deformation space, more rotation and earlier rebound of the headform impactor, which will benefit the head impact protection performance. In addition, hood geometry characteristics such as hood angle and curvature have effects on structural stiffness. Therefore, inclusion of considerations on pedestrian head protection into the vehicle hood styling design stage may lead to a more effective and efficient engineering design process on headform impact analysis.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tushar Baviskar, Jagadish Mahadevaiah, Vijay Shankar Iyer, Mark Neal
Abstract EEVC WG17 Upper Leg impactors have been used to assess the risk of pedestrian upper leg injuries with respect to regulatory and consumer metric rating requirements. The paper compares the femur injury responses between the finite element models of the EEVC WG17 Upper Leg impactor, the FlexPLI and the 50th percentile male GM/UVa pedestrian model on two sample vehicle architectures, for a sedan and a sports utility vehicle. The study shows that the peak femur load and maximum bending moment response are higher in the EEVC WG17 Upper Leg impactor than the FlexPLI and the human body model. Variation studies are carried out to study the influence of impact location on the vehicle, impactor knee height, additional upper body mass and human body model size on the femur injury responses. The FlexPLI femur responses correlate better with those of the human body model and indicate that the impactor has the potential to be an effective surrogate leg form of a pedestrian with appropriate refinement.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yukou Takahashi, Miwako Ikeda
Abstract The validity of evaluating FlexPLI peak injury measures has been shown by the correlation of the peak measures between a human FE model and a FlexPLI FE model. However, comparisons of tibia bending moment time histories (BMTHs) between these models show that the FlexPLI model exhibits a higher degree of oscillatory behavior than the human model. The goal of this study was to identify potential improvements to the FlexPLI such that the legform provides more biofidelic tibia BMTHs at the normal standing height. Impact simulations using a human FE model and a FlexPLI FE model were conducted against simplified vehicle models to compare tibia BMTHs. The same series of impact simulations were conducted using the FlexPLI models that incorporated potential measures to identify measures effective for further enhancement of the biofidelity. An additional analysis was also conducted to investigate the key factor for minimizing the oscillation of the tibia BMTH. The results of this study showed that the change of the mass distribution between the bony and flesh parts, along with the addition of the mass compensating for the upper body, provide more biofidelic FlexPLI tibia BMTHs, when used at the normal standing height.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Bryan Styles, Jeffrey Santrock, Curtis Vincent, Michael Leffert, Narasimha Putcha
An evaluation methodology has been developed for assessing the suitability of R-1234yf in vehicles. This relates primarily to evaluating the flammability of R-1234yf in the engine compartment during a frontal collision. This paper will discuss the process followed in the methodology, the technical rationale for this process, and the results of the analysis. The specific types of analysis included in the methodology are: exhaust-system thermal characterization, computer simulated crash tests, actual crash tests, teardown and examination of crashed parts, and releases of refrigerant onto hot exhaust manifolds. Each type of analysis was logically ordered and combined to produce a comprehensive evaluation methodology. This methodology has been applied and demonstrates that R-1234yf is difficult to ignite when factors that occur in frontal crashes are simultaneously considered. Factors considered in this analysis include: crush and deformation of the vehicle structure, airflow in the engine compartment, exhaust system temperatures during different driving scenarios, and coolant release due to damage of the engine coolant system.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Chi-Chun Yao, Jin-Yan Hsu, Yu-Sheng Liao, Ming Hung Li
Abstract Vehicle Rollover Prevention/Warning Systems have recently been an important topic in Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) of automotive electronics field. This paper will propose a rollover-prevention system implementation with vehicle dynamic model, video-detection technique and rollover index to help the driver avoid accidents as driving into a curve. Due to the reason that vehicle rollover motion analysis needs complicated computation and accurate parameters of vehicle stability in real time, in the first stage a vehicle dynamic model based on Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) algorithm is built, which can estimate vehicle roll/yaw motion in the curve by vehicle sensors. And then the image-based technique will be employed in detecting the front road curvature, and combined in the system to predict vehicle steering status. The final stage is to apply the vehicle rollover index with estimated vehicle motion to predict the dangerous level to drivers for warning. In the system validation, a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) with Microcontroller Unit (MCU) hardware structure is equipped and implemented in our vehicle experimental platform.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Toshiyuki Yanaoka, Yasuhiro Dokko
Abstract The high frequency of fatal head injuries of elderly people in traffic accidents is one of the important issues in Japan. One of the causes may be vulnerability of the aged brain. While a human head/brain FE model is a useful tool to investigate head injury mechanism, there has not been a research result using a model considering the structural and qualitative changes of the brain by aging. The objective of this study was to clarify the generational difference of intracranial responses related to traumatic brain injuries (TBI) under impact loading. In this study, the human head/brain FE models in their twenties (20s) and seventies (70s) were used. They were developed by reflecting the age-specific characteristics, such as shape/size and stiffness of brain matter and blood vessels, to the baseline model developed by Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) LLC. The generational difference of intracranial responses related to TBI, such as cumulative strain damage measure (CSDM), dilatational damage measure (DDM) and elongation of bridging vein (BV), were studied using the models.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
William R. Bussone, Michael Prange
Abstract Few studies have investigated pediatric head injury mechanics with subjects below the age of 8 years. This paper presents non-injurious head accelerations during various activities for young children (2 to 7 years old). Eight males and five females aged 2-7 years old were equipped with a head sensor package and head kinematics were measured while performing a series of playground-type activities. The maximum peak resultant accelerations were 29.5 G and 2745 rad/s2. The range of peak accelerations was 2.7 G to 29.5 G. The range of peak angular velocities was 4.2 rad/s to 22.4 rad/s. The range of peak angular accelerations was 174 rad/s2 to 2745 rad/s2. Mean peak resultant values across all participants and activities were 13.8 G (range 2.4 G to 13.8 G), 12.8 rad/s (range 4.0 rad/s to 12.8 rad/s), and 1375 rad/s2 (range 105 rad/s2 to 1375 rad/s2) for linear acceleration, angular velocity, and angular acceleration, respectively. The peak accelerations measured in this study were similar to older children performing similar tasks.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ellen L. Lee, Patrick J. Lee, Wilson C. Hayes
Abstract Non-neutral posture prior to impact is one of many factors thought to influence the onset and severity of whiplash associated disorders following low speed, rear impact collisions. The Graphical Articulated Total Body Model (GATB) is one simulation tool that has been used to investigate injury risk in rear impact collisions, though the model has not previously been validated for occupants in non-neutral postures. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the GATB model during low speed rear impacts in out-of-position postures, by comparing simulations to previously published volunteer head accelerations. Twelve simulations (four occupants in each of three postures) were performed. Results demonstrated good agreement between the GATB simulations and the volunteer kinematics, with a mean error for peak head acceleration of 3.4 ± 13%. In addition, influence of out-of-position postures on the risk of whiplash injury for different sized occupants was investigated using the Neck Injury Criterion (NIC).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Chinmoy Pal, Tomosaburo Okabe, Kulothungan Vimalathithan, Muthukumar Muthanandam, Jeyabharath Manoharan, Satheesh Narayanan
Abstract A comprehensive analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of BMI on different body region injuries for side impact. The accident data for this study was taken from the National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS). It was found that the mean BMI values for driver and front passengers increases over the years in the US. To study the effect of BMI, the range was divided into three groups: Thin (BMI<21), Normal (BMI 24-27) and Obese (BMI>30). Other important variables considered for this study were model year (MY1995-99 for old vehicles & MY2000-08 for newer vehicles), impact location (side-front F, side-center P & side-distributed Y) and direction of force (8-10 o'clock for nearside & 2-4 o'clock for far-side). Accident cases involving older occupants above 60 years was omitted in order to minimize the bone strength depreciation effect. Results of the present study indicated that the Model Year has influence on lower extremity injuries. Occurrence of pelvis injury was found to be influenced by BMI and was validated with logistic regression analysis.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Anthony Dominic Cornetto, Jeffrey Suway, Ronny Wahba, Fawzi Bayan
Abstract Numerous studies have validated SIMON and DyMESH with respect to vehicle dynamics and crash analysis for accident reconstruction. The impetus for this paper is to develop an accessible methodology for calculating three-dimensional stiffness coefficients for HVE-SIMON and DyMESH. This method uses acceleration-time data (crash pulse) from a vehicle crash test, data that is widely available through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The crash pulse, along with vehicle mass and impact speed, are used to calculate the force acting on the vehicle and the associated vehicle deflection time history. A technique for determining the area-deflection function is created from a computer model of the vehicle, HVE-SIMON, and basic photo-editing software. The calculated force divided by the associated area function (F/A) is plotted versus deflection and a third-order polynomial is then fit to the curve. The coefficients of this third-order polynomial are the A, B, C, and D stiffness coefficients.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Timothy P. Austin, Peter A. Chisholm, Roger W. Schreiber, P. Michael Neal
Abstract In the investigation of a collision involving recreational watercraft, analytical methods are generally limited when compared to incidents involving land-based vehicles. As is indicated in previous publications, investigators often rely on time/distance relationships, human factors, the matching of damage to determine vessel positioning at impact, and the recollections of witnesses. When applicable, speed estimates are generally based on the boat engine's revolutions. By considering the engine speed, the drive gear ratio, the propeller pitch, and the likely slip of the propeller, an estimation of the boat's travel speed can be made. In more recent publications, it has been recognized that Event Data Recorder (EDR) technology incorporated into various Electronic Control Units (ECUs) used in automotive applications can be beneficial to collision investigation and reconstruction. These devices record data surrounding diagnostic occurrences, airbag deployments, and, with respect to some heavy vehicles, “last stop” and/or “sudden deceleration” events.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lisa P. Gwin, Herbert Guzman, Enrique Bonugli, William Scott, Mark Freund
Abstract There is a paucity of recent data quantifying the injury risk of forces and accelerations that act on the whole body in a back-to-front direction. The purpose of this study was to quantify the level of back-to-front accelerations that volunteers felt were tolerable and non-injurious. Instrumented volunteers were dropped supine onto a mattress, and their accelerations during the impact with the mattress were measured. Accelerometers were located on the head, upper thoracic and lower lumbar regions. Drop heights started at 0.6 m (2 ft) and progressed upward as high as 1.8 m (6 ft) based on the test subjects' consent. The test panel was comprised of male and female subjects whose ages ranged from 25 to 63 years of age and whose masses ranged from 62 to 130 kg (136 to 286 lb). Peak head, upper thoracic and lower lumbar accelerations of 25.9 g, 29.4 g and 39.6 g were measured. There was considerable restitution in the impacts with the mattress and the test subjects experienced changes in velocity (ΔVs) of 5.2-11.4 m/s (11.6-25.5 mph).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Simon B. Albrodt, Fadi Tahan, Kennerly Digges
Abstract Different roof strength methods are applied on the 2003 Ford Explorer finite element (FE) model to achieve the current Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 216 requirements. Two different modification approaches are utilized. Additionally, the best design of each approach is tested dynamically, in rollover and side impact simulations. In the first approach, several roll cage designs are integrated in all pillars, roof cross-members, and in the side roof rails. A roll cage design with a strength-to-weight ratio (SWR) of 3.58 and 3.40 for driver and passenger sides, respectively, with a weight penalty of 18.54 kg is selected for dynamic test assessments. The second approach investigates different localized reinforcements to achieve a more reasonable weight penalty. A localized reinforcement of the B-pillar alone with a tube meets the new FMVSS 216 requirements with a weight penalty of 4.52 kg and is selected for dynamic analyses. The two selected reinforcement designs are tested in a dynamic unconstrained rollover crash under different pitch angles while using common rollover initial conditions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Taewung Kim, Jason Kerrigan, Varun Bollapragada, Jeff Crandall, Ravi Tangirala, Michael Guerrero
Abstract Some rollover test methods, which impose a touchdown condition on a test vehicle, have been developed to study vehicle crashworthiness and occupant protection in rollover crashes. In ground-tripped rollover crashes, speed, steering maneuver, braking, vehicle inertial and geometric properties, topographical and road design characteristics, and soil type can all affect vehicle touchdown conditions. It is presumed that while there may be numerous possible combinations of kinematic metrics (velocity components and orientation) at touchdown, there are also numerous combinations of metrics that are not likely to occur in rollover crashes. To determine a realistic set of touchdown conditions to be used in a vehicle rollover crash test, a lateral deceleration sled-based non-destructive rollover initiation test system (RITS) with a fully programmable deceleration pulse is in development. A full-size SUV vehicle dynamics model was developed and validated with static test data and curb-trip rollover test data.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Donald Parker, John Zolock, Richard Keefer
Studies of rollover accidents have reported crash attributes such as the number of rolls, rollout distance, initial over-the-ground speed, average roll rate, average over-the-ground deceleration, magnitude of roof deformation, cumulative damage, time and post-crash headroom. While these more general attributes are related to the repeated vehicle-to-ground impacts during a rollover, it has been previously shown [1] that a specific ground impact during a rollover and its consequences can be studied in more detail by using its acceleration time history (crash pulse or impulse) and energy loss. These two quantities are particularly meaningful to use when studying impact mechanics, however, they are limited to circumstances where the data exists, which means real-world on-road crashes cannot be used directly. Acceleration and energy data have been collected and previously published for three Subaru Forester dolly rollover tests, and have been studied in more detail in this writing. This same vehicle model has also been crash tested by the NHTSA.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Santosh Uttam Bhise, Meyyappan Valliappan
Abstract This paper highlights a simplified CAE model technique, which can simulate and predict door crush strength performance quickly. Such quick models can be used for DFSS and Design change studies. The proposed method suggests an equivalent sub model technique using only the door beam with tuned stiffness end springs to predict FMVSS214S full vehicle crush performance. Such models can be solved in minutes and hence very useful for DFSS studies during product design. The proposed method can be used to finalize door beam design for identical size of vehicle doors to meet required FMVSS214S crush performance. The paper highlights the door beam end springs tuning for identical size of cars and SUVs. Four vehicles were considered for the study. A single spring F-D (force -displacement) is tuned which correlated well for frond door of all the four vehicles. A separate unique spring F-D was needed which correlated well for rear door of all the 4 vehicles.
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